Tag Archives: post production

Quick Chat: Freefolk US executive producer Celia Williams

By Randi Altman

A few months back, UK-based post house Finish purchased VFX studio Realise and renamed the company Freefolk. They also expanded into the US with a New York City-based studio. Industry vet Celia Williams, who was most recently head of production at agency Arnold NY, is heading up Freefolk US. To find out more about the recently rebranded entity, we reached out to Williams.

Can you describe Freefolk? What kind of services do you offer?
Freefolk is a team of creative artists, technicians and problem solvers who use post production as their tool box. We offer services including high-end FilmLight Baselight color grading, remote grading, 2D and 3D visual effects, final conform, shoot supervision, animation, data management and direction of special projects. We work across the mediums of advertising, film, TV and digital content.

L-R: Celia Williams, Paul Harrison and Jason Watts.

What spurred on Freefolk’s expansion to the US?
Having carved out a reputation in London over the last 13 years as a commercials post house, the expansion to the US seemed like a natural progression for the founders, allowing them to export a boutique service and high-quality work rather than becoming another large machine in London.

Will you be offering the same services in both locations?
The services we offer in London will all be represented in New York. Color grading plays such an important role in the process these days, so we are spearheading with a Baselight suite driven by Paul Harrison and 2D VFX department being set up by Jason Watts.

Will you share staff between New York and the UK?
Yes, there will be a sharing of resources and, obviously, experience across the offices. A great thing about opening in New York is being able to offer our staff the experience of working in a foreign city. It also gives clients who are increasingly working across multiple markets a seamless global service.

Why the rebrand from Finish to Freefolk?
The rebrand from Finish to Freefolk came about as part of the expansion into the US and the acquisition of Realise. It was also a timely opportunity to express one of the core values of the company, and the way it values its staff and clients — Freefolk is about the people involved in the process.

What does the acquisition of Realise mean to the company?
Realise has brought a wealth of experience and talent to the table. They combine creative skill and technical understanding in equal measure. They are known in both commercials and now film and TV for offering very specialized capabilities with Side Effects Houdini and customized software.

We have just completed VFX work on 400 shots over 10 episodes of NBC’s Emerald City TV series (due to be released early 2017) and have just embarked on our next long-form project. It’s really exciting to be expanding into other mediums such as TV, film, installation work, projection mapping and other experimental and experiential arenas.

You have an ad agency background. From your own experience how important is that to clients?
It’s extremely important and comforting, actually. Understanding what the producers and creatives are challenged with on a daily basis gives me the ability to offer workable solutions to their problems in a very collaborative way. They don’t have to wonder if I “get” where they’re coming from. Frankly, I do.

I think that it’s emotionally helpful as well. To know someone can be an understanding shoulder to lean on and is taking their concerns seriously is beyond important. Everyone is working at breakneck speed in our industry, which can lead to a lack of humanity in our interactions. One of the main reasons I was attracted to working with Freefolk is that they are deeply dedicated to keeping that humanity and personal touch in the way they do business.

The way that post companies service agencies has changed due to the way that products are now being marketed — online ads, social media, VR. Can you talk about that?
To be well informed and prepped as early on in the process as you can be is key. And to truly partner with the producers and creatives, as much as they need or want, is critical. What might work in one medium may be less impactful in another, so from the get-go, how do we plan to ensure all deliverables are strong, and to offer insights into new technology that might impact the outcome? It’s all about sharing and collaboration.

I may be one of the few people who’ve never really panicked about the different ways we deliver final work — our industry has always been about change, which is what keeps it interesting. At the end of the day, it’s always been about delivering content, in one form or another. So you need to know your final deliverables list and plan accordingly.

Steve Holyhead

AJA brings on Steve Holyhead from Fox Broadcasting

Steve Holyhead has joined AJA as senior product manager for desktop products. He joins AJA from Fox Broadcasting Company where he was director of technical operations.

Holyhead recently moved to Grass Valley, where AJA is headquartered, from Los Angeles. In addition to working at Fox, his 20-plus years of industry experience includes developing professional digital video workflows with BloomCast, managing post operations at Discovery Communications and working as a technology evangelist, producer and technical marketing manager for both Discreet (now Autodesk) and Avid. He has also developed Avid and Adobe training courses for multiple partners, including Lynda.com.

