Tag Archives: Technicolor-PostWorks

The long, strange trip of Amir Bar-Lev’s new Dead doc

Deadheads take note — Long Strange Trip, director Amir Bar-Lev’s four-hour documentary on rock’s original jam band, the Grateful Dead, is now available for viewing. While the film had a theatrical release in New York and Los Angeles on May 26, the doc was made available on Amazon Video as a six-episode series.

L-R: Jack Lewars and Keith Jenson.

Encompassing the band’s rise and decades-long career, the film, executive produced by Martin Scorsese, was itself 14 years in the making. That included three months of final post at Technicolor PostWorks New York, where colorist Jack Lewars and online editor Keith Jenson worked with Bar-Lev to finalize the film’s form and look.

The documentary features scores of interviews conducted by Bar-Lev with band members and their associates, as well as a mountain of concert footage and other archival media. All that made editorial conforming complex as Jenson (using Autodesk Flame) had to keep the diverse source material organized and make it fit properly into a single timeline. “We had conversions that were made from old analog tapes, archival band footage, DPX scans from film and everything in between,” he recalls. “There was a lot of cool stuff, which was great, but it required attention to detail to ensure it came out nice and smooth.”

The process was further complicated as creative editorial was ongoing throughout post. New material was arriving constantly. “We do a lot of documentary work here, so that’s something we’re used to,” Jenson says. “We have workflows and failsafes in place for all formats and know how to translate them for the Lustre platform Jack uses. Other than the sheer amount, nothing took us by surprise.”

Lewars faced a similar challenge during grading as he was tasked with bringing consistency to material produced over a long period of time by varying means. The overall visual style, he says, recalls the band’s origins in the psychedelic culture of the 1960s. “It’s a Grateful Dead movie, so there are a lot of references to their experiments with drugs,” he explains. “Some sections have a trippy feel where the visuals go in and out of different formats. It almost gives the viewer the sense of being on acid.”

The color palette, too, has a psychedelic feel, reflecting the free-spirited essence of the band and its co-founder. “Jerry Garcia’s life, his intention and his outlook, was to have fun,” Lewars observes. “And that’s the look we embraced. It’s very saturated, very colorful and very bright. We tried to make the movie as fun as possible.”

The narrative is frequently punctuated by animated sequences where still photographs, archival media and other elements are blended together in kaleidoscopic patterns. Finalizing those sequences required a few extra steps. “For the animation sequences, we had to cut in the plates and get them to Jack to grade,” explains Jenson. “We’d then send the color-corrected plates to the VFX and animation department for treatment. They’d come back as completed elements that we’d cut into the conform.”

The documentary climaxes with the death of Garcia and its aftermath. The guitarist suffered a heart attack in 1995 after years of struggling with diabetes and drug addiction. As those events unfold, the story undergoes a mood change that is mirrored in shifts in the color treatment. “There is a four-minute animated sequence in the last reel where Jerry has just passed and they are recapping the film,” Lewars says. “Images are overlaid on top of images. We colored those plates in hyper saturation, pushing it almost to the breaking point.

“It’s a very emotional moment,” he adds. “The earlier animated sequences introduced characters and were funny. But it’s tied together at the end in a way that’s sad. It’s a whiplash effect.”

Despite the length of the project and the complexity of its parts, it came together with few bumps. “Supervising producer Stuart Macphee and his team were amazing,” says Jenson. “They were very well organized, incredibly so. With so many formats and conversions coming from various sources, it could have snowballed quickly, but with this team it was a breeze.”

Lewars concurs. Long Strange Trip is an unusual documentary both in its narrative style and its looks, and that’s what makes it fascinating for Deadheads and non-fans alike. “It’s not a typical history doc,” Lewars notes. “A lot of documentaries go with a cold, bleach by-pass look and gritty feel. This was the opposite. We were bumping the saturation in parts where it felt unnatural, but, in the end, it was completely the right thing to do. It’s like candy.”

You can binge it now on Amazon Video.

Looking at the ACES color workflow on Café Society

By Sarah Priestnall

Last year’s Café Society marked a milestone in Woody Allen’s cinematic career — the first of his movies to be acquired digitally, mostly with the Sony F65 camera, and with additional use of the Sony F55. To accompany him in this endeavor, he turned to legendary Italian cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, ASC. Storaro has, of course, shot some of the most iconic movies of all time, including Apocalypse Now, Little Buddha and The Sheltering Sky. A period piece, set in the 1930s, Café Society tells the story of Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg), who leaves the Bronx for Hollywood where he meets and falls in love with a beautiful young woman (Kristen Stewart) who is involved with a mysterious married man.

