Tag Archives: review and approval

Frame.io 2.0 offers 100 new features, improvements for collaboration

Frame.io, developers of the video review and collaboration platform for content creators, has unveiled Frame.io 2.0 , an upgrade offering over 100 new features and improvements. This new version features new client Review Pages, which expands content review and sharing. In addition, the new release offers deeper workflow integration with Final Cut Pro X and Avid Media Composer, plus a completely re-engineered player.

“Frame.io 2 is based on everything we’ve learned from our customers over the past two years and includes our most-requested features,” says Emery Wells, CEO of Frame.io.

Just as internal teams can collaborate using Frame.io’s comprehensive annotation and feedback tools, clients can now provide detailed feedback on projects with Review Pages, which is designed to make the sharing experience simple, with no log-in required.

Review Pages give clients the same commenting ability as collaborators, without exposing them to the full Frame.io interface. Settings are highly configurable to meet specific customer needs, including workflow controls (approvals), security (password protection, setting expiration date) and communication (including a personalized message for the client).

The Review Pages workflow simplifies the exchange of ideas, consolidating feedback in a succinct manner. For those using Adobe Premiere or After Effects, those thoughts flow directly into the timeline, where you can immediately take action and upload a new version. Client Review Pages are also now available in the Frame.io iOS app, allowing collaboration via iPhones and iPads.

Exporting and importing comments and annotations into Final Cut Pro X and Media Composer has gotten easier with the upgraded, free desktop companion app, which allows users to open downloaded comment files and bring them into the editor as markers. There is now no need to toggle between Frame.io and the NLE.

Users can also now copy and paste comments from one version to another. The information is exportable in a variety of formats, whether that’s a PDF containing a thumbnail, timecode, comment, annotation and completion status that can be shared and reviewed with the team or as a .csv or .xml file containing tons of additional data for further processing.

Also new to Frame.io 2.0 is a SMPTE-compliant source timecode display that works with both non-drop and drop-frame timecode. Users can now download proxies straight from Frame.io.

The Frame.io 2.0 player page now offers better navigation, efficiency and accountability. New “comment heads” allow artists to visually see who left a comment and where so they can quickly find and prioritize feedback on any given project. Users can also preview the next comment, saving them time when one comment affects another.

The new looping feature, targeting motion and VFX artists, lets users watch the same short clip on loop. You can even select a range within a clip to really dive in deep. Frame.io 2.0’s asset slider makes it easy to navigate between assets from the player page.

The new Frame.io 2.0 dashboard has been redesigned for speed and simplicity. Users can manage collaborators for any given project from the new collaborator panel, where adding an entire team to a project takes one click. A simple search in the project search bar makes it easy to bring up a project. The breadcrumb navigation bar tracks every move deeper into a sub-sub-subfolder, helping artists stay oriented when getting lost in their work. The new list view option with mini-scrub gives users the birds-eye view of everything happening in Frame.io 2.0.

Copying and moving assets between projects takes up no additional storage, even when users make thousands of copies of a clip or project. Frame.io 2.0 also now offers the ability to publish direct to Vimeo, with full control over publishing options, so pros can create the description and set privacy permissions, right then and there.

New cineSync offerings include iOS app, updated security features

Cospective has released the latest version of its remote review and approval solution — cineSync 4.0 introduces a new iOS app, an overhauled video playback system, deeper production tracking integrations with Shotgun and ftrack. Enhanced security features are being offered via its new cineSync Pro Studio product, including on-demand watermarking via a new integration with MediaSilo’s Safestream.

Shotgun viewer

cineSync 4.0 has been developed in conjunction with the security departments of several major studios. This has resulted in the creation of cineSync Pro Studio, in addition to cineSync and cineSync Pro. cineSync Pro Studio’s integration with MediaSilo’s SafeStream watermarking technology allows for automated, on-demand, individual watermarking of all review files. All guests in the review will receive customizable files watermarked with their name, cineSync session key, IP address and the review time/date. The process is fast and efficient, due to Safestream’s scalable architecture.

