Tag Archives: post production

Behind the Title: Park Road Post’s Anthony Pratt

NAME: Anthony Pratt

COMPANY: Park Road Post Production

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Park Road is a bespoke post production facility, and is part of the Weta Group of Companies based on the Miramar Peninsular in Wellington, New Zealand.

We are internationally recognized for our award-winning sound and picture finishing for TV and film. We walk alongside all kinds of storytellers, supporting them from shoot through to final delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Workflow Architect — Picture

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I get to think about how we can work with a production to wrap process and people around a project, all with a view of achieving the best result at the end of that process. It’s about taking a step back and challenging our current view while thinking about what’s next.

We spend a lot of time working with the camera department and dailies team, and integrating their work with editorial and VFX. I work alongside our brilliant director of engineering for the picture department, and our equally skilled systems technology team — they make me look good!

From a business development perspective, I try to integrate the platforms and technologies we advance into new opportunities for Park Road as a whole.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I quite like outreach around the company and the group, so presenting and sharing is fun — and it’s certainly not always directly related to the work in the picture department. Our relationships with film festivals, symposia, the local industry guilds and WIFT always excite me.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite time of all is when we get to see our clients work in a cinema with an audience for the first time — then the story is really real.

It’s great when our team is actively engaged as a creative partner, especially during the production phase. I enjoy learning from our technical team alongside our creative folk, and there’s always something to learn.

We have fantastic coffee and baristas; I get to help QC that throughout my day!

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
It’s always hard when a really fantastic story we’ve helped plan for isn’t greenlit. That’s the industry, of course, but there are some stories we really want to see told! Like everyone, there are a few Monday mornings that really need to start later.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I get a huge kick on the days we get to sign off the final DCP for a theatrical release. It’s always inspiring seeing all that hard work come together in our cinema.

I am also particularly fond of summer days where we can get away from the facility for a half hour and eat lunch on a beach somewhere with the crew — in Miramar a beach is only 10 minutes away.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be building my own business and making my own work — if it wasn’t strictly film related it would still be narrative — and I’m always playing with technology, so no doubt I’d be asking questions about what that meant from a lived perspective, regardless of the medium. I’d quite probably be distilling a bit more gin as well!

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION? HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I think it kind of chose me in the end… I’ve always loved the movies and experimented with work in various media types from print and theatre through animation and interactivity — there was always a technology overtone — before landing where I needed to be: in cinema.

I came to high-end film post somewhat obliquely, having built an early tapeless TV pipeline; I was able to bring that comfort with digital acquisition to an industry transitioning from 35mm in the mid 2000s.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m profoundly privileged to work for a company owned by Peter Jackson, and I have worked on every project of his since The Lovely Bones. We are working on Christian Rivers’ Mortal Engines at present. We recently supported the wonderful Jess Hall shooting on the Alexa 65 for Ghost in the Shell. He’s a really smart DOP.

I really enjoy our offshore clients. As well as the work we do with our friends in the USA. we’ve done some really great work recently with clients in China and the Middle East. Cultural fusion is exhilarating.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
We worked with director Geoff Murphy to restore and revisit his seminal New Zealand feature from 1983 UTU Redux, and that was the opening night feature for the 2013 NZ International Film Festival. It was incredibly good fun, was honorable and is a true taonga in our national narrative.

A Park Road Mistika grading suite.

The Hobbit films were a big chunk of the last decade for us, and our team was recognized with multiple awards. The partnerships we built with SGO, Quantum, Red and Factorial are strong to this day. I was very fortunate to collect some of those awards on our team’s behalf, and was delighted to have that honor.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I rely on clean water and modern medicine to help keep myself, and our wider community, safe from harm. And I am really conscious that to keep that progress moving forward we’re going to have to shepherd our natural world one hell of a lot better.

Powerful computing and fast Internet transformed not only our work, but time and distance for me. I’ve learned more about film, music and art because of the platforms running without friction on the Internet than I would have dared dreamed in the ‘90s.

