Tag Archives: post production

DigitalFilm Tree’s Ramy Katrib talks trends and keynoting BMD conference

By Randi Altman

Blackmagic, which makes tools for all parts of the production and post workflow, is holding its very first Blackmagic Design Conference and Expo, produced with FMC and NAB Show. This three-day event takes place on February 11-13 in Los Angeles. The event includes a paid conference featuring over 35 sessions, as well as a free expo on February 12, which includes special guests, speakers and production and post companies.

Ramy Katrib, founder and CEO of Hollywood-based post house and software development company DigitalFilm Tree, is the keynote speaker for the conference. FotoKem DI colorist Walter Volpatto and color scientist Joseph Slomka will be keynoting the free expo on the 12th.

We reached out to Katrib to find out what he’ll be focusing on in his keynote, as well as pick his brains about technology and trends.

Can you talk about the theme of your keynote?
Resolve has grown mightily over the past few years, and is the foundation of DigitalFilm Tree’s post finishing efforts. I’ll discuss the how Resolve is becoming an essential post tool. And with Resolve 14, folks who are coloring, editing, conforming and doing VFX and audio work are now collaborating on the same timeline, and that is huge development for TV, film and every media industry creative and technician.

Why was it important for you to keynote this event?
DaVinci was part of my life when I was a colorist 25 years ago, and today BMD is relevant to me while I run my own post company, DigitalFilm Tree. On a personal note, I’ve known Grant Petty since 1999 and work with many folks at BMD who develop Resolve and the hardware products we use, like I/O cards and Teranex converters. This relationship involves us sharing our post production pain points and workflow suggestions, while BMD has provided very relevant software and hardware solutions.

Can you give us a sample of something you might talk about?
I’m looking forward to providing an overview of how Resolve is now part of our color, VFX, editorial, conform and deliverables effort, while having artists provide micro demos on stage.

You alluded to the addition of collaboration in Resolve. How important is this for users?
Resolve 14’s new collaboration tools are a huge development for the post industry, specifically in this golden age of TV where binge delivery of multiple episodes at the same time is common place. As the complexity of production and post increases, greater collaboration across multiple disciplines is a refreshing turn — it allows multiple artists and technicians to work in one timeline instead of 10 timelines and round tripping across multiple applications.

Blackmagic has ramped up their NLE offerings with Resolve 14. Do you see more and more editors embracing this tool for editing?
Absolutely. It always takes a little time to ramp up in professional communities. It reminds me of when the editors on Scrubs used Final Cut Pro for the first time and that ushered FCP into the TV arena. We’re already working with scripted TV editors who are in the process of transitioning to Resolve. Also, DigitalFilm Tree’s editors are now using Resolve for creative editing.

What about the Fairlight audio offerings within? Will you guys take advantage of that in any way? Do you see others embracing it?
For simple audio work like mapping audio tracks, creating multi mixes for 5.1 and 7.1 delivery and mapping various audio tracks, we are talking advantage of Fairlight and audio functionality within Resolve. We’re not an audio house, yet it’s great to have a tool like this for convenience and workflow efficiency.

What trends did you see in 2017 and where do you think things will land in 2018?
Last year was about the acceptance of cloud-based production and post process. This year is about the wider use of cloud-based production and post process. In short, what used to be file-based workflows will give way to cloud-based solutions and products.

postPerspective readers can get $50 off of Registration for the Blackmagic Design Conference & Expo by using Code: POST18. Click here to register

Made in NY’s free post training program continues in 2018

New York City’s post production industry continues to grow thanks to the creation of New York State’s Post Production Film Tax Credit, which was established in 2010. Since then, over 1,000 productions have applied for the credit, creating almost a million new jobs.

“While this creates more pathways for New York City residents to get into the industry, there is evidence that this growth is not equally distributed among women and people of color. In response to this need, the NYC Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment decided to create the Made in New York Post Production Training Program, which built on the success of the Made in New York PA Training Program, which for the last 11 years has trained over 700 production assistants for work on TV and film sets,” explains Ryan Penny, program director of the Made In NY Post Production Training Program.