For additional review security, guests are authenticated in advance — only guests who have been approved will have review access. This allows maximum control over who has access to review material, while imposing as few technical hurdles as possible. All reviews are also tracked in the management portal, allowing admins to see when reviews occurred and who was involved.

“We worked closely with the world’s biggest production studios on cineSync Pro Studio. Security was a key concern,” explains Cospective CEO Rory McGregor. “In working in close collaboration with MediaSilo and their SafeStream technology, we’ve met these concerns and more, delivering a tool that’s not only better positioned to deliver efficient, streamlined reviews, but also to do so in with the highest possible level of security and in a completely dependable environment.”

iPhone playlist interface

Also new from Cospective is a cineSync app for iOS. It allows guests to join cineSync reviews from mobile devices. The app integrates seamlessly with Shotgun and ftrack, meaning review information and media can be pushed securely to mobile devices. Files are automatically deleted at the end of the review, but all drawings and saved frames can be saved back to Shotgun or ftrack by the session host.

Let’s dig into some cineSync 4.0, which is what the company is calling an overhaul of its video playback system. QuickTime has been retired and replaced by a new, adaptable video architecture. This means that cineSync 4.0 can support a wide array of video formats, resolutions, and frame-rates across all platforms.

cineSync 4.0 features a deeper integration with production tracking tools Shotgun, ftrack and NIM. Users can browse and load media playlists directly from these applications, and access seamless transfer and recording of review information, saved frames and other feedback. cineSync 4.0 is available now.

Cospective will continue to roll out new features for cineSync (which won an Oscar by the way), cineSync Pro and cineSync Pro Studio over the coming months. Users with a valid subscription to an existing cineSync package, will be eligible to upgrade to the latest version.

The price will increase depending on the amount of features that tool includes. All cineSync products have security measures, but Pro Studio is especially thorough as the only tool with watermarking and guest authentication.

Here are the baseline costs for each product: cineSync, 12 months for 10 users is $1,599; cineSync Pro, 12 months for 10 users is $4,999; and cineSync Pro Studio, 12 months for 10 users is $8,000

Quick Chat: Wipster’s Rollo Wenlock on Slack integration

By Randi Altman

Cloud-based review and approval tool Wipster, which lets you upload your latest edit, share it with clients and colleagues and have frame-accurate conversations directly on the video, now offers integration with Slack, allowing for realtime team messaging.

Wipster CEO/founder Rollo Wenlock says, “Now you can get your Wipster notifications directly in your team Slack channel, making it super-easy for the whole team to instantly see where a review is at.”

I reached out to Wenlock to find out more about Wipster, the Slack integration and what it means for users.

wipster-slack-comment-streamHow old is Wipster now, and can you describe how it works?
Wipster was born in 2013. Wipster is a content review and approval platform for creative teams and their stakeholders to rapidly iterate video projects by sharing work-in-progress for realtime pin-point comments right on the content. Teams speed up their production by up to 60 percent and get closer creative collaboration with their workmates, thus enhancing the work. We like to say that Wipster is the “Google Docs of video.”

How has the tool evolved over the years?
In the beginning we were very focused on creating a very specific user experience to prove people wanted to share work-in-progress and talk all over it. Wipster only worked for single users, only certain types of video could be uploaded, and at the very start, when comments were made, you had no way of knowing who made them!

Now Wipster works for multiple integrated teams, comments are realtime, with replies, added imagery and social “likes.” All commentary becomes automatic to-do lists, and you can have the whole Wipster experience right inside Adobe Creative Cloud.

What types of pros have been taking advantage of Wipster?
In the early days it was freelancers and small studios working for large agencies and brands. Now we have the large agencies and brands as customers as well. Companies like Red Bull, Delta Airlines and Intel. We have every type of creative team using Wipster every day to enhance their creative work.