I hold in my hand a mobile access point that can not only access a mind-bogglingly large world of knowledge and media, but can also dynamically represent that information for my benefit and allow me to acknowledge the value of trust in that connection — there’s hope for us in the very large being accessible by way of the very small.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I kind of abandoned Facebook a few years ago, but Film Twitter has some amazing writers and cinematographers represented. I tend to be a bit of a lurker most other places — sometimes the most instructive exercise is to observe! Our private company Slack channels supplement the rest of my social media time.

To be honest, most of our world is respectfully private, but I do follow @ParkRoadPost on Instagram and Twitter.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Our team has a very broad range of musical tastes, and we tend to try and share that with each other… and there is always Radiohead. I have a not-so-secret love of romantic classical music and lush film scores. My boss and I agree very much on what rock (and a little alt-country) should sound like, so there’s a fair bit of that!

When my headphones are on there is sometimes old-school liquid or downbeat electronica, but mostly I am listening to the best deep house that Berlin and Hamburg have to offer while I work.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
A quick walk around the peninsular is a pretty good way of chilling out, especially if it’s dusk or dawn — then I can watch some penguins on the rocks while ships come in and out of the harbor!

My family (including the furry ones!) are incredible, and they help provide perspective in all things.

Wellington is the craft beer capital of New Zealand, so there’s always an opportunity for some food and an interesting drop from Garage Project (or Liberty brewing out of Auckland) with mates in town. I try and hang out with a bunch of my non-industry friends every month or so — those nights are definitely my favorite for music, and are good for my soul!

Sim Group purchases Vancouver’s The Crossing Studios

Sim Group, a family of companies offering production and post services across TV, feature film and commercials, has strengthened its place in the industry with the acquisition of Vancouver-based The Crossing Studios. This full-service studio and production facility adds approximately 400,000 square feet to Sim’s footprint.

With proximity to downtown Vancouver, the city’s international airport and all local suppliers, The Crossing Studios has been home to many television series, specials and feature films. In addition to providing full-service studio rentals, mill/paint/lockup space and production office space, The Crossing Studios also offer post production services, including Avid suite rentals, dailies, color correction and high-speed connectivity.

The Crossing Studios was founded by Dian Cross-Massey in 2015 and is the second-largest studio facility in the lower mainland, comprised of nine buildings in Vancouver, all are located just 30 minutes from downtown. Cross-Massey has over 25 years of experience in the industry, having worked as a writer, executive producer, visual effects supervisor, director, producer and a production manager. Thanks to this experience, Cross-Massey prides herself on knowing first-hand how to anticipate client needs and contributes to the success of her clients’ projects.

“When I was a producer, I worked with Sim regularly and always felt they had the same approach to fair, honest work as I did, so when the opportunity presented itself to combine resources and support our shared clients with more offerings, the decision to join together felt right,” says Cross-Massey.

The Crossing Studios clients include Viacom, Fox, Nickelodeon, Lifetime, Sony Pictures, NBCUniversal and ABC.

“The decision to add The Crossing Studios to the Sim family was a natural one,” says James Haggarty, CEO, Sim Group. “Through our end-to-end services, we pride ourselves on delivering streamlined solutions that simplify the customer experience. Dian and her team are extremely well respected within the entertainment industry, and together, we’ll not only be able to support the incredible growth in the Vancouver market, but clients will have the option to package everything they need from pre-production through post for better service and efficiencies.”

Caringo offering 100TB of free S3 scale-out storage to M&E firms

Caringo, a scale-out cloud and object storage platform company, is offering complimentary full-featured 100TB Swarm licenses to qualified media & entertainment firms with a need to store, manage and protect their growing library of digital assets while keeping them securely accessible.

Qualified firms include but are not limited to recording studios, content creation and post production houses, broadcasters and film studios.

“IT execs in the M&E space are under extreme pressure to provide long-term accessible storage and instant search and delivery to customers and viewers,” said Adrian Herrera, VP of marketing at Caringo. “The cloud isn’t a viable option for many because of security and cost concerns. The solution to this is using the same technology that powers major clouds — object storage — secure in their datacenter.”

The complimentary 100TB license and integration consultation is immediately available to qualified M&E firms. Interested parties can visit their website for more info.