Storaro uses color and tone throughout Café Society to great effect creating distinctive looks for the different locations. For this, he worked closely with Anthony Raffaele, senior colorist at Technicolor PostWorks, New York. Influenced by photographers and artists, such as Georgia O’Keefe, Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Hopper, Storaro uses look and color as a tool to help tell the story and place the characters in a particular location —in this case the Bronx, Hollywood and New York. As Bobby Dorfman moves from the Bronx, with its muted tones, to Hollywood, the colors become more vibrant and luminous. His life changes drastically and so when he moves back to New York the color palette becomes a blend of the two, reflecting that Bobby’s life has been changed by his time on the West Coast.

Unlike many of his projects, Anthony Raffaele had the opportunity to grade the dailies as well as the final digital intermediate. Conversations between him and Storaro began in pre-production. “We started a workflow and color conversation very early on,” explains Raffaele. “From our initial meeting with Vittorio and his DIT Simone D’Arcangelo, the color pipeline was paramount so that we could maintain the color decisions from on-set through to the finish.” Storaro insisted on a 4K 16-bit pipeline from the camera through to the digital intermediate. He had used Filmlight’s Baselight before on Muhammed: The Messenger of God, and based on that experience he knew that he wanted to use it again.

Although ACES was not used for the dailies, Raffaele was looking for a way to get a really strong image with deep blacks and vibrant colors — something that Storaro thought was perhaps missing in the dailies, at least compared to a film print. He had successfully used ACES previously on a movie with Dean Cundey, ASC — on the movie Freedom in 2014. After some experimentation with Baselight, he realized that he could achieve the richness that Storaro desired with Baselight’s revamped color pipeline which includes ACES throughout. “Filmlight does a great job with ACES color. I’ve found that using their IDTs (Input Display Transforms) gives me a great starting place, says Raffaele. “You can get a really great image very quickly. Also once you’re in ACES color space, creating any deliverable is very easy. The color mapping is amazingly accurate.”

The ease of the ACES integration in Baselight, together with the time saved by using ACES, allowed Raffaele to maximize the time he spent on creative color grading. The fidelity of the original 4K 16-bit images carried through to the digital intermediate with ACES wide color gamut. As Raffaele explains, the combination of Baselight and ACES also made the creation of an HDR deliverable simple as well as future-proofing the content, “there is the archival benefit to using ACES. The large color space will, in theory, futureproof the color decisions made in the room.”

Like many other colorists, Raffaele is convinced of the value of ACES, using it on every project he can. In fact, he is again collaborating with Storaro and DIT Simone D’Arcangelo on Woody Allen’s latest project and using ACES from beginning to end.


Sarah Priestnall has worked in the entertainment technology for many years, always at the forefront of the digital transition, with companies like Kodak, Hollywood Intermediate and Codex.

Storage Workflows for 4K and Beyond

Technicolor-Postworks and Deluxe Creative Services share their stories.

By Beth Marchant

Once upon a time, an editorial shop was a sneaker-net away from the other islands in the pipeline archipelago. That changed when the last phases of the digital revolution set many traditional editorial facilities into swift expansion mode to include more post production services under one roof.

The consolidating business environment in the post industry of the past several years then brought more of those expanded, overlapping divisions together. That’s a lot for any network to handle, let alone one containing some of the highest quality and most data-dense sound and pictures being created today. The networked storage systems connecting them all must be robust, efficient and realtime without fail, but also capable of expanding and contracting with the fluctuations of client requests, job sizes, acquisitions and, of course, evolving technology.

There’s a “relief valve” in the cloud and object storage, say facility CTOs minding the flow, but it’s still a delicate balance between local pooled and tiered storage and iron-clad cloud-based networks their clients will trust.

Technicolor-Postworks
Joe Beirne, CTO of Technicolor-PostWorks New York, is probably as familiar as one can be with complex nonlinear editorial workflows. A user of Avid’s earliest NLEs, an early adopter of networked editing and an immersive interactive filmmaker who experimented early with bluescreen footage, Beirne began his career as a technical advisor and producer for high-profile mixed-format feature documentaries, including Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 and the last film in Godfrey Reggio’s KOYAANISQATSI trilogy.