There are many review and approval apps out there these days, what makes Wipster different? Is it suited to a particular workflow?
Since our launch there have been a number of other apps launch, some doing a great job, others not quite getting the user experience right. The reason why brands and studios are coming to Wipster is our relentless focus on making the review experience work seamlessly between the creative and the stakeholder.

Oftentimes, these people have never worked together before, and creating a very easy and memorable experience heightens their relationship. For our customers, Wipster is a new way of working, which takes them 100x beyond the process they had before, which usually involved a disconnected collection of social video apps and email.

Can you talk about your Slack integration? What does it offer users that they didn’t have before? How does it enhance the process?
We talk to our customers every day, multiple times a day — and they tell us about all the apps and workflows they already have, and what they would like them to do with Wipster — which is insanely helpful.

Our customers want to use Wipster as their “pre-publish” platform, and anything we can do to make their lives simpler and more enjoyable is top of our list. Thousands of our users are working in Slack every day, so it was a no-brainer that we create a Wipster activity channel for them to access right inside Slack.

When using Slack and Wipster together, you can access all your Wipster activity right inside a Slack channel in realtime. This means people in your team can see when videos have been uploaded and shared. You can see when teammates and clients have viewed work, and made comments. You can even see what frame of the video they commented on, with a green dot showing you where they had clicked. This workflow is just another way we are rapidly speeding up the process in which creatives and stakeholders can work together.

Main Photo Caption: Rollo Wenlock (far right) and the Wipster team.

Quick Chat: Emery Wells discusses Frame.io for Adobe After Effects

By Randi Altman

Frame.io is a cloud-based video collaboration tool that was designed to combine the varied ways pros review and approve projects — think Dropbox, Vimeo or email. Frame.io allows you to create projects and add collaborators and files to share in realtime.

They are now offering integration with Adobe’s After Effects that includes features like realtime comments and annotations that sync to your comp, the ability to import comments and annotations into your comp as live shape layers, and uploads of project files and bins.

To find out more, I reached out to Frame.io’s co-founder/CEO Emery Wells.

You just launched a panel for Adobe After Effects. Why was this the next product you guys targeted?
We launched our first Adobe integration with Premiere Pro this past NAB. It was a huge amount of work to rebuild all the Frame.io collaboration features for the Adobe Extension architecture, but it was worth the effort. The response from the Premiere integration was one of the best and biggest we received. After Effects is Premiere’s best friend. It’s the workhorse of the post industry. From complex motion graphics and visual effects to simple comps and title sequences, After Effects is one the key tools video pros rely on so we knew we had to extend all of the capabilities into AE.

Can you discuss the benefits users get from this panel?
Workflow is often one of the biggest frustrations any post pro faces. You really just want to focus on making cool stuff, but inevitably that requires wrangling renders, uploading files everywhere, collecting feedback and generally just doing a bunch of stuff that has nothing to do what you’re good at and what you enjoy. Frame.io for Adobe After Effects allows you to focus on the work you do well in the tool you use to do it. When you need to get feedback from someone, just upload your comp to Frame.io from within AE. Those people will immediately get a notification via email or their phone and they can start leaving feedback immediately. That feedback then flows right back into your comp where you’re doing the work.

We just cut out all the inefficient steps in between. What it really provides, more than anything else, is rapid iteration. The absolute best work only comes through that creative iteration. We never nail something on our first try. It’s the 10th try, the 50th try. Being able to try things quickly and get feedback quickly not only saves time and money, but will actually produce better work.

Will there be more Adobe collaboration offerings to come?
The way we built the panel for Premiere and After Effects actually uses the entire Frame.io web application codebase. It essentially just has a different skin on it so it feels native to Adobe apps. What that essentially means is all the updates we do to the core web application get inherited by Premiere and After Effects, so there will be many more features to come.

