Tag Archives: sound designer

Behind the Title: 3008 Editorial’s Matt Cimino and Greg Carlson

NAMES: Matt Cimino and Greg Carlson

COMPANY: 3008 Editorial in Dallas

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Cimino: We are sound designers/mixers.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Cimino: Audio is a storytelling tool. Our job is to enhance the story directly or indirectly and create the illusion of depth, space and a sense of motion with creative sound design and then mix that live in the environment of the visuals.

Carlson: And whenever someone asks, I always tend to prioritize sound design before mixing. Although I love every aspect of what we do, when a spot hits my room as a blank slate, it’s really the sound design that can take it down a hundred different paths. And for me, it doesn’t get better than that.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Carlson: I’m not sure a brief job title can encompass what anyone really does. I am a composer as well as a sound designer/mixer, so I bring that aspect into my work. I love musical elements that help stitch a unified sound into a project.

Cimino: That there really isn’t “a button” for that!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Carlson: The freedom. Having the opportunity to take a project where I think it should go and along the way, pushing it to the edge and back. Experimenting and adapting makes every spot a completely new trip.

Matt Cimino

Cimino: I agree. It’s the challenge of creating an expressive and aesthetically pleasing experience by taking the soundtrack to a whole new level.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Cimino: Not Much. However, being an imperfect perfectionist, I get pretty bummed when I do not have enough time to perfect the job.

Carlson: People always say, “It’s so peaceful and quiet in the studio, as if the world is tuned out.” The downside of that is producer-induced near heart attacks. See, when you’re rocking out at max volume and facing away from the door, well, people tend to come in and accidentally scare you to death.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Cimino: I’m a morning person!

Carlson: Time is an abstract notion in a dark room with no windows, so no time in particular. However, the funniest time of day is when you notice you’re listening about 15 dB louder than the start of the day. Loud is better.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Cimino: Carny. Or Evel Knievel.

Carlson: Construction/carpentry. Before audio, I had lots of gritty “hands-on” jobs. My dad taught me about work ethic, to get my hands dirty and to take pride in everything. I take that same approach with every spot I touch. Now I just sit in a nice chair while doing it.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION? HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Cimino: I’ve had a love for music since high school. I used to read all the liner notes on my vinyl. One day I remember going through my father’s records and thinking at that moment, I want to be that “sound engineer” listed in the notes. This led me to study audio at Columbia College in Chicago. I quickly gravitated towards post production audio classes and training. When I wasn’t recording and mixing music, I was doing creative sound design.

Carlson: I was always good with numbers and went to Michigan State to be an accountant. But two years in, I was unhappy. All I wanted was to work on music and compose, so I switched to audio engineering and never looked back. I knew the second I walked into my first studio, I had found my calling. People always say there isn’t a dream job; I disagree.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Cimino: A fun, stress-free environment full of artistry and technology.

Carlson: It is a place I look forward to every day. It’s like a family, solely focused on great creative.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT SPOTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Cimino: Snapple, RAM, Jeep, Universal Orlando, Cricket Wireless, Maserati.

Carlson: AT&T, Lay’s, McDonald’s, Bridgestone Golf.

Greg Carlson

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Carlson: It’s nearly impossible to pick one, but there is a project I see as pivotal in my time here in Dallas. It was shortly after I arrived six years ago. I think it was a boost to my confidence and in turn, enhanced my style. The client was The Home Depot and the campaign was Lets Do This. A creative I admire greatly here in town gave me the chance to spearhead the sonic approach for the work. There are many moments, milestones and memories, but this was a special project to me.

Cimino: There are so many. One of the most fun campaigns I worked on was for Snapple, where each spot opened with the “pop!” of the Snapple cap. I recorded several pops (close-miced) and selected one that I manipulated to sound larger than life but also retain the sound of the brands signature cap pop being opened. After the cap pops, the spot transforms into an exploding fruit infusion. The sound was created by smashing Snapple bottles for the glass break, crushing, smashing and squishing fruit with my hands, and using a hydrophone to record splashing and underwater sounds to create the slow-motion effect of the fruit morphing. So much fun.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Cimino: During a mix, my go-tos are iZotope, Sound Toys and Slate Digital. Outside the studio I can’t live without my Apple!

