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Creative nominees named for HPA Awards

Nominees in the creative categories for the 2017 HPA Awards have been announced. Receiving a record-breaking number of entrants this year, the HPA Awards creative categories recognize the outstanding work done by individuals and teams who bring compelling content to a global audience.

Launched in 2006, the HPA Awards recognize outstanding achievement in editing, sound, visual effects and color grading for work in television, commercials and feature films. The winners of the 12th Annual HPA Awards will be announced on November 16 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The 2017 HPA Award nominees are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film
The Birth of a Nation
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor – Hollywood

Ghost in the Shell
Michael Hatzer // Technicolor – Hollywood

Photo Credit: Hopper Stone.

Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures
Natasha Leonnet // Efilm

Doctor Strange
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor – Hollywood

Beauty and the Beast
Stefan Sonnenfeld // Company 3

Fences
Michael Hatzer // Technicolor – Hollywood

Outstanding Color Grading – Television
The Last Tycoon – Burying the Boy Genius
Timothy Vincent // Technicolor – Hollywood

Game of Thrones – Dragonstone
Joe Finley // Chainsaw

Genius – Einstein: Chapter 1
Pankaj Bajpai // Encore Hollywood

The Crown – Smoke and Mirrors
Asa Shoul // Molinare

The Man in the High Castle – Detonation
Roy Vasich // Technicolor

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial
Land O’ Lakes – The Farmer
Billy Gabor // Company 3

Pennzoil – Joyride Tundra
Dave Hussey // Company 3

Jose Cuervo – Last Days
Tom Poole // Company 3

Nedbank – The Tale of a Note
Sofie Borup // Company 3

Squarespace – John’s Journey
Tom Poole // Company 3

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film
Hidden Figures
Peter Teschner

Dunkirk
Lee Smith, ACE

The Ivory Game
Verena Schönauer

Get Out
Gregory Plotkin

Lion
Alexandre de Franceschi

Game of Thrones

Outstanding Editing – Television
Game of Thrones – Stormborn
Tim Porter, ACE

Stranger Things – Chapter 1: The Vanishing of Will Byers
Dean Zimmerman

Game of Thrones – The Queen’s Justice
Jesse Parker

Narcos – Al Fin Cayo!
Matthew V. Colonna, Trevor Baker

Westworld – The Original
Stephen Semel, ACE, Marc Jozefowicz

Game of Thrones – Dragonstone
Crispin Green

Outstanding Editing – Commercial
Nespresso – Comin’ Home
Chris Franklin // Big Sky Edit

Bonafont – Choices
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Optum – Heroes
Chris Franklin // Big Sky Edit

SEAT – Moments
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film
Fate of the Furious
Peter Brown, Mark Stoeckinger, Paul Aulicino, Steve Robinson, Bobbi Banks // Formosa Group

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Addison Teague, Dave Acord, Chris Boyes, Lora Hirschberg // Skywalker Sound

Sully
Alan Murray, Bub Asman, John Reitz, Tom Ozanich // Warner Bros. Post Production Creative Services

John Wick: Chapter 2
Mark Stoeckinger, Alan Rankin, Andy Koyama, Martyn Zub, Gabe Serano // Formosa Group

Doctor Strange
Shannon Mills, Tom Johnson, Juan Peralta, Dan Lauris // Skywalker Sound

Outstanding Sound – Television
Underground – Soldier
Larry Goeb, Mark Linden, Tara Paul // Sony Pictures Post

Stranger Things – Chapter 8: The Upside Down
Craig Henigham // FOX
Joe Barnett, Adam Jenkins, Jordan Wilby, Tiffany Griffith // Technicolor – Hollywood

Game of Thrones – The Spoils of War
Tim Kimmel, MPSE, Paula Fairfield, Mathew Waters, CAS, Onnalee Blank, CAS, Bradley C. Katona, Paul Bercovitch // Formosa Group

The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble
Pete Horner // Skywalker Sound
Dimitri Tisseyre // Envelope Music + Sound
Dennis Hamlin // Hamlin Sound

American Gods – The Bone Orchard
Bradley North, Joseph DeAngelis, Kenneth Kobett, David Werntz, Tiffany S. Griffith // Technicolor

