Tag Archives: NAB

Quantum’s StorNext 6 Release Now Shipping

The industry’s ongoing shift to higher-resolution formats, its use of more cameras to capture footage and its embrace of additional distribution formats and platforms is putting pressure on storage infrastructure. For content creators and owners to take full advantage of their content, storage must not only deliver scalable performance and capacity but also ensure that media assets remain readily available to users and workflow applications. Quantum’s new StorNext 6 is engineered to address these requirements.

StorNext 6 is now shipping with all newly purchased Xcellis offerings and is also available at no additional cost to current Xcellis users running StorNext 5 under existing support contracts.

Leveraging its extensive real-world 4K testing and a series of 4K reference architectures developed from test data, Quantum’s StorNext platform provides scalable storage that delivers high performance using less hardware than competing systems. StorNext 6 offers a new quality of service (QoS) feature that empowers facilities to further tune and optimize performance across all client workstations, and on a machine-by-machine basis, in a shared storage environment.

Using QoS to specify bandwidth allocation to individual workstations, a facility can guarantee that more demanding tasks, such as 4K playback or color correction, get the bandwidth they need to maintain the highest video quality. At the same time, QoS allows the facility to set parameters ensuring that less timely or demanding tasks do not consume an unnecessary amount of bandwidth. As a result, StorNext 6 users can take on work with higher-resolution content and easily optimize their storage resources to accommodate the high-performance demands of such projects.

StorNext 6 includes a new feature called FlexSpace, which allows multiple instances of StorNext — and geographically distributed teams — located anywhere in the world to share a single archive repository, allowing collaboration with the same content. Users at different sites can store files in the shared archive, as well as browse and pull data from the repository. Because the movement of content can be fully automated according to policies, all users have access to the content they need without having it expressly shipped to them.

Shared archive options include both public cloud storage on Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud via StorNext’s existing FlexTier capability and private cloud storage based on Quantum’s Lattus object storage or, through FlexTier third-party object storage, such as NetApp StorageGrid, IBM Cleversafe and Scality Ring. In addition to simplifying collaborative work, FlexSpace also makes it easy for multinational companies to establish protected off-site content storage.

FlexSync, which is new to StorNext 6, provides a fast and simple way to synchronize content between multiple StorNext systems that is highly manageable and automated. FlexSync supports one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-one file replication scenarios and can be configured to operate at almost any level: specific files, specific folders or entire file systems. By leveraging enhancements in file system metadata monitoring, FlexSync recognizes changes instantly and can immediately begin reflecting those changes on another system. This approach avoids the need to lock the file systems to identify changes, reducing synchronization time from hours or days to minutes, or even seconds. As a result, users can also set policies that automatically trigger copies of files so that they are available at multiple sites, enabling different teams to access content quickly and easily whenever it’s needed. In addition, by providing automatic replication across sites, FlexSync offers increased data protection.

StorNext 6 also gives users greater control and selectivity in maximizing their use of storage on an ROI basis. When archive policies call for storage across disk, tape and the cloud, StorNext makes a copy for each. A new copy expiration feature enables users to set additional rules determining when individual copies are removed from a particular storage tier. This approach makes it simpler to maintain data on the storage medium most appropriate and economical and, in turn, to free up space on more expensive storage. When one of several copies of a file is removed from storage, a complementary selectable retrieve function in StorNext 6 enables users to dictate which of the remaining copies is the first priority for retrieval. As a result, users can ensure that the file is retrieved from the most appropriate storage tier.

StorNext 6 offers valuable new capabilities for those facilities that subscribe to Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rules for content auditing and tracking. The platform can now track changes in files and provide reports on who changed a file, when the changes were made, what was changed and whether and to where a file was moved. With this knowledge, a facility can see exactly how its team handled specific files and also provide its clients with details about how files were managed during production.

As facilities begin to move to 4K production, they need a storage system that can be expanded for both performance and capacity in a non-disruptive manner. StorNext 6 provides for online stripe group management, allowing systems to have additional storage capacity added to existing stripe groups without having to go offline and disrupt critical workflows.

Another enhancement in StorNext 6 allows StorNext Storage Manager to automate archives in an environment with Mac clients, effectively eliminating the lengthy retrieve process previously required to access an archived directory that contains offline files  which can number in the hundreds of thousands, or even millions.