“Steve brings a blend of real-world production and technology developer experience to AJA. His understanding of production, broadcast and post, together with his experience both designing enterprise scale workflows and as a master trainer for Adobe, Apple and Avid products, will make powerful contributions to the success of our customers,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

Veteran Kitty Snyder joins Atlanta’s Artifact as EP

Atlanta-based creative studio Artifact Design has hired post production veteran Kitty Snyder as executive producer. In this new role, Snyder will use her expertise in developing brand and marketing strategies, developing client relationships and bidding and producing projects. Her strong ties within the agency and film community will complement the full range of production, design, VFX, animation and post capabilities of the Artifact.

Most recently, Snyder was the director of creative partnerships for the Atlanta branches of Beast, Company 3 and Method Studios, all part of Deluxe Creative Services. Her previous positions include producer at ad agency Huge, where she worked on campaigns for such clients as Airheads, Lowe’s, Mohawk and Coca-Cola. She also spent nearly decade as senior business manager, creative services, at Crawford Media Services.

A former singer-songwriter, Snyder has toured the country solo and with bands. She got her start in the television and film industry producing and writing for various network shows for HGTV and GPTV. Since then, she has collaborated with clients such as Tyler Perry Studios, Cartoon Network and CNN, as well as ad agencies BBDO, JWT and Ogilvy & Mather.

Bill Hewes

Behind the Title: Click 3X executive producer Bill Hewes

NAME: Bill Hewes

COMPANY: Click 3X  (@Click3X) in New York City.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a digital creation studio that also provides post and animation services.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am an executive producer with a roster of animation and live-action directors.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing everything from the initial creative pitch, working closely with directors, budgeting, approach to a given project, overseeing line producers for shooting, animation and post, client relations and problem solving.

PGIM Prudential

One recent project was this animated spot for a Prudential Global Investment Management campaign.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably that there is no limit to the job description — it involves business skills, a creative sensibility, communication and logistics. It is not about the big decisions, but more about the hundreds of small ones made moment to moment in a given day that add up.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Winning projects.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Losing projects

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Depends on the day and where I am.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
A park ranger at Gettysburg.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t choose it. I had been on another career path in the maritime transportation industry and did not want to get on another ship, so I took an entry-level job at a video production company. From day one, there was not a day I did not want to go to work. I was fortunate to have had great mentors that made it possible to learn and advance.

Click it or Ticket

‘Click it or Ticket’ for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Two animated spots for Prudential Global Investment Management, commercials and a social media campaign for Ford Trucks, and two humorous online animated spots for the NHTSA’s “Click It or Ticket” campaign.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
A few years back, I took some time off and worked with a director for several months creating films for Amnesty International. Oh, and putting a Dodge Viper on a lava field on a mountain in Hawaii.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The wheel, anesthesia and my iPhone.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I share an office, so we take turns picking the music selections. Lately, we’ve been listening to a lot of Kamasi Washington, Telemann, J Mascis and My Bloody Valentine.

I also would highly recommend, “I Plan to Stay a Believer” by William Parker and the album, “The Inside Songs” by Curtis Mayfield.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Jeet Kune Do, boxing, Muy Thai, Kali/Escrima, knife sparring, and some grappling. But I do this outside of the office.

Post vet Russ Robertson returns to Deluxe, joins Encore New York

After a year away, Russ Robertson has returned to Deluxe as SVP of sales at the company’s Encore New York. With scripted original series reaching 455 — a record — in 2016 and more shows delivering in HDR formats, Robertson’s 20 years of post experience will support content creators as they navigate this global, multi-format market. He re-joins Deluxe after a year at Panavision, where he was VP of marketing of camera systems and production services.

Robertson first joined Deluxe in 2002 in Toronto. He spent 14 years as VP of sales in Toronto, Vancouver and New York. He helped establish the New York outpost of Deluxe’s Encore in the process. He began his 20-year post career in sales and services roles at a number of facilities in Toronto.

“I had an amazingly educational year learning about cameras and lenses, but there’s so much happening in post right now — new models, a sea change in workflows with HDR, and so much opportunity to help clients create content for worldwide audiences, I couldn’t stay away.”

