Tag Archives: The Flash

Quick Chat: New president/GM Deluxe TV post services Dom Rom

Domenic Rom, a fixture in the New York post community for 30 years, has been promoted to president and GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services. Rom was most recently managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which incorporates Encore/Company 3/Method. He will now be leading Deluxe’s global services for television, specifically, the Encore and Level 3 branded companies. He will be making the move to Los Angeles.

Rom’s resume is long. He joined DuArt Film Labs in 1984 as a colorist, working his way up to EVP of the company, running both its digital and film lab divisions. In 2000, he joined stock footage/production company Sekani (acquired by Corbis), helping to build the first fully digital content distribution network. In 2002, he founded The Lab at Moving Images, the first motion picture lab to open in in New York in 25 years. It was acquired by PostWorks, which named Rom COO overseeing its Avid rentals, remote set-ups, audio mixing, color correction and editorial businesses. In 2010, Rom joined Technicolor NY as SVP post production. When PostWorks NY acquired Technicolor NY, Rom again became COO of the now-larger company. He joined Deluxe in 2013 as GM of its New York operations.

“I love what I’m seeing today in the industry,” he says. “It has been said many times, but we’re truly in a golden age of television. The best entertainment in the world is coming from the networks and a whole new generation of original content creators. It’s exciting to be in a position to service that work. There are few, if any, companies that have invested in the research, technology and talent to the degree Deluxe has, to help clients take advantage of the latest advancements — whether it’s HDR, 4K, or whatever comes next, to create amazing new experiences for viewers.”

postPerspective reached out to Rom, as he was making his transition to the West Coast, to find out more about his new role and his move.

What does this position mean to you?
This position is the biggest honor and challenge of my career. I have always considered Encore and Level 3 to be the premier television facilities in the world, and to be responsible for them is amazing and daunting all at the same time. I am so looking forward to working with the facilities in Vancouver, Toronto, New York and London.

What do you expect/hope to accomplish in this new role?
To bring our worldwide teams even closer and grow the client relationships even stronger than they already are, because at the end of the day this is a total relationship business and probably my favorite part of the job.

How have you seen post and television change over the years?
I was talking about this with the staff out here the other day. I have seen the business go from film to 2-inch tape to 1-inch to D2 to D5 to HDCAM (more formats than I can remember) to nonlinear editing and digital acquisition — I could go on and on. Right now the quality and sheer amount of content coming from the studios, networks, cablenets and many, many new creators is both exciting and challenging. The fact that this business is constantly changing helps to keep me young.

How is today’s production and post technology helping make TV an even better experience for audiences?
In New York we just completed the first Dolby Vision project for an entire episodic television season (which I can’t name yet), and it looks beautiful. HDR opens up a whole new visual world to the artists and the audience.

Are you looking forward to living in Los Angeles?
I have always danced with the idea of living in LA throughout my career, and to do so this far in is interesting timing. My family and, most importantly, my brand new grandson are all on the east coast so I will maintain my roots there while spreading them out west as well.

Behind the Title: Empty Sea Audio’s Mark Camperell

NAME: Mark Camperell

COMPANY: LA’s Empty Sea Audio (@Empty_Sea)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We provide sound design, mixing, recording and original music composition for film, TV, games, commercials and the web. Our sister company, The Library by Empty Sea, produces royalty-free sound effects packs.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Supervising Sound Editor/Re-Recording Mixer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I serve as creative lead and manage all of our projects here at Empty Sea Audio. I record sounds in the field for our editors to use. I edit, design and mix our more challenging work.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I also own the company, so that means I wear a lot of hats. I’m in charge of the scheduling, bookkeeping, social media, sales and library management.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Creating sounds from scratch. Nothing is more satisfying than hearing something that didn’t exist before, especially when you are working with material that you recorded in the field yourself. It’s like those moments in time have all come together and are forever written down, sonically.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Spreadsheets. Spreadsheets are the worst.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunch.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d probably be working in an office somewhere, fighting with the copy machine.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I had a background in music, and that is how I got into sound in the first place. At some point during my time at Loyola Marymount, I realized that there were way more opportunities out there for post production sound than for music.

So, I shifted my focus and never looked back. Everyday I’m reminded that it was the right choice.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just completed a digital prequel for Heroes Reborn: Dark Matters for our friends at Retrofit Films/NBC. We’ve also had an on-going project with the folks at Create Advertising mixing commercial spots and trailers.