The system offers:
• Hardware and server use for content. Use up to 95% of hard drive space and 100% of drive bays for digital assets.
• The ability to automatically add performance or capacity in 90 seconds and continuously upgrade hardware without downtime or disruption to asset accessibility.
• Automated policy-based protection to optimize for rapid access or data center footprint delivering enterprise-grade durability while defending against ransomware attacks.
• Cross-platform collaboration and access enabled by Write/Read/Edit via HTTP, S3 or NFS interchangeably.
• Rapid asset retrieval and instant delivery via integrated search with the ability to add custom metadata.

Main Image: NEP’s control room where Caringo’s solutions are in use.

Mistika Ultima offering storage connectivity via ATTO HBAs

SGO has certified ATTO’s 12Gb ExpressSAS host bus adapters (HBAs) for use with its high-end post system, the Mistika Ultima. This new addition can help post teams to better manage large data transfers and offer support for realtime editing of uncompressed 4K video.

The latest addition to the ATTO ExpressSAS family, the 12Gb SAS/SATA HBA provides users with fast storage connectivity while allowing scalability for next-gen platforms and infrastructures. Optimized for extremely low latency and high-bandwidth data transfer, ExpressSAS HBAs offer a wide variety of port configurations, RAID-0, -1, and -1e.

“Projects that our customers are working on are becoming incredibly data heavy and the integration of ATTO products into a Mistika solution will help smooth and speed up data transfers, shortening production times,” said Miguel Angel Doncel, CEO of SGO.

Chatting up IBC’s Michael Crimp about this year’s show

Every year, many from our industry head to Amsterdam for the International Broadcasting Convention. With IBC’s start date coming fast, what better time for the organization’s CEO, Michael Crimp, to answer questions about the show, which runs from September 15-19.

IBC is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. How will you celebrate?
In addition to producing a commemorative book, and our annual party, IBC is starting a new charitable venture, supporting an Amsterdam group that provides support through sport for disadvantaged and disabled children. If you want to play against former Ajax players in our Saturday night match, bid now to join the IBC All-Stars.

It’s also about keeping the conversation going. We are 50 years on and have a huge amount to talk about — from Ultra HD to 5G connectivity, from IP to cyber security.

How has IBC evolved over the past 10 years?
The simple answer is that IBC has evolved along with the industry, or rather IBC has strived to identify the key trends which will transform the industry and ensure that we are ahead of the curve.

Looking back 10 years, digital cinema was still a work in progress: the total transition we have now seen was just beginning. We had dedicated areas focused on mobile video and digital signage, things that we take for granted today. You can see the equivalents in IBC2017, like the IP Showcase and all the work done on interoperability.

Five years ago we started our Leaders’ Summit, the behind-closed-doors conference for CEOs from the top broadcasters and media organizations, and it has proved hugely successful. This year we are adding two more similar, invitation-only events, this time aimed at CTOs. We have a day focusing on cyber security and another looking at the potential for 5G.

We are also trying a new business matchmaking venue this year, the IBC Startup Forum. Working with Media Honeypot, we are aiming to bring startups and scale-ups together with the media companies that might want to use their talents and the investors who might back the deals.

Will IBC and annual trade shows still be relevant in another 50 years?
Yes, I firmly believe they will. Of course, you will be able to research basic information online — and you can do that now. We have added to the online resources available with our IBC365 year-round online presence. But it is much harder to exchange opinions and experiences that way. Human nature dictates that we learn best from direct contact, from friendly discussions, from chance conversations. You cannot do that online. It is why we regard the opportunity to meet old friends and new peers as one of the key parts of the IBC experience.

What are some of the most important decisions you face in your job on a daily basis?
IBC is an interesting business to head. In some ways, of course, my job as CEO is the same as the head of any other company: making sure the staff are all pulling in the same direction, the customers are happy and the finances are secure. But IBC is unlike any other business because our focus is on spreading and sharing knowledge, and because our shareholders are our customers. IBC is organized by the industry for the industry, and at the top of our organization is the Partnership Board, which contains representatives of the six leading professional and trade bodies in the industry: IABM, IEE, IET, RTS, SCTE and SMPTE.