Outstanding Sound – Commercial
Honda – Up
Anthony Moore, Neil Johnson, Jack Hallett // Factory
Sian Rogers // SIREN

Virgin Media – This Is Fibre
Anthony Moore // Factory

Kia – Hero’s Journey
Nathan Dubin // Margarita Mix Santa Monica

SEAT – Moments
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Rio 2016 Paralympic Games – We’re the Superhumans
Anthony Moore // Factory

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales
Gary Brozenich, Sheldon Stopsack, Patrick Ledda, Richard Clegg, Richard Little // MPC

War for the Planet of the Apes

War for the Planet of the Apes
Dan Lemmon, Anders Langlands, Luke Millar, Erik Winquist, Daniel Barrett // Weta Digital

Beauty and the Beast
Kyle McCulloch, Glen Pratt, Richard Hoover, Dale Newton, Neil Weatherley // Framestore

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2
Guy Williams, Kevin Andrew Smith, Charles Tait, Daniel Macarin, David Clayton // Weta Digital

Ghost in the Shell
Guillaume Rocheron, Axel Bonami, Arundi Asregadoo, Pier Lefebvre, Ruslan Borysov // MPC

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television
Black Sails – XXIX
Erik Henry
Yafei Wu, Nicklas Andersson, David Wahlberg // Important Looking Pirates
Martin Lippman // Rodeo

Westworld

The Crown – Windsor
Ben Turner, Tom Debenham, Oliver Cubbage, Lionel Heath, Charlie Bennett // One of Us

Taboo – Episode One
Henry Badgett, Nic Birmingham, Simon Rowe, Alexander Kirichenko, Finlay Duncan // BlueBolt VFX

Ripper Street – Occurrence Reports
Ed Bruce, Nicholas Murphy, Denny Cahill, Piotr Swigut, Mark Pinheiro // Screen Scene

Westworld – The Bicameral Mind
Jay Worth // Deep Water FX
Bobo Skipper, Gustav Ahren, Jens Tenland // Important Looking Pirates
Paul Ghezzo // Cosa VFX

Outstanding Visual Effects – Commercial
Walmart – Lost & Found
Morgan MacCuish, Michael Ralla, Aron Hjartarson, Todd Herman // Framestore

Honda – Keep the Peace
Laurent Ledru, Georgia Tribuiani, Justin Booth-Clibborn, Ellen Turner // Psyop

Nespresso – Comin’ Home
Martin Lazaro, Murray Butler, Nick Fraser, Callum McKevney // Framestore

Kia – Hero’s Journey
Robert Sethi, Chris Knight, Tom Graham, Jason Bergman // The Mill

Walmart – The Gift
Mike Warner, Kurt Lawson, Charles Trippe, Robby Geis // Zero VFX

In other awards news, Larry Chernoff has been named recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. Winners of the coveted Engineering Excellence Award include Colorfront Engine by Colorfront, Dolby Vision Post Production Tools by Dolby, Mistika VR by SGO and the Weapon 8K Vista Vision by Red Digital Cinema. These special awards will be bestowed at the HPA Awards gala as well.

The HPA Awards gala ceremony is expected to be a sold-out affair and early ticket purchase is encouraged. Tickets for the HPA Awards are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.hpaawards.net.

Behind the Title: Composer Michael Carey

NAME: Michael Carey (@MichaelCarey007)

COMPANY: Resonation Music

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative director/composer (film/commercials/TV) and songwriter/producer/mixer (album work).

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
For commercials, film and TV projects, I work closely with the director, producer and agency to come up with something that meets their needs and the needs of the project. I develop an understanding of their overall vision, and then I conceptualize, compose and produce original music to capture the essence of this vision, in a complimentary way.

i-want-to-say-composer-main-title-opening-scenes

Michael Carey was composer of the main title theme and the opening scenes for ‘I Want to Say.’

This includes themes, underscore, source, main titles, end titles, etc. When it comes to album projects and soundtrack songs, I often write for (or with) the featured artist or band and produce the track from end to end. This means that I am also the engineer, programmer, session player and often mixer for a project.