JVC GY-LS300CH camera offering 4K 4:2:2 recording, 60p output

JVC has announced version 4.0 of the firmware for its GY-LS300CH 4KCAM Super 35 handheld camcorder. The new firmware increases color resolution to 4:2:2 (8-bit) for 4K recording at 24/25/30p onboard to SDXC media cards. In addition, the IP remote function now allows remote control and image viewing in 4K. When using 4K 4:2:2 recording mode, the video output from the HDMI/SDI terminals is HD.

The GY-LS300CH also now has the ability to output Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) video at 60/50p via its HDMI 2.0b port. Through JVC’s partnership with Atomos, the GY-LS300CH integrates with the new Ninja Inferno and Shogun Inferno monitor recorders, triggering recording from the camera’s start/stop operation. Plus, when the camera is set to J-Log1 gamma recording mode, the Atomos units will record the HDR footage and display it on their integrated, 7-inch monitors.

“The upgrades included in our Version 4.0 firmware provide performance enhancements for high raster recording and IP remote capability in 4K, adding even more content creation flexibility to the GY-LS300CH,” says Craig Yanagi, product marketing manager at JVC. “Seamless integration with the new Ninja Inferno will help deliver 60p to our customers and allow them to produce outstanding footage for a variety of 4K and UHD productions.”

Designed for cinematographers, documentarians and broadcast production departments, the GY-LS300CH features JVC’s 4K Super 35 CMOS sensor and a Micro Four Thirds (MFT) lens mount. With its “Variable Scan Mapping” technology, the GY-LS300CH adjusts the sensor to provide native support for MFT, PL, EF and other lenses, which connect to the camera via third-party adapters. Other features include Prime Zoom, which allows shooters using fixed-focal (prime) lenses to zoom in and out without loss of resolution or depth, and a built-in HD streaming engine with Wi-Fi and 4G LTE connectivity for live HD transmission directly to hardware decoders as well as JVCVideocloud, Facebook Live and other CDNs.

The Version 4.0 firmware upgrade is free of charge for all current GY-LS300CH owners and will be available in late May.

Bluefish444 releases IngeSTore 1.1, adds edit-while-record capability

Bluefish444 was at NAB with Version 1.1 of its IngeSTore multichannel capture software, which is now available free from the Bluefish444 website. Compatible with all Bluefish444 video cards, IngeSTore captures multiple simultaneous channels of 3G/HD/SD-SDI to popular media files for archive, edit, encoding or analysis. IngeSTore improves efficiency in the digitization workflow by enabling multiple simultaneous recordings from VTRs, cameras and any other SDI source.

The new version of IngeSTore software also adds “Edit-While-Record” functionality and additional support for shared storage including Avid. Bluefish444 has partnered with Drastic Technologies to bring additional CODEC options to IngeSTore v1.1 including XDCAM, DNxHD, JPEG 2000, AVCi and more. Uncompressed, DV, DVCPro and DVCPro HD codecs will be made available free to Bluefish444 customers in the IngeSTore update.

The Edit-While-Record functionality allows editors access captured files while they are still being recorded to disk. Content creation tools such as Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Assimilate Scratch can output SDI and HDMI with Bluefish444 video cards while IngeSTore is recording and the files are growing in size and length.

MTI Film updates Cortex for V.4, includes Dolby Vision HDR metadata editing

MTI Film is updating its family of Cortex applications and tools, highlighted by Cortex V.4. In addition to legacy features such as a dailies toolset, IMF and AS-02 packaging and up-res algorithms, Cortex V.4 adds DCP packaging (with integrated ACES color support), an extended edit tool and officially certified Dolby Vision metadata editing capabilities.

“We allow users to manipulate Dolby Vision HDR metadata in the same way that they edit segments of video,” says Randy Reck, MTI Film’s director of development. “In the edit tool, they can graphically trim, cut and paste, add metadata to video, analyze new segments that need metadata and adjust parameters within the Dolby Vision metadata on a shot-by-shot basis.”

With the integration of the Dolby Vision ecosystem, Cortex V.4 provides a method for simultaneously QC-ing HDR and SDR versions of a shot with Dolby Vision metadata. For delivery, the inclusion of the Dolby Vision “IMF-like” output format allows for the rendering and delivery of edited Dolby Vision metadata alongside HDR media in one convenient package.

