Tag Archives: SIGGRAPH 2017

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2017

Last April, postPerspective announced the debut of our Impact Awards, celebrating innovative products and technologies for the post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. We are now happy to present our second set of Impact Awards, celebrating the outstanding offerings presented at SIGGRAPH 2017.

Now that the show is over, and our panel of VFX/VR/post pro judges has had time to decompress, dig out and think about what impressed them, we are happy to announce our honorees.

And the winners of the postPerspective Impact Award from SIGGRAPH 2017 are:

  • Faceware Technologies for Faceware Live 2.5
  • Maxon for Cinema 4D R19
  • Nvidia for OptiX 5.0  

“All three of these technologies are very worthy recipients of our first postPerspective Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH,” said Randi Altman, postPerspective’s founder and editor-in-chief. “These awards celebrate companies that define the leading-edge of technology while producing tools that actually make users’ working lives easier and projects better, and our winners certainly fall into that category.

“While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production. We’ve tapped real-world users in these areas to vote for our Impact Awards, and they have determined what tools might be most impactful to their day-to-day work. That’s what makes our awards so special.”

There were many new technologies and products at SIGGRAPH this year, and while only three won an Impact Award, our judges felt there were other updates that it was important to let people know about as well.

Blackmagic Design’s Fusion 9 was certainly turning heads and Nvidia’s VRWorks 360 Video was called out as well. Chaos Group also caught our judges attention with V-Ray for Unreal Engine 4.

Stay tuned for future Impact Award winners in the coming months — voted on by users for users — from IBC.

Maxon debuts Cinema 4D Release 19 at SIGGRAPH

Maxon was at this year’s SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles showing Cinema 4D Release 19 (R19). This next-generation of Maxon’s pro 3D app offers a new viewport and a new Sound Effector, and additional features for Voronoi Fracturing have been added to the MoGraph toolset. It also boasts a new Spherical Camera, the integration of AMD’s ProRender technology and more. Designed to serve individual artists as well as large studio environments, Release 19 offers a streamlined workflow for general design, motion graphics, VFX, VR/AR and all types of visualization.

With Cinema 4D Release 19, Maxon also introduced a few re-engineered foundational technologies, which the company will continue to develop in future versions. These include core software modernization efforts, a new modeling core, integrated GPU rendering for Windows and Mac, and OpenGL capabilities in BodyPaint 3D, Maxon’s pro paint and texturing toolset.

More details on the offerings in R19:
Viewport Improvements provide artists with added support for screen-space reflections and OpenGL depth-of-field, in addition to the screen-space ambient occlusion and tessellation features (added in R18). Results are so close to final render that client previews can be output using the new native MP4 video support.

MoGraph enhancements expand on Cinema 4D’s toolset for motion graphics with faster results and added workflow capabilities in Voronoi Fracturing, such as the ability to break objects progressively, add displaced noise details for improved realism or glue multiple fracture pieces together more quickly for complex shape creation. An all-new Sound Effector in R19 allows artists to create audio-reactive animations based on multiple frequencies from a single sound file.

The new Spherical Camera allows artists to render stereoscopic 360° virtual reality videos and dome projections. Artists can specify a latitude and longitude range, and render in equirectangular, cubic string, cubic cross or 3×2 cubic format. The new spherical camera also includes stereo rendering with pole smoothing to minimize distortion.

New Polygon Reduction works as a generator, so it’s easy to reduce entire hierarchies. The reduction is pre-calculated, so adjusting the reduction strength or desired vertex count is extremely fast. The new Polygon Reduction preserves vertex maps, selection tags and UV coordinates, ensuring textures continue to map properly and providing control over areas where polygon detail is preserved.

Level of Detail (LOD) Object features a new interface element that lets customers define and manage settings to maximize viewport and render speed, create new types of animations or prepare optimized assets for game workflows. Level of Detail data exports via the FBX 3D file exchange format for use in popular game engines.

AMD’s Radeon ProRender technology is now seamlessly integrated into R19, providing artists a cross-platform GPU rendering solution. Though just the first phase of integration, it provides a useful glimpse into the power ProRender will eventually provide as more features and deeper Cinema 4D integration are added in future releases.

Modernization efforts in R19 reflect Maxon’s development legacy and offer the first glimpse into the company’s planned ‘under-the-hood’ future efforts to modernize the software, as follows:

  • Revamped Media Core gives Cinema 4D R19 users a completely rewritten software core to increase speed and memory efficiency for image, video and audio formats. Native support for MP4 video without QuickTime delivers advantages to preview renders, incorporate video as textures or motion track footage for a more robust workflow. Export for production formats, such as OpenEXR and DDS, has also been improved.
  • Robust Modeling offers a new modeling core with improved support for edges and N-gons can be seen in the Align and Reverse Normals commands. More modeling tools and generators will directly use this new core in future versions.
  • BodyPaint 3D now uses an OpenGL painting engine giving R19 artists painting color and adding surface details in film, game design and other workflows, a real-time display of reflections, alpha, bump or normal, and even displacement, for improved visual feedback and texture painting. Redevelopment efforts to improve the UV editing toolset in Cinema 4D continue with the first-fruits of this work available in R19 for faster and more efficient options to convert point and polygon selections, grow and shrink UV point selects, and more.