On large projects that require fast turnaround, I wear the “creative director” hat, and I assemble and manage a specific team of colleagues to collaborate with me — those I know can get the job done at the highest level. I keep things focused and cohesive, and strive to maintain a consistent musical voice.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Whichever medium I’m working in, be it music-for-picture or album work, the underlying fundamentals are surprisingly similar. In both instances, it’s ultimately about storytelling – conveying maximum emotional impact in a compelling way. Using dynamics, melody, tension, release, density and space to create memorable moments and exciting transitions to keep the viewer or listener engaged.

I’m always striving to support the “main event.” In film, it’s visuals and dialog. In album work it’s the singer’s performance. I see my job as building a metaphorical “frame” around the picture. Enhance, reinforce, compliment, but never distract.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Two parts, really. First, the satisfaction of achieving a collective goal. Helping a filmmaker/artist realize their vision, while finding a way to authentically express my own musical vision and make a deeper connection with the audience experiencing the work.

There are moments in the course of a project when you hit on something that’s undeniable. Everyone involved immediately feels it. Human connections are made. Those are great moments, and ultimately you want the whole piece to feel like that.

The second part is the inspiration that comes from working collaboratively (usually with people at the top of their game) with those talented peers who challenge and push you in directions you might not have taken otherwise.

WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS FOR SCORING? HOW DO YOU BEGIN?
1) Watch film/read script. 2) Discuss with director, get a sense of their vision. 3) Create musical sketches and build a sonic palette. If there’s already some picture available to work with, then I’ll tackle a scene that feels representative of the rest of the project and refine it with input from the director. My goal is to create a musical/sonic “voice” or “sound” for the film that becomes an inextricable part of its personality.

CAN YOU WALK US THROUGH YOUR WORKFLOW?
Once overall direction has been established and scenes have been spotted, my first step with a scene is to map things out tempo/timing-wise, making note of any significant cuts, events or moments that need to be hit (or avoided) musically.

By defining this structure first, it frees me up to explore musically and texturally with a clear understanding of where “ins” and “outs” are. By then, I usually have a pretty clear sense of what I want to hear as it pertains to realizing the vision of the director, and from that point it is about execution —programming, recording live instrumentation, processing/manipulation and mixing — whatever is required to make the scene “feel” the way it does in my head.

DOES YOUR PROCESS CHANGE DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PROJECT? FILM VS. SPOT, ETC?
There are certain nuances that have to be considered when approaching these different types of projects. Nailing the details in short form (commercials) is often more crucial because you have an entire world of information to convey in 30 seconds or less. There can be no missed moment or opportunity. It needs to feel cohesive with a cinematic story arc, and a compelling payoff at the end, all in an incredibly compressed window of time.

This is less evident in long-form projects. With feature films or TV, you often have the luxury to build musical movements more naturally as a scene progresses.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
That’s a tough one. As a kid I wanted to be an anthropologist. At 21, I went to a cooking school in Paris for a month thinking that that might be cool. More recently, I’ve been dabbling with building websites for friends using template-based platforms like Squarespace.

I think the common themes with these other interests are curiosity, experimentation, creativity and storytelling. Bringing an idea to life, making the abstract tangible. At the end of the day, music still allows me to do these things with a greater degree of satisfaction.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew music would be my path by age 14. I was playing guitar in local bands at the time, and then moved into steady club gigs. By the time I was 18, I was in a signed band, recording and touring. I couldn’t have imagined doing anything else. When I hit my 20s, I knew that writing and composing was the path ahead (vs. being a “gun for hire” guitarist).

I still played in bands and did lots of session work, but I focused more on songwriting and learning about recording and production. During that time, I had the opportunity to work with some legendary British engineer producers. At one point, a well-known video director who had shot some videos with one of my bands had started doing commercials, and he was unhappy with the music that an ad agency had put in one of his spots. So he recruited me to take a shot a composing a new score. It all clicked, and that opened the door to a couple of decades of high-profile commercial spots, as well as consistent work from major ad agencies and brands.

