Tag Archives: Silver Sound Studio

Recording live musicians in 360

By Luke Allen

I’ve had the opportunity to record live musicians in a couple of different in-the-field scenarios for 360 video content. In some situations — such as the ubiquitous 360 rock concert video — simply having access to the board feed is all one needs to create a pretty decent spatial mix (although the finer points of that type of mix would probably fill up a whole different article).

But what if you’re shooting in an acoustically interesting space where intimacy and immersion are the goal? What if you’re in the field in the middle of a rainstorm without access to AC power? It’s clear that in most cases, some combination of ambisonic capture and close micing is the right approach.

What I’ve found is that in all but a few elaborate set-ups, a mobile ambisonic recording rig (in my case, built around the Zaxcom Nomad and Soundfield SPS-200) — in addition to three to four omni-directional lavs for close micing — is more than sufficient to achieve excellent results. Last year, I had the pleasure of recording a four-piece country ensemble in a few different locations around Ireland.

Micing a Pub
For this particular job, I had the SPS and four lavs. For most of the day I had planted one Sanken COS-11 on the guitar, one on the mandolin, one on the lead singer and a DPA 4061 inside the upright bass (which sounded great!). Then, for the final song, the band wanted to add a fiddle to the mix — yet I was out of mics to cover everything. We had moved into the partially enclosed porch area of a pub with the musicians perched in a corner about six feet from the camera. I decided to roll the dice and trust the SPS to pick up the fiddle, which I figured would be loud enough in the small space that a lav wouldn’t be used much in the mix anyways. In post, the gamble paid off.

I was glad to have kept the quieter instruments mic’d up (especially the singer and the bass) while the fiddle lead parts sounded fantastic on the ambisonic recordings alone. This is one huge reason why it’s worth it to use higher-end Ambisonic mics, as you can trust them to provide fidelity for more than just ambient recordings.

An Orchestra
In another recent job, I was mixing for a 360 video of an orchestra. During production we moved the camera/sound rig around to different locations in a large rehearsal stage in London. Luckily, on this job we were able to also run small condensers into a board for each orchestra section, providing flexibility in the mix. Still, in post, the director wanted the spatial effect to be very perceptible and dynamic as we jump around the room during the lively performance. The SPS came in handy once again; not only does it offer good first-order spatial fidelity but a wide enough dynamic range and frequency response to be relied on heavily in the mix in situations where the close-mic recordings sounded flat. It was amazing opening up those recordings and listening to the SPS alone through a decent HRTF — it definitely exceeded my expectations.

It’s always good to be as prepared as possible when going into the field, but you don’t always have the budget or space for tons of equipment. In my experience, one high-quality and reliable ambisonic mic, along with some auxiliary lavs and maybe a long shotgun, are a good starting point for any field recording project for 360 video involving musicians.


Sound designer and composer Luke Allen is a veteran spatial audio designer and engineer, and a principal at SilVR in New York City. He can be reached at luke@silversound.us.

VR Audio: What you need to know about Ambisonics

By Claudio Santos

The explosion of virtual reality as a new entertainment medium has been largely discussed in the filmmaking community in the past year, and there is still no consensus about what the future will hold for the technology. But regardless of the predictions, it is a fact that more and more virtual reality content is being created and various producers are experimenting to find just how the technology fits into the current market.

Out of the vast possibilities of virtual reality, there is one segment that is particularly close to us filmmakers, and that is 360 videos. They are becoming more and more popular on platforms such as YouTube and Facebook and present the distinct advantage that —  beside playing in VR headsets, such as the GearVR or the DayDream — these videos can also be played in standalone mobile phones, tablets and stationary desktops. This considerably expands the potential audience when compared to the relatively small group of people who own virtual reality headsets.

But simply making the image immerse the viewer into a 360 environment is not enough. Without accompanying spatial audio the illusion is very easily broken, and it becomes very difficult to cue the audience to look in the direction in which the main action of each moment is happening. While there are technically a few ways to design and implement spatial audio into a 360 video, I will share some thoughts and tips on how to work with Ambisonics, the spatial audio format chosen as the standard for platforms such as YouTube.