The Post Production Training Program seeks to diversify New York’s post industry by training low-income and unemployed New Yorkers in the basics of editing, animation and visual effects. Created in partnership with the Blue Collar Post Collective, BRIC Media Arts and Borough of Manhattan Community College, the course is free to participants and consists of a five-week, full-time skills training and job placement program administered by workforce development non-profit Brooklyn Workforce Innovations.

Trainees take part in classroom training covering the history and theory of post production, as well as technical training in Avid Media Composer, Adobe’s Premiere, After Effects and Photoshop, as well as Foundry’s Nuke. “Upon successful completion of the training, our staff will work with graduates to identify job opportunities for a period of two years,” says Penny.

Ryan Penny, far left with the most recent graduating class.

Launched in June 2017, the Made in New York Post Production Training Program graduated its second cycle of trainees in January 2018 and is now busy establishing partnerships with New York City post houses and productions who are interested in hiring graduates of the program as post PAs, receptionists, client service representatives, media management technicians and more.

“Employers can expect entry-level employees who are passionate about post and hungry to continue learning on the job,” reports Penny. “As an added incentive, the city has created a work-based learning program specifically for MiNY Post graduates, which allows qualified employers to be reimbursed for up to 80% of the first 280 hours of a trainee’s wages. This results in a win-win for employers and employees alike.”

The Made in New York Post Production Training Program will be conducting further cycles throughout the year, beginning with Cycle 3 planned for spring 2018. More information on the program and how to hire program graduates can be found here.

Sci-Tech Award winners named

The 2018 Sci-Tech Awards (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) have been bestowed to 34 individuals and one company representing 10 scientific and technical achievements. Each recipient will be honored at the annual Scientific and Technical Awards Presentation on February 10 at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly Hills.

“This year we are happy to honor a very international group of technologists for their innovative and outstanding accomplishments,” says Ray Feeney, Academy Award recipient and chair of the Scientific and Technical Awards Committee. “These individuals have significantly contributed to the ongoing evolution of motion pictures and their efforts continue to empower the creativity of our industry.”

Technical Achievement Award Winners (Academy Certificates)

Honorees: Jason Smith and Jeff White for the original design, and to Rachel Rose and Mike Jutan for the architecture and engineering of the BlockParty procedural rigging system at Industrial Light & Magic.

BlockParty streamlines the rigging process through a comprehensive connection framework, a unique graphical user interface and volumetric rig transfer. This has enabled ILM to build richly detailed and unique creatures while greatly improving artist productivity.

Honorees: Joe Mancewicz, Matt Derksen and Hans Rijpkema for the design, architecture and implementation of the Rhythm & Hues Construction Kit rigging system.

This toolset provides a new approach to character rigging that features topological independence, continuously editable rigs and deformation workflows with shape-preserving surface relaxation, enabling 15 years of improvements to production efficiency and animation quality.

Honorees: Alex Powell for the design and engineering and to Jason Reisig for the interaction design, and to Martin Watt and Alex Wells for the high-performance execution engine of the Premo character animation system at DreamWorks Animation.

Premo enables animators to pose full-resolution characters in representative shot context, significantly increasing their productivity.

Honorees: Rob Jensen for the foundational design and continued development and to Thomas Hahn for the animation toolset and to George ElKoura, Adam Woodbury and Dirk Van Gelder for the high-performance execution engine of the Presto Animation System at Pixar Animation Studios.

Presto allows artists to work interactively in scene context with full-resolution geometric models and sophisticated rig controls, and has significantly increased the productivity of character animators at Pixar.

Scientific and Engineering Award Winners (Academy Plaques)

Honorees: John Coyle, Brad Hurndell, Vikas Sathaye and Shane Buckham for the concept, design, engineering and implementation of the Shotover K1 camera system.

This six-axis stabilized aerial camera mount, with its enhanced ability to frame shots while looking straight down, enables greater creativity while allowing pilots to fly more effectively and safely.