Can you talk a bit about the conference?
One significant development from that first IBC 50 years ago is the nature of the conference. The founders were insistent that an exhibition needed a technical conference, and in 1967 it was based solely on papers outlining the latest research.

Today, the technical papers program still forms the center piece of the conference. But today our conference is much broader, speaking to the creative and commercial people in our community as well as the engineering and operational.

This year’s conference is subtitled “Truth, Trust and Transformation,” and has five tracks running over five days. Session topics range from the deeply technical, like new codec design, to fake news and alternative facts. Speakers range from Alberto Duenas, the principal video architect at chipmaker ARM to Dan Danker, the product director at Facebook.

How are the attendees and companies participating in IBC changing?
The industry is so much broader than it once was. Consumers used to watch television, because that was all that the technology could achieve. Today, they expect to choose what they want to watch, when and where they want to watch it, and on the device and platform which happen to be convenient at the time.

As the industry expands, so does the IBC community. This year, for example, we have the biggest temporary structure we have ever built for an IBC, to house Hall 14, dedicated to content everywhere.

Given that international travel can be painful, what should those outside the EU consider?
Amsterdam is, in truth, a very easy place for visitors in any part of the world to reach. Its airport is a global hub. The EU maintains an open attitude and a practical approach to visas when required, so there should be no barriers to anyone wanting to visit IBC.

The IBC Innovation Awards are always a draw. Can you comment on the calibre of entries this year?
When we decided to add the IBC Innovation Awards to our program, our aim was to reflect the real nature of the industry. We wanted to reward the real-world projects, where users and technology partners got together to tackle a real challenge and come up with a solution that was much more than the sum of its parts.

Our finalists range from a small French-language service based in Canada to Google Earth; from a new approach to transmitters in the USA to an online service in India; and from Asia’s biggest broadcaster to the Spanish national railway company.

The Awards Ceremony on Sunday night is always one of my highlights. This year there is a special guest presenter: the academic and broadcaster Dr. Helen Czerski. The show lasts about an hour and is free to all IBC visitors.

What are the latest developments in adding capacity at IBC?
There is always talk of the need to move to another venue, and of course as a responsible business we keep this continually under review. But where would we move to? There is nowhere that offers the same combination of exhibition space, conference facilities and catering and networking under one roof. There is nowhere that can provide the range of hotels at all prices that Amsterdam offers, nor its friendly and welcoming atmosphere.

Talking of hotels, visitors this year may notice a large building site between hall 12 and the station. This will be a large on-site hotel, scheduled to be open in time for IBC in 2019.

And regulars who have resigned themselves to walking around the hoardings covering up the now not-so-new underground station will be pleased to hear that the North-South metro line is due to open in July 2018. Test trains are already running, and visitors to IBC next year will be able to speed from the centre of the city in under 10 minutes.

As you mentioned earlier, the theme for IBC2017 is “Truth, Trust and Transformation.” What is the rationale behind this?
Everyone has noticed that the terms “fake news” and “alternative facts” are ubiquitous these days. Broadcasters have traditionally been the trusted brand for news: is the era of social media and universal Internet access changing that?

It is a critical topic to debate at IBC, because the industry’s response to it is central to its future, commercially, as well as technically. Providing true, accurate and honest access to news (and related genres like sport) is expensive and demanding. How do we address this key issue? Also, one of the challenges of the transition to IP connectivity is the risk that the media industry will become a major target for malware and hackers. As the transport platform becomes more open, the more we need to focus on cyber security and the intrinsic design of safe, secure systems.

OTT and social media delivery is sometimes seen as “disruptive,” but I think that “transformative” is the better word. It brings new challenges for creativity and business, and it is right that IBC looks at them.

Will VR and AR be addressed at this year’s conference?
Yes, in the Future Zone, and no doubt on the show floor. Technologies in this area are tumbling out, but the business and creative case seems to be lagging behind. We know what VR can do, but how can we tell stories with it? How can we monetize it? IBC can bring all the sides of the industry together to dig into all the issues. And not just in debate, but by seeing and experiencing the state of the art.