Eventually, this journey led me down the road of TV and film. All the while, I kept a foot in the album world, writing for and producing artists in the US and internationally.

andy-vargas-the-beat-2016-hmma-winner-producer-songwriterCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I Want To Say— Composer: Main Title and opening scenes (Healdsburg International Film Festival – Best Documentary).
LBS– Songwriter/Producer: End Title Track feat. J.R. Richards of Dishwalla (Sundance Official Selection, Independent Spirit Awards nominee)
• Andy Vargas/The Beat (Producer/Songwriter – Winner 2016 Hollywood Music in Media Awards “R&B/Soul”)
• Escape The Fate/Alive (Songwriter — hit single, #26 Active Rock, album #2 Billboard Hard Rock charts)

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s hard to pick one. Some of the projects listed above are contenders. There’s a young band I’m developing and producing right now called Bentley. I will be very proud when that is released. They’re fantastic.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Pro Tools. It’s my “instrument” as much as any guitar or keyboard. It’s allowed me to be incredibly productive and make anything I hear in my head a reality. Steven Slate, Sound Toys and PSP plug-ins. Vibe, warmth, color, saturation, detail. My extensive collection of vintage gear (amps, mics, mic pres, compressors, guitars, boutique pedals, etc.). Not sure if these qualify as “technology,” but they all have buttons and knobs and make great noises!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (to a lesser extent lately).

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have an amazing family who helps keep me centered with my eyes on the big picture. Running and exercise (not enough, but feels great when I do) and, increasingly, I try to meditate each morning. A friend and colleague whose studio demeanor I’ve always admired turned me onto it. He’s consistently calm and focused even in the midst of total drama and chaos. I’d like to think I’m getting there.

Main Image: Patricia Maureen Photography-P.M.P

The 2016 Creative Arts Awards winners

The 68th Primetime Emmys will be handed out on September 18, but in our industry, we know the real action happens at the Creative Arts Awards. The 2016 Creative Arts Emmys, honoring outstanding artistic and technical achievement in a variety of television program genres, were split into two nights for the first time.

Here are some of the winners who took home statues on September 10 and 11:

Outstanding Special Visual Effects — Game of Thrones
Outstanding Special Visual Effects in a Supporting Role — Sherlock: The Abominable Bride (Masterpiece)
Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series — Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (Check out our interview with editor Kabir Akhtar about his process)
Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Limited Series or Movie — The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story
Outstanding Multi-Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series — The Big Bang Theory
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series — Black Sails
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Limited Series, Movie or Special — Fargo
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) — Game of Thrones
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation — Mozart in the Jungle
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Limited Series or Movie — The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story
Outstanding Cinematography for a Multi-Camera Series — Nicky, Ricky, Dicky & Dawn
Outstanding Cinematography for a Limited Series or Movie — Fargo
Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series — The Man in the High Castle
Outstanding Original Main Title Theme Music — Marvel’s Jessica Jones
Outstanding Music Composition for a Limited Series, Movie or Special (Original Dramatic Score) — The Night Manager
Outstanding Music Composition for a Series (Original Dramatic Score) — Mr. Robot
Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics — The Hunting Ground

For a complete list of winners for September 10, click here.

For a complete list of winners for September 11, click here.

Our main image: HBO’s Game of Thrones.

Dave Cole joins FotoKem as senior colorist

FotoKem has hired Dave Cole as senior colorist, strengthening its DI talent offerings. One of Cole’s first projects for Burbank-based FotoKem, will be Legendary’s upcoming Kong: Skull Island.

Cole’s career began in his native Australia, where he was a telecine operator and technical director, quickly segueing to colorist. His early work includes collaborating with director Peter Jackson and cinematographer Andrew Lesnie, ASC, on color for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring in 2001 at The PostHouse AG and King Kong in 2004 at Weta Digital.

In 2006, he moved to Los Angeles and joined LaserPacific Media where he was colorist on the Oscar-nominated Ides of March, The Savages, Tron: Legacy, the Alvin and the Chipmunks series, and the Best Cinematography Academy Award-winning Life of Pi.

Most recently, at Modern VideoFilm, Cole was supervising colorist on titles such as The Book of Life, Eye in the Sky, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip, An Ordinary Man and created looks for TV series such as Sleepy Hollow, Reign and Scorpion.

In addition to his colorist duties, Cole has been helping in the development of emerging HDR technologies for manufacturers and studios, as well as providing HDR grading for several major home theater releases.