Dell intros new Precision workstations, Dell Canvas and more

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Dell Precision workstations, Dell announced additions to its Dell Precision fixed workstation portfolio, a special anniversary edition of its Dell Precision 5520 mobile workstation and the official availability of Dell Canvas, the new workspace device for digital creation.

Dell is showcasing its next-generation, fixed workstations at SIGGRAPH, including the Dell Precision 5820 Tower, Precision 7820 Tower, Precision 7920 Tower and Precision 7920 Rack, completely redesigned inside and out.

The three new Dell Precision towers combine a brand-new flexible chassis with the latest Intel Xeon processors, next-generation Radeon Pro graphics and highest-performing Nvidia Quadro professional graphics cards. Certified for professional software applications, the new towers are configured to complete the most complex projects, including virtual reality. Dell’s Reliable Memory Technology (RMT) Pro ensures memory challenges don’t kill your workflow, and Dell Precision Optimizer (DPO) tailors performance for your unique hardware and software combination.

The fully-customizable configuration options deliver the flexibility to tackle virtually any workload, including:

  • AI: The latest Intel Xeon processors are an excellent choice for artificial intelligence (AI), with agile performance across a variety of workloads, including machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL) inference and training. If you’re just starting AI workloads, the new Dell Precision tower workstations allow you to use software optimized to your existing Intel infrastructure.
  • VR: The Nvidia Quadro GP100 powers the development and deployment of cognitive technologies like DL and ML applications. Additional Nvidia Pascal GPU options like HBM2 memory, and NVLink technologies allow professional users to create complex designs in computer-aided engineering (CAE) and experience life-like VR environments.
  • Editing and playback: Radeon Pro SSG Graphics with HBM2 memory and 2TB of SSD onboard allows real-time 8K video editing and playback, high-performance computing of massive datasets, and rendering of large projects.

The Dell Precision 7920 Rack is ideal for secure, remote workers and delivers the same power and scalability as the highest-performing tower workstation in a 2U form factor.  The Dell Precision 5820, 7820, 7920 towers and 7920 Rack will be available for order beginning October 3.

“Looking back at 20 years of Dell Precision workstations, you get a sense of how the capabilities of our workstations, combined with certified and optimized software and the creativity of our awesome customers, have achieved incredible things,” said Rahul Tikoo, vice president and general manager for Dell Precision workstations. “As great as those achievements are, this new lineup of Dell Precision workstations enables our customers to be ready for the next big technology revolution that is challenging business models and disrupting industries.”

Dell Canvas

Dell has also announced its highly-anticipated Dell Canvas, available now. Dell Canvas is a new workspace designed to make digital creative more natural. It features a 27” QHD touch screen that sits horizontally on your desk and can be powered by your current PC ecosystem and the latest Windows 10 Creator’s Update. Additionally, a digital pen provides precise tactile accuracy and the totem offers diverse menu and shortcut interaction.

For the 20th anniversary of Dell Precision, Dell is introducing a limited-edition anniversary model of its award-winning mobile workstation, the Dell Precision 5520. The Dell Precision 5520 Anniversary Edition is Dell’s thinnest, lightest, and smallest mobile workstation, available for a limited time, in hard-anodized aluminum, with a brushed metallic finish in a brand-new Abyss color with anti-finger print coating. The device is available now with two high-end configuration options.

Blackmagic’s Fusion 9 is now VR-enabled

At SIGGRAPH, Blackmagic was showing Fusion 9, its newly upgraded visual effects, compositing, 3D and motion graphics software. Fusion 9 features new VR tools, an entirely new keyer technology, planar tracking, camera tracking, multi-user collaboration tools and more.

Fusion 9 is available now with a new price point — Blackmagic has lowered the price of its Studio version from $995 to $299 Studio Version. (Blackmagic is also offering a free version of Fusion.) The software now works on Mac, PC and Linux.

Those working in VR get a full 360º true 3D workspace, along with a new panoramic viewer and support for popular VR headsets such as Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Working in VR with Fusion is completely interactive. GPU acceleration makes it extremely fast so customers can wear a headset and interact with elements in a VR scene in realtime. Fusion 9 also supports stereoscopic VR. In addition, the new 360º spherical camera renders out complete VR scenes, all in a single pass and without the need for complex camera rigs.

The new planar tracker in Fusion 9 calculates motion planes for accurately compositing elements onto moving objects in a scene. For example, the new planar tracker can be used to replace signs or other flat objects as they move through a scene. Planar tracking data can also be used on rotoscope shapes. That means users don’t have to manually animate motion, perspective, position, scale or rotation of rotoscoped elements as the image changes.

Fusion 9 also features an entirely new camera tracker that analyzes the motion of a live-action camera in a scene and reconstructs the identical motion path in 3D space for use with cameras inside of Fusion. This lets users composite elements with precisely matched movement and perspective of the original. Fusion can also use lens metadata for proper framing, focal length and more.