Joe Beirne

Joe Beirne

In his 11 years as a technology strategist at Technicolor-PostWorks New York, Beirne has also become fluent in evolving color, DI and audio workflows for clients such as HBO, Lionsgate, Discovery and Amazon Studios. CTO since 2011, when PostWorks NY acquired the East Coast Technicolor facility and the color science that came with it, he now oversees the increasingly complicated ecosystem that moves and stores vast amounts of high-resolution footage and data while simultaneously holding those separate and variously intersecting workflows together.

As the first post facility in New York to handle petabyte levels of editorial-based storage, Technicolor-PostWorks learned early how to manage the data explosion unleashed by digital cameras and NLEs. “That’s not because we had a petabyte SAN or NAS or near-line storage,” explains Beirne. “But we had literally 25 to 30 Avid Unity systems that were all in aggregate at once. We had a lot of storage spread out over the campus of buildings that we ran on the traditional PostWorks editorial side of the business.”

The TV finishing and DI business that developed at PostWorks in 2005, when Beirne joined the company (he was previously a client), eventually necessitated a different route. “As we’ve grown, we’ve expanded out to tiered storage, as everyone is doing, and also to the cloud,” he says. “Like we’ve done with our creative platforms, we have channeled our different storage systems and subsystems to meet specific needs. But they all have a very promiscuous relationship with each other!”

TPW’s high-performance storage in its production network is a combination of local or semi-locally attached near-line storage tethered by several Quantum StorNext SANs, all of it air-gapped — or physically segregated —from the public Internet. “We’ve got multiple SANs in the main Technicolor mothership on Leroy Street with multiple metadata controllers,” says Beirne. “We’ve also got some client-specific storage, so we have a SAN that can be dedicated to a particular account. We did that for a particular client who has very restrictive policies about shared storage.”

TPW’s editorial media, for the most part, resides in Avid’s ISIS system and is in the process of transitioning to its software-defined replacement, Nexis. “We have hundreds of Avids, a few Adobe and even some Final Cut systems connected to that collection of Nexis and ISIS and Unity systems,” he says. “We’re currently testing the Nexis pipeline for our needs but, in general, we’re going to keep using this kind of storage for the foreseeable future. We have multiple storage servers that serve that part of our business.”

Beirne says most every project the facility touches is archived to LTO tape. “We have a little bit of disc-to-tape archiving going on for the same reasons everybody else does,” he adds. “And some SAN volume hot spots that are all SSD (solid state drives) or a hybrid.” The facility is also in the process of improving the bandwidth of its overall switching fabric, both on the Fibre Channel side and on the Ethernet side. “That means we’re moving to 32Gb and multiple 16Gb links,” he says. “We’re also exploring a 40Gb Ethernet backbone.”

Technicolor-Postworks 4K theater at their Leroy Street location.

This backbone, he adds, carries an exponential amount of data every day. “Now we have what are like two nested networks of storage at a lot of the artist workstations,” he explains. “That’s a complicating feature. It’s this big, kind of octopus, actually. Scratch that: it’s like two octopi on top of one another. That’s not even mentioning the baseband LAN network that interweaves this whole thing. They, of course, are now getting intermixed because we are also doing IT-based switching. The entire, complex ecosystem is evolving and everything that interacts with it is evolving right along with it.”

The cloud is providing some relief and handles multiple types of storage workflows across TPW’s various business units. “Different flavors of the commercial cloud, as well as our own private cloud, handle those different pools of storage outside our premises,” Beirne says. “We’re collaborating right now with an international account in another territory and we’re touching their storage envelope through the Azure cloud (Microsoft’s enterprise-grade cloud platform). Our Azure cloud and theirs touch and we push data from that storage back and forth between us. That particular collaboration happened because we both had an Azure instance, and those kinds of server-to-server transactions that occur entirely in the cloud work very well. We also had a relationship with one of the studios in which we made a similar connection through Amazon’s S3 cloud.”

Given the trepidations most studios still have about the cloud, Beirne admits there will always be some initial, instinctive mistrust from both clients and staff when you start moving any content away from computers that are not your own and you don’t control. “What made that first cloud solution work, and this is kind of goofy, is we used Aspera to move the data, even though it was between adjacent racks. But we took advantage of the high-bandwidth backbone to do it efficiently.”

Both TPW in New York and Technicolor in Los Angeles have since leveraged the cloud aggressively. “We our own cloud that we built, and big Technicolor has a very substantial purpose-built cloud, as well as Technicolor Pulse, their new storage-related production service in the cloud. They also use object storage and have some even newer technology that will be launching shortly.”