Cole joins a colorist FotoKem team that includes Alastor Arnold, John Daro, Mark Griffith, George Koran, Kostas Theodosiou and Walter Volpatto. These colorists have worked on such titles as San Andreas, The Boxtrolls, Palo Alto, The D Train, Interstellar, The Conjuring 2, Independence Day: Resurgence and Central Intelligence. The team calls on Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and SGO’s Mistika.

HPA Award noms and reactions

The Hollywood Post Alliance (HPA) has announced the nominees for the 2015 HPA Awards, which recognize outstanding achievement in Editing, Sound, Visual Effects and Color Grading for work in television, commercials and feature films. The winners of the 10th Annual HPA Awards will be announced at a ceremony on November 12, 2015, at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The 2015 HPA Award nominees are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

Monsoon
Charles Boileau // Post-Moderne

The Boxtrolls
John Daro // FotoKem

Whiplash
Natasha Leonnet // Modern VideoFilm

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

Lady of Csejte
Keith Roush // Roush Media

Steve Scott at last year's awards. Photo: Capture Imaging/Ryan Miller

Steve Scott at last year’s awards. Photo: Capture Imaging/Ryan Miller

Birdman
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor
“I’m incredibly honored and grateful to be nominated for this year’s HPA Award for Outstanding Color Grading -Feature Film,” says Scott. “I remember how dumbfounded I was when I first talked with cinematographer Chivo Lubeski about Birdman, and he told me, ‘The whole movie is basically one long shot.’ Through previous experience with this amazing DP, I knew that we would be asked to carry out many complex tasks on any particular moment along this fluid, hand-held continuum of a movie. How do you even begin to sort that out in the DI? To my knowledge, no DI had ever been done on a movie that was a single long shot. There was no precedent, and no one to ask for advice. We had to create a new way of working. That was the biggest challenge of this project, and working that challenge out to help Chivo and Alejandro realize their original creative vision was the most gratifying, rewarding part of my experience with Birdman.”

Outstanding Color Grading – Television

Olive Kitteridge – Incoming Tide 
Pankaj Bajpai // Encore

Boardwalk Empire – Golden Days for Boys and Girls  
John Crowley // Technicolor PostWorks NY

John Crowley

John Crowley

Golden Days for Boys and Girls was Episode One of Season 5, which was my first encounter of the series,” explains Crowley. “I was a new member of such an outstanding and established team and I knew I had to be on top of my game. It was a great challenge as a colorist to try to carry on the feel and unique looks that were established from the past four seasons, and now to be nominated for my work is such a gratifying feeling.

“I’d like to thank Brad Carpenter, one of the shows producers, for having the confidence in me to make that happen. I’d also like to thank the director of the show, Timothy Van Patten, and the cinematographer of this episode, Jonathan Freeman. It was such a great honor and privilege to be associated with such distinguished members of our industry.”

Sense8 – What’s Going On? 
Tony Dustin // Technicolor

Game of Thrones – Hardhome
Joe Finley // Chainsaw

Masters of Sex – A Parliament of Owls
Matt Lear // Sony Pictures Television

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial   

Toyota – Harrier 
Siggy Ferstl // Company 3

Lexus – Face Off
Dave Hussey // Company 3

Dodge – Wisdom
Beau Leon // Company 3

Lincoln – Intro
Tom Poole // Company 3

Caterpillar – Lantern Festival
Rob Sciarratta // Company 3

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film 

Selma
Spencer Averick

American Sniper
Joel Cox, ACE; Gary Roach, ACE

Whiplash

Whiplash
Tom Cross, ACE

The Imitation Game
William Goldenberg, ACE

Interstellar
Lee Smith, ACE

Outstanding Editing – Television

Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways – Austin
Scott D. Hanson // Therapy Studios

Vice on HBO – Cold War 2.0
Rich Lowe

Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways – Nashville
Kristin McCasey // Therapy Studios

House of Cards

House of Cards – Chapter 32
Cindy Mollo, ACE // Netflix

Game of Thrones – Hardhome
Tim Porter // Beyond the Wall Productions, Inc.