The software’s new delta keyer features a complete set of matte finesse controls for creating clean keys while preserving fine image detail. There’s also a new clean plate tool that can smooth out subtle color variations on blue- and greenscreens in live action footage, making them easier to key.

For multi-user collaboration, Fusion 9 Studio includes Studio Player, a new app that features a playlist,
storyboard and timeline for playing back shots. Studio Player can track version history, display annotation notes, has support for LUTs and more. The new Studio Player is suited for customers that need to see shots in a suite or theater for review and approval. Remote synchronization lets artists  sync Studio Players in multiple locations.

In addition, Fusion 9 features a bin server so shared assets and tools don’t have to be copied onto each user’s local workstation.

Quick Chat: SIGGRAPH’S production sessions chair Emily Hsu

With SIGGRAPH 2017 happening in LA next week, we decided to reach out to Emily Hsu, this year’s production sessions chair to find out more about the sessions and the process in picking what to focus on. You can check out this year’s sessions here. By the way, Hsu’s day job is production coordinator at Portland, Oregon’s Laika Studios. So she comes at this from an attendee’s perspective.

How did you decide what panels to offer?
When deciding the production sessions line-up, my team and I consider many factors. One of the first is a presentation’s appeal to a wide range of SIGGRAPH attendees, which means that it strikes a nice harmony between the technical and the artistic. In addition, we consider the line-up as whole. While we retain strong VFX and animated feature favorites, we also want to round out the show with new additions in VR, gaming, television and more.

Ultimately, we are looking for work that stands out — will it inspire and excite attendees? Does it use technology that is groundbreaking or apply existing technologies in a groundbreaking way? Has it received worthy praise and accolades? Does it take risks? Does it tell a story in a unique way? Is it something that we’ve never seen within the production sessions program before? And, of course, does it epitomize the conference theme: “At the Heart of Computer Graphics & Interactive Techniques?”

These must be presentations that truly get to the heart of a project — not just the obvious successes, but also the obstacles, struggles and hard work that made it possible for it all to come together.

How do you make sure there is a balance between creative workflow and technology?
With the understanding that Production Sessions’ subject matter is targeted toward a broad SIGGRAPH audience, the studios and panelists are really able determine that balance.

Production Session proposals are often accompanied by varied line-ups of speakers from either different areas of the companies or different companies altogether. What’s especially incredible is when studio executives or directors are present on a panel and can speak to over-arching visions and goals and how everything interacts in the bigger picture.

These presentations often showcase the cross-pollination and collaboration that is needed across different teams. The projects are major undertakings by mid-to-large size crews that have to work together in problem solving, developing new systems and tools, and innovating new ways to get to the finish line — so the workflow, technology and art all go hand-in-hand. It’s almost impossible to talk about one without talking about the other.

Can you talk more about the new Production Gallery?
The Production Gallery has been a very special project for the Production Sessions team this year. Over the years since Production Sessions began, we’ve had special appearances by Marvel costumes, props, Laika puppets, and an eight-foot tall Noisy Boy robot from Real Steel, but they have only been available for viewing in the presentation time slots.

In creating a new space that runs Sunday through Wednesday of the conference, we’re hoping to give attendees a true up-close-and-personal experience and also honor more studio work that may often go unnoticed or unseen.

When you go behind-the-scenes of a film set or on a studio tour, there are tens of thousands of elements involved – storyboards, concept artwork, maquettes, costumes, props, and more. This space focuses on those physical elements that are lovingly created for each project, beyond the final rendered piece you see in the movie theater. In peeling back the curtain, we’re trying to bring a bit of the studios straight to the attendees.

The Production Gallery is one of the accomplishments from this year that I’m most proud of, and I hope it grows in future SIGGRAPH conferences.

If someone has never been to SIGGRAPH before, what can you tell them to convince them it’s not a show to miss?
SIGGRAPH is a conference to be experienced, not to hear about later. It opens up worlds, inspires creativity, creates connections and surrounds you in genius. I always come out of it reinvigorated and excited for what’s to come.

At SIGGRAPH, you get a glimpse into the future right now — what non-attendees may only be able to see or experience in many years or even decades. If it’s a show you don’t attend, you’re not just missing — you’re missing out.

If they have been in the past, how is this year different and why should they come?
My first SIGGRAPH was 2011 in Vancouver, and I haven’t skipped a single conference since then. Technology changes and evolves in the blink of an eye and I’ve blinked a lot since last year. There’s always something new to be learned or something exciting to see.

The SIGGRAPH 2017 Committee has put an exceptional amount of effort into the attendee experience this year. There are hands-on must-see-it-to-believe-it kinds of experiences in VR Village, the Studio, E-Tech and the all-new VR Theater, as well as improvements to the overall SIGGRAPH experience to make the conference smoother, more fun, collaborative and interactive.

I won’t reveal any surprises here, but I can say that there will be quite a few that you’ll have to see for yourself! And on top of all that, a giraffe named Tiny at SIGGRAPH? That’s got to be one for the SIGGRAPH history books, so come join us in making history.