Honorees: Jeff Lait, Mark Tucker, Cristin Barghiel and John Lynch for their contributions to the design and architecture of Side Effects Software’s Houdini visual effects and animation system.

Houdini’s dynamics framework and workflow management tools have helped it become the industry standard for bringing natural phenomena, destruction and other digital effects to the screen.

Honorees: Bill Spitzak and Jonathan Egstad for the visionary design, development and stewardship of Foundry’s Nuke compositing system.

Built for production at Digital Domain, Nuke is used across the motion picture industry, enabling novel and sophisticated workflows at an unprecedented scale.

Honorees: Abigail Brady, Jon Wadelton and Jerry Huxtable for their significant contributions to the architecture and extensibility of Foundry’s Nuke compositing system.

Expanded as a commercial product at The Foundry, Nuke is a comprehensive, versatile and stable system that has established itself as the backbone of compositing and image processing pipelines across the motion picture industry.

Honorees: Leonard Chapman for the overall concept, design and development, to Stanislav Gorbatov for the electronic system design, and to David Gasparian and Souhail Issa for the mechanical design and integration of the Hydrascope telescoping camera crane systems.

With its fully waterproof construction, the Hydrascope has advanced crane technology and versatility by enabling precise long-travel multi-axis camera movement in, out of and through fresh or salt water.

Academy Award of Merit (Oscar statuette)

Honorees: Mark Elendt and Side Effects Software for the creation and development of the Houdini visual effects and animation system.

With more than twenty years of continual innovation, Houdini has delivered the power of procedural methods to visual effects artists, making it the industry standard for bringing natural phenomena, destruction and other digital effects to the screen.

Gordon E. Sawyer Award (Oscar statuette)

Honoree: Jonathan Erland, visual effects technologist

Presented to an individual in the motion picture industry whose technological contributions have brought credit to the industry.

All images courtesy of A.M.P.A.S.

Seasoned pros and young talent team on short films

By James Hughes

In Los Angeles on a Saturday morning, a crew of 10 students from Hollywood High School — helmed by 17-year-old director Celine Gimpirea — were transforming a corner of the Calgary Cemetery into a movie set. In The Box, a boy slips inside a cardboard box and finds himself transported to other realms. On this well-manicured lawn, among rows of flat, black granite grave markers, are rows of flat, black camera cases holding Red cameras, DIT stations, iPads and MacBook Pros.

Gimpirea’s is one of three teams of filmmakers involved in a month-long filmmaking workshop connecting creative pros with emerging talent. The teams worked with tools from Apple, including the MacBook Pro, iMac and Final Cut Pro X, as well as the Red Raven camera for shooting. LA-based independent filmmaking collective We Make Movies provided post supervision. They used a workflow very similar to that of the feature film Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, which was shot on Red and edited in FCP X.

In the documentary La Buena Muerte produced by instructors from the Mobile Film Classroom, a non-profit that provides digital media workshops to youth in under-resourced communities, the filmmakers examine mortality and family bonds surrounding the Day of the Dead, the Mexican holiday honoring lost loved ones. And in The Dancer, director Krista Amigone channels her background in theater to tell a personal story about a dancer confronting the afterlife.

Krista Amigone

During a two-week post period, teams received feedback from a rotating cast of surprise guests and mentors from across the industry, each a professional working in the field of film and television production.

Among the first mentors to view The Dancer was Sean Baker, director of 2017’s critically acclaimed The Florida Project and the 2015 feature Tangerine, shot entirely on iPhone 5S. Baker, who edits his own films, surveyed clips from Amigone’s shoot. Each take had been marked with the Movie Slate app on an iPad, which automatically stores and logs the timecode data. Together, they discussed Amigone’s backstory as well. A stay-at-home mother of a three-year-old daughter, she is no stranger to maximizing time and resources. She not only served as writer and director, but also star and choreographer.

