Tag Archives: production

Sim Group purchases Vancouver’s The Crossing Studios

Sim Group, a family of companies offering production and post services across TV, feature film and commercials, has strengthened its place in the industry with the acquisition of Vancouver-based The Crossing Studios. This full-service studio and production facility adds approximately 400,000 square feet to Sim’s footprint.

With proximity to downtown Vancouver, the city’s international airport and all local suppliers, The Crossing Studios has been home to many television series, specials and feature films. In addition to providing full-service studio rentals, mill/paint/lockup space and production office space, The Crossing Studios also offer post production services, including Avid suite rentals, dailies, color correction and high-speed connectivity.

The Crossing Studios was founded by Dian Cross-Massey in 2015 and is the second-largest studio facility in the lower mainland, comprised of nine buildings in Vancouver, all are located just 30 minutes from downtown. Cross-Massey has over 25 years of experience in the industry, having worked as a writer, executive producer, visual effects supervisor, director, producer and a production manager. Thanks to this experience, Cross-Massey prides herself on knowing first-hand how to anticipate client needs and contributes to the success of her clients’ projects.

“When I was a producer, I worked with Sim regularly and always felt they had the same approach to fair, honest work as I did, so when the opportunity presented itself to combine resources and support our shared clients with more offerings, the decision to join together felt right,” says Cross-Massey.

The Crossing Studios clients include Viacom, Fox, Nickelodeon, Lifetime, Sony Pictures, NBCUniversal and ABC.

“The decision to add The Crossing Studios to the Sim family was a natural one,” says James Haggarty, CEO, Sim Group. “Through our end-to-end services, we pride ourselves on delivering streamlined solutions that simplify the customer experience. Dian and her team are extremely well respected within the entertainment industry, and together, we’ll not only be able to support the incredible growth in the Vancouver market, but clients will have the option to package everything they need from pre-production through post for better service and efficiencies.”

Chatting up IBC’s Michael Crimp about this year’s show

Every year, many from our industry head to Amsterdam for the International Broadcasting Convention. With IBC’s start date coming fast, what better time for the organization’s CEO, Michael Crimp, to answer questions about the show, which runs from September 15-19.

IBC is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. How will you celebrate?
In addition to producing a commemorative book, and our annual party, IBC is starting a new charitable venture, supporting an Amsterdam group that provides support through sport for disadvantaged and disabled children. If you want to play against former Ajax players in our Saturday night match, bid now to join the IBC All-Stars.

It’s also about keeping the conversation going. We are 50 years on and have a huge amount to talk about — from Ultra HD to 5G connectivity, from IP to cyber security.

How has IBC evolved over the past 10 years?
The simple answer is that IBC has evolved along with the industry, or rather IBC has strived to identify the key trends which will transform the industry and ensure that we are ahead of the curve.

Looking back 10 years, digital cinema was still a work in progress: the total transition we have now seen was just beginning. We had dedicated areas focused on mobile video and digital signage, things that we take for granted today. You can see the equivalents in IBC2017, like the IP Showcase and all the work done on interoperability.

Five years ago we started our Leaders’ Summit, the behind-closed-doors conference for CEOs from the top broadcasters and media organizations, and it has proved hugely successful. This year we are adding two more similar, invitation-only events, this time aimed at CTOs. We have a day focusing on cyber security and another looking at the potential for 5G.

We are also trying a new business matchmaking venue this year, the IBC Startup Forum. Working with Media Honeypot, we are aiming to bring startups and scale-ups together with the media companies that might want to use their talents and the investors who might back the deals.

Will IBC and annual trade shows still be relevant in another 50 years?
Yes, I firmly believe they will. Of course, you will be able to research basic information online — and you can do that now. We have added to the online resources available with our IBC365 year-round online presence. But it is much harder to exchange opinions and experiences that way. Human nature dictates that we learn best from direct contact, from friendly discussions, from chance conversations. You cannot do that online. It is why we regard the opportunity to meet old friends and new peers as one of the key parts of the IBC experience.

What are some of the most important decisions you face in your job on a daily basis?
IBC is an interesting business to head. In some ways, of course, my job as CEO is the same as the head of any other company: making sure the staff are all pulling in the same direction, the customers are happy and the finances are secure. But IBC is unlike any other business because our focus is on spreading and sharing knowledge, and because our shareholders are our customers. IBC is organized by the industry for the industry, and at the top of our organization is the Partnership Board, which contains representatives of the six leading professional and trade bodies in the industry: IABM, IEE, IET, RTS, SCTE and SMPTE.