Carlson: ProTools, all things iZotope, Native Instruments.

THIS IS A HIGH-STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS. WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Cimino: Family and friends. I love watching my kiddos play select soccer. Relaxing pool or beachside with a craft cider. Or on a single path/trail with my mountain bike.

Carlson: I work on my home, build things, like to be outside. When I need to detach for a bit, I prefer dangerous power tools or being on a body of water.

Review: Soundly — an essential tool for sound designers

By Ron DiCesare

The people behind the sound effects database Soundly and I think alike. We both imagine a world where all audio files are accessible from any computer at anytime. Soundly is helping accomplish that with their cloud-based audio sound effect searchable database and online sound effects library. Having access to thousands of sound effects online via the cloud from any computer anywhere with Internet access is long overdue. I am so pleased to see Soundly paving the way to what I see as the inevitable workflow of the future.

When I started out in audio post production years ago, sound effect libraries were all on CDs. Back then I had to look through a huge directory listing the tens of thousands of sounds available on all of the audio CDs, which I called “the big phone book of sounds.” I remember thinking to myself that there must be a better way. After years of struggling with these phone books, technology finally made a viable step forward with iTunes. That led to my “innovative” idea to rip all of my sound effect CDs to iTunes to use it as a makeshift searchable database. It was crude, but worked a hell of a lot better than the phone books and audio CDs!

Once digital audio files became the norm, technology got on board and finally offered us searchable database programs exclusively for sound effects. Now Soundly has made another leap forward with its cloud access.

Over the years, I have acquired well over 100,000 sound effects — 112,495 to be exact. In my library, there are a fair amount of custom sounds (particularly vocal reactions) that I have recorded myself. All of these sounds are stored on a 1TB external hard drive (with an ilok/dongle) that I take with me to every studio I work at, including my home studio.

The problem for me is that I am a freelance audio mixer and sound designer working at many different studios in New York City, in addition to my home studio on Long Island. That means I am forced to take my external sound effects drive and ilok to every studio I work at for every session. I am always at risk of losing the drive and/or ilok or simply forgetting them behind when going to and from studios. I have often asked myself, wouldn’t it be great to have all my sounds accessible from any computer with Internet access at all times? Enter Soundly.

Soundly can be broken down into two main parts. First, they offer 300-plus or 7,500-plus sounds included in their database for immediate use. This depends on which price option you choose, which is either free or a monthly subscription. Second, they offer the ability to upload all of users’ existing sound effects to a local drive or, better yet, the cloud. Uploading to the cloud makes your sounds available from a computer with Internet access, in addition to the over 7,500 sound effects included with Soundly.

A Wide Appeal
Soundly is available for Mac and PC, and is very easy to install — it took me just a few minutes. Once installed, the program immediately gives access to over 7,500 high-quality sound effects, many as 96kHz, 24-bit Wav files. This is ideal for anyone not able to spend the thousands of dollars needed to build up a large library by purchasing sound effects from a variety of companies. That could include video editors who are often asked to do sound design without a proper or significant database of sounds to choose from. All too often these video editors are forced to look to the Internet for any kind of free sound effect, but the quality can be dubious at times. Audio mixers and sound designers, who are just starting out and getting their libraries underway could benefit as well.