Meanwhile, the La Buena Muerte crew, headed by executive producer Manon Banta, were editing their piece. Reviewing the volume of interviews and B-roll, all captured by cinematographer Elle Schneider on the 4.5K Red Raven camera, initially felt like a daunting task. Fortunately, their metadata was automatically organized after being imported straight into Final Cut Pro X from Shot Notes X and Lumberjack, along with the secondary source audio via Sync-N-Link X, which spared days of hand syncing.

Perhaps the most constructive feedback about story structure came from TJ Martin, director of LA92 and Undefeated, the Oscar-winner for Best Documentary Feature in 2012, which director Jean Balest has used as teaching material in the Mobile Film Classroom. Midway through the cut, Martin was struck by a plot point he felt required precision placement up front: A daughter is introduced while presiding over a conceptual art altar alongside her mother, who reveals she’s coping with her own pending death after a stage four cancer diagnosis.

Reshoots were vital to The Box. The dream world Gimpirea created — she cites Christopher Nolan’s Inception as an influence — required some clarification. During a visit from Valerie Faris, the Oscar-nominated co-director of Little Miss Sunshine and Battle of the Sexes, Gimpirea listened intently as she offered advice for pickup shots. Faris urged Gimpirea to keep the story focused on the point of view of her young lead during his travels. “There’s a lot told in his body and seeing him from behind,” Faris said. “In some ways, I’m more with him when I’m traveling behind him and seeing what he’s seeing.”

Celine Gimpirea

Gimpirea’s collaborative nature was evident throughout post. She was helped out by Antonio Manriquez, a video production teacher at Hollywood High, as well as her crew. Kais Karram was the film’s assistant director, and twin brother Zane was cinematographer. The brothers’ athleticism was an asset on-set, particularly during a day-long shoot in Griffith Park where they executed numerous tracking shots behind the film’s fleet-footed star as he navigated a walkway they had cleared of park visitors.

The selection of music was crucial, particularly for Amigone. For her main theme, she wanted a sound reminiscent of John Coltrane’s “After The Rain” and Claude Debussy’s “Clair De Lune.” She chose an original nocturne by John Mickevich, a composer and fellow member of the collective We Make Movies, whose founder/CEO Sam Mestman is also the CEO of LumaForge, developer of the Jellyfish Mobile — a “portable cloud,” as he put it — which, along with two MacBook Pros, were storing and syncing Amigone’s footage on location. Mestman believes “post should live on set.” As proof, a half-day of work for the editing team was done before the dance studio shoot had even wrapped.

During his mentor visit, Aaron Kaufman, director and longtime producing partner of filmmaker Robert Rodriguez, encouraged the teams to not be precious about losing shots in service of story. The documentary team certainly heeded this advice, as did Gimpirea, who cut a whole scene from Calvary Cemetery from her film.

As the project was winding down, Gimpirea reflected on her experience. “Knowing all the possibilities that I have in post now, it allows me to look completely differently at production and pre-production, and to pick out, more precisely, what I want,” she said.

Main Image: Shooting with the Red Raven at the Calvary Cemetery.


James Hughes is a writer and editor based in Chicago.

Sim Post LA beefs up with Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman

It’s always nice when good things happen to good people. Recently, long-time industry post pros Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman joined Sim Post LA — Greg as VP of post and Paul as VP of engineering and technology.

postPerspective has known both Greg and Paul for years and often call on them to pick their brains about technology, so having them end up working together warms our hearts.

Sim Post is a division of Sim, which provides end-to-end solutions for TV and feature film production and post production in LA, Vancouver, Toronto, New York and Atlanta.

“I’ll be working with the operations, sales, technology and finance teams to ensure tight integration between departments — always in the service of our clients,” reports Ciaccio. “Our ability to offer end-to-end services is a great advantage in the industry. I’ve admired the work produced by the talented group at Sim Post LA (formerly Chainsaw and Bling), and now I’m pleased to be a part of the team.”