The caveat to moving any storage-related workflow into the cloud is thorough and continual testing, says Beirne. “Do I have more concern for my clients’ media in the cloud than I do when sending my own tax forms electronically? Yea, I probably do,” he says. “It’s a very, very high threshold that we need to pass. But that said, there’s quite a bit of low-impact support stuff that we can do on the cloud. Review and approval stuff has been happening in the cloud for some time.” As a result, the facility has seen an increase, like everyone else, in virtual client sessions, like live color sessions and live mix sessions from city to city or continent to continent. “To do that, we usually have a closed circuit that we open between two facilities and have calibrated displays on either end. And, we also use PIX and other normal dailies systems.”

“How we process and push this media around ultimately defines our business,” he concludes. “It’s increasingly bigger projects that are made more demanding from a computing point of view. And then spreading that out in a safe and effective way to where people want to access it, that’s the challenge we confront every single day. There’s this enormous tension between the desire to be mobile and open and computing everywhere and anywhere, with these incredibly powerful computer systems we now carry around in our pockets and the bandwidth of the content that we’re making, which is high frame rate, high resolution, high dynamic range and high everything. And with 8K — HDR and stereo wavefront data goes way beyond 8K and what the retina even sees — and 10-bit or more coming in the broadcast chain, it will be more of the same.” TPW is already doing 16-bit processing for all of its film projects and most of its television work. “That’s piles and piles and piles of data that also scales linearly. It’s never going to stop. And we have a VR lab here now, and there’s no end of the data when you start including everything in and outside of the frame. That’s what keeps me up at night.”

Deluxe Creative Services
Before becoming CTO at Deluxe Creative Services, Mike Chiado had a 15-year career as a color engineer and image scientist at Company 3, the grading and finishing powerhouse acquired by Deluxe in 2010. He now manages the pipelines of a commercial, television and film Creative Services division that encompasses not just dailies, editorial and color, but sound, VFX, 3D conversion, virtual reality, interactive design and restoration.

MikeChiado

Mike Chiado

That’s a hugely data-heavy load to begin with, and as VR and 8K projects become more common, managing the data stored and coursing through DCS’ network will get even more demanding. Branded companies currently under the monster Deluxe umbrella include Beast, Company 3, DDP, Deluxe/Culver City, Deluxe VR, Editpool, Efilm, Encore, Flagstaff Studios, Iloura, Level 3, Method Studios, StageOne Sound, Stereo D, and Rushes.

“Actually, that’s nothing when you consider that all the delivery and media teams from Deluxe Delivery and Deluxe Digital Cinema are downstream of Creative Services,” says Chiado. “That’s a much bigger network and storage challenge at that level.” Still, the storage challenges of Chiado’s segment are routinely complicated by the twin monkey wrenches of the collaborative and computer kind that can unhinge any technology-driven art form.

“Each area of the business has its own specific problems that recur: television has its issues, commercial work has its issues and features its issues. For us, commercials and features are more alike than you might think, partly due to the constantly changing visual effects but also due to shifting schedules. Television is much more regimented,” he says. “But sometimes we get hard drives in on a commercial or feature and we think, ‘Well that’s not what we talked about at all!”

Company 3’s file-based digital intermediate work quickly clarified Chiado’s technical priorities. “The thing that we learned early on is realtime playback is just so critical,” he says. “When we did our very first file-based DI job 13 years ago, we were so excited that we could display a certain resolution. OK, it was slipping a little bit from realtime, maybe we’ll get 22 frames a second, or 23, but then the director walked out after five minutes and said, ‘No. This won’t work.’ He couldn’t care less about the resolution because it was only always about realtime and solid playback. Luckily, we learned our lesson pretty quickly and learned it well! In Deluxe Creative Services, that still is the number one priority.”

It’s also helped him cut through unnecessary sales pitches from storage vendors unfamiliar with Deluxe’s business. “When I talk to them, I say, ‘Don’t tell me about bit rates. I’m going to tell you a frame rate I want to hit and a resolution, and you tell me if we can hit it or not with your solution. I don’t want to argue bits; I want tell you this is what I need to do and you’re going to tell me whether or not your storage can do that.’ The storage vendors that we’re going to bank our A-client work on better understand fundamentally what we need.”

