Tag Archives: post production Shuttle XL

Review: G-Tech’s G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters, Thunderbolt 3

By Brady Betzel

As video recording file sizes continue to creep up, so do our hard drive storage size, RAID and bandwidth needs. These days we are seeing a huge amount of recorded media needing to be offloaded, edited and color graded in the field. G-Technology has stepped up to bat with its 24TB G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series adapters, Thunderbolt 3 edition — a portable, durable, adaptable and hardware-RAID powered storage solution.

In terms of physical appearance, the G-Speed Shuttle XL is just shy of 10x7x16-inches and weighs in at around 25 pounds. It’s not exactly lightweight, but with spinning hard drives it’s what I would expect. To get a lighter RAID you would need SSD drives, but those would most likely triple the price. The case itself is actually pretty rugged; it seems like it could withstand a minimal amount of production abuse, but again without being an SSD RAID you have some risks since spinning disk drives are more volatile.

The exterior is made out of a hard plastic, and it would have been nice to have the rubberized feel on at least the handle of the Shuttle XL — similar to G-Tech’s Rugged line of drives — but it still feels solid. To open the Shuttle XL, there is an easy-to-access switch on the front. There is a lock switch that took me a few wiggles to work correctly, but I would loved to have seen a key lock that would to add a little more security since this RAID will most likely house important data. When closing the front door, the slide lock wouldn’t fully close unless I pushed hard a second time. If I didn’t do that the door would open by itself. On the back are the two Thunderbolt 3 ports, a power cable plug and a Kensington Lock slot. On the inside of this particular Shuttle XL are six 4TB 7200 RPM Enterprise Class HGST (Western Digital) drives configured to a RAID-5 by default and two EV Series Bay adapters.

Since I was on a Windows-based PC I had to download and format the drives since it comes formatted for Mac OS by default. The EV adapters allow for quick connection of memory products like Atomos Master Caddy drives, CFast 2.0 or even Red Mini Mags. This gives you fast connection on set for transferring and backing up your media without extra card readers. The HGST hard drives are enterprise class, which very simply means that the drives are rated to be run 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year more reliably than standard hard drives. This should do as it says, but if it doesn’t there is a five-year limited warranty that will back up this product. Basically, if the RAID or its drives fail due to craftsmanship errors, they will replace or repair it. Keep in mind, you are responsible for shipping the item back to them, and with the heavy weight of the RAID it may be costly if it goes bad. They will not cover accidental damage or misuse. Another caveat to G-Technology’s limited warranty is that they will not cover commercial use, so if you plan to use the G-Speed on a commercial shoot, you might not be covered. You should contact G-Technology’s support to check if your use will be covered: 1.888.426.5214 if you are in North or South America, including Canada.

The Shuttle XL comes pre-RAID formatted in a RAID-5 configuration for the Mac OS, but it can also be formatted as RAID-0,-1, -6, -10 and 50 using the G-Speed Studio Utility. Here is a quick RAID primer in case you forget the differences:

– RAID-0: All drives are used as one large drive. This gives you the fastest RAID performance.
– RAID-1: Total amount of drive space is halved, so if one drive goes out you will not lose your data and it will be rebuilt over time once the bad drive is replaced. The speed is slower than RAID 0. Essentially each drive is mirrored to an identical drive in the RAID.
– RAID-5: Needs at least three drives and uses each drive to create a safety net if a drive fails. The plus side is that it is faster than RAID-1 and includes a safety net. This is why G-Technology ships this drive with this configuration. You will have about 80% of usable disk space. The downside is that if a drive goes out you, will have degraded speed until the RAID fully repopulates itself once the bad drive is replaced.
– RAID-6: Works similar to RAID-5 but has two safety nets (a.k.a. parita blocks). One drawback of RAID-5 is that if a second drive goes out while the RAID database is rebuilding, all data can be lost permanently. RAID-6 adds another safety net so that if two drives go out you can still rebuild your RAID. The downside is that you have only 60% of your storage usable.
RAID-10: RAID-10 requires at least four drives and cuts your usable drive count in half. The upside is that if a drive goes out, you will not have degraded speed during the RAID rebuilding process, which depending on the data involved can be multiple days or longer. RAID-10 essentially mirrors a striped RAID.
– RAID-50: RAID-50 can be thought of as a RAID-5 + 0 and needs a minimum of six drives. It’s two RAID arrays running RAID-5. In each of those RAID arrays you will lose one drive’s worth of usable space. The good news is that if you can have a drive in each RAID array go out while minimizing total RAID loss unlink RAID-5 alone.