In addition to accessing 7,500-plus high-quality sounds, Soundly allows for the purchase of additional sound effect libraries in the store section of the program, such as “Cinematic Hits and Transitions” from SoundBits and “Summer Nature Ambiences” by Soundholder. The store also gives the user access to all free sound effects across the Internet via Freesound.org. This will no doubt help fill in any gaps in the large variety of sounds needed for any video editor or sound designer. But just as the Soundly disclaimer notes for the free sound effects, there is no way to enforce any kind of quality control or audio standard for the wide range of free sounds available throughout the Internet. Even so, Soundly manages to be a one-stop shop for all Internet sound searches rather than just randomly searching the Internet blindly.

Targeted Appeal
Any seasoned audio mixer or sound designer will tell you that it is best to stay away from free sounds found on the Internet in general. Audio mixers like me who have been working for over 30 years (though I do not look like I am over 50!) are more likely to have built up their own sound effect libraries over the years that they prefer to use. For example, my sound effect library contains both purchased sounds from many of the various commercial libraries and a fair amount of custom sounds I have recorded on the job. That is why uploading a user’s own entire sound effect library to the cloud for use with Soundly (which in my case is almost 1TB) is an absolute necessity.

Now I admit, I am the exception and not the rule. I need access to all of my audio files at all times because I am never in one place for long. That is why Soundly is ideal for me. I can dial up Soundly and access the cloud instantly from any computer that has Internet access. Now I can leave my sound effects drive at home, which is a huge relief.

I know that the vast majority of audio professionals on my level have a staff position. Most of them typically work at multi-room facilities and rarely, if ever, need to leave their facility for an audio mix or sound design. Soundly offers multi-room licenses for just that reason. But more importantly, it means that most of the major audio facilities have their sound effect libraries accessible to all their staff on some kind of network server such as a RAID or NAS. So why switch to Soundly’s cloud storage service when an audio or video facility has access to many TBs worth of network storage of their own? The answer in a nutshell is price.

To fully understand if Soundly could replace a network server in a large audio or video facility, let’s breakdown Soundly’s pricing options starting with the free option. Soundly offers access to the free cloud library of over 300 sound effects, a maximum of 2,500 pre-existing local files and no upload space allotment. Next is Soundly’s Pro subscription for $14.99 a month, allowing for all the features of Soundly, access to the 7,500-plus cloud-based sound effects and unlimited access to pre-existing local files.

But for the real heavy lifting, Soundly offers storage space options needed to upload large amounts of sounds to the cloud at a very competitive rate. For example, to get access to my pre-existing sound effect library totaling nearly 1TB worth of sound effects, Soundly offers an annual fee of $500 for cloud storage that size. Compare that to the cost of installing and maintaining RAID or NAS storage systems that a large facility might use and it could very well be a better and more cost-effective option, not to mention it’s accessible everywhere. So freelancers like me, or staff audio engineers, can count on reliable, safe, large-scale storage of their data by switching to Soundly.

Operation
Installing Soundly is fast and easy. I was instantly able to access all of the included sounds. Once my entire sound effect library was uploaded, it was well worth the time and effort needed for such a large amount of files. Searching for sound effects worked exactly as I expected it to. All possible sounds came up with the search criteria I specified, all based on file names and metadata. Simply click on any sound file to play it and see if it’s right for your project.

Now here is where Soundly really impressed me. There are two ways of exporting your sound files: drag and drop and what Soundly calls “spot-to.” Drag and drop works with Pro Tools, Nuendo, Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and FCP X and 7, to name a few. The “spot-to” function works with Pro Tools, specifically Pro Tools HD 12.7. The “spot-to” function is where the real power and speed comes into play. The “spot-to” icon appears automatically whenever Pro Tools is active (it disappears when the Pro Tools is not active, so just be aware of that). Click on the icon and your sound file is sent to Pro Tools in an instant.

There are two great options when using the “spot-to” icon, spot to bin or spot to timeline. Each one has its advantages depending on how you like to work. Sending to your bin makes it accessible via the clip list in Pro Tools. Sending to the timeline adds it to wherever your curser is located on any track. That is a real time saver. To illustrate this, let’s look at how few steps are needed to get your sound file in your time line or bin. I counted three steps. Step one: select the sound in Soundly. Step two: send to Pro Tools using the “spot-to” icon. Step three: immediately working with the sound file in my session, which really is not a step. So, we can say it is actually just two steps. Yes, it’s that fast and easy.