China’s Wanda Studios expands in a big way

China’s The Wanda Group is adding a $8.2 billion dollar “movie metropolis” to the company’s existing entertainment hub. Wanda Studios Qingdoa spans over 400 acres in a northern region between Beijing and Shanghai.

The complex will offer a variety of facilities for film and television production, with a floor area of 58 million square feet, 30 soundstages — including one of the largest soundstages in the world at 107,600 square feet — 24 production workshops, tenant office space, backlots with permanently constructed sets and two large water tanks. The studio supports every facet of production for a rapidly growing base of global creative clients.

In order to keep things running smoothly across all departments, Wanda Studios is calling on Xytech’s MediaPulse to manage all operations from budget to execution through financial reconciliation for the soundstages, production workshops, office spaces and other services offered by the studio. The solution also includes the implementation of a MediaPulse Rental to manage the business and track equipment with integration to a RFID tagging system. The initial installation of MediaPulse is now live and full deployment is anticipated by the completion of the studio in the coming months.

Digging Deeper: Fraunhofer’s Dr. Siegfried Foessel

By Randi Altman

If you’ve been to NAB, IBC, AES or regional conferences involving media and entertainment technology, you have likely seen Fraunhofer exhibiting or heard one of their representatives speaking on a panel.

Fraunhofer first showed up on my radar years ago at an AES show in New York City when they were touting the new MP3 format, which they created. From that moment on, I’ve made it a point to keep up on what Fraunhofer has been doing in other areas of the industry, but for some, what Fraunhofer is and does is a mystery.

We decided to help with that mystery by throwing some questions at Dr. Siegfried Foessel, Fraunhofer IIS Department Moving Picture Technologies.

Can you describe Fraunhofer?
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is an organization for applied research that has 67 institutes and research units at locations throughout Germany. At present, there are around 24,000 people. The majority are qualified scientists and engineers who work with an annual research budget of more than 2.1 billion euros.

More than 70 percent of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft’s research revenue is derived from contracts with industry and from publicly financed research projects. Almost 30 percent is contributed by the German federal and Länder governments in the form of base funding. This enables the institutes to work ahead on solutions to problems that will become relevant to industry and society within the next five or ten years from now.

How did it all begin? Is it a think tank of sorts? Tell us about Fraunhofer’s business model.
The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft was founded in 1949 and is a recognized non-profit organization that takes its name from Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787–1826), the illustrious Munich researcher, inventor and entrepreneur. Its focus was clearly defined to do application-oriented research and to develop future-relevant key technologies. Through their research and development work, the Fraunhofer Institutes help to reinforce the competitive strength of the economy. They do so by promoting innovation, strengthening the technological base, improving the acceptance of new technologies and helping to train the urgently needed future generation of scientists and engineers.

What is Fraunhofer IIS?
The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS is an application-oriented research institution for microelectronic and IT system solutions and services. With the creation of MP3 and the co-development of AAC, Fraunhofer IIS has reached worldwide recognition. In close cooperation with partners and clients, the ISS institute provides research and development services in the following areas: audio and multimedia, imaging systems, energy management, IC design and design automation, communication systems, positioning, medical technology, sensor systems, safety and security technology, supply chain management and non-destructive testing. About 880 employees conduct contract research for industry, the service sector and public authorities.

Fraunhofer IIS partners with companies as well as public institutions?
We develop, implement and optimize processes, products and equipment until they are ready for use in the market. Flexible interlinking of expertise and capacities enables us to meet extremely broad project requirements and complex system solutions. We do contracted research for companies of all sizes. We license our technologies and developments. We work together with partners in publicly funded research projects or carry out commercial and technical feasibility studies.

IMF transcoding.

What is the focus of Fraunhofer IIS’ Department of Moving Picture Technologies?
For more than 15 years, our Department Moving Picture Technologies has driven developments for digital cinema and broadcast solutions focused on imaging systems, post production tools, formats and workflow solutions. The Department Moving Picture Technologies was chosen by the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) to develop and implement the first certification test plan for digital cinema as the main reference for all systems in this area. As a leader in the ISO standardization committee for digital cinema within JPEG, my team and I are driving standardization for JPEG 2000 and formats, such as DCP and the Interoperable Master Format (IMF.)