VR shoot in Bryce Canyons with Google for the Hidden Worlds of the National Parks project. Credit: Hunt Beaty Picture by: Hunt Beaty

First, what is Ambisonics and why are we talking about it?
Ambisonics is a sound format that is slightly different from your usual stereo/surround paradigm because its channels are not attached to speakers. Instead, an Ambisonics recording actually represents the whole spherical soundfield around a point. In practice, it means that you can represent sound coming from all directions around a listening position and, using an appropriate decoder, you can playback the same recording in any set of speakers with any number of channels arranged around the listener horizontally or vertically. That is exactly why it is so interesting to us when we are working with spatial sound for VR.

The biggest challenge of VR audio is that you can’t predict which direction the viewer will be looking at in any given time. Using Ambisonics we can design the whole sound sphere and the VR player decodes the sound to match the direction of the video in realtime, decoding it into binaural for accurate headphone playback. The best part is that the decoding process is relatively light on processing power, which makes this a suitable option for mediums with limited resources such as smartphones.

In order to work with Ambisonics we have two options: to record the sound on location with an Ambisonics microphone, which gives us a very realistic representation of the sound in the location and is very well suited to ambiance recordings, for example; or we can encode other sound formats such as mono and stereo into Ambisonics and then manipulate the sound in the sphere from there, which gives us great flexibility in post production to use sound libraries and create interesting effects by carefully adjusting the positioning and width of a sound in the sphere.

Example: Mono “voice of God” placement. The left shows the soundfield completely filled, which gives the “in-head” illusion.

There are plenty of resources online explaining the technical nature of Ambisonics, and I definitely recommend reading them so you can better understand how to work with it and how the spatiality is achieved. But there aren’t many discussions yet about the creative decisions and techniques used in sound for 360 videos with Ambisonics, so that’s what we will be focusing on from now on.

What to do with mono “in-head” sources such as VO?
That was one of the first tricky challenges we found with Ambisonics. It is not exactly intuitive to place a sound source equally in all directions of the soundfield. The easiest solution comes more naturally once you understand how the four channels of the Ambisonics audio track interact with each other.

The first channel of the ambisonics audio, named W, is omnidirectional and contains the level information of the sound. The other three channels describe the position of the sound in the soundfield through phase relationships. Each one of the channels represents one dimension, which enables the positioning of sounds in three dimensions.

Now, if we want the sound to play at the same level and centered from every direction, what we want is for the sound source to be at the center of the soundfield “sphere,” where the listeners head is. In practice, that means that if you play the sound out of the first channel only, with no information into either of the other three channels, the sound will play “in-head.”

What to do with stereo non-diegetic music?
This is the natural question that follows the one of knowing what to do with mono sources. And the answer is a bit trickier. The mono, first channel trick doesn’t work perfectly with stereo sources because for that to work you would have to first sum the stereo to mono, which might be undesirable depending on your track.

If you want to maintain the stereo width of the source, one good option we found was to mirror the sound in two directions. Some plug-in suites, such as the Ambix VST, offer the functionality to mirror hemispheres of the soundfield. That could also be accomplish with careful positioning of a copy of the source, but this will make things easier.

Example of sound paced in the “left” of the soundfield in ambisonics.

Generally, what you want is to place the center of the stereo source in the focus of the action your audience will be looking at and mirror the top-bottom and the front-back. This will keep the music playing at the same level regardless of the direction the viewer looks at, but will keep the spatiality of the source. The downside is that the sound is not anchored to the viewer, so changes in direction of the sources will be noted as the viewer turns around, notably inverting the sides when looking at the back. I usually find this to be an interesting effect nonetheless, and it doesn’t distract the audience too much. If the directionality is too noticeable you can always mix a bit of the mono sum of the music into both channels in order to reduce the perceived width of the track.

How to creatively use reverberation in Ambisonics?
There is a lot you can do with reverberation in Ambisonics and this is only a single trick I find very useful when dealing with scenes in which you have one big obstacle in one direction (such as a wall), and no obstacles in the opposite direction.