For me, the most important aspect of Soundly’s “spot-to” function is that it copies the sound file to Pro Tools rather than referencing it. This is significant. Some people may have learned the hard way, like I have, that referencing a sound effect does not include that sound effect in your audio folder within your session. This is key because coping it into your session’s audio folder allows you to move your session from drive to drive, room to room or studio to studio without the dreaded missing sound file error message in Pro Tools when the drive or network housing the sound effects cannot be located. As far as I know, only Sound Miner’s higher priced options do this crucial copy to audio folder step. In contrast, all of Soundly’s pricing options do this essential step.

Let’s not ignore the fact that Soundly works as a stand-alone program without any DAW or video editing software needed. Simply drag and drop the sound file to a folder located anywhere, say your desktop, should you happen to want to work outside of your DAW or video software for whatever reason.

Organization
With Soundly, there are a variety of ways you can organize your library, all customizable and up to the user. For me, I kept it very simple. I chose a three-folder hierarchy as follows: Soundly’s built-in cloud library, my entire personal sound effects library and my “greatest hits” for my most useful sounds. All three folders are located under the master cloud folder, which means that all my sounds and folders can be searched at once, or in any combination. You can choose one or more of your folders whenever you do a search. That means you can really hone in your search if you would like to set up multiple sub folders – or not. For me, when I do a search I will typically want to search all my sounds all at once since I cannot take the time to think of sub categories that may or may not yield better results. My organization and set up is purely my own preference and it is sure to vary from user to user. Each person can set up their folders however they feel best to organize their library.

Hard to Pick a Favorite Feature
I think my absolute favorite feature of Soundly is the pitch shift function. That’s because whenever I am finding and auditioning sounds with the pitch shift engaged (up or down), the sound file will be sent to my DAW with the exact amount of pitch shift applied to the sound effect! That means I do not have to recreate or guess the amount of pitch shifting I used when auditioning the sound after it is imported into Pro Tools. The same goes for the reverse function. There is no doubt that pitch shift and reverse are the two most common alterations for sound effects done by sound designers. Soundly has these two crucial functions built-in to the search and export functions.

Another feature worth noting is marking favorite or popular sounds with a star, like flagging an important email. Marking your favorite sounds with the star icon means you do not have to make a separate folder for your favorites as I have done in the past. Playlists are another noteworthy feature. Making playlists can be a great way of storing all your sounds as you are searching for a project that can be downloaded or sent to your DAW in a more organized fashion after your search. This is much faster than downloading each sound effect one by one as you find the sound effects needed for larger sound design projects. Making multiple playlists is another way to speed up the searching process over all. Playlists can be shared with other Soundly users.

More to Come
In the future, we can expect to see more options for the output format. Currently you can choose bit rate and sample rate, but you will only be able to export .wav files. Future releases are slated to include AIFF, MP3 and even Ogg Vorbis for the gaming world.

As Soundly grows, there will be more sound effects added to the cloud for use. Not surprisingly, the folks behind Soundly are sound designers and the program clearly reflects that. Soundly’s developer Peder Jørgensen and sound designer Christian Schaanning really understand how today’s sound designers work. More importantly, they understand how tomorrow’s sound designers will work.


Ron DiCesare is an audio mixer and sound designer located in the New York City area. His work can be heard on promos and shows, including “Noisey” featuring Kendrick Lamar, “B. Deep,” “F**k That’s Delicious” and “Moltissomo” with Chef Mario Batali on Vice’s Munchies channel. He also works on spots and promos. He can be reached at rononizer@gmail.com.