Outstanding Editing – Commercial

Adidas – Takers
Steve Gandolfi // Cut+Run

Fiat – Alive
Kristin McCasey // Therapy Studio

Skullcandy – Push Play
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

GNP Seguros – World Cup
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Google – Young Together
Miky Wolf // Big Sky Edit

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film

Interstellar
Richard King, Gary Rizzo, Gregg Landaker, Mark Weingarten // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Mad Max: Fury Road
Mark Mangini, Scott Hecker, Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

American Sniper
Alan Murray, Tom Ozanich, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Birdman
Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montano, Martin Hernandez, Aaron Glascock // NBCUniversal StudioPost

Unbroken
Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montano, Becky Sullivan, Andrew DeCristofaro // NBCUniversal StudioPost

Outstanding Sound – Television

Halt and Catch Fire – SETI
Sue Cahill, Keith Rogers, Scott Weber, Jane Boegel, Mark Cleary, Kevin McCullough // NBCUniversal StudioPost

Black Sails – XVIII
Benjamin Cook, Stefan Hendrix, Jeffrey Pitts, Sue Cahill, Onnalee Blank, Matthew Waters // Starz

Game of Thrones – Hardhome
Tim Kimmel, Paula Fairfield, Bradley Katona, Paul Bercovitch, Onnalee Blank, Mathew Waters // Formosa Group

Banshee – You Can’t Hide from the Dead
Bradley North, Joseph DeAngelis, Ken Kobett, Tiffany Griffith, David Werntz // Technicolor

Homeland – Redux
Nello Torri, Alan Decker // NBCUniversal StudioPost
Craig Dellinger // Sony Sound Services

Outstanding Sound – Commercial

Medicontour – Bi-Flex 1.8
Phil Bolland // Factory

The Syria Campaign – In Reverse
Jon Clarke // Factory

Honda – The Other Side
Tom Joyce, Anthony Moore // Factory

Volvo –The Swell
Aaron Reynolds // Wave Studios

Prada – The Battlefield
Miky Wolf // Big Sky Edit

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film

Jurassic World
Tim Alexander, Glen McIntosh, Tony Plett, Kevin Martel, Martyn Culpitt // Industrial Light & Magic

Tomorrowland
Craig Hammack, Eddie Pasquarello, Francois Lambert, Maia Kayser, Barry Williams // Industrial Light & Magic

Into the Woods
Matt Johnson, Christian Irles, Daniel Tarmy, Nicolas Chevallier, Benoit Dubuc // MPC

Birdman

Birdman
Ara Khanikian, Sebastien Moreau, Sebastien Francoeur, Patrick David, Laurent Spillemaecker // Rodeo FX

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White, Matt Aitken // Weta Digital
Outstanding Visual Effects – Television

Game of Thrones – The Dance of Dragons
Joe Bauer, Steve Kullback, Derek Spears, Eric Carney, Jabbar Raisani // Fire and Blood Productions

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television

Ripper Street – Whitechapel Terminus
Ed Bruce, Nicolas Murphy, John O’Connell, Joseph Courtis, Ronan Gantly // Screen Scene

Marvel’s Agent Carter – Now Is Not The End
Sheena Duggal, Richard Bluff, Jay Mehta, Chad Taylor, Cody Gramstad // Industrial Light & Magic

Black Sails – XVIII
Erik Henry // Starz
Ken Jones // Digital Domain
Nic Spier // Shade FX
Christina Spring, Bjorn Ahlstedt // Crazy Horse Effects

The Flash – Grodd Lives
Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Stefan Bredereck, Jason Shulman, Gevork Babityan // Encore VFX

Outstanding Visual Effects – Commercial

Shell – Shapeshifter
Russell Dodgson, Robert Herrington, Ahmed Gharraph, Rafael Camacho // Framestore UK

Pepsi – Halftime Touches Down
Chris Eckhardt, Michael Ralla // Framestore

General Electric – Invention Donkey
Seth Gollub, Theo Jones, Russell Miller, Raul Ortego // Framestore NY

Game Of War – Decisions
Benjamin Walsh, Brian Burke, Ian Holland, Brandon Nelson // Method Studios

Game Of War – Time
Benjamin Walsh, Brian Burke, Ian Holland, Chris Perkowitz // Method Studios

Tips: What I know now but didn’t then

By Brady Betzel

I’ve passed my 10-year anniversary working in TV — specifically post production — and it’s really pretty crazy. When I started, I was an eager beaver willing to listen and do (almost) anything the “important” people told me I should do. Now, while I still like to think I am eager, I like to feel like I am a very informed beaver, albeit a pretty skeptical one.