In this situation, the sound would reflect from the barrier and return to the listener from one direction, while on the opposite side there would be no significant reflections because of the open field. You can simulate that by placing a slightly delayed reverb coming from the direction of the barrier only. You can adjust the width of the reflection sound to match the perceived size of the barrier and the delay based on the distance the barrier is from the viewer. In this case the effect usually works better with drier reverbs with defined early reflections but not a lot of late reflections.

Once you experiment with this technique you can use variations of if to simulate a variety of spaces and achieve even more realistic mixes that will fool anyone into believing the sounds you placed in post production were recorded on location.

Main Caption: VR shoot in Hawaii with Google for the Hidden Worlds of the National Parks project. Credit: Hunt Beaty.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor at Silver Sound/SilVR in New York.

Silver Sound opens audio-focused virtual reality division

By Randi Altman

New York City’s Silver Sound has been specializing in audio post and production recording since 2003, but that’s not all they are. Through the years, along with some Emmy wins, they have added services that include animation and color grading.

When they see something that interests them, they investigate and decide whether or not to dive in. Well, virtual reality interests them, and they recently dove in by opening a VR division specializing in audio for 360 video, called SilVR. Recent clients include Google, 8112 Studios/National Geographic and AT&T.

Stories-From-the-Network-Race-car-experience

Stories From The Network: 360° Race Car Experience for AT&T

I reached out to Silver Sound sound editor/re-recording mixer Claudio Santos to find out why now was the time to invest in VR.

Why did you open a VR division? Is it an audio-for-VR entity or are you guys shooting VR as well?
The truth is we are all a bunch of curious tinkerers. We just love to try different things and to be part of different projects. So as soon as 360 videos started appearing in different platforms, we found ourselves individually researching and testing how sound could be used in the medium. It really all comes down to being passionate about sound and wanting to be part of this exciting moment in which the standards and rules are yet to be discovered.

We primarily work with sound recording and post production audio for VR projects, but we can also produce VR projects that are brought to us by creators. We have been making small in-house shoots, so we are familiar with the logistics and technologies involved in a VR production and are more than happy to assist our clients with the knowledge we have gained.

What types of VR projects do you expect to be working on?
Right now we want to work on every kind of project. The industry as a whole is still learning what kind of content works best in VR and every project is a chance to try a new facet of the technology. With time we imagine producers and post production houses will naturally specialize in whichever genre fits them best, but for us at least this is something we are not hurrying to do.

What tools do you call on?
For recording we make use of a variety of ambisonic microphones that allow us to record true 360 sound on location. We set up our rig wirelessly so it can be untethered from cables, which are a big problem in a VR shoot where you can see in every direction. Besides the ambisonics we also record every character ISO with wireless lavs so that we have as much control as possible over the dialogue during post production.

Robin Shore using a phone to control the 360 video on screen, and on his head is a tracker that simulates the effect of moving around without a full headset.

For editing and mixing we do most of our work in Reaper, a DAW that has very flexible channel routing and non-standard multichannel processing. This allows us to comfortably work with ambisonics as well as mix formats and source material with different channel layouts.

To design and mix our sounds we use a variety of specialized plug-ins that give us control over the positioning, focus and movement of sources in the 360 sound field. Reverberation is also extremely important for believable spatialization, and traditional fixed channel reverbs are usually unconvincing once you are in a 360 field. Because of that we usually make use of convolution reverbs using ambisonic Impulse responses.

When it comes to monitoring the video, especially with multiple clients in the room, everyone in the room is wearing headphones. At first this seemed very weird, but it’s important since that’s the best way to reproduce what the end viewer will be experiencing. We have also devised a way for clients to use a separate controller to move the view around in the video during playback and editing. This gives a lot more freedom and makes the reviewing process much quicker and more dynamic.

How different is working in VR from traditional work? Do you wear different hats for different jobs?
That depends. While technically it is very different, with a whole different set of tools, technologies and limitations, the craft of designing good sound that aids in the storytelling and that immerses the audience in the experience is not very different from traditional media.

The goal is to affect the viewer emotionally and to transmit pieces of the story without making the craft itself apparent, but the approaches necessary to achieve this in each medium are very different because the final product is experienced differently. When watching a flat screen, you don’t need any cues to know where the next piece of essential action is going to happen because it is all contained by a frame that is completely in your field of view. That is absolutely not true in VR.