Not long ago Frame.io got a huge infusion of cash thanks to some heavy-hitter investors. How has this changed the way you guys work?
It’s allowing us to move faster and in parallel. We’ve now shipped four really unique products in about a year and half. The core web app, the Apple Design award-winning iOS app, the full experiences that live inside Premiere and AE, and our desktop companion app that integrated with Final Cut Pro X. All these products require considerable resources to maintain and push forward, so the capital infusion will allow us to continue building a complete ecosystem of apps that all work together to solve the most essential creative collaboration challenges.

What’s next for Frame.io?
The integrations are a really key part of our strategy, and you’ll see more of them moving forward. We want to embed Frame.io as deeply as we can in the creative apps so it just becomes a seamless part of your experience.

Check out this video for more:

Forbidden intros remote review app for editing tool Forscene

Forbidden, makers of the video editing tool Forscene, has introduced a review app and new UI for the Forscene Virtual Ingest Server running on Mac. These advances will be make it even easier for remote crews and contributors to use Forscene to collaborate on video productions.

The Forscene Review App is an easy-to-use application for reviewing and approving edits on-the-go. Editors working in Forscene’s video editing software simply drag their finished sequences to the review button and drop them there to make their edit available for review.

The app alerts reviewers and makes the sequence available for them to play, scrub through, comment on and approve or reject from their iOS device. Content for review is only available to Forscene account holders with access to the relevant project, but because the app has a custom UI design, reviewers don’t need to be familiar with the Forscene interface to view and provide feedback on the shared content. This makes it an ideal review tool for producers and other executives that don’t have hands-on editing skills.

Forscene’s Virtual Ingest Server was first introduced at NAB 2016 and provides an alternative to traditional hardware-based ingest workflows by running Forscene’s ingest software withing a virtual machine on the user’s laptop or computer.

The new UI and automated setup for Mac users will simplify and speed up the setup process – making it easier for data wranglers on location to automatically create and upload proxies to the Forscene cloud while backing up shoot rushes. The Virtual Ingest Server is currently being used by Curve Media on a new observational documentary series scheduled for broadcast in early 2017.

“Forscene’s virtual ingest server is critical to the workflow of the remote observational doc series we’re currently working on,” says Claire Simpson, series producer at Curve Media. “It allows our editorial team to review and identify key story elements within hours of the shoot, even though the crew is hundreds of miles away. The sheer volume of footage we are uploading combined with the speed in which we can watch it has made the filming period so much easier and more efficient.”

Both the Forscene Review App and the new Forscene Virtual Ingest Server UI are scheduled for release by the end of 2016.

Collaboration app from Frame.io available for iPhone

Frame.io, which seems to be releasing new features and tools almost monthly, has developed an iPhone app for video review and collaboration. The all-new iOS app gives editors, producers, artists and filmmakers the ability to share, review and collaborate on videos wherever they are.

Frame.io for iOS includes: time-based comments and video annotations so you can draw directly on video frames to accurately communicate your feedback; video transcoding in the cloud so you can upload any video format and not have to worry about playback compatibility; version control so you can see what your video looked like one version ago or 100 versions ago; Comment Replay, which loops a four-second range around any comment so you can get a sense of what it means in context; TouchScrub, allowing users to slide their finger over a thumbnail to preview; and Touch ID for added security.

“We spent eight months perfecting the Frame.io experience for iPhone”, says Frame.io CEO, Emery Wells. “The old way of working with email and 10 different file sharing and video review services just wasn’t cutting it. We first solved that problem on the web and now with Frame.io for iOS we’ve made the entire video review and collaboration experience accessible from anywhere.”

We reached out to Frame.io’s Emery Wells to find out more about the app. First we asked, why the eight-month timeframe for building the app?

“Doing an iOS app from scratch is a big undertaking. We wanted it to be 100 percent native. We didn’t choose to reuse any code, we didn’t rewrap the web application. This allowed us to take advantage of all the latest features available in iOS like Touch ID and 3D Touch,” he explains. “We completely redesigned three or four times before arriving at the final design. Simultaneously to designing, we started coding all the really essential parts of the app. The stuff we know we’ll need even if we go through another drastic design change. We kept working like this until we came up with two to three magic moments. When we impress ourselves then we know we’re ready to start thinking about shipping.