Because some of the Deluxe company brands share office space — Method and Company 3 moved into a 63,376-square-foot former warehouse in Santa Monica a few years ago — they have access to the same storage infrastructure. “But there are often volumes specially purpose-built for a particular job,” says Chiado. “In that way, we’ve created volumes focused on supporting 4K feature work and others set up specifically for CG desktop environments that are shared across 400 people in that one building. We also have similar business units in Company 3 and Efilm, so sometimes it makes sense that we would want, for artist or client reasons, to have somebody in a different location from where the data resides. For example, having the artist in Santa Monica and the director and DP in Hollywood is something we do regularly.”

Chiado says Deluxe has designed and built with network solution and storage solution providers a system “that suits our needs. But for the most part, we’re using off-the-shelf products for storage. The magic is how we tune them to be able to work with our systems.”

Those vendors include Quantum, DDN Storage and EMC’s network-attached storage Isilon. “For our most robust needs, like 4K feature workflows, we rely on DDN,” he says. “We’ve actually already done some 8K workflows. Crazy world we live in!” For long-term archiving, each Deluxe Creative Service location worldwide has an LTO-tape robot library. “In some cases, we’ll have a near-line tier two volume that stages it. And for the past few years, we’re using object storage in some locations to help with that.”

Although the entire group of Deluxe divisions and offices are linked by a robust 10GigE network that sometimes takes advantage of dark fiber, unused fiber optic cables leased from larger fiber-optic communications companies, Chiado says the storage they use is all very specific to each business unit. “We’re moving stuff around all the time but projects are pretty much residing in one spot or another,” he says. “Often, there are a thousand reasons why — it may be for tax incentives in a particular location, it may be for project-specific needs. Or it’s just that we’re talking about the London and LA locations.”

With one eye on the future and another on budgets, Chiado says pooled storage has helped DCS keep costs down while managing larger and larger subsets of data-heavy projects. “We are always on the lookout for ways to handle the next thing, like the arrival of 8K workflows, but we’ve gained huge, huge efficiencies from pooled storage,” he says. “So that’s the beauty of what we build, specific to each of our world locations. We move it around if we have to between locations but inside that location, everybody works with the content in one place. That right there was a major efficiency in our workflows.”

Beyond that, he says, how to handle 8K is still an open question. “We may have to make an island, and it’s been testing so far, but we do everything we can to keep it in one place and leverage whatever technology that’s required for the job,” Chiado says. “We have isolated instances of SSDs (solid-state drives) but we don’t have large-scale deployment of SSDs yet. On the other end, we’re working with cloud vendors, too, to be able to maximize our investments.”

Although the company is still working through cloud security issues, Chiado says Deluxe is “actively engaging with cloud vendors because we aren’t convinced that our clients are going to be happy with the security protocols in place right now. The nature of the business is we are regularly involved with our clients and MPAA and have ongoing security audits. We also have a group within Deluxe that helps us maintain the best standards, but each show that comes in may have its own unique security needs. It’s a constant, evolving process. It’s been really difficult to get our heads and our clients’ heads around using the cloud for rendering, transcoding or for storage.”

Luckily, that’s starting to change. “We’re getting good traction now, with a few of the studios getting ready to greenlight cloud use and our own pipeline development to support it,” he adds. “They are hand in hand. But I think once we move over this hurdle, this is going to help the industry tremendously.”

Beyond those longer-term challenges, Chiado says the day-to-day demands of each division haven’t changed much. “Everybody always needs more storage, so we are constantly looking at ways to make that happen,” he says. “The better we can monitor our storage and make our in-house people feel comfortable moving stuff off near-line to tape and bring it back again, the better we can put the storage where we need it. But I’m very optimistic about the future, especially about having a relief valve in the cloud.”

Our main image is the shared 4K theater at Company 3 and Method.

Netflix’s ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ gets crisper look via UHD

NYC’s Technicolor Postworks created a dedicated post workflow for the upgrade.

Having compiled seven Emmy Award nominations in its debut season, Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt returned in mid-April with 13 new episodes in a form that is, quite literally, bigger and better.

The sitcom, from co-creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, features the ever-cheerful and ever-hopeful Kimmy Schmidt, whose spirit refuses to be broken, even after being held captive during her formative years. This season the series has boosted its delivery format from standard HD to the crisper, clearer, more detailed look of Ultra High Definition (UHD).

L-R: Pat Kelleher and Roger Doran

As with the show’s first season, post finishing was done at Technicolor PostWorks New York. Online editor Pat Kelleher and colorist Roger Doran once again served as the finishing team, working under the direction of series producer Dara Schnapper, post supervisor Valerie Landesberg and director of photography John Inwood. Almost everything else, however, was different.