Quick Chat: Ian Stynes on mixing two Sundance films

By Kristine Pregot

A few years back, I had the pleasure of working with talented sound mixer Ian Stynes on a TV sketch comedy. It’s always nice working with someone you have collaborated with before. There is a comfort level and unspoken language that is hard to achieve any other way. This year we collaborated once again for So Yong Kim’s 2016 film Lovesong, which made its premiere at this year’s Sundance and had its grade at New York’s Nice Shoes via colorist Sal Malfitano.

Ian has been busy. In fact, another film he mixed recently had its premiere at Sundance as well — Other People, from director Chris Kelly.

Ian Stynes

Ian Stynes

Since we were both at the festival, I thought what better time to ask him how he approached mixing these two very different films.

Congrats on your two films at Sundance, Lovesong (which is our main image) and Other People. How did the screenings go?
Both screenings were great; it’s a different experience to see the movie in front of an excited audience. After working on a film for a few months it’s easy to slip into only watching it from a technical standpoint — wondering, if a certain section is loud enough, or if a particular sound effect works — but seeing it with an engaged crowd (especially as a world premiere at a place like Sundance) is like seeing it with fresh eyes again. You can’t help but get caught up.

What was the process like to work with each director for the film?
I’ve been lucky enough to work with some wonderful directors, and these movies were no exception. Chris Kelly, the director for Other People, who is a writer on a bunch of TV shows including SNL and Broad City is so down to earth and funny. The movie was based on the true story of his mother, who died from cancer. So he was emotionally attached to the film in a unique way. He was very focused about what he wanted but also knew when to sit back and let me do my thing. This was Chris’s first movie, but you wouldn’t know it.

For Lovesong, I worked with director So Yong Kim once again. She makes all her films with her husband Bradley Rust Gray. They switch off with directorial duties but are both extremely involved in each other’s movies. This is my third time working on a film with the two of them — the other two were For Ellen with Paul Dano and Jon Heder, and Exploding Girl with Zoe Kazan. So is an amazing director to work with; it feels like a real collaboration mixing with her. She is creative and extremely focused with her vision, but always inclusive and kind to everyone involved in the crew.

With both films a lot of work was done ahead of time. I try and get it to a very presentable place before the directors come in. This way we can focus on the creative tasks together. One of the fun parts of my job is that I get to sit in a room for a good while and work closely with creative and fun people on something that is very meaningful to them. It’s usually a bit of a bonding experience by the end of it.

How long did each film take you to mix?
I am also extremely lucky to work with some great people at Great City Post. I was the mixer, supervising sound editor and sound designer on both films, but I have an amazing team of people working with me.

Matt Schoenfeld did a huge amount of sound designing on both movies, as well as some of the mixing on Lovesong. Jay Culliton was the dialogue editor on Other People. Renne Bautista recorded Foley and dealt with various sound editing tasks. Shaun Brennan was the Foley artist, and additional editing was done by Daniel Heffernan and Houston Snyder. We are a small team but very efficient. We spent about eight to 10 weeks on each film.

Lovesong

How is it different to mix comedy than it is to mix a drama?
When you add sound to a film it’s important to think about how it is helping the story — how it augments or moves the story along. The first level of post sound work involves cleaning and removing anything that might take the viewer out of the world of the story (hearing mics, audio distortion, change in tone etc.).

Beyond that, different films need different things. Narrative features usually call for the sound to give energy to a film but not get in the way. Of course, there are always specific moments where the sound needs to stand out and take center stage. Most people usually aren’t aware of it or know what post sound specifically entails, but they certainly notice when it is missing or a bad sound job was done. Dramas usually have more intensity to the story and comedy’s can be a bit lighter. This often informs the sound design, edit and mix. That said, every movie is still different.

What is your favorite sound design on a film of all time?
I love Ben Burtt, who did all the Star Wars movies. He also did Wall-E, which is such a great sound design movie. The first 40 or so minutes have no direct dialogue — all the audio is sound design. You might not realize it, but it is very effective. On the DVD extra Ben Burtt did a doc about the sound for that movie. The documentary ends up being about the history of sound design itself. It’s so inspiring, even for non-sound people. Here is the link.