Cyber security and security breaches are becoming more frequent. How will IBC address these challenges?
Cyber security is such a critical issue that we have devoted a day to it in our new C-Tech Forum. Beyond that, we have an important session on cyber security on Friday in the main conference with experts from around the world and around the industry debating what can and should be done to protect content and operations.

Incidentally, we are also looking at artificial intelligence and machine learning, with conference sessions in both the technology and business transformation strands.

What is the Platform Futures — Sport conference aiming to address?
Platform Futures is one of the strands running through the conference. It looks at how the latest delivery and engagement technologies are opening new opportunities for the presentation of content.

Sport has always been a major driver – perhaps the major driver – of innovation in television and media. For many years now we have had a sport day as part of the conference. This year, we are dedicating the Platform Futures strand to sport on Sunday.

The stream looks at how new technology is pushing boundaries for live sports coverage; the increasing importance of fan engagement; and the phenomenon of “alternative sports formats” like Twenty20 cricket and Rugby 7s, which provide lucrative alternatives to traditional competitions. It will also examine the unprecedented growth of eSports, and the exponential opportunities for broadcasters in a market that is now pushing towards the half-billion-dollar size.

 

Industry vets open NYC post boutique Twelve

Colorist Lez Rudge and veteran production and post executives Marcelo Gandola, Axel Ericson and Ed Rilli have joined forces to launch New York City-based Twelve, a high-end post boutique for the advertising, film and television industries. Twelve has already been working on campaigns for Jagermeister, Comcast, Maybelline and the NY Rangers.

Twelve’s 4,500-square-foot space in Manhattan’s NoMad neighborhood features three Blackmagic Resolve color rooms, two Autodesk Flame suites and a 4K DI theater with a 7.1 Dolby surround sound system and 25-person seating capacity. Here, clients also have access to a suite of film and production services — editorial, mastering, finishing and audio mixing — as part of a strategic alliance with Ericson and his team at Digital Arts. Ericson, who brings 25 years of experience in film and television, also serves as managing partner of Twelve.

From Twelve’s recent Avion tequila campaign.

Managing director Rilli will handle client relations, strategy, budgets and deadlines, among other deliverables for the business. He was previously head of production at Nice Shoes for 17 years. His long list of agency clients includes Hill Holiday, Publicis, Grey and Saatchi & Saatchi and projects for Dunkin Donuts, NFL, Maybelline and Ford.

Gandola was most recently chief operations officer at Harbor Picture Company. Other positions include EVP at Hogarth, SVP of creative services at Deluxe, VP of operations at Company 3 and principal of Burst @ Creative Bubble, a digital audio and sound design company.

On the creative side, Rudge was formerly a colorist and partner at Nice Shoes. Since 2015, Rudge has also been focusing on his directorial career. His most recent campaign for the NY Rangers and Madison Square Garden — a concept-to-completion project via Twelve — garnered more than 300,000 Facebook hits on its first day.

While Twelve is currently working on short-form content, such as commercials and marketing campaigns, the company is making a concerted effort to extend its reach into film and television. Meanwhile, the partners also have a significant roster expansion in the works.

“After all of these years on both the vendor and client side, we’ve learned how best to get things done,” concludes Gandola. “In a way, technology has become secondary, and artistry is where we keep the emphasis. That’s the essence of what we want to provide clients, and that’s ultimately what pushed us to open our own place.”

Main Image (L-R): Ed Rilli, Axel Ericson, Lez Rudge & Marcelo Gandola

Assimilate and Z Cam offer second integrated VR workflow bundle

Z Cam and Assimilate are offering their second VR integrated workflow bundle, which features the Z Cam S1 Pro VR camera and the Assimilate Scratch VR Z post tools. The new Z Cam S1 Pro offers a higher level of image quality that includes better handling of low lights and dynamic range with detailed, well-saturated, noise-free video. In addition to the new camera, this streamlined pro workflow combines Z Cam’s WonderStitch optical-flow stitch feature and the end-to-end Scratch VR Z tools.