Those RAID formatting options are a lot to think about, and frankly I have to look them up about every year or so. If you didn’t read all about RAID formatting, then you may want to stick with RAID-5, which gives you a nice combo of safety vs. speed. If you are a risk taker, backup your data regularly, or if you can survive a total RAID failure, RAID-0 might be more your style. But in the end, keep in mind no matter how good your equipment is or how high a level of RAID protection you have, you can always suffer a total RAID failure and backups are always important.

I tested the 24TB Shuttle XL in each of the available RAID configurations on an HP ZBook Studio G4 with a Thunderbolt 3 interface using the AJA System Test Utility. Each test used the 4GB testing size, 3840×2160 resolution and DNxHR 444 codec since I typically use RAIDS when editing video or motion based projects, which tend to be higher file size. As a caveat, when I lowered the file size to 1GB the speeds increased tremendously. For instance, in RAID-0 the Read/Write speeds were 953MB/s/2274MB/s compare to those below. Here are my results, including the total size of the RAID:

RAID-0: 21.83TB – Read: 960 MB/s – Write: 1451 MB/s
RAID-1: 10.91TB – Read: 439 MB/s – Write: 639 MB/s
RAID-5: 18.19TB – Read: 950 MB/s – Write: 1171 MB/s ***
RAID-6: 14.55TB – Read: 683 MB/s – Write: 750 MB/s
RAID-10: 10.91TB – Read: 506 MB/s – Write: 667 MB/s
RAID-50: 14.55TB – Read: 614 MB/s – Write: 933 MB/s

***I pulled a drive while working live in RAID-5 and while the read/write speed degraded to Read: 326MB/s and Write: 858MB/s it continued to function while the RAID rebuilt itself.

For some reference I also ran the AJA System Test on my local hard drive and got Read 1606MB/s — Write 1108MB/s, which is pretty fast, so the Shuttle XL is doing well. I also wanted to test real-world copy speed and using 50GB of Cinema DNG files here are the results:

RAID-0: 2 mins. 7 seconds (~403 MB/s)
RAID-1: 3 mins. 35 seconds (~238 MB/s)
RAID-5: 2 mins. 49 seconds (~303 MB/s)
RAID-6: 3 mins. 6 seconds(~275 MB/s)
RAID-10: 3 mins. 17 seconds (~260 MB/s)
RAID-50: 2 mins. 45 seconds (~310 MB/s)

While these results are pretty self explanatory, when configured in RAID-5 they are pretty impressive. If you ran the tests continuously for a day you would probably see some variation on the average, maybe a little higher than what you see here. The speeds are pretty impressive, especially when considering a drive can give out and you can still be running at a pretty high bandwidth. Technically, G-Technology states that the Shuttle XL can reach a maximum transfer rate up to 1500MB/s — which I was close to hitting. This is very surprising since typically these specs are a little like miles-per-gallon on new cars but not in this case. I really appreciate that accuracy and think it will go a long way with consumers. In terms of other apps, I wasn’t running anything other than the AJA System Test, but I also did not shut down anything in the background so it is possible some background apps affected these transfer numbers, but I wouldn’t say they had a lot of influence, you should see similar results.

Summing Up
In the end, the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters Thunderbolt 3 Edition is a great choice for a RAID that might need to stand up to a little abuse in the field. The 24TB version of the Shuttle XL that connects using Thunderbolt 3 has a retail price of $2,799.95 with EV adapters being sold separately for between $99.95 and $199.95. The Shuttle XL is available from 24TB all the way up to 72TB, which will cost you $7,699.95.

If you like the idea of multiple RAID options, including ones that require more than four drives, the Shuttle XL has a decent price, a great build quality that should last you for years thanks to its Enterprise Class hard drives, and high bandwidth — the only thing better would be to load it with some SSD drives, but that could cost another $10,000 and would call for another review. Check out the Shuttle XL at G-Technologies website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.