I urge anyone reading this to watch it. I guarantee it will get you thinking about sound for film in a way you never have before.

Kristine Pregot is a senior producer at New York City-based Nice Shoes.


Review: RTW Mastering Tools (Masterclass Plug-Ins Series)

By Diego Jimenez

Loudness metering equipment is always an important ingredient in our work environment at Hobo Audio. The projects we work on always demand different standards and specifications, whether it’s mixing for TV, film or the web. Our goal is to not only provide excellent quality audio, but also a comfortable listening experience to the consumer while meeting all the specifications our clients require.

There are many metering solutions on the market currently, and I believe it’s because you can now use them as plug-ins.

RTW Mastering Tools ($549) is a versatile new plug-in that helps you check the proportion and balance of your mixes. It’s ideal for audio post production work because of the customization and placement you can do of all the meters and analyzers offered. This is essential for our studio because we are constantly switching between mix sessions or mix rooms, so we can assign different settings and parameters depending on the kind of mix that we are doing.

Diego Jimenez in one of Hobo's Pro Tools suites.

Diego Jimenez in one of Hobo’s Pro Tools suites.

RTW also has a variety of peak program metering scales and supports leading global loudness standards, including ITU BS.1770-3/1771-1, ATSC A/85, EBU R128, ARIB, OP-59, AGICOM and the CALM Act.

I like to have numerical meters to check loudness, and RTW offers both numerical and a bar graph. It has a general preferences window, as well as a setting window for each individual meter or analyzer (up to six). RTW has in-depth settings like routing up to eight channels, true peak sensitivity, channel weighting, surround sound analyzer, audio vectorscope and many more. The plug-in also includes multiple choices for the users, such as colors and views of the bars and meters, size and placement as well as total freedom for customization in the plug-in for any of your mix needs.

Putting it to the Test
I used the RTW plug-in for a total of 22 days and in three different scenarios — web, TV and film mixing. I also ran the plug-in in two of our rooms, one housing Pro Tools HDX with 5.1 surround sound capabilities and the other, a stereo room, with Pro Tools HD Native. Both  rooms feature Apple Mac Pros — the surround room offers 32GB of RAM, and the stereo room offers 24GB of RAM.

main

The first thing that impressed me about the RTW plug-in was the ability to create and arrange your tools or instruments in the plug-in window. It’s amazing. You can save your presets, and you are good to go. But it would also be good to have a couple of options in case you need a quick start… for instance, something like the true peak meter only, and the numeric values with the short- and long term-loudness numeric values so you can quickly start checking your mix. So, to reiterate, while I do love that they allow the user to customize to their own needs, it would be nice to have one or two presets as a start point.

All the time, and in our templates, we add a meter on sessions —on an aux track with the same input as my full mix recording track to measure the overall mix level. Then I create a dead-end bus for the output. While using the RTW in 5.1 mixes it would have been helpful if  the plug-in could match my surround presets in Pro Tools. Instead I had to create these settings. Also, when mixing in surround, not all the time, I use the meter in other audio and aux tracks with multiple outputs for other reason. This generated another problem because the plug-in bypassed itself when you use multiple outputs in your track.

RTW is a plug-in that you can use not only to measure your mix levels but also to check your mix panning, stereo or surround imaging. As an example, I added RTW to my FX sub and used the surround sound analyzer to check the behavior and dynamics of the sound design mix. I also checked phasing with the Correlator, or the Vectorscope, looking for more creative ways to use the RTW tools.

Another wish would be that RTW allow  the plug-in do multiple outputs. The plug-in also bypassed itself sometimes with just one output when I was using it in a small recording session using Pro Tools HD Native.