The first season had been shot by Inwood with Arri Alexa, capturing in 1080p, and finished in ProRes 4444. The new episodes were shot with Red Dragon, capturing in 5K, and needed to be finished in UHD. That meant that the hardware and workflow used by Kelleher and Doran had to be retooled to efficiently manage UHD files four times larger than ProRes.

“It was an eye opener,” recalls Kelleher of the change. “Obviously, the amount of drive space needed for storage is huge. Everyone from our data manager through to the people who did the digital deliveries had to contend with the higher volume of data. The actual hands-on work is not that different from an HD show, but you need the horses to do it.”

Before post work began, engineers from Technicolor PostWorks’ in-house research unit, The Test Lab, analyzed the workflow requirements of UHD and began making changes. They built an entirely new hardware Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidtsystem for Kelleher to use, running Autodesk’s Flame Premium. It consisted of an HP Z820 workstation with Nvidia Quadro K6000 graphics, 64GB of RAM and dual Intel Xeon Processor E5-2687Ws (20M Cache, 3.10 GHz, 8.00 GT/s Intel QPI). Kelleher described its performance in handling UHD media as “flawless.”

Doran’s color grading suite got a similar overhaul. For him, engineers built a Linux-based workstation to run Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, V11, and set up a dual monitoring system. That included a Panasonic 300 series display to view media in 1080p and a Samsung 9500 series curved LED to view UHD. Doran could then review color decisions in both formats (while maintaining a UHD signal throughout) and spot details or noise issues in UHD that might not be apparent at lower resolution.

While the extra firepower enabled Kelleher and Doran to work with UHD as efficiently as HD, they faced new challenges. “We do a lot of visual effects for this show,” notes Kelleher. “And now that we’re working in UHD, everything has to be much more precise. My mattes have to be tight because you can see so much more.”

Doran’s work in the color suite similarly required greater finesse. “You have to be very, very aware,” he says. “Cosmetically, it’s different. The lighting is different. You have to pay close attention to how the stars look.”

Doran is quick to add that, while grading UHD might require closer scrutiny, it’s justified by the results. “I like the increased range and greater detail,” he says. “I enjoy the extra control. Once you move up, you never want to go back.”

Both Doran and Kelleher credited the Technicolor PostWorks engineering team of Eric Horwitz, Corey Stewart and Randy Main for their ability to “move up” with a minimum of strain. “The engineers were amazing,” Kelleher insists. “They got the workflow to where all I had to think about was editing and compositing. The transition was so smooth, you almost forgot you were working in UHD, except for the image quality. That was amazing.”

Technicolor PostWorks has leased 50,000 square feet of space in NYC (!)

In a city where space is at a minimum, the fact that Technicolor PostWorks New York has leased a space that is bigger than a football field, is almost unbelievable (and this is not an article from The Onion).

Set to open early this summer, the new facility will house 120-plus editing rooms available to film and television productions for rental on a long- or short-term bases. Technicolor PostWorks will provide editing systems and related technology, as well as on-site support and engineering. The facility will be directly linked with the company’s existing downtown finishing and sound facility network.

The move is a response to recent growth in film and television production in New York. “The production environment in the New York area, especially for episodic television and independent film, is very strong, and we expect it to strengthen for the foreseeable future,” said CEO David Rosen. “This new editing facility is an expression of our confidence and enhances our ability to provide producers with robust, stable post-production resources.”

The location, 1411 Broadway, is centrally located south of Times Square and features 24/7 access, on-site parking and 22 passenger and three freight elevators. It is within easy walking distance of Penn Station, the Port Authority Terminal and Grand Central Station.

The new space also offers the flexibility to serve productions of varying size and requirements. Premises can be configured for use as cutting suites, open bullpen areas or production offices. Technicolor PostWorks COO Rob DeMartin noted that the company’s long-term lease — 2026 and beyond — translates into predictable overhead costs that will ultimately benefit filmmakers.

Setting the visual tone for ABC’s ‘Madoff’

Bernie Madoff, one of the most hated men on earth thanks to his massive Ponzi scheme, was recently the focus of a four-part ABC miniseries called, simply, Madoff.

Technicolor PostWorks New York colorist Anthony Raffaele worked directly with Madoff cinematographer Frankie DeMarco in finalizing a look of the series, which captures the big money atmosphere of Wall Street in the 1990s and 2000s.