Can you talk a bit about the conference?
One significant development from that first IBC 50 years ago is the nature of the conference. The founders were insistent that an exhibition needed a technical conference, and in 1967 it was based solely on papers outlining the latest research.

Today, the technical papers program still forms the center piece of the conference. But today our conference is much broader, speaking to the creative and commercial people in our community as well as the engineering and operational.

This year’s conference is subtitled “Truth, Trust and Transformation,” and has five tracks running over five days. Session topics range from the deeply technical, like new codec design, to fake news and alternative facts. Speakers range from Alberto Duenas, the principal video architect at chipmaker ARM to Dan Danker, the product director at Facebook.

How are the attendees and companies participating in IBC changing?
The industry is so much broader than it once was. Consumers used to watch television, because that was all that the technology could achieve. Today, they expect to choose what they want to watch, when and where they want to watch it, and on the device and platform which happen to be convenient at the time.

As the industry expands, so does the IBC community. This year, for example, we have the biggest temporary structure we have ever built for an IBC, to house Hall 14, dedicated to content everywhere.

Given that international travel can be painful, what should those outside the EU consider?
Amsterdam is, in truth, a very easy place for visitors in any part of the world to reach. Its airport is a global hub. The EU maintains an open attitude and a practical approach to visas when required, so there should be no barriers to anyone wanting to visit IBC.

The IBC Innovation Awards are always a draw. Can you comment on the calibre of entries this year?
When we decided to add the IBC Innovation Awards to our program, our aim was to reflect the real nature of the industry. We wanted to reward the real-world projects, where users and technology partners got together to tackle a real challenge and come up with a solution that was much more than the sum of its parts.

Our finalists range from a small French-language service based in Canada to Google Earth; from a new approach to transmitters in the USA to an online service in India; and from Asia’s biggest broadcaster to the Spanish national railway company.

The Awards Ceremony on Sunday night is always one of my highlights. This year there is a special guest presenter: the academic and broadcaster Dr. Helen Czerski. The show lasts about an hour and is free to all IBC visitors.

What are the latest developments in adding capacity at IBC?
There is always talk of the need to move to another venue, and of course as a responsible business we keep this continually under review. But where would we move to? There is nowhere that offers the same combination of exhibition space, conference facilities and catering and networking under one roof. There is nowhere that can provide the range of hotels at all prices that Amsterdam offers, nor its friendly and welcoming atmosphere.

Talking of hotels, visitors this year may notice a large building site between hall 12 and the station. This will be a large on-site hotel, scheduled to be open in time for IBC in 2019.

And regulars who have resigned themselves to walking around the hoardings covering up the now not-so-new underground station will be pleased to hear that the North-South metro line is due to open in July 2018. Test trains are already running, and visitors to IBC next year will be able to speed from the centre of the city in under 10 minutes.

As you mentioned earlier, the theme for IBC2017 is “Truth, Trust and Transformation.” What is the rationale behind this?
Everyone has noticed that the terms “fake news” and “alternative facts” are ubiquitous these days. Broadcasters have traditionally been the trusted brand for news: is the era of social media and universal Internet access changing that?

It is a critical topic to debate at IBC, because the industry’s response to it is central to its future, commercially, as well as technically. Providing true, accurate and honest access to news (and related genres like sport) is expensive and demanding. How do we address this key issue? Also, one of the challenges of the transition to IP connectivity is the risk that the media industry will become a major target for malware and hackers. As the transport platform becomes more open, the more we need to focus on cyber security and the intrinsic design of safe, secure systems.

OTT and social media delivery is sometimes seen as “disruptive,” but I think that “transformative” is the better word. It brings new challenges for creativity and business, and it is right that IBC looks at them.

Will VR and AR be addressed at this year’s conference?
Yes, in the Future Zone, and no doubt on the show floor. Technologies in this area are tumbling out, but the business and creative case seems to be lagging behind. We know what VR can do, but how can we tell stories with it? How can we monetize it? IBC can bring all the sides of the industry together to dig into all the issues. And not just in debate, but by seeing and experiencing the state of the art.