RTW_Mastering_Tools_Box

 

The biggest issue, and it was surprising to me that happened more in Pro Tools HDX than in our Pro Tools Native systems, was that the Pro Tools meters response was affected when you use RTW. The cursor slows down a little, and when playing back in a complex session like a TV show or a film project you really can see the latency on the display when playing back. To reiterate once more, this only happened in sessions where I used several plug-ins and had several tracks opened. What caught my attention was that in my Pro Tool CPU and memory meters there’s not much activity happening to create this problem; it’s only happening when I use the plug-in and you can really tell the stress you add in Pro Tools in these large sessions.

Summing Up
Besides some minor issues, RTW’s Mastering Tools are an amazing plug-in. It’s very extensive, and I think if I had it more time to experiment the more I would like it.  As I mentioned before, it’s so loaded with tools that you can not only accurately check your mixes, but the tools can also help explore and guide your creativity.

RTW Mastering Tools are great to have in your studio toolbox. It’s fresh, versatile and user friendly. It helps with the average volume in your mix, and it’s an essential element for all the different kinds of media and specifications mixes need these days.

Diego Jimenez is a sound designer and engineer at New York City’s Hobo Audio. 

Behind the Title: Stir Audio’s Amber Tisue

NAME: Amber Tisue

COMPANY: Stir Post Audio @stirpost 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Stir Post Audio, based in Chicago, is a new joint studio venture involving the partners of APG Audio and Sonixphere Music. We work in every aspect of audio post production for TV, radio, interactive and film.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Sound Designer and Mixer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It entails everything having to do with creating sound for picture. Basically, I’ll get a video completely stripped of all sound and then create the soundscape to either sound very realistic, abstract or a blend of the two, depending on creative direction.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think most people, at least those outside of the industry, don’t really understand what I do. It’s funny because every time my dad sees a commercial I’ve done, he’ll call me up and ask: “You did the music on that commercial? That was great!” I then have to explain, “Dad, I make everything you hear in the commercial except the music.”

Also, I feel that many people underestimate the power of a soundscape. Sound is truly half of picture, but is thought of last. Imagine a film like Jurassic Park without the T.rex footsteps or the roars or the jungle ambience. The impact would be stripped from it without sound.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of what I do is the fact that I get to be creative and make people feel emotion through sound. I approach each project as a work of art, and I get to paint each canvas through sound.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part is that it is all so subjective. Everyone has his or her own idea of what something should sound like, and it’s neither right nor wrong. Finding that balance between what I want as an expert in my field versus what a client wants is the hardest part of what I do.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Hmm… Well I’m most definitely not a morning person. I think my favorite time of day is at dusk, where I can be outside catching a sunset, meeting up with friends, grabbing a happy hour drink on a patio, and just being.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Well my dream is to be able to work on my music full-time and to be able to focus on perfecting that craft. If I had ultimate freedom from monetary pressures, I would be traveling the world with the one I love and helping animals in some capacity.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I really feel that this profession chose me. I knew early on that I wanted to be able to record my own music, and subsequently earned a degree in audio engineering from San Francisco State. I interned in the Bay Area’s top music recording studios but couldn’t make ends meet financially. I heard about an opening for an audio engineer at the ad agency Goodby Silverstein and Partners in San Francisco and landed the job… with zero real-world post production experience. So in that way, I really did fall into being a sound designer.

I’ve always had a profound interest in how sounds are made, how sound in film is created to be so impactful, to evoke emotion and to glue the viewer to the screen. I learned that it was so involved, intricate and technical — you don’t just plug a microphone in and what you record is what ends up on screen. There is an entire world of processing to enhance the sound before it makes it on screen.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I recently finished a huge 5 Gum re-branding campaign (below). I designed the mnemonic and the soundscape for the campaign, which was a lot of fun.