We also are working together with SMPTE and other standardization bodies worldwide. Renowned developments for the department that are highly respected are the Arri D20/D21 camera, the easyDCP post production suite for DCP and IMF creation and playback, as well as the latest developments and results of multi-camera/light-field technology.

What are some of the things you are working on and how does that work find its way to post houses and post pros?
The engineers and scientists of the Department Moving Picture Technologies are working on tools and workflow solutions for new media file formats like IMF to enable smooth integration and use in existing workflows and to optimize performance and quality. As an example, we always enhance and augment the features available through the post production easyDCP suite. The team discusses and collaborates with customers, industry partners and professionals in the post production and digital cinema industries to identify the “most wanted and needed” requirements.

easyDCP

We preview new technologies and present developments that meet these requirements or facilitate process steps. Examples of this include the acceleration process of IMF or DCP creation by using an approach based on a hybrid JPEG 2000 functionality or introducing a media asset management tool for DCP/IMF or dailies. We present our ideas, developments and results at exhibitions such as NAB, the HPA Tech Retreat and IBC, as well as SMPTE conferences and plugfests all around the world.

Together with distribution partners who are selling the products like easyDCP, Fraunhofer IIS licenses those developments and puts them into the market. Therefore, the team always looks for customer feedback for their developments that is supported by a very active community.

Who are some of your current customers and partners?
We have more than 1,500 post houses as customers, managed by our licensing partner easyDCP GmbH. Nearly all of the Hollywood studios and post houses on all continents are our customers. We also work together with integration partners like Blackmagic and Quantel. Most of the names of our partners in the contract research area are confidential, but to name some partners from the past and present: Arri, DCI, IHSE GmbH.

Which technologies are available for license now?
• Tools for creation and playback of DCPs and IMPs, as standalone tools and for integration into third party tools
• Tools for quality control of DCPs and IMPs
• Tools for media asset management of DCPs and IMPs
• Plug-ins for light-field-processing and depth map generation
• Codecs for mezzanine compression of images

Lightfield tech

What are you working on now that people should know about?
We are developing new tools and plug-ins for bringing lightfield technology to the movie industry to enhance creativity opportunities. This includes system aspects in combination with existing post tools. We are chairing and actively participating on adhoc groups for lightfield-related standardization efforts in the JPEG/MPEG Joint Adhoc Group for digital representations of light/sound fields for immersive media applications (see https://jpeg.org/items/20160603_pleno_report.html).

We are also working together with DIN on a proposal to standardize digital long-term archive formats for movies. Basic work is done with German archives and service providers at DIN NVBF3 and together with CST from France at SMPTE with IMF App#4. Furthermore, we are developing mezzanine image compression formats for the transmission of video over IP in professional broadcast environments and GPU accelerated tools for creation and playback of JPEG 2000 code streams.

How do you pick what you will work on?
The employees at Fraunhofer IIS are very creative people. By observation of the market, research in joint projects and cooperation with universities, ideas are created and evaluated. Employees and our student scientists are discussing with industry partners what might be possible in the near future and which ideas have the greatest potential. Selected ideas will then be evaluated with respect to the business opportunities and transformed into internal projects or proposed as research projects. Our employees are tasked with working much like our eponym Joseph von Fraunhofer, as researchers, inventors and entrepreneurs — all at the same time.

What other “hats” do you wear in the industry?
As mentioned earlier, Fraunhofer is involved in standardization bodies and industry associations. For example, I chair the Systems Group within ISO SC29WG1 (JPEG) and the post production group within ISO TC36 (Cinematography). I am also a SMPTE governor (EMEA and Central and South America region) and a SMPTE fellow, along with supporting SMPTE conferences as a program committee member.

Currently, I am president of the German Society Fernseh- und Kinotechnische Gesellschaft (FKTG) and am involved in associations like EDCF and ISDCF. Additionally, I’m a speaker for the German VDE/ITG society in the area of media technology. Last, but not least, I chair the German standardization body at DIN for NVBF3 and consult the German federal film board in questions related to new technical challenges in the film industry.