Wells believes the magic moments in this first release were these three key things:
1.  Pull down collaborator animation. This is really custom UI/UX and animation.
2. TouchScrub with Peek and Pop support. “The first time we got TouchScrub working everyone was giddy,” he says. “There is something so satisfying about scrubbing your finger over a clip to get a quick preview. Peek and Pop support was icing on the cake.”

3. Comment Replay. This was an idea Wells came up with when they were working on their Premiere launch video. “Team members were leaving notes for me like, ‘Needs to come in on the beat.’ I’d be reading these notes on our yet-unreleased iPhone app and it would be really hard to experience that little moment where the note was left. I wanted to loop that little range a few times to a get a sense of what he meant and understand the comment in context. We came up with the idea of Comment Replay, which loops four seconds around any comment. It’s insanely useful.”

We also asked Wells if plans for a non-iOS mobile device was in his future. “We started with iOS probably because most of our team is iOS-centric. We all have iPhones and Macs. It’s not a religious decision. Android is great and hopefully at some point in the future we’ll see Frame.io on Android but our expertise and familiarity was more in line with iOS.”

Also available in French and German, the Frame.io iOS app can be downloaded now from the App Store. Check out their product video…

Talking to Assimilate about new VR dailies/review tool

CEO Jeff Edson and VP of biz dev Lucas Wilson answer our questions

By Randi Altman

As you can tell from our recent Sundance coverage, postPerspective has a little crush on VR. While we know that today’s VR is young and creatives are still figuring out how it will be used — narrative storytelling, gaming, immersive concerts (looking at you Paul McCartney), job training, therapy, etc. — we cannot ignore how established film fests and trade shows are welcoming it, or the tools that are coming out for its production and post.

One of those tools comes from Assimilate, which is expanding its Scratch Web cloud-platform capabilities to offer a professional, web-based dailies/review tool for reviewing headset-based 360-degree VR content, regardless of location.

How does it work? Kind of simply: Users launch this link vr360.sweb.media on an Android phone (Samsung S6 or other) via Chrome, click the goggles in the lower right corner, put it in their Google Cardboard and view immediate headset-based VR. Once users launch the Scratch Web review link for the VR content, they can playback VR imagery, pan around imagery or create a “magic window” so they can move their smart phone around, similar to looking through a window to see the 360-degree content behind it.

The VR content, including metadata, is automatically formatted for 360-degree video headsets, such as Google Cardboard. The reviewer can then make notes and comments on their mobile device to send back to the sender. The company says they will be announcing support for other mobile devices, headsets and browsers in the near future.

On the heels of this news, we decided to reach out to Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson and VP of business development Lucas Wilson to find out more.

Assimilate has been offering tools for VR, but with this new dailies and reviews tool, you’ve taken it to a new level. Can you talk about the evolution of how you service VR and how this newest product came to be?
Jeff Edson: Professional imagery needs professional tools and workflows to succeed. Much like imagery evolutions to date (digital cinema), this is a new way to capture and tell stories and provide experiences. VR provides a whole new way for people to tell stories amongst other experiences.

So regarding the evolution of tools, Scratch has supported the 360 format for a while now. It has allowed people to playback their footage as well as do basic DI — basic functionality to help produce the best output. As the production side of VR continues to evolve, the workflow aligns itself with a more standard process. This means the same toolset for VR as exists for non-VR. Scratch Web-VR is the natural progression to provide VR productions with the ability to review dailies worldwide.

