Tag Archives: Samsung

Samsung’s 360 Round for 3D video

Samsung showed an enhanced Samsung 360 Round camera solution at NAB, with updates to its live streaming and post production software. The new solution gives professional video creators the tools they need — from capture to post — to tell immersive 360-degree and 3D stories for film and broadcast.

“At Samsung, we’ve been innovating in the VR technology space for many years, including introducing the 360 Round camera with its ruggedized design, superior low light and live streaming capabilities late last year,” says Eric McCarty of Samsung Electronics America.

The Samsung 360 Round offers realtime 3D video to PCs using the 360 Round’s bundled software so video creators can now view live video on their mobile devices using the 360 Round live preview app. In addition, the 360 Round live preview app allows creators to remotely control the camera settings, via Wi-Fi router, from afar. The updated 360 Round PC software now provides dual monitor support, which allows the editor to make adjustments and show the results on a separate monitor dedicated to the director.

Limiting luminance levels to 16-135, noise reduction and sharpness adjustments, as well as a hardware IR filter make it possible to get a clear shot in almost no light. The 360 Round also offers advanced stabilization software and the ability to color-correct on the fly, with an intuitive, easy-to-use histogram. In addition, users can set up profiles for each shot and save the camera settings, cutting down on the time required to prep each shot.

The 360 Round comes with Samsung’s advanced Stitching software, which weaves together video from each of the 360 Round’s 17 lenses. Creators can stitch, preview and broadcast in one step on a PC without the need for additional software. The 360 Round also enables fine-tuning of seamlines during a live production, such as moving them away from objects in realtime and calibrating individual stitchlines to fix misalignments. In addition, a new local warping feature allows for individual seamline calibrations in post, without requiring a global adjustment to all seamlines, giving creators quick and easy, fine-grain control of the final visuals.

The 360 Round delivers realtime 4K x 4K (3D) streaming with minimal latency. SDI capture card support enables live streaming through multiple cameras and broadcasting equipment with no additional encoding/decoding required. The newest update further streamlines the switching workflow for live productions with audio over SDI, giving producers less complex events (one producer managing audio and video switching) and a single switching source as the production transitions from camera to camera.

Additional new features:

  • Ability to record, stream and save RAW files simultaneously, making the process of creating dailies and managing live productions easier. Creators can now save the RAW files to make further improvements to live production recordings and create a higher quality post version to distribute as VOD.
  • Live streaming support for HLS over HTTP, which adds another transport streaming protocol in addition to the RTMP and RTSP protocols. HLS over HTTP eliminates the need to modify some restrictive enterprise firewall policies and is a more resilient protocol in unreliable networks.
  • Ability to upload direct (via 360 Round software) to Samsung VR creator account, as well as Facebook and YouTube, once the files are exported.

IBC 2015 Blog: Rainy days but impressive displays, solutions

By Robert Keske

While I noted in my first post that we were treated to beautiful weather in Amsterdam during the first days of IBC 2015, the weather on day four was not quite as nice… it was full of rain and thunderstorms, the latter of which was heard eerily through the RAI Exhibition Centre.

CLIPSTER

The next-gen Clipster

I spent day three exploring content delivery and automation platforms.

Rohde & Schwarz’s next-gen Clipster is finally here and is a standout — built on an entirely new hardware platform. It’s seamless, simplified, faster and looks to have a hardware and software future that will not require a forklift upgrade. 

Colorfront, also a leader in on-set dailies solutions, has hit the mark with its Transkoder product. The new HDR mathematical node is nothing less than impressive, which is nothing less than expected from Colorfront engineering.

Colorfront Transkoder

Colorfront Transkoder

UHD and HDR were also forefront at the show as the need for higher quality content continues to grow, and I spent day four examining these emerging display and delivery technologies. Both governments and corporate entities are leading the global community towards delivery of UHD to households starting in 2015, so I was especially interested in seeing how display and content providers would be raising the standards in display tech.

Sony, Samsung and Panasonic (our main image) all showcased impressive results to support UHD and HDR, and I’m looking forward to seeing what further developments and improvements the industry has to offer for both professional and consumer adoption.

Overall, while its seemed like a smaller show this year, I’ve been impressed by the quality of technology on display. IBC never fails to deliver a showcase of imagination and innovation and this year was no different.  

New York-based Robert Keske is CIO/CTO at Nice Shoes (@NiceShoesOnline).

Mirada helps FX promote ‘The Strain’ in 360-degrees

LA’s Mirada, a design, VFX and animation studio founded by filmmaker Guillermo del Toro, partnered with Headcase and ad agency Digital Kitchen to create an immersive VR experience to promote season two of FX’s The Strain, developed by Del Toro and Chuck Hogan.

The Strain VR experience follows the character Vasiliy Fet, a former Ukranian rat exterminator, as he leads viewers on a 360-degree journey through an abandoned warehouse, all while under constant threat of attack from vampires.

Mirada built a custom VR application to run the experience wirelessly across six Samsung Gear VR headsets, allowing multiple viewers to engage in the experience at the same time. The application also facilitated the playback of realtime vision-distorting effects in the VR headset, simulating blinking eyes and tunnel vision to heighten suspense.

“Even though the Gear VR comes with a solid stock 360-degree video player, the platform that we developed allowed us customize this app in a really unique way,” reports Mirada technical director Andrew Cochrane (pictured right on set). “We had total control over the experience – from sync to realtime effects and spatial audio – we even disabled the touchpad to prevent viewers from accidentally pausing the video.”

Mirada facilitated the VR pipeline for the entire project and worked closely with Headcase from the start of pre-pro. Live action was captured using a cinema-grade spherical camera rig developed by Headcase, and Cochrane was on set to provide technical and creative supervision.

Mirada stitched the multi camera footage together into 360-degree scenes for dailies that were sent back to Headcase for editorial. Once Headcase locked picture with FX Network, Mirada proceeded to final spherical stitching, articulate clean-up and compositing, custom spatial audio playback for the project and designing the final delivery application.

They also called on Nuke, Resolve, and After Effects for the piece.

The VR pipeline for The Strain was developed using a suite of tools that Mirada designed, initially customized to power the Google Shop VR experience, the studio’s first immersive cinema project that debuted in April of 2015.