Ciaccio’s resume includes executive operations management positions for creative service divisions at Ascent, Technicolor and Deluxe, and has led product development teams creating products. He also serves as chair of the ASC Motion Imaging Technology Council’s Workflow Committee, currently focused on ACES education and enlightenment, and is a member of the UHD/HDR Committee and Joint ASC/ICG/VES/PGA VR Committee.

Chapman, a Fellow of SMPTE, has held executive technology and engineering positions over the last 30 years, including his long-time role at FotoKem, as well as stints at Unitel Video and others. His skillset includes expertise in storage and networking infrastructure, facility engineering and operations.

“Sim has a lot of potential, and when the opportunity was presented to lead their engineering and technology departments, it really intrigued me,” says Chapman. “The LA facility itself is well constructed from the ground up. I’m looking forward to working with the creative and technical teams across the organization to enhance our technical operations, foster innovation and elevate performance for our clients.”

Greg and Paul are based at Sim’s operations in Hollywood.

Main Caption: (L-R) Greg Ciaccio and Paul Chapman

Industry mainstay Click3X purchased by Industrial Color Studios

Established New York City post house Click3X has been bought by Industrial Color Studios. Click3X is a 25-year-old facility that specializes in new media formats such as VR, AR, CGI and live streaming. Industrial Color Studios is a visual content production company. Founded in 1992, Industrial Color’s services range from full image capture and e-commerce photography to production support and post services, including creative editorial, color grading and CG.

With offices in New York and LA, Industrial Color has developed its own proprietary systems to support online digital asset management for video editing and high-speed file transfers for its clients working in broadcast and print media. The company is an end-to-end visual content production provider, partnering with top brands, agencies and creative professionals to accelerate multi-channel creative content.

Click3X was founded in 1993 by Peter Corbett, co-founder of numerous companies specializing in both traditional and emerging forms of media.  These include Media Circus (a digital production and web design company), IllusionFusion, Full Blue, ClickFire Media, Reason2Be, Sound Lounge and Heard City. A long-time member of the DGA as a commercial film director, Corbett emigrated to the US from Australia to pursue a career as a commercial director and, shortly thereafter, segued into integrated media and mixed media, becoming one of the first established film directors to do so.

Projects produced at Click3X have been honored with the industry’s top awards, including Cannes Lions, Clios, Andy Awards and others. Click3X also was presented with the Crystal Apple Award, presented by the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, in recognition of its contributions to the city’s media landscape.

Corbett will remain in place at Click3X and eventually the companies will share the ICS space on 6th Avenue in NYC.

“We’ve seen a growing need for video production capabilities and have been in the market for a partner that would not only enhance our video offering, but one that provided a truly integrated and complementary suite of services,” says Steve Kalalian, CEO of Industrial Color Studios. “And Click3X was the ideal fit. While the industry continues to evolve at lightning speed, I’ve long admired Click3X as a company that’s consistently been on the cutting edge of technology as it pertains to creative film, digital video and new media solutions. Our respective companies share a passion for creativity and innovation, and I’m incredibly excited to share this unique new offering with our clients.”

“When Steve and I first entered into talks to align on the state of our clients’ future, we were immediately on the same page,” says Corbett, president of Click3X. “We share a vision for creating compelling content in all formats. As complementary production providers, we will now have the exciting opportunity to collaborate on a robust and highly-regarded client roster, but also expand the company’s creative and new media capabilities, using over 200,000 square feet of state-of-the-art facilities in New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia.”

The added capabilities Click3X gives Industrial Color in video production and new media mirrors its growth in the field of e-commerce photography and image capture. The company has recently opened a new 30,000 square-foot studio in downtown Los Angeles designed to produce high-volume, high-quality product photography for advertisers. That studio complements the company’s existing e-commerce photography hub in Philadelphia.

Main Image: (L-R) Peter Corbett and Steve Kalalian

Fotokem posts Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Burbank-based post house FotoKem provided creative and technical services for the Disney/Lucasfilm movie Star Wars: The Last Jedi. The facility built advanced solutions that supported the creative team from production to dailies to color grade. Services included a customized workflow for dailies, editorial and VFX support, conform and a color pipeline that incorporated all camera formats (film and file-based).