Z Cam and Assimilate have designed their combined technologies to ensure as simple a workflow as possible, including making it easy to switch back and forth between the S1 Pro functions and the Scratch VR Z tools. Users can also employ Scratch VR Z to do live camera preview, prior to shooting with the S1 Pro. Once the shoot begins with the S1 Pro, Scratch VR Z is then used for dailies and data management, including metadata. You don’t have to remove the SD cards and copy; it’s a direct connect to the PC and then to the camera via a high-speed Ethernet port. Stitching of the imagery is then done in Z Cam’s WonderStitch — now integrated into Scratch VR Z — as well as traditional editing, color grading, compositing, support for multichannel audio from the S1 or external ambisonic sound, finishing and publishing (to all final online or standalone 360 platforms).

Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z  bundle highlights include:
• Lower light sensitivity and dynamic range – 4/3-inch CMOS image sensor
• Premium 220 degree MFT fisheye lens, f/2.8~11
• Coordinated AE (automatic exposure) and AWB ( automatic white-balance)
• Full integration with built-in Z Cam Sync
• 6K 30fps resolution (post stitching) output
• Gig-E port (video stream & setting control)
• WonderStich optical-flow based stitching
• Live Streaming to Facebook, YouTube or a private server, including text overlays and green/composite layers for a virtual set
• Scratch VR Z single, a streamlined, end-to-end, integrated VR post workflow

“We’ve already developed a few VR projects with the S1 Pro VR camera and the entire Neotopy team is awed by its image quality and performance,” says Alex Regeffe, VR post production manager at Neotopy Studio in Paris. “Together with the Scratch VR Z tools, we see this integrated workflow as a game changer in creating VR experiences, because our focus is now all on the creativity and storytelling rather than configuring multiple, costly tools and workflows.”

The Z Cam S1 Pro/Scratch VR Z bundle is available within 30 days of ordering. Priced at $11,999 (US), the bundle includes the following:
– Z CamS1 Pro Camera main unit, Z Cam S1 Pro battery unit (w/o battery cells), AC/DC power adapter unit and power connection cables (US, UK, EU).
– A Z Cam WonderStitch license, which is an optical flow-based stitching feature that performs offline stitching of files from Z Cam S1 Pro. Z Cam WonderStitch requires a valid software license associated with a designated Z Cam S1 Pro, and is nontransferable.
– A Scratch VR Z permanent license: a pro VR end-to-end, post workflow with an all-inclusive, realtime toolset for data management, dailies, conform, color grading, compositing, multichannel and ambisonic sound, and finishing, all integrated within the Z Cam S1 Pro camera. Includes one-year of support/updates.

The companies are offering a tutorial about the bundle.

Larry Chernoff to get 2017 HPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Post production industry veteran Larry Chernoff has been named the 2017 recipient of the HPA Lifetime Achievement Award by the HPA (Hollywood Professional Association). Chernoff will receive the award during the HPA Awards gala on November 16 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The mission of the award is to give recognition to individuals who have, with great service, dedicated their careers to the betterment of the industry. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given at the discretion of the HPA Board and Awards Committee and it is not required to be bestowed every year.

As the recipient of the Los Angeles Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 1997, Chernoff is recognized as a successful entrepreneur, helping to found and lead several successful post production companies that, in turn, have launched hundreds of post production careers. He has built companies and impacted the industry by fostering innovation and by nurturing talented young people to develop their craft, believing that they are the key to a company’s, and the industry’s, future.

Chernoff grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and attended New York’s School of Visual Arts. Between high school and college, at the age of 18, he landed a job as a “can carrier” at a commercial production house. Once there, he learned to sync dailies. When an editor called in sick, he was asked to fill in, thus beginning his editing career. In 1974, Chernoff moved to Los Angeles and joined Filmcore, a recently formed commercial editing company. Within two years he became partner, going on to play a lead role in the founding of post houses Encore and Riot. He served as president of 4MC, later Ascent Media Creative Services, overseeing operations in Los Angeles, New York and London.

Chernoff joined MTI Film as a board member in 2003 and was elevated to CEO in 2005. Under his direction, the company has become a leading independent provider of post finishing and restoration services. Its software division has been the source of products, including DRS Nova, a tool for digital restoration, and Cortex, a family of solutions for dailies processing and workflow management.