Lucas Wilson: When VR first started appearing as a real deliverable for creative professionals, Assimilate jumped in. Scratch has supported 360 video live to an Oculus Rift for more than a year now. But with the new Scratch Web toolset and the additional tools added in Scratch to make 360 work more easily and be more accessible, it is no longer just a feature added to a product. It is a workflow and process — review and approval for Cardboard via a web link, or via the free Scratch Play tool, along with color and finishing with Scratch.

It seems pretty simple to use, how are you able to do this via the cloud and through a standard browser?
Jeff: The product is very straight forward to use, as there is a very wide range of people who will have access to it, most of whom do not want the technology to get in the way of the solution. We work very hard at the core of all we have developed — interactive performance.

Lucas: Good programmers (smiles)! Seriously though, we looked at what was needed and what was missing in the VR delivery chain and tried to serve those needs. Scratch Web allows users to upload a clip and generate a link that will work in Cardboard. Review and approval is now just clicking a link and putting your phone into a headset.

What’s the price?
Jeff: The same price as Scratch Web — Free-Trial, Basic-$79/month, Extended-$249/month and Enterprise for special requirements.

Prior to this product, how were those working on VR production going about dailies and reviews?
Jeff: In most cases they were doing it by looking at output from several cameras for review. The main process for viewing was to edit and publish. There really was no tool targeted at dailies/review of VR.

Lucas: It has been really difficult. Reviews are typically done on a flat screen and by guessing, or by reverse engineering MilkVR or Oculus Videos in GearVR.

Can you talk about real-world testing of the product? VR productions that used this tool?
Lucas: We have a few large productions doing review and approval right now with Scratch Web. We can’t talk about them yet, but one of them is the first VR project directed by an A-List director. There are also two of the major sports leagues in the US who employed the tool.

Frame.io updates video collaboration tool

The minds behind Frame.io have added some new features to their cloud-based video collaboration tool, which they say has now surpassed 50,000 members from 120 countries.

These include the following for the Frame.io Web App 1.1
• New Private Team Files and Folders — You can now set files and folders to be invisible from collaborators.
• New Collaborator Permissions — You can now restrict collaborators from downloading, sharing or inviting other collaborators.
• New Project Sharing — When project sharing is turned on, anyone with the link can join. You can invite large groups of collaborators without having to invite them individually.
• New Realtime Upload Status — Now all participants of a project can see upload progress in realtime, which can eliminate lots of confusion.
• Expanded Keyboard Shortcuts — You can now use the arrow keys to navigate through thumbnails: spacebar to Quicklook, Esc to exit, Enter key to enter the player, and Esc key again to exit the player.

Updates for the Final Cut Pro Companion App 1.1. include:
• Added support for queuing
• Drag and drop upload from the desktop
• Custom export locations allow access to rendered FCP X media
• Convert FCP X markers into timestamped Frame.io comments
• Added options to choose marker types when exporting only clips with markers
• New reduced bandwidth option

See our past coverage of Frame.io here.

Emery Wells on his now-launched collaboration app Frame.io

By Randi Altman

After years of development and months of private beta, Frame.io — a cloud-based video review, collaboration and sharing platform for creative teams — is now available.

Back in July of last year, I spoke with one of the creators of Frame.io, Emery Wells (@emerywells), a working colorist and owner of New York-based post house Katabatic Digital. With Frame.io, Wells, along with his partner John Traver, set out to put all aspects of the review and approval process into a single application, calling on his experience as a working post pro.

While the product is now live, our story from last year maps out in detail what Wells and team Continue reading

Talking collaboration with Wipster founder Rollo Wenlock

By Randi Altman

Just over a month ago, Wipster, a cloud-based collaborative video review and approval platform, officially launched after a deliberately lengthy beta program. Created by a filmmaker Rollo Wenlock, this product targets anyone creating video content.

With artists working remotely more than ever these days, as well as clients based all over the world, collaboration tools are becoming more important than ever, as evidenced by just how many there are out there in the market at the moment.

The tool offers the ability to comment and reply to feedback directly on the video; unlimited access to all versions of your video; frame and comment activity notifications via email; Continue reading