The long-established post house worked directly with director Rian Johnson; DP Steve Yedlin, ASC; producer Ram Bergman; Lucasfilm head of post Pippa Anderson; and Lucasfilm director of post Mike Blanchard.

FotoKem was brought on prior to the beginning of principal photography and designed an intricate workflow tailored to accommodate the goals of production. A remote post facility was assembled near-set in London where film technician Simone Appleby operated two real-time Scanity film scanners, digitizing up to 15,000 feet a day of 35mm footage at full-aperture 4K resolution. Supported by a highly secure network, FotoKem NextLab systems ingested the digitized film and file-based camera footage, providing “scan once instant-access” to everything, and creating a singular workflow for every unit’s footage. By the end of production over one petabyte of data was managed by NextLab. This allowed the filmmakers, visual effects teams, editors and studio access to securely and easily share large volumes of assets for any part of the workflow.

“I worked with FotoKem previously and knew their capabilities. This project clearly required a high level of support to handle global locations with multiple units and production partners,” says Bergman. “We had a lot of requirements at this scale to create a consistent workflow for all the teams using the footage, from production viewing dailies to the specific editorial deliverables, visual effects plates, marketing and finishing, with no delays or security concerns.”

Before shooting began, Yedlin worked with FotoKem’s film and digital lab to create specialized scanner profiles and custom Look Up Tables (LUTs). FotoKem implemented the algorithms devised by Yedlin into their NextLab software to obtain a seamless match between digital footage and film scans. Yedlin also received full-resolution stills, which served as a communication funnel for color and quality control checks. This color workflow was devised in collaboration with FotoKem color scientist Joseph Slomka, and executed by NextLab software developer Eric Cameron and dailies colorist Jon Rocke, who were on site throughout the entire production.

“As cinematographers, we work hard to create looks, and FotoKem made it possible for me to take control of each step in the process and know exactly what was happening,” says Yedlin. The color science support I received made true image control a realized concept.”

Calibrated 4K monitoring via the Sony X300 and the high availability SAN on site, managed by NextLAB, enabled a real time workflow for dailies. Visual effects and editorial teams, via high density NAS, were allowed instant access to full fidelity footage during and after production for all VFX pulls and conform pulls. The NAS acted as a back-up for all source content, and was live throughout production. Through the system’s interface, they could procure footage, pull shots as needed, and maintain exact color and metadata integration between any step.

For the color grade, FotoKem colorist Walter Volpatto used Blackmagic Resolve to fine-tune raw images, as well as those from ILM, with Johnson and Yedlin using the color and imaging pipeline established from day one. FotoKem also set up remote grading suites at Skywalker Sound and Disney so the teams could work during the sound mix, and later while grading for HDR and other specialty theatrical deliverables. They used a Barco 4K projector for final finishing.

“The film emulation LUT that Steve (Yedlin) created carried nuances he wanted in the final image and he was mindful of this while shooting, lighting both the film and digital scenes so that minimal manipulation was required in the color grade,” Volpatto explains. “Steve’s mastery of lighting for both formats, as well as his extensive understanding of color science, helped to make the blended footage look more cohesive.”

Volpatto also oversaw the HDR pass and IMAX versions. Ultimately, multiple deliverables were created by FotoKem including standard DCP, HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG, 3D (in standard, stereo Dolby and 2D Dolby HDR) and home video formats. FotoKem worked with IMAX to align the color science pipeline with their Xenon and laser DCPs and 15-perf 70mm prints as well.

“It’s not every day that we would ship scanners to remote locations and integrate a real-time post environment that would rival many permanent installations,” concludes Mike Brodersen, FotoKem’s chief strategy officer.

ACE celebrates editing, names 68th annual Eddie nominees

Awards season has begun, as evidenced by the American Cinema Editors (ACE) naming their nominees for the 68th annual ACE Eddie Awards. The Eddies recognize outstanding editing in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries. Trophies will be handed out during ACE’s annual awards ceremony on January 26.