In acknowledging the honor, Chernoff said, “I am, of course, honored to be recognized by my peers. I follow an illustrious list of previous honorees who, like me, have dedicated their professional lives to the advancement of post production and its standing in the industry. I share this award with many people who have consistently partnered with me to create outstanding contributions to the work and industry we love.”

In addition to The Lifetime Achievement Award, other special awards, including Engineering Excellence, The Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation, and honors in 12 creative categories (editing, visual effects, sound and color grading) will be given out at the gala.

Paris Can Wait director Eleanor Coppola

By Iain Blair

There are famous Hollywood dynasties, and then there’s the Coppolas, with such giant talents as Francis, Sofia, Roman, Nic Cage and the late Carmine.

While Eleanor, the matriarch of the clan and Francis’ wife, has long been recognized as a multi-talented artist in her own right, thanks to her acclaimed documentaries and books (Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, Notes on the Making of Apocalypse Now, Notes on a Life), it’s only recently — at the grand age of 81 — that she’s written, produced and directed her feature film debut, Paris Can Wait.

Eleanor Coppola on set in France.

It stars Oscar-nominee Diane Lane as a woman who unexpectedly takes a trip through France, which reawakens her sense of self and her joie de vivre. At a crossroads in her life, and long married to an inattentive movie producer (Alec Baldwin), she finds herself taking a car trip from Cannes to Paris with a garrulous business associate of her husband. What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a journey of discovery involving mouthwatering meals, spectacular wines and picturesque sights.

Maybe it’s something in the water — or the famed Coppola wine, or her genes — but like her many family members, Eleanor Coppola seems to have a natural gift for capturing visual magic, and the French road trip unfolds like a sun-drenched adventure that makes you want to pack your bags and join the couple immediately.

I recently spoke with Coppola about making the film.

You began directing feature films at an age when most directors have long since retired. What took you so long?
I made documentaries, and my nature is to be an observer, so I never thought about doing a fiction film. But I had this true story, this trip I took with a Frenchman, and it felt like a really good basis for a road movie — and I love road movies — so I began writing it and included all these wonderful, picturesque places we stopped at, and someone suggested that we break down. Then my son said, “You should fix it,” so I gradually added all these textures and colors and flavors that would make it as rich as possible.

I heard it took a long time to write?
I began writing, and once I had the script together I began looking for a director, but I couldn’t quite find the right person. Then one morning at breakfast (my husband) Francis said, “You should direct it.” I’d never thought of directing it myself, so I took classes in directing and acting to prepare, but it ended up taking six years to bring all the elements together.

I assume getting financing was hard?
It was, especially as I’m not only a first-time feature director, but my movie has no aliens, explosions, kidnappings, guns, train wrecks — and nobody dies. It doesn’t have any of the usual elements that bankers want to invest in, so it took a long time to patch together the money — a bit here, a bit there. That was probably the hardest part of the whole thing. You can’t get the actors until you have the financing, and you can’t get the financing until you have the actors. It’s like Catch-22, and you’re caught in this limbo between the two while you try and get it all lined up.

After Francis persuaded you to direct it, did he give you a lot of encouragement and advice?
I asked him a lot about working with actors. I’ve been on so many sets with him and watched him directing, and he was very helpful and supportive, especially when we ran into the usual problems every film has.

I heard that just two weeks into shooting, the actor originally set to play Michael was unable to get out of another project?
Yes, and I was desperate to find a replacement, and it was such short notice. But by some miracle, Alec Baldwin called Francis about something, and he was able to fly over to France at the last moment and fill in. And other things happened. We were going to shoot the opening at the Hotel Majestic in Cannes, but a Saudi Arabian prince arrived and took over the entire hotel, so we had to scramble to find another location.

How long was the shoot?
Just 28 days, so it was a mad dash all over France, especially as we had so many locations I wanted to fit in. Pretty much every day, the AD and the production manager would come over to me after lunch and say, “Okay, you had 20 shots scheduled for today, but we’re going to have to lose four or five of them. Which ones would you like to cut?” So you’re in a constant state of anxiety and wondering if the shots you are getting will even cut together.Since we had so little time and money, we knew that we could never come back to a location if we missed something and that we’d have to cut some stuff out altogether, and there’s the daily race to finish before you lose light, so it was very difficult at times.