4 nice main project shot

I also recently won a Bronze Addy for my sound design on a Re/Max spot called Dreams, where I created a dream-like, whimsical world with overstated sound effects and crazy reverberant spaces.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
My favorite project was one of the earliest spots that I worked on. It was for Adobe Photoshop and it was completely abstract. I had to create a sound for something that had no sound, that didn’t make a sound and didn’t exist in life. A creature born from a petri dish, evolving through time from a guppy-like thing, into a metallic vegetable, into a conglomerate of bird-reptilian species that escapes the petri dish and flies off into space.

I often speak about the idea of the “anti-sound,” or sound that exists in silence, if that makes sense. For example, what it sounds like in your head after a close-range bomb detonates — you lose your hearing, but there is still sound there to be heard.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I am enamored by the simple things in life, so technology to me is more of an asset to life than a necessity. I do enjoy having an iPhone and I use the map application most. I like knowing how to get from place to place, even if it’s in another country.

My other favorites are headphones — having high-quality headphones allows me to work from anywhere at any time — and lastly Pro Tools, which is the industry standard, and I wouldn’t have this career without it.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I used to be an avid Facebook user, but found myself getting lost in the Internet vortex. I’ll post occasionally and message friends, but I focus my time on other things these days. Twitter eludes me, but Instagram is probably my favorite form of social media because it allows me to post a picture and get back to my life.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I love being outdoors, being in nature, connecting with something bigger than myself. Being in or near water is the most calming to my soul; being with loved ones and family fulfills me most. And vacations, I am always planning a vacation.

‘Fury’ Part I: The Sounds of War

By Jennifer Walden

Having three job titles on a film may seem like a huge undertaking, but it’s actually quite a natural flow — taking the reins at the starting gate and steering a film’s sound from the pre-production phase through the final mix of the sound effects. That’s just what Paul N.J. Ottosson (sound designer, sound re-recording mixer and sound supervisor) has done for every film he’s worked on since 2008’s The Hurt Locker, for which he won two Oscars (Best Sound Editing, Sound Mixing), including 2012’s Zero Dark Thirty, for which he won a Best Sound Editing Oscar.

As the supervising sound editor, sound designer and re-recording mixer for the sound effects on director David Ayer’s Fury, Ottosson was able to take concepts from early conversations with Ayer and maintain those through the final mix. “It’s a good linear process. I Continue reading

Meet the Artist: Formosa’s Odin Benitez

NAME: Odin Benitez

COMPANY: West Hollywood’s Formosa Group

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We create sound tracks for motion pictures, television, games and Internet sound.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Supervising Sound Editor/Sound Designer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL? 
I work with the filmmakers to create the best possible sound tracks for their movies. This involves making sure that the dialog is smooth and can be heard with clarity. It also involves Continue reading

Oscar-winner Lon Bender joins Formosa Group

West Hollywood – Academy Award-winning supervising sound editor and sound designer Lon Bender has joined Formosa Group (www.formosagroup.com), a sound post company working with film and interactive clients.

“I am delighted to join my friends and some of the motion picture sound industry’s most respected veterans at Formosa Group,” said Bender, one of the founders of Soundelux, where he worked for more than 30 years. “It was a difficult decision to leave the company I founded and built over three decades, and the friends working there, but the community which is Formosa is a great support to my creative endeavors.”

Bender won an Oscar, BAFTA and two MPSE Golden Reel Awards for the Sound Effects Editing for Braveheart (shared with Formosa Group’s Per Hallberg). He won Golden Reel Awards for The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Pochahontas. Bender was also nominated for an Oscar for Drive and Blood Diamond, and a BAFTA for Shrek and The Last of the Mohicans.

He won a scientific and technical award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the Advanced Data Encoding System. He has received a total of 26 Golden Reel Award nominations spanning 23 films over the past three decades.

His credits include more than 125 movies. He was supervising sound editor and/or sound designer on films including August: Osage County, The Hunger Games, Drive, Shrek, Prince of Egypt, Mulan, Pochahontas, Braveheart, Legends of the Fall, Glory, Bull Durham, The Princess Bride, Stand By Me, and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.