Here are the nominees for the 68th annual ACE Eddie Awards:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Blade Runner 2049
Joe Walker, ACE

The Shape of Water

Dunkirk
Lee Smith, ACE

Molly’s Game
Alan Baumgarten, ACE, Josh Schaeffer & Elliot Graham, ACE

The Post
Michael Kahn, ACE & Sarah Broshar

The Shape of Water
Sidney Wolinsky, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
Baby Driver
Jonathan Amos, ACE & Paul Machliss, ACE

Get Out 
Gregory Plotkin

I, Tonya
Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE

Lady Bird
Nick Houy

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Jon Gregory, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Coco
Steve Bloom

Despicable Me 3
Clair Dodgson

The Lego Batman Movie
David Burrows, ACE, Matt Villa & John Venzon, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Cries From Syria
Aaron I. Butler

Jane
Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE, Will Znidaric, Brett Morgen

Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold

Ann Collins

LA 92
TJ Martin, Scott Stevenson, Dan Lindsay

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (SMALL SCREEN):
The Defiant Ones – Part 1
Lasse Järvi, Doug Pray

Five Came Back: The Price of Victory
Will Znidaric

The Nineties – Can We All Get Along?
Inbal Lessner, ACE

Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge – 01
Ben Sozanski, ACE, Geeta Gandbhir; Andy Grieve, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Black-ish: “Lemons”
John Peter Bernardo, Jamie Pedroza

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: “Josh’s Ex-Girlfriend Wants Revenge”
Kabir Akhtar, ACE & Kyla Plewes

Portlandia: “Amore”
Heather Capps, Ali Greer, Jordan Kim

Will & Grace: “Grandpa Jack”
Peter Beyt

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Curb Your Enthusiasm: “Fatwa!”
Steven Rasch, ACE

Curb Your Enthusiasm: “The Shucker”
Jonathan Corn, ACE

Glow: “Pilot”
William Turro, ACE

Veep: “Chicklet”
Roger Nygard, ACE & Gennady Fridman

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Better Call Saul: “Chicanery”
Skip Macdonald, ACE

Better Call Saul: “Witness”
Kelley Dixon, ACE & Skip Macdonald, ACE

Fargo: “Aporia”
Henk Van Eeghen, ACE

Fargo: “Who Rules the Land of Denial”
Andrew Seklir, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Big Little Lies: “You Get What You Need”
David Berman

Stranger Things

Game of Thrones: “Beyond the Wall”
Tim Porter, ACE

The Handmaid’s Tale: “Offred”
Julian Clarke, ACE & Wendy Hallam Martin

Stranger Things: “The Gate”
Kevin D. Ross, ACE

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Feud: “Pilot”
Adam Penn, ACE & Ken Ramos

Genius: Einstein “Chapter One”
James D. Wilcox

The Wizard of Lies
Ron Patane

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Deadliest Catch: “Lost at Sea”
Rob Butler, ACE & Ben Bulatao, ACE
 
Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath: “The Perfect Scientology Family”
Reggie Spangler, Ben Simoff, Kevin Hibbard & Vince Oresman

Vice News Tonight: “Charlottesville: Race & Terror”
Tim Clancy, Cameron Dennis, John Chimples & Denny Thomas

Final ballots will be mailed on January 5, and voting ends on January 18. The Blue Ribbon screenings, where judging for all television categories and the documentary film category take place, occurs on January 14. Projects in the aforementioned categories are viewed and judged by committees comprised of professional editors (all ACE members). All 950+ ACE members vote during the final balloting of the ACE Eddies, including active members, life members, affiliate members and honorary members.

London’s Lola provides VFX for three holiday shows

London’s Lola Post Production has been busy leading up to the holidays, working on three shows scheduled to air over the Christmas period: Little Women (BBC One), Grandpa’s Great Escape (BBC One) and Ratburger (Sky One).