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I personally wrapped up sound effects editorial on The Flash Season 1 back in May for the awesome folks at Atomic Sound.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I’d have to say Dr0ne. Dr0ne was a fast paced, sci-fi web series that we did for executive producer Justin Lin and director Robert Glickert. It really put us on the map as far as being a solid team that could creatively contribute to ambitious projects.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone. My rig. My coffee machine with the built-in grinder/timer.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook and Twitter.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
My outlet is running. I’ll run for upwards of two hours straight without music or anything. A lot of people think I’m nuts to go without music, but it’s my time to give my ears a break and to be alone with my thoughts. It really helps me to wind down.

Quick Chat: Scarab’s Robyn Haddow talks ‘The Flash’ and ‘Arrow’

Robyn Haddow is a motion graphics and playback artist with Vancouver-based Scarab Digital as well as an active freelancer. At Scarab, she is presently providing Fantasy User Interface (FUI) and animation designs for the series The Flash and Arrow for the CW as well as for Proof, a new medical drama debuting soon on TNT.

The Flash is known for his distinctive powers. What kinds of animations and graphics are you providing to create his unique look?
Yes, the Flash has very distinctive powers! The Flash’s tech comes from a team of scientists based out of the “Cortex,” which is his lair. One of the scientists is the character of Cisco Ramon, who builds a lot of the tech for Flash. Our job is to create all the tech that comes out the Cortex. We developed the look of the Cortex early on for the pilot; a cyan and blue tone palette with hints of yellow and white for a nice complimentary color accent. The screens are generally comprised of many different schematics of buildings, machine diagnostics, calculations, wireframes of gadgets and all kinds of maps of various locations in Central City.

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The Flash

Once you are given story points from the production team how much creative freedom do you have?
We have almost total creative freedom. We worked hard to establish the look of the Cortex (where most of our screens take place) for the pilot and in turn earned a lot of trust from the production designer.

Can you tell us about your design/animation workflow?
My workflow begins by reading the scenes in the script I am building screens for. After I have correctly understood all the story points, I jump into Illustrator to begin to block out my shots. I take screen grabs of 3D assets I have that I would like to incorporate and begin to rough out my composition with them. I start by blocking out the main elements on my screen and then concentrate on building out the different sections piece by piece.

Once I have a layout I am happy with, I bring in tools such as Adobe After Effects to get my elements working in here. I then jump into Maxon Cinema 4D to work on shading my 3D assets and create the look I am going for in the model. Once happy with the look, I block out my 3D animation, generally as a single asset that I will import into After Effects. I jump back into After Effects to block out my main animation and also focus on smaller detailed elements and animations.

I have a very tight production deadline — typically I am given only a day to work on a screen, but sometimes I am required to generate two or three. Using efficient tools is critical in helping me to maximize my time as best I can.

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Arrow

What are the challenges of creating sophisticated VFX in the fast turnaround time of television?
Great question. Time is the biggest one! Typically I will have a day to complete a build for a scene, and as I mentioned this can include two or three builds. This is a personal challenge because I like to include a lot of detail in my work. I hit the design and animation in broad strokes and with whatever time remains I get to go back and add in extra little bits. As I continue to build up my workflow I am constantly working to improve on-time management, thus giving me more time for all the extra little bits I like to add.

Another challenge is handling the 3D assets that we receive from post. Often times the models are very dense meshes and it can be tricky to optimize them in order to work best for my purposes.

More from The Flash

More from The Flash

Is there a scene — or show — that are you particularly proud of, and why?
Hmm… The season went by so fast for all the shows, so this is a tricky question! I suppose I can narrow it down to sets. I am really proud of the look of the Cortex in The Flash as I led the design on that as well as the look of the Palmer Tech set in Arrow. I am a big nerd for super hero suits so any screen that includes ATOM’s Exosuit from Arrow or the Flash’s suit is definitely up there with some of my fav builds.

Who are some of your personal sci-fi inspirations?
I am a huge fan of work done by Jayse Hansen. His work is so well thought out, detailed and polished! I also look up to his abilities in design and animation as well as the speed in which he can create. I was first introduced to the world of screen graphics by stumbling upon some of Mark Coleran’s work. And, of course, I am in love with everything put out there by Territory Studio.