Where did you do the post?
All back at our home in Napa Valley, where we have editing and post production facilities all set up at the winery.

You worked with editor Glen Scantlebury, whose credits include Godfather III and Bram Stoker’s Dracula for Francis, Michael Bay’s The Rock, Armageddon and Transformers, Conair, The General’s Daughter and Tomb Raider. What did he bring to the project?
What happened was, I had a French editor who assembled the film while we were there, but it didn’t make financial sense to then bring her back to Napa, so Francis put me together with Glen and we worked really well together. He’s so experienced, but not just cutting these huge films. He’s also cut a lot of indies and smaller films and documentaries, and he did Palo Alto for (my granddaughter) Gia, so he was perfect for this. He didn’t come to France.

What were the main editing challenges?As they say, there are three films you make: the one you wrote, the one you shot and the one you then edit and get onto the screen. It’s always the same challenge of finding the best way of telling the story, and then we screened versions for people to see where any weaknesses were, and then we would go back and try to correct them. Glen is very creative, and he’d come up with fresh ways of dealing with any problems. We ended up spending a couple of months working on it, after he spent an initial month at home doing his own assembly.

I must say, I really enjoyed the editing process more than anything, because you get to relax more and shape the material like clay and mold it in a way you just can’t see when you’re in the middle of shooting it. I love the way you can move scenes around and juxtapose things that suddenly work in a whole new way.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music?
They’re so important, and can radically alter a scene and the emotions an audience feels. I had the great pleasure of working with sound designer Richard Beggs, who won the Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and who’s done the sound for so many great films, including Rain Man and Harry Potter, and he’s worked with (my daughter) Sofia on some of her films like Lost in Translation and Marie Antoinette.

He’s a master of his craft and helped bring the film alive. Also, he recommended the composer Laura Karpman, who’s won several Emmys and worked with Spielberg and John Legend and all sorts of people. Music is really the weakest part for me, because I just don’t know what to do, and like Glen, Laura was just a perfect match for me. The first things she wrote were a little too dark, I felt, as I wanted this to be fun and light, and she totally got it, and also used all these great finger-snaps, and the score just really captures the feeling I wanted. We mixed everything up in Napa as well.

Eleanor Coppola and writer Iain Blair.

Do you want to direct another feature now, or was once enough?
I don’t have anything cooking that I want to make, but I’ve recently made two short story films, and I really enjoyed doing that since I didn’t have to wait for years to get the financing. I shot them in Northern California, and they were a joy to do.

There’s been a lot of talk about the lack of opportunity for women directors. What’s your advice to a woman who wants to direct?
Well, first off, it’s never too late! (Laughs) Look at me. I’m 81, and this is my first narrative film. Making any film is hard, finding the financing is even harder. Yes, it is a boy’s club, but if you have a story to tell never give up. Women should have a voice.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Audio post vet Rex Recker joins Digital Arts in NYC

Rex Recker has joined the team at New York City’s Digital Arts as a full-time audio post mixer and sound designer. Recker, who co-founded NYC’s AudioEngine after working as VP and audio post mixer at Photomag recording studios, is an award-winning mixer with a long list of credits. Over the span of his career he has worked on countless commercials with clients including McCann Erickson JWT, Ogilvy & Mather, BBDO, DDB, HBO and Warner Books.

Over the years, Recker has developed a following of clients who seek him out for his audio post mixer talents — they seek his expertise in surround sound audio mixing for commercials airing via broadcast, Web and cinemas. In addition to spots, Recker also mixes long-form projects, including broadcast specials and documentaries.

Since joining the Digital Arts team, Recker has already worked on several commercial campaigns, promos and trailers for such clients as Samsung, SlingTV, Ford, Culturelle, Orvitz, NYC Department of Health, and HBO Documentary Films.

Digital Arts, owned by Axel Ericson, is an end-to-end production, finishing and audio facility.