Quantum shipping StorNext 5.4

Quantum has introduced StorNext 5.4, the latest release of their workflow storage platform, designed to bring efficiency and flexibility to media content management. StorNext 5.4 enhancements include the ability to integrate existing public cloud storage accounts and third-party object storage (private cloud) — including Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, NetApp StorageGRID, IBM Cleversafe and Scality Ring — as archive tiers in a StorNext-managed media environment. It also lets users deploy applications embedded within StorNext-powered Xcellis workflow storage appliances.

Quantum has also included a new feature called StorNext Storage Manager, offering automated, policy-based movement of content into and out of users’ existing public and private clouds while maintaining the visibility and access that StorNext provides. It offers seamless integration for public and private clouds within a StorNext-managed environment — as well as primary disk and tape storage tiers, full user and application access to media stored in the cloud without additional hardware or software, and extended versioning across sites and the cloud.

By enabling applications to run inside its Xcellis Workflow Director, the new Dynamic Application Environment (DAE) capability in StorNext 5.4 allows users to leverage a converged storage architecture, reducing the time, cost and complexity of deploying and maintaining applications.

StorNext 5.4 is currently shipping with all newly-purchased Xcellis, StorNext M-Series and StorNext Pro Solutions, as well as Artico archive appliances. It is available at no additional cost for StorNext 5 users under current support contracts.

TwoPoint0 adds editors Debbie McMurtrey and David Cornman

TwoPoint0 has added two veteran editors to its New York-based studio: David Cornman and Debbie McMurtrey.

Cornman is a commercial editor who has cut comedy, effects-driven, dramatic and documentary-style spots for clients such as AIG, GE, Accenture, Bank of America, Staples, Verizon and Computer Associates. He has won awards from the AICE, AICP, Clio and Addys, and he has an Emmy nom in the Best Commercial category.

Cornman’s recent projects include a package of Crayola spots for McGarry-Bowen and P&G work out of Havas, as well as a several digital projects for Facebook’s Creative Shop. A recent passion project included shooting and editing a piece for Atria Senior Living in Rye Brook, New York, which gave residents the chance to try rowing for the first time. Rowers ranged in age from 85-97. “That was fun to be part of,” he says.

McMurtrey started her career at Crew Cuts in 1999. In 2007, she was hired as the first editor at Nomad’s East Coast office. From there she worked at Cutting Room, Red Car and Alkemy X. In addition to spots and branded web content, she has also cut short films that have screened in over 30 festivals, a sitcom pilot for VH1, and parody commercials for Saturday Night Live. She recently collaborated with director/producer Greg Kohs on his feature documentary, The Great Alone, which chronicles the comeback journey of four-time Iditarod champion Lance Mackey. McMurtrey considers her specialty to be docu-style. She excels at taking raw footage and finding the narrative in order to shape the story. She also enjoys editing dialogue and comedy.

McMurtrey has recently worked with director Zack Resnicoff of Impressionista Films on three campaigns for Fisher Price, including 20 individual spots.They have previously worked together on projects for Macy’s, Blue Cross and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Other recent projects completed by McMurtrey include the “We the Voters” campaign and a series of films for Stephens Bank, including a bio of Alexander Hamilton. She has also edited projects this fall for Facebook, Hewlett Packard and Nintendo.

To view Cornman’s and McMurtrey’s reels on the studio’s site.

The A-List: Collateral Beauty director David Frankel

By Iain Blair

Oscar-winner David Frankel is probably best known for his enormously successful films The Devil Wears Prada and Marley & Me, but the writer/director has an eclectic slate of films under his belt, including The Big Year, Hope Springs and One Chance.

Frankel owns a “Best Short” Oscar for his film Dear Diary, an Emmy for his direction of the miniseries Band of Brothers, and an Emmy nom for the Entourage pilot. In addition, he directed several episodes of Sex and the City, and the miniseries From the Earth to the Moon.

David Frankel

Frankel’s new film, Collateral Beauty, is a drama about a successful New York advertising executive who suffers a great tragedy and retreats from life. While his concerned friends try desperately to reconnect with him, he seeks answers from the universe by writing letters to Love, Time and Death. But it’s not until his notes bring unexpected personal responses that he begins to understand how these constants interlock in a life fully lived, and how even the deepest loss can reveal moments of meaning and beauty.  Frankel assembled an all-star cast, including Will Smith, Edward Norton, Keira Knightley, Michael Peña, Kate Winslet and Helen Mirren..