Cortex V.4’s Edit Tool has been updated to include industry-standard trimming and repositioning of edited segments within the timeline through a drag-and-drop function. The entire look of the Edit Tool (available in the Dailies and Enterprise editions of Cortex) has also been updated to accommodate a new dual-monitor layout, making it easier for users to scrub through media in the source monitor while keeping the composition in context in the record monitor.

MTI Film is also offering a new subscription-based DIT+ edition of Cortex. “It doesn’t make sense for productions to purchase a full software package if their schedule includes a hiatus when it won’t be used,” explains Reck.

DIT+ contains all aspects of the free DIT version of Cortex with the added ability to render HD ProRes, DNx and H.264 files for delivery. A DIT+ subscription starts at $95 per month, and MTI Film is offering a special NAB price of $595 for the first year.

Timecode and GoPro partner to make posting VR easier

Timecode Systems and GoPro’s Kolor team recently worked together to create a new timecode sync feature for Kolor’s Autopano Video Pro stitching software. By combining their technologies, the two companies have developed a VR workflow solution that offers the efficiency benefits of professional standard timecode synchronization to VR and 360 filming.

Time-aligning files from the multiple cameras in a 360° VR rig can be a manual and time-consuming process if there is no easy synchronization point, especially when synchronizing with separate audio. Visually timecode-slating cameras is a disruptive manual process, and using the clap of a slate (or another visual or audio cue) as a sync marker can be unreliable when it comes to the edit process.

The new sync feature, included in the Version 3.0 update to Autopano Video Pro, incorporates full support for MP4 timecode generated by Timecode’s products. The solution is compatible with a range of custom, multi-camera VR rigs, including rigs using GoPro’s Hero 4 cameras with SyncBac Pro for timecode and also other camera models using alternative Timecode Systems products. This allows VR filmmakers to focus on the creative and not worry about whether every camera in the rig is shooting in frame-level synchronization. Whether filming using a two-camera GoPro Hero 4 rig or 24 cameras in a 360° array creating resolutions as high as 32K, the solution syncs with the same efficiency. The end results are media files that can be automatically timecode-aligned in Autopano Video Pro with the push of a button.

“We’re giving VR camera operators the confidence that they can start and stop recording all day long without the hassle of having to disturb filming to manually slate cameras; that’s the understated benefit of timecode,” says Paul Bannister, chief science officer of Timecode Systems.

“To create high-quality VR output using multiple cameras to capture high-quality spherical video isn’t enough; the footage that is captured needs to be stitched together as simply as possible — with ease, speed and accuracy, whatever the camera rig,” explains Alexandre Jenny, senior director of Immersive Media Solutions at GoPro. “Anyone who has produced 360 video will understand the difficulties involved in relying on a clap or visual cue to mark when all the cameras start recording to match up video for stitching. To solve that issue, either you use an integrated solution like GoPro Omni with a pixel-level synchronization, or now you have the alternative to use accurate timecode metadata from SyncBac Pro in a custom, scalable multicamera rig. It makes the workflow much easier for professional VR content producers.”

Eizo intros DCI-4K reference monitor for HDR workflows

Eizo will be at NAB next week demonstrating its ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 31.1-inch reference monitor, which offers DCI-4K resolution (4096×2160) for pro HDR post workflows.

Eizo says the ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 can display both very bright and very dark areas on the screen without sacrificing the integrity of either. The monitor achieves the 1000cd/m (typical) high brightness level needed for an HDR content display. It can achieve a typical contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 for displaying true blacks.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports both the HLG (Hybrid Log-Gamma) and PQ (Perceptual Quantization) curves so post pros can rely on a monitor compliant with industry standards for HDR video.

The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 supports various video formats, including HDMI input compatible with 10-bit 4:2:2 at 50/60p. The DisplayPort input supports up to 10-bit 4:4:4 at 50/60p. Additional features include 98 percent of the DCI-P3 color space smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 24-bit LUT (look-up-table) and an optional light-shielding hood.
The ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 will begin shipping in early 2018.