The following are some myths about building a career based on my personal experience.

The Need to Say Yes to Everything
This one is a little polarizing because it touches on the working for free topic, which I don’t actively support. To me you aren’t working for free if you are able to develop a skill or use the project for your own benefit. Short term it might be “free” but the long-term benefits will pay off if you are able to learn and grow technically and/or creatively.

That being said, you don’t need to say yes to everything. Take this with a heavy dose of common sense, but if someone tells you to do something and your gut is saying the opposite, lean toward your inner voice. People tend to respect that more than if you always say yes, no matter the job. I learned this first hand when I was offline editing — sometimes editors are tasked with showing the client what they say they want, but they may think one thing and then end up with a completely different end product.

I edited a sizzle reel — a cheap way of making a pseudo-pilot where the content is not fully flushed out but may have a spark of an idea that editors sometimes cover in fancy light leaks and sparkles. The client said it would be easy (it wasn’t and never is), and they had a story producer that would give me editing points for a five-minute sizzle reel. Long story short, the story producer had a completely different (and frankly boring) story in mind for a sizzle reel.

As I watched all 12 hours of “awesome” material, I found about 30 seconds of real story… I thought. So while I edited their version, I also edited mine. Eventually they thought the whole thing needed to be re-done. I then sent them my version and they took it. They had a couple of notes but their five-minute already done sizzle reel turned into a completely different story in three and a half minutes. The moral of this story is don’t always be a 
“yes” person.

Moving Up the Ladder Quickly
Here is another that has bugged me for a long time, and I still struggle with it. I was an assistant editor for four years, and I feel my rise to editor should have come faster. I always saw assistants moving up quickly around me, the commonality (usually) was that they weren’t that good at their job. It seemed counterintuitive, but then I realized that just because you move up quickly in rank, doesn’t always mean you are qualified for the job — your boss may just want you out of their hair.

In the assistant editor world, that could mean that you are messing up tons of stuff that other people are fixing without you knowing (not that I experienced that or anything like that). So if you aren’t moving up the ladder quickly don’t stress about it. Be assertive, but don’t be rude.

You Must Know Editing, Color, Mixing…
There is nothing like real-world experience. There is nothing like sitting in a color grading session with the colorist powering DaVinci Resolve color panels, or being in a audio mix stage for the first time and hearing how powerful different mixes are.

However, you don’t always get the luxury of being mentored while sitting next to the colorist. You don’t always get to play with the lift, gamma or gain without worrying about messing up. Don’t be afraid to watch tutorials on YouTube, Lynda.com, RippleTraining.com or other paid or free training sites. When I do get a free moment, I often watch tutorials on YouTube and learn techniques I would never have thought of before. It doesn’t matter if you watch a 10-year-old teaching After Effects expressions or Mocha tracking Big Bird into a scene, if you become a master wireframe remover thanks to YouTube videos, you may very well earn the same paycheck and work on just the same films as someone who learned at USC.

Partying Vs. Networking
I firmly believe that you don’t need to live in Hollywood and go to the Chateau Marmont weekly to become an editor, or whatever post position you want to achieve. I live an hour and 20 minutes outside of Hollywood in an avocado orchard, and work on shows that millions of people watch each week. I rarely go to parties or events, and I still get jobs. My work speaks for itself.

However, I also feel that if I was more of a social person I may have different opportunities. So while partying isn’t always necessary, maybe take a middle road: do some networking (in-person and via social media) but also take some time away from the hustle and bustle of Highland.

Interning
I started my career as an intern on the show On Air with Ryan Seacrest, so this may be a little weird, but bear with me. I see a lot of people who work in TV turn their noses up when they hear people that haven’t interned before get jobs. I have to admit I was one of those people until I realized you don’t need a college degree, internship or any formal training for that matter.