The user can be looking in any direction at any given time, so the sound often fills in the role of guiding the viewer to the next area of interest, and this reflects on how we manipulate the sounds in the mix. There is also a bigger expectation that sounds will be more realistic in a VR environment because the viewer is immersed in an experience that is trying to fool them into believing it is actually real. Because of that, many exaggerations and shorthands that are appropriate in traditional media become too apparent in VR projects.

So instead of saying we need to put on different hats when tackling traditional media or VR, I would say we just need a bigger hat that carries all we know about sound, traditional and VR, because neither exists in isolation anymore.

I am assuming that getting involved in VR projects as early as possible is hugely helpful to the audio. Can you explain?
VR shoots are still in their infancy. There’s a whole new set of rules, standards and whole lot of experimentation that we are all still figuring out as an industry. Often a particular VR filming challenge is not only new to the crew but completely new in the sense that it might not have ever been done before.

In order to figure out the best creative and technical approaches to all these different situations it is extremely helpful to have someone on the team thinking about sound, otherwise it risks being forgotten and then the project is doomed to a quick fix in post, which might not explore the full potential of the medium.

This doesn’t even take into consideration that the tools still often need to be adapted and tailored to fit the needs of a particular project, simply because new-use-cases are being discovered daily. This tailoring and exploration takes time and knowledge, so only by bringing a sound team early on into the project can they fully prepare to record and mix the sound without cutting corners.

Another important point to take into consideration is that the delivery requirements are still largely dependent on the specific platform selected for distribution. Technical standards are only now starting to be created and every project’s workflows must be adapted slightly to match these specific delivery requirements. It is much easier and more effective to plan the whole workflow with these specific requirements in mind than it is to change formats when the project is already in an advanced state.

What do clients need to know about VR that they might take for granted?
If we had to choose one thing to mention it would be that placing and localizing sounds in post takes a lot of time and care because each sound needs to be placed individually. It is easy to forget how much longer this takes than the traditional stereo or even surround panning because every single diegetic sound added needs to be panned. The difference might be negligible when dealing with a few sound effects, but depending on the action and the number of moving elements in the experience, it can add up very quickly.

Working with sound for VR is still largely an area of experimentation and discovery, and we like to collaborate with our clients to ensure that we all push the limits of the medium. We are very open about our techniques and are always happy to explain what we do to our clients because we believe that communication is the best way to ensure all elements of a project work together to deliver a memorable experience.

Our main is Red Velvet for production company Station Film.

Review: CEDAR Studio 7 audio plug-in tools

By Robin Shore

When it comes to cleaning up damaged and noisy recordings, the tools from CEDAR Audio have long been respected in the audio community. CEDAR, which is sold by Independent Audio in the US, bills itself as “dedicated solely to audio restoration and speech enhancement for film, post, TV and radio broadcast; CD and DVD mastering, libraries and archives; and for audio forensic investigation.”

A few months ago they released CEDAR Studio 7, an update to the company’s earlier software bundles, which brings CEDAR’s renowned hardware into the software realm. This allows in-the-box mixers access to CEDAR‘s top-of-the-line processing without ever leaving the DAW.

While previous versions of CEDAR Studio were available exclusively as Pro Tools plug-ins, CEDAR Studio 7 comes in both AAX and VST flavors, allowing those of us who like to mix off the beaten path to use them with any DAW software we please. We use Cockos Reaper at Silver Sound.

Robin Shore

Robin Shore

In The Bundle
The bundle consists of seven separate audio plug-ins: DNS One dialogue noise suppressor, Declick, Decrackle, Declip, Debuzz, Auto Dehiss and Adaptive Limiter. All of these components are very nice. The DNS One and “De-” plug-ins all do exactly what their names imply, often with stunning results. Adaptive Limiter is an interesting take on multi-band dynamics. Its response is based on a variable EQ curve that changes in realtime depending on incoming signal, allowing it to limit output levels in a very natural sounding way.