 Directed by Raymond De Felitta, Madoff is told from the perspective of its title character (Richard Dreyfuss) and portrays his schemes to defraud investors and meticulous efforts to keep the truth about his activities hidden from the public and his family.

DeMarco shot the show with an Arri Alexa camera and used vintage Cooke Speed Panchro lenses to give the imagery a filmic look indicative of its time period. He also shot Super 16 and Super 8 film for Madoff’s childhood sequence.

“It’s a character-driven story told from one person’s point of view,” DeMarco recalls. “So, I didn’t want it looking too sharp or crisp. I used the vintage Cooke Speed Panchro lenses to give the movie a more round, human feel.”

Much of the action shifts between the 19th floor of the Lipstick Building in Midtown Manhattan, which housed the offices of Madoff’s investment firm, and a small boiler room operation on the 17th floor — this was hidden from all but a few insiders and is where the dirty work of the fraud scheme was carried out.

 The different atmospheres of these two settings are subtly reinforced through cinematography, lighting and color correction. “Everything that occurs on the 19th floor has a polished, crisp, business feel that’s accented by cooler tones,” says Raffaele, who uses a FilmLight Baselight. “Downstairs, where the fraud occurs, the look is contrasted by a softer, diffused look accented with uncomfortable colors like yellow and green.”

During final grading sessions, DeMarco and Raffaele collaborated remotely. DeMarco was in London working on another project, so Raffaele sent him materials each day that he could review on an iPad. “We had good control over the lighting on the set, so the color was very close when Anthony got it,” DeMarco says. “He did a lovely job of punching up things and fine tuning. He has a great eye and got what I wanted from the get-go.”

As the story progresses and Madoff’s scheme unravels, the look becomes progressively darker. Especially bleak are scenes set in Madoff’s jail cell, where the greenish overtones aAnthony Raffaele re pronounced. A different color treatment was applied to the dreamlike sequences representing Madoff’s thoughts, as he imagines what lies ahead when the truth about his activities comes out.

“Bernie’s visions have a high contrast look, which set them off as something that’s going on inside his head and give them an uncomfortable feel,” Raffaele explains.

Overall, DeMarco says Madoff does a great job of pulling viewers into its antagonist’s inner world. That, he notes, was the product of many factors, beginning with director De Felitta’s strong vision and Dreyfuss’ inspired performance. “There was a very collegial rapport on the set where everyone contributed ideas,” he explains. “It was a real treat to work with Richard Dreyfuss.”

DeMarco adds that the collaborative spirit carried through to post production. “I talked with Anthony before the shoot so we were already on the same page when we reached post — he took that ball and ran with it. It’s a sprawling movie — covering more than 15 years —but it had limited locations, so once we set a look, we were able to carry it through all four episodes.”

 

Technicolor PostWorks John Crowley on color grading ‘The Americans’

By Randi Altman

Just a couple of weeks ago, FX’s The Americans aired its third season finale, and it was a good one. Who would expect anything less? This drama follows a Russian husband and wife who are undercover in the DC area during the Cold War. They look American, sound American and have two kids, who truly are American.

The show is shot in New York and gets its color grading from New York-based Technicolor PostWorks (@postworksNY) via colorist John Crowley, who works directly with the show’s DP Richard Rutkowski. He and Rutkowski started talking back in October 2013, right before the show started shooting Season Two. You may remember we covered the audio post for The Americans back in earlyMarch. Another New York post house, Sync Sound, and specifically Ken Hah, provided these services.  Continue reading

Technicolor-PostWorks buys The Room, Ben Murray named VP of Creative Services

New York-based post studio Technicolor-PostWorks has acquired The Room, a finishing studio that has been hosted on its premises for the past three years. The Room’s staff, equipment and dedicated 4K workflow will be now be integrated into the Technicolor-PostWorks facility at 110 Leroy Street. Ben Murray, founder of The Room, will assume a new role as VP, creative services for Technicolor-PostWorks.

Under Murray’s leadership, The Room has developed a client-centric approach to feature film post, combining efficient data and workflow management, new technology, team-based operations and personalized service.

Ben Murray

Ben Murray

 

Recent projects for The Room include St. Vincent, Her, The Giver, True Detective, Marco Polo, Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown and Years of Living Dangerously.

Murray (pictured) will apply a similar approach to the full range of Technicolor-PostWorks film and television operations. “Ben will be our creative and technical lead, focusing on workflow design, training, talent management and recruiting,” says Technicolor-PostWorks COO Rob DeMartin. “He will work with clients in pre-production, oversee project management, collaborate with our engineering team, and assist in overall strategic planning.”