If you know how to make an opening title graphic in Cinema 4D better than someone with a Master’s Degree in communication, the fact is that you just do. Don’t be ashamed and don’t feel like you don’t deserve a job over someone else. Just go for it.

Keep in mind that doesn’t give you an excuse to be complacent and uninformed about your job description and duties.

Obviously, all of these tips are to be taken with humility and common sense, but in the end if you have the talent, drive and fortitude to stand up for your ideas, then you can make it in post production, even if it means taking a few extra years to become a quality audio mixer, sound designer, visual effects artists, motion graphics maniac or whatever.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood. Previously, he was editing The Real World at Bunim Murray Productions. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com, and follow him on Twitter, @allbetzroff.

Zoic’s Mike Romey discusses previs app ZEUS:Scout

By Randi Altman

Visual effects studio Zoic has released to the masses an iPad-based previs tool they developed while providing shots for VFX-heavy shows such as Once Upon a Time, Intelligence, Pan Am and V. The app is available now via iTunes for $9.99.

According to Zoic (@zoicstudios), ZEUS:Scout (Zoic Environmental Unification System) offers seven main modes: View allows the user to move the camera around and save camera positions for shock blocking purposes; Measurements mode allows users to bring real-world measurements into a virtual world; Characters mode can be used to insert character cards into the virtual location; Props lets users add, move, rotate and scale set props that are available for in-app purchase; Previs Animation lets users explore camera moves for previs and rehearsal purposes. The Tracking mode allows users to use the tablet as a virtual camera with the CG view matching the Continue reading

Meet the Artist/Owner: Mechanism Digital’s Lucien Harriot

NAME: 
Lucien Harriot (@mechdigi)

COMPANY:Mechanism Digital Inc.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
A New York City-based production studio founded in 1996, providing design, visual effects and new development for the film, television and advertising industry. We are a smart, friendly group of passionate creatives who stay up late to help entertainment and marketing pros tell their stories in memorable ways.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?

Executive producer and visual effects supervisor.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being chief cook and bottle washer. Sales, quality control, overseeing marketing message and Continue reading

Hula Post ups Josh Rizzo to CTO

Hollywood-based Hula Post Production, which provides equipment rental services including edit suites and workflow development to the post production and broadcast world, has promoted Josh Rizzo to chief technology officer. He will lead Hula’s technical direction, help develop business opportunities and oversee strategic planning for future service and support offerings.

Rizzo has been an integral part of the Hula Post Production team for over 10 years, including two years as VP of technology for Slate Media Group and eight years with Wexler Video. At Wexler, he served in a variety of engineering roles, lastly director of technology. He has worked with clients from the film, television, broadcast and advertising industries while Continue reading

Encore ups Robert Glass, adds Augie Melendez

Encore, offering post and visual effects, has promoted Robert Glass to senior VP, sales worldwide. They have also hired Augie Melendez as VP, sales. Both will work out of Encore’s Los Angeles headquarters.

With almost two decades of experience, Glass now oversees sales for Encore locations worldwide as well as Level 3 Post, a Burbank-based post shop also owned by Deluxe Entertainment Services. Part of an overall restructure to help Encore expand into emerging markets, the new post allows Glass to continue developing close ties with studios, while also leveraging the connectivity of Encore’s multiple locations to arrange custom end-to-end solutions.

“At Encore, we strive to ensure that regardless of location, productions have access to our expertise and technology on a local level. Robert has been an integral part of Encore’s ongoing success and is the perfect person to drive synergy across our facilities globally,” said Encore executive VP Bill Romeo.

Augie

Augie Melendez

Brought in by Glass, Melendez joins Encore after spending six years as director of post production at Warner Bros.’ in-house post facility, where he helped establish its TV operation. Having worked on Family Ties supervising post production, Melendez has aided in the creation of shows for nearly every network. His inaugural project for Encore is a 4K 35mm film pilot for Amazon.

In addition to its Los Angeles facility, Encore also holds offices in New York, Vancouver, London and Toronto, and offers near-set services anywhere in the world via Mobilabs, a proprietary compact system for on-site color management and dailies.

Robert Glass is pictured at top.