Cyber security and security breaches are becoming more frequent. How will IBC address these challenges?
Cyber security is such a critical issue that we have devoted a day to it in our new C-Tech Forum. Beyond that, we have an important session on cyber security on Friday in the main conference with experts from around the world and around the industry debating what can and should be done to protect content and operations.

Incidentally, we are also looking at artificial intelligence and machine learning, with conference sessions in both the technology and business transformation strands.

What is the Platform Futures — Sport conference aiming to address?
Platform Futures is one of the strands running through the conference. It looks at how the latest delivery and engagement technologies are opening new opportunities for the presentation of content.

Sport has always been a major driver – perhaps the major driver – of innovation in television and media. For many years now we have had a sport day as part of the conference. This year, we are dedicating the Platform Futures strand to sport on Sunday.

The stream looks at how new technology is pushing boundaries for live sports coverage; the increasing importance of fan engagement; and the phenomenon of “alternative sports formats” like Twenty20 cricket and Rugby 7s, which provide lucrative alternatives to traditional competitions. It will also examine the unprecedented growth of eSports, and the exponential opportunities for broadcasters in a market that is now pushing towards the half-billion-dollar size.

 

Ross Cooper joins Golden’s roster of directors

LA’s Golden, which is made up of live-action directors and a collective of designers and visual effects artists, has added director Ross Cooper to its roster. Formerly known as OneInThree, Cooper’s resume is chock full of commercial and music video work.

Cooper studied graphic design at Central Saint Martins in London, but his interest in original visual ideas evolved while pursuing a Master’s degree from London’s Royal College of Art. After winning two Silver D&ADs in interaction design and architecture for the live video installation The Last Clock, Cooper began shooting videos for bands like Two Door Cinema Club, Wild Beasts and The Teenagers. He went on to receive a number of nominations as an up-and-coming filmmaker at the Music Video Awards, including Best New Director, Best Art Direction and Best Budget Video.

Cooper stepped into the commercial world with a recreation of his VV Brown video for the song “Leave!” made for French bank BNP Paribas. The spot featured a rotating cardboard box that revealed a different stylized diorama with every spin. Since that time, Cooper has continued to hone his in-camera perspective to visual effects and trompe l’oeil, crafting ads for brands including Ford, O2, Trident and Betway.

Hush adds Eloise Murphy as senior producer

Design agency Hush has expanded its creative production team with the addition of senior producer Eloise Murphy. In her new position at Hush, Murphy will oversee all project phases and develop relationships with new and existing vendors.

During her career, Murphy has worked in the UK and North America for companies such as the BBC, TED and Moment Factory. Her resume is diverse, working on projects that range from content production for Madonna’s Rebel Heart Tour to experiential production for TED Talks in Rio de Janeiro. Her experience spans digital design, content production and experiential activations for brands including Samsung, Intel and BBC Radio 1.

“Having worked with a variety of brands, artists and companies, I have a solid understanding of how to manage projects optimally within different settings, parameters and environments,” says Murphy. “It has enabled me to be highly adaptable, flexible and develop a strong knack for pre-empting, identifying and resolving issues promptly and successfully. I believe my international experience has made me well-versed in managing complex projects and I’m looking forward to bringing new ideas to the table at Hush.”

Behind the Title: Arnold Worldwide’s Jon Drawbaugh

NAME: Jon Drawbaugh

COMPANY: Arnold Worldwide

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Arnold is a global creative agency that sits within Havas Creative Group and has offices in Boston (HQ), London, Madrid, Milan, New York, Prague, São Paulo, Shanghai, Sydney and Toronto.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
EVP, Director of Integrated Production

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I like to think of the job as sort of production curator. I am the steward of all the wonderful things that we make as an agency — from sites to apps to video content to still imagery to live brand experiences. I produce by supporting creative solutions and executions. We’re in a period of disruption in the agency world, and I find the opportunities exciting. There’s always something new to learn and a “never been done before” to figure out.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m lucky that’s it’s a very roll up your sleeves and dig into the work kind of role. Unlike other leadership roles that are administrative or directorial in nature, I’m very hands-on while still being strategic and holistic. I’ll go from managing staffing allocations into content strategy meetings and then be in an edit bay reviewing creative decks and making ballpark estimates. I also spend a fair amount “producing” for the agency.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Collaborating with my team, creative teams, clients and partners.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Number crunching.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Late afternoon. If all my meetings are done for the day, it’s a great time to grab a coffee and reflect on the solutions of the day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I wish I could be an amazing chef with popular, hip restaurants. In reality, I’d likely be working for a production company producing or directing content.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
To be honest, I stumbled into advertising. I didn’t know anything about it until I moved to New York City. I landed a temp job at Messner Vetere Berger McNamee Schmetter as a receptionist. Advertising seemed so glamorous, what with the producers jetting off to foreign countries and working with famous feature directors. It sounded much more fun than what I had been doing, which was making copies in the basement of a law firm.