The drama’s behind-the-scenes creative team included director of photography Maryse Alberti (Creed), editor Andrew Marcus (American Ultra) and composer Theodore Shapiro (Trumbo).

I spoke with Frankel about making the film.

There’s been a lot of mystery about this film and the plot?
Will plays this advertising guy who loses his six-year-old daughter to cancer and he spirals into a deep hole. He’s devastated, he’s divorced, he’s not functioning at work anymore, and everyone tries to help him reconnect, but nothing really works. Then they come up with this wacky scheme, which involves hiring some actors to help him answer the questions he’s asking of the universe. I saw it as this screwball drama — a little crazy — but also very grounded and emotional. There’s a lot of moving moments and tragedy, but I think it’s quite uplifting and hopeful.

useYou got an amazing cast. Any surprises with Will Smith?
He was everything I expected and more. He’s such a risk-taker and keeps challenging himself as an actor. He took on stuff here he’s never done before, and Jacob Latimore was very impressive, really able to hold his own with the others, and there was a very unlikely pairing of actors — Helen Mirren and Michael Peña — that was unexpected and which worked out so well.

You shot this on location all over New York. How tough was it?
People complain about it a lot, but I never do. We shot it in eight weeks. It was great and wherever you go, people would help decorate the streets with Christmas lights and the street vendors would come out, and neighbors would help keep the streets quiet while we shot, so there was all this enthusiasm and great support. And you can’t really fake New York, and I love the fact that wherever you point a camera, it looks amazing.

You shot digitally, but it has a very filmic look.
Right, and I really struggle to see the difference between film and digital now, because digital’s so good. Maryse did a great job. She shot Dear Diary for me 20 years ago, and we quickly picked up where we left off. The goal was to make some very beautiful images and focus on composition and the performances.

Do you enjoy the post process?
I love post because it’s the time of discovery. When you’re shooting, it’s a time of wonder — when you’re scratching your heads for weeks on end and trying to deal with the schedule and budget and all that. Once you’re in post, you finally sit down to start telling the story you want, and when you start solving the puzzles that are in front of you in the cutting room, it’s just so satisfying. We did all the post in New York, and all the cutting at The Post Factory in Tribeca, and then we did all the sound work at the Warner Bros. mixing stage. We also recorded the music and orchestra in New York, so it was very much a New York production.

Talk about working for the first time with editor Andrew Marcus. Was he on the set?
He was on set a lot, and he actually lived just down the street from one of the locations, so he’d stop by a lot and we’d discuss stuff every day. He was so enthusiastic right from the start, and I think he’s quite brilliant. The way I work with editors is to tell them at the wrap party, ‘Pretend I got hit by a bus on the way home and you have to now finish the movie. Don’t just do an assembly and string scenes together.’ The big challenge on this was getting the tone right, as it’s such a strange mix of humor and really heavy drama, and sometimes all in the same scene.

You shot in early spring, but there’s a lot of winter, so you must have needed some VFX?
Right. We used VFX to add some Christmas decorations, lights, some snow, and we had to do clean-up. Mr. X in New York did all that.

You’ve collaborated with composer Theodore Shapiro a lot. How important is sound and music to you?
It’s huge. I’ve worked with just one composer my whole career, and Ted wrote this beautiful score that’s perfect, because it’s such an emotional movie but it also needed a very restrained score that doesn’t tell you how to feel, and I had the most fun being in the studio with him and trying stuff out. And all the sound design is so crucial to it too —capturing the sounds of New York, the subway trains.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
We did the DI at Company 3 in Chelsea, with Tim Stipan, who’s a genius. He just did Silence with Scorsese and he has this fantastic eye for storytelling through color. I’m always involved with the DI, but even more so this time as Maryse had to go off to shoot Chappaquiddick, so I did a lot of the sessions with Tim, and it probably ended up a little warmer with me in there.

This is releasing at the same time as this new little film Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Are you nervous?
No, not at all. It’s good counter-programming. The Devil Wears Prada opened against Superman and did great. I like to think people want choices.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.