Also included with CEDAR Studio 7 is Retouch, CEDAR’s standalone spectral editor. For those unfamiliar with spectral editing, this is a tool that allows you to isolate and remove problematic sounds like coughs and squeaks by visually drawing over them on a spectrogram. As the name of the software implies, the process is similar to retouching a photo.

This suite of tools is a great one, but they come with a price. The CEDAR Studio 7 offerings might be the most expensive audio plug-ins I’ve come across. Each component is sold individually for $3,543 — with the exception of the DNS One dialogue noise suppressor, which is $4,647. The entire bundle will cost you $13,318.

DNS ONE traffic suppression copy

In spite of the impressive capabilities, the high cost of entry might make many think twice before purchasing, and comparisons to more wallet friendly options are inevitable. But in the case of the DNS One Dialogue Noise Suppressor plug-in, the price may certainly be justified.

DNS One
Meant for cleaning up loud background noise in location recordings, DNS One shares its processing algorithms and interface with the similarly named DNS hardware units. Seven faders are used to control the plug-in. The left-most fader adjusts the overall amount of noise reduction, while the other six are used for fine-tuning particular frequency bands.

A group of buttons across the top lets you concentrate the plug-in’s activity to a specific part of the audio spectrum. Perhaps my favorite part of DNS One is the “Learn” button, which will analyze incoming audio and automatically adjust the plug-in’s settings on the fly. I am usually distrustful of this sort of thing in other plug-ins, but the folks at CEDAR seem to have gotten it right. While dialing in settings by hand is quick and easy thanks to the well-designed interface, it is rarely even necessary, as the Learn function seems to put things right on the money nearly every time. Not only does this make finding the right settings incredibly easy, it allows the plug-in to be useful in otherwise difficult situations where the character of the background noise changes across time.

The past few years have seen some great de-noise offerings from other companies, but none of them work nearly as well as this one. Like any de-noiser DNS One will start to sound pretty wacky if taken too far, but I found that compared to similar products, it could be pushed much harder without degrading the parts of the audio I wanted to preserve.

The Rest of the Suitedebuzz
CEDAR’s other plug-ins work very well, but so do some of their more affordable counterparts. Running the same audio through equivalent processes in both bundles, I found that many of the de- editing tools in iZotope RX4 gave similar results to the CEDAR versions, but at a fraction of the price. Likewise, the Adaptive Limiter is neat, but with the glut of fine dynamics plug-ins already available I cannot imagine this one becoming a regular part of my toolkit.

The one area where I think CEDAR does out-do its competitors is in design and ease of use. Other plug-ins are often cluttered with lots of finicky parameters and visual gak. Most of the CEDAR plug-ins are controlled by just a few small knobs, and the plug-in windows are small enough that you can easily have several open at once without them getting in the way of other things on the computer screen. The knobs and sliders in the CEDAR plug-ins seem fine tuned to respond exactly how you want. While similar results can be attained with other products, they are not as always as fast or simple to use as the CEDAR versions.

autodehiss copy

Summing Up
All told, CEDAR Studio 7 is an amazing product capable of producing some truly miraculous results on damaged audio. If cleaning up noisy dialogue is a regular part of your work and you want the absolute best tool available, the DNS One plug-in is worth a serious look.

For the rest of the components, those that are turned off by CEDAR’s prices should know cheaper alternatives do exist, but those who place a high value on time and simplicity may decide that the full CEDAR Studio 7 bundle is the right choice for them.

Robin Shore is a founding member and co-owner of New York-based audio post house Silver Sound Studios.

Dolby bringing Atmos to homes… are small post houses next?

By Robin Shore

Last month Dolby announced that its groundbreaking Atmos surround sound format will soon be available outside of commercial cinemas. By sometime early next year consumer’s will be able to buy special Atmos-enabled A/V receivers and speakers for their home theater systems.

I recently had the chance to demo a prototype of an Atmos home system at an event hosted at Dolby’s New York offices.

A brief overview for those who might not be totally familiar with this technology: Atmos is Dolby’s latest surround sound format. It includes overhead speakers which allow sounds to be panned above the audience. Rather than using a traditional track-based paradigm, Atmos mixes are object-oriented. An Atmos mix contains up to 128 audio objects, each with  Continue reading