From there I worked in the creative department and dabbled in copy writing. I wanted to get to making TV spots quickly, so I figured taking the producer track would get me there faster. Plus, I was producing theater projects on the side and discovered I could actually get paid for producing if I worked at an ad agency.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m new to Arnold, so I don’t have my fingerprints on any projects just yet, but I’m a big fan of the recent work like Jack Daniel’s Global Barrel Hunt and their Our Town film (pictured). I also love the Hershey’s My Dad spot and Reese’s #AllTreesAreBeautiful social campaign.

Prior to Arnold, I’m really proud of the Qualcomm Invisible Museum app and Fabric Content projects I worked on out of DDB SF.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s a tough one. I’m so proud of a lot of the work I’ve made over the years. For example, the massive Acura TLX integrated launch we did at Mullen LA, the documentary film I made with Lucy Walker Make Haste Slowly: The Kikkoman Creed, or the viral hit Nanerpus before there were viral hits.

But I’d say the animated short Smutley for AIDES (the French association tackling HIV and AIDS) I produced at Goodby, Silverstein and Partners is one of my proudest. A chance to use our ad skills for good, and how many times in a career can you say you made a cartoon about a cat having sex with all different kinds of animals to Joan Jett’s “Bad Reputation.”

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My iPhone, my vintage HiFi, and my camera. Running water and heat are pretty cool, too.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, SnapChat, Vine, Houseparty, Tumblr, Periscope, LinkedIn, Pinterest and others.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I love music. All kinds. But generally I don’t have a lot of time at the office to plug in my headphones. When I do, I generally use Spotify or Apple Music to listen to the Indie genre.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to listen to LPs on my vintage HiFi with my family. It’s our important family together time. We like to go hunting for vinyl together on weekends. Record Store Day is like a second Christmas for us.

Behind the Title: Volt Studios EP Amanda Tibbits

NAME: Amanda Tibbits

COMPANY: Minneapolis-based Volt Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a one-stop production shop for high-end creative content. We provide production, post production and design.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner/Executive Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Basically, I control the time, money and communication for all projects that come through our doors. I am in charge of figuring out how to bring a piece to life within a client’s timeframe and budget.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I like to refer to myself as a mother hen or air traffic controller, depending on the day. I keep all the artists sane and all the projects moving in and out of the facility.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Getting to work with amazing talent in our studio and collaborating with some of the best creative brains on the client/agency side. And free beer.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Being attached to my desk all day (i.e. air traffic control).

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
This is going to sound crazy, but Monday mornings. We all kind of gather, catch up and talk about what is happening that week.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Tap dancer or tambourine player. Those are jobs, right?

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
This job chose me. I answered a classified ad in the paper, which totally makes me sound like a dinosaur. It was a job as a receptionist at a post house. I had no idea what that meant but as soon as I walked in I knew it was where I belonged. That was 20 years ago.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Arby’s TV campaigns are always fun. Every time I get a rough cut and hear the scripts I crack up. The Subaru brand spots we recently finished made me pretty emotional. We just worked on Life cereal’s first TV spot in a decade. I remember “Mikey Likes It.” So, it was cool to see where the brand has evolved to.

jon-stewartWHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It was pretty fun to be involved in the Arby’s commercial that was a farewell to Jon Stewart. The combination of Ving Rhames singing the Golden Girls theme song and Jon Stewart’s one-liners… we couldn’t go wrong.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, Bluetooth in my car and a record player.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m big into Instagram. All my friends want me to Snapchat but I can’t handle one more social media outlet.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I do… Otis Redding, Johnny Cash or The Beastie Boys, depending on my mood.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
See the comment about free beer. No really, I try to get out and enjoy the Minnesota lakes. I also take every minute of my allotted vacation time. No rolling over days over for
this girl.