The team created over 50 shots for Grandpa’s Great Escape. Based on the book by David Walliams and produced by King Bert, it’s the story of Grandpa, a World War II flying ace, who now suffers from Alzheimer’s disease and is moved to an old peoples’ home called Twilight Towers, run by Miss Dandy.

Grandpa’s Great Escape

Lola’s Tim Zaccheo created an entirely CG landscape, sky and planes (and avatars of the characters) in Side Effects Houdini and PlanetSide Software’s Terragen. Chris Glew and Desi Valcheva comped the greenscreen cockpit shots of Grandpa and Jack as they’re pursued by RAF jet fighters.

Another King Bert production and David Walliams adaptation is Ratburger (our main image). Lola completed more than 100 shots for this gruesome yet funny story. Ratburger follows a young girl named Zoe, who befriends a baby rat and names him Armitage. He’s no ordinary rat — he can dance and that’s where Lola came in. They built a photoreal CG dancing rat to take over from the on-set Armitage and to perform the more dangerous stunts.

Lola’s animation team (headed by Helen Bucknall) produced the dancing rat action for this Sky One Christmas Eve offering.

For Playground TV’s three-part adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, Lola created around 80 VFX shots.

AICP and AICE to merge January 1

The AICP and AICE are celebrating the New Year in a very special way — they are merging into one organization. These two associations represent companies that produce and finish the majority of advertising and marketing content in the moving image. Post merger, AICP and AICE will function as a single association under the AICP brand. They will promote and advocate for independent production and post companies when it comes to producing brand communications for advertising agencies, advertisers and media companies.

The merger comes after months of careful deliberations on the part of each association’s respective boards and final votes of approval by their memberships. Under the newly merged association’s structure, executive director of AICE Rachelle Madden will assume the title of VP, post production and digital production affairs of AICP. She will report to president/CEO of AICP Matt Miller. Madden is now tasked with taking the lead on AICP’s post production offerings, including position papers, best practices, roundtables, town halls and other educational programs. She will also lead a post production council, which is being formed to advise the AICP National Board on post matters.

Former AICE members will be eligible to join the General Member Production companies of AICP, with access to all benefits starting in 2018. These include: Participation in the Producers’ Health Benefits Plan (PHBP); the AICP Legal Initiative (which provides legal advice on contracts with agencies and advertisers); and access to position papers, guidelines and other tools as they relate to business affairs and employment issues. Other member benefits include access to attend meetings, roundtables, town halls and seminars, as well as receiving the AICP newsletter, member discounts on services and a listing in the AICP membership directory on the AICP website.

All AICP offerings — including its AICP Week Base Camp for thought leadership — will reflect the expanded membership to include topics and issues pertaining to post production. Previously created AICE documents, position papers and forms will now live on aicp.com.

The AICP was founded in 1972 to protect the interests of independent commercial producers, crafting guidelines and best practice in an effort to help its members run their businesses more effectively. Through its AICP Awards, the organization celebrates creativity and craft in marketing communications.

AICE was founded in 1998 when three independent groups representing editing companies in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York formed a national association to discuss issues and undertake initiatives affecting post production on a broader scale. In addition to editing, the full range of post production disciplines, including color correction, visual effects, audio mixing and music and sound design are represented.

From AICP’s perspective, says Miller, merging the two organizations has benefits for members of both groups. “As we grow more closely allied, it makes more sense than ever for the organizations to have a unified voice in the industry,” he notes. He points out that there are numerous companies that are members of both organizations, reflecting the blurring of the lines between production and post that’s been occurring as media platforms, technologies and client needs have changed.

For Madden, AICE’s members will be joining an organization that provides them with a firm footing in terms of resources, programs, benefits and initiatives. “There are many reasons why we moved forward on this merger, and most of them involve amplifying the voice of the post production industry by combining our interests and advocacy with those of AICP members. We now become part of a much larger group, which gives us a strength in numbers we didn’t have before while adding critical post production perspectives to key discussions about business practices and industry trends.”

Main Image: Matt Miller and Rachelle Madden