“We aim to streamline services for both features and episodic television,” Murray says. “We will work to provide increasingly nimble technology and a more responsive level of service across the board.”

Murray believes that the operational efficiencies that make The Room successful translate well to the larger facility. “It’s an opportunity to extend our more agile, client-focused approach,” he explains. “As The Room rapidly grew, particularly over the last year, the quality of service was not diluted —in fact, it improved.  In taking this next step, with a larger pool of talent, greater physical capacity and much higher bandwidth, our focus will be to elevate the quality of service available for all our clients.  I am confident that the formula will continue to scale.”

Technicolor-PostWorks gets institutionalized for ‘Stonehearst Asylum’

For the film Stonehearst Asylum from Director Brad Anderson and Millennium Entertainment, Technicolor-PostWorks New York‘s facility provided editorial systems and support to the production in addition to handling the editorial conforming, color grading and deliverables.

Based on an Edgar Allan Poe story, Stonehearst Asylum (Kate Beckinsale, Ben Kingsley, Michael Caine) is a thriller about patients who take over a corrupt mental institution. The film was shot in Bulgaria with DP Thomas Yatsko. Brian Gates edited the film at Technicolor-PostWorks’ West Village location. The film was conformed by editor George Bunce on Autodesk Smoke. Technicolor-PostWorks generated DCP, film and video deliverables.

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Senior colorist Sam Daley applied the final grade in Autodesk Lustre, working under the direct supervision of Anderson and Yatsko. Daley’s role was to enhance the film’s period setting and tense story. “The film takes place at the very end of the 19th century,” notes Yatsko. “It’s set in a remote location in northern England. It’s winter and the facility has no electricity, little oil and few supplies. Most scenes are lit by candlelight.”

Yasko contrasted the warm candlelight with blue lighting from the windows to create separation and convey the sense that we are in a remote country location.  That resulted in a dark, moody look that was further refined in post production. “Sam had his challenges,” Yatsko adds. “In addition to working with minimal light, we shot in Bulgaria in the summer time, where it was hot and sunny, while what we needed was a look that was grey and gloomy.”

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Daley applied a number of atmospheric effects, enhancing the glow of candles and smoothing fog in exterior scenes. He also spent considerable time making skin tone adjustments. “Many of the characters are meant to look unhealthy, as if they are sick or have not been eating well,” Daley explains. “We took some of the life out of their faces. Our Lustre allowed me to isolate skin tones and manipulate them independent of the surrounding frame.”

The final look of the film, says Daley, is different from most period dramas. “Although the hair, wardrobe and set were all period, we treated it like a modern suspense film,” Daley says. “We made a lot of strong color choices.  We didn’t go into a modern palette, but we pushed the colors. We walked a fine line: respecting the time period, while delivering an entertaining movie.”

 

 

Colorist Anthony Raffaele joins Technicolor-PostWorks

Anthony Raffaele has joined Technicolor-PostWorks as a finishing colorist. He comes to the New York-based studio from Deluxe, New York, where he was senior colorist.

Raffaele has served as the finishing colorist on the CBS series Blue Bloods for the past four seasons, and has worked with a number of top cinematographers, including Dean Cundey, Igor Martinovic, Javier Aguirresarobe, Anette Haellmigk and Rachel Morrison.

“Anthony is a rising talent with strong relationships among established and emerging directors and DPs,” says Technicolor-PostWorks COO Rob DeMartin.

Raffaele began his career with Nice Shoes in 2001 and joined Deluxe in 2009. He has experience on a variety of grading platforms, including Autodesk Lustre, Da Vinci Resolve and FilmLight Baselight.

He earned his first credit as a DI colorist on the 2011 horror thriller Silent House, where he collaborated with cinematographer Igor Martinovic. He worked with Martinovic again last year on the indie drama Sunlight Jr. starring Matt Dillon and Naomi Watts. His most recent feature credit is Freedom, lensed by Dean Cundey.

On Blue Bloods¸ Raffaele has been collaborating with television DPs Craig DiBona and David Insley. His other television credits include The Tomorrow People and Gotham, both with director Danny Cannon, and The Corrections, a pilot written and directed by Noah Baumbach and based on the Jonathan Franzen bestseller. Raffaele’s credits as dailies colorists, including Blue Jasmine, The Dictator and Remember Me. He has a degree in film from Hofstra University.