Flanders Scientific offering two transport cases for OLEDs

Have OLED monitor, will travel? If that’s the case, Flanders Scientific, which offers broadcast monitors and other solutions for production to post, has two options for you.

The first is a new compact custom hardshell transport case for all FSI 24.5-inch OLED monitors. It features a lift-out monitor caddy, with a compartment for a hood, cablesHARD SHELL INSIDE and other accessories. The fully waterproof latching Hardshell Transport Case ($695) is 29 pounds and 32 by 21 by 13-inches big. Inside, custom foam, designed specifically for 24.5-inch FSI OLED monitors — including the AM250, CM250 and DM250 — allows users to put a monitor into the case with FSI’s MM100 VESA to LightStand mount still attached. It’s not designed for use with a desktop stand attached.

The second option is FSI’s TC27 Rolling Trolley Case ($495), which is a lighter and more compact carrying case that has the additional benefit of being able to accommodate a monitor with desktop stand, yoke mount or VESA to LightStand Mount still attached. The TC27 zippered case is made of thermoformed plastic wrapped in cordura and ballistic nylon, which can also be checked as baggage when flying.

The TC27 trolley can easily accommodate most flat panel monitors ranging in size from 23 to 27 inches, including any generation of Apple’s 27-inch iMac computers. It can also be used on many monitors with a yoke mount or VESA to LightStand mount attached. Weighing in at 23.2 pounds, it includes a built-in retractable handle, interior foam padding and oversized wide-base wheels.

Both products can be found at www.shopfsi.com.

@LArge opens NYC location within Napoleon Group

Santa Monica’s @LArge Productions + Post has opened an office in New York City located within The Napoleon Group, one of @LArge’s strategic partners in post. The location offers a permanent East Coast presence and expanded services through Napoleon, including storyboards and previsualization.

@LArge works in two ways. They have the more traditional model of agency/production and post board-flow where they put together a team best suited for a project. They also have an in-house “at agency” model whereby they serve as the production arm for some agencies and are involved from start to finish. The Napoleon Group offers a wide range of post services and talent including animators, editors, designers, illustrators, and character artists.

Why a New York office? @LArge Productions + Post managing director Tracy Mays says, “Our services are offered globally, but we always knew that we wanted to have two US offices — LA and New York. The organic relationship with The Napoleon Group provided the right time/right place opportunity for us to realize this vision.”

“Having just entered into a collaboration with @LArge to launch our live-action division, Napoleon@LArge, we’re thrilled to be able to partner with their team to provide a base of operations for them here in New York,” says Napoleon COO Spiro Kafarakis.

Why fast file transfers are critical to video production, post


By Katie Staveley

Accelerated file transfer software is not new. It’s been around for many years and has been used by the world’s largest media brands. For those teams of content producers, it has been a critical piece of their workflow architecture, but it wasn’t until recently that this kind of software has become more accessible to every size company, not just the largest. And just in time.

It goes without saying that the process of producing and delivering content is ever-evolving. New problems and, as a result, new solutions arise all the time. However, a few challenges in particular seem to define the modern media landscape, including support for a globally distributed team, continuous demand for high-resolution content and managing the cost of production.

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These challenges can be thought of from many different angles, and likewise resolved in different ways. One aspect that is often overlooked is how organizations are moving their precious video content around as part of the pre-production, post and distribution phases of the workflow. The impact of distributed teams, higher resolution content and increasing costs are driving organizations of all sizes to rethink how they are moving content. Solutions that were once “good enough” to get the job done — like FTP or shipping physical media — are rapidly being replaced with purpose-built file transfer tools.

Here are some of the reasons why:

1. Distributed teams require a new approach
Bringing final content to market very rarely happens under one roof or in one location anymore. More and more teams of media professionals are working around the globe. Obviously, production teams work remotely when they are filming on location. And now, with the help of technology, media organizations can build distributed teams and get access to the talent they need regardless of where they’re located, giving them a competitive advantage. In order to make this work well, organizations need to consider implementing a fast file transfer solution that is not only accessible globally, but moves large files fast, especially when bandwidth speeds are less than optimal.

2. File sizes are growing
The demand for higher resolution content is driving innovation of production technology like cameras, audio equipment and software. While HD and even Ultra HD (UHD) content is becoming more mainstream, media professionals have to think about how their entire toolset is helping them meet those demands. High-resolution content means exponentially larger files sizes. Moving large files around within the prepro and post workflows, or distributing final content to clients, can be especially difficult when you don’t have the right tools in place. If your team is delivering HD or UHD content today, or plans to in the future, implementing a fast file transfer solution that will help you send content of any size without disrupting your business is no longer a nice-to-have. It’s business critical.

3. You can’t afford delays
When it comes to getting your files where they need to be, hope is not a strategy. The reality is that production will often finish up later than you hoped. Deadlines are hard and you still need to get your content out the door. Any number of factors can cause you to miss deadlines, but transferring content files shouldn’t be your biggest delay. You can’t afford slow transfer times, or even worse, interruptions that force you start the transfer all over again. Implementing a solution that gives you reliable, fast file transfer and predictability around when your files will arrive is a strategy. Not only will it enable your employees and partners to focus on producing the content, it will help you to create a positive experience for your customers whether they are reviewing pre-release content, or receiving the final cut.

4. Customer experience matters
Any time your customers are interacting with your brand they are forming an opinion of you. In today’s highly-competitive world, it’s imperative that you delight your customers with the content you’re producing and their experience working with you. Your file transfer solution is part of building that positive experience. The solution needs to be reliable and fast and not leave your customers disappointed because the file didn’t arrive when they expected; or make them feel frustrated because it was too painful to use. They should be able to focus on your content, not on how you’re delivering it to them — your solution should just work. It’s a necessary part of today’s media business to have a cost-efficient, low-maintenance way to send and share content that ensures a delightful customer experience.

5. Your business is growing
Moving digital video content has been part of the media business for over a decade, and there have been solutions that have worked well enough for many organizations. But when considering the rapid growth in file sizes, increased distribution of teams and the importance of customer experience, you’ll find that those solutions are not built to scale as your business grows. Planning for the future means finding a solution that has flexibility of deployment, is easy to manage and maintain, and the cost of expansion is proportional to your size. Growth is hard, but managing your file transfer tools doesn’t have to be.

Managing cost and keeping profit margins healthy is as imperative as always. Fortunately the days where every technology purchase requires significant capital investment are waning. The good news is that the availability of cloud-hosted solutions and other advancements have given rise to powerful solutions that are accessible to every size company. As a result, media professionals have affordable access to the technology they need to stay competitive without breaking the bank, which includes fast file transfer software. Investing today in the right solution will make a big impact on your business now and into the future.

Katie Staveley is VP of marketing at Signiant.

Director Lesley Chilcott joins Splendid & Co. roster

LA-based production house Splendid & Co. has added director Lesley Chilcott to its roster. An award-winning filmmaker, documentarian and producer, Chilcott began her career in the commercial world before diving into the documentary arena as a producer of films such as the Academy Award-winning An Inconvenient Truth; the Barack Obama biographic film A Mother’s Promise shown at the 2008 Democratic National Convention; It Might Get Loud, about legendary guitarists The Edge, Jimmy Page and Jack White; and Waiting for Superman, for which she received an award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Documentary from the PGA.

Her current documentary, CodeGirl, was released last month. The film tracks the story of 5,000 girls from 60 nations as they competed in an entrepreneurship and coding competition organized by Technovation. Prior to its release in theaters, Chilcott uploaded the film for free on YouTube in conjunction with Google’s Made with Code initiative. In addition to being shown at 64 Google offices worldwide, teen girls from around the globe hosted viewing parties.

Chilcott’s commercial focus establishes her aptitude for the lifestyle realm, directing spots for brands such as Motorola, AT&T, Corona, M&Ms and Cover Girl. Having wrapped CodeGirl, her move to Splendid marks a focused interest in commercials.

“With so many great production companies in the mix, Splendid stood out to me as a highly inventive company that not only supports their talent but is ingenious in the way that they source truly interesting and different work,” says Chilcott. “This is very appealing to me.”

“Lesley brings such unique skill to our roster with her experience as a documentary filmmaker and commercial director,” says Erin Tauscher, Splendid partner and executive producer. “Her ability to elicit incredible performances from real people as well as trained actors really stood out to me when I watched her body of work for the first time.”