In addition to the new ColorEdge Prominence CG3145 HDR reference monitor, Eizo currently offers optional HLG and PQ curves for many of its current CG Series monitors. The optimized gamma curves render images to appear more true to how the human eye perceives the real world compared to SDR. This HDR gamma support is available as an option for ColorEdge CG318-4K, CG248-4K, CG277 and CG247X. Both gamma curves were standardized by the ITU as ITU-R BT.2100. In addition, the PQ curve was standardized by SMPTE as ST-2084.

Film and sound editor Dody Dorn to headline NAB SuperMeet

The 16th Annual Las Vegas SuperMeet is taking place on April 25 at the Rio Hotel in Las Vegas during the NAB Show. Oscar-nominated film and sound editor Dody Dorn will be the featured presenter.

SuperMeets are networking gatherings of Final Cut Pro, Adobe, Avid and Resolve editors, gurus and digital filmmakers. Tickets are on sale now on the SuperMeet website. Doors open at 4:30pm with the SuperMeet Digital Showcase featuring 20 software and hardware developers. SuperMeet presentations will begin at 7:00pm and continue until 11:00pm.

Dorn received an Oscar nomination for Christopher Nolan’s debut feature, Memento (along with nominations for an AFI Film Award and the ACE Eddie Award for her editing). That same year, Dorn earned Emmy and Eddie Award noms for her work on the ABC miniseries, Life With Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows.

Throughout the 1980s, she worked mostly in the sound arena, with additional supervising and sound editing credits that include Silverado, The Big Chill, Mrs. Soffel, Racing With the Moon, The Big Easy and Children of a Lesser God.

Dorn started the sound company Sonic Kitchen in 1989 with sound designer/composer Blake Leyh, and, in 1990, won a Golden Reel Award for Best Sound from the Motion Picture Sound Editors Society for James Cameron’s The Abyss.

Following her work on Memento, Dorn reunited with filmmaker Nolan on his next feature project, Insomnia. She then began a collaboration with Ridley Scott, editing his next three films — Matchstick Men, Kingdom of Heaven and A Good Year.

Dorn most recently completed work on 2017’s Power Rangers.

NAB: The making of Jon Favreau’s ‘The Jungle Book’

By Bob Hoffman

While crowds lined up above the south hall at NAB to experience the unveiling of the new Lytro camera, across the hall a packed theatre conference room geeked-out as the curtain was slightly pulled back during a panel on the making of director Jon Favreau’s cinematic wonder, The Jungle Book.   Moderated by ICG Magazine editor David Geffner, Oscar-winning VFX supervisor Rob Legato, ASC, along with Jungle Book producer Brigham Taylor and Technicolor master colorist Mike Sowa enchanted the packed room with stories of the making and finishing of the hit film.

Legato first started developing his concepts for “virtual production” techniques on Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator, and shortly thereafter, with James Cameron and his hit Avatar. During the panel, Legato took the audience through a set of short demo clips of various scenes in the film while providing background on the production processes used by cinematographer Bill Pope, ASC, and Favreau to capture the live-action component of the film. Legato pointedly explained that his process is informed by a very traditional analog approach. The development of his thinking is based on a commitment to giving the filmmaking team tools and methodologies that allow them to work within their own particular comfort zones.

They may be working in a virtual environment, but Favreau’s wonderful touch is brilliantly demonstrated by the performance of 12-year-old Neel Sethi on his theatrical debut feature. Geffner noted more than once that “the emotional stakes are so well done you get involved emotionally” — without any notion of the technical complexity underlying the narrative.  One other area noted by Legato and Sowa was the myriad of theatrical-HDR deliverables for The Jungle Book, including up to 14-foot lamberts for the 3D presentation.  This film, and presentation, was just another clear indicator that HDR is a clear differentiator that audiences are clamoring for.

Bob Hoffman works at Technicolor in Hollywood.

Pixspan at NAB with 4K storage workflow solutions powered by Nvidia

During the NAB Show, Pixspan was demonstrating new storage workflows for full-quality 4K images powered by the Nvidia Quadro M6000. Addressing the challenges that higher resolutions and increasing amounts of data present for storage and network infrastructures, Pixspan is offering a solution that reduces storage requirements by 50-80 percent, in turn supporting 4K workflows on equipment designed for 2K while enabling data access times that are two to four times faster.

Pixspan software and the Nvidia Quadro M6000 GPU together deliver bit-accurate video decoding at up to 1.3GBs per second — enough to handle 4K digital intermediates or 4K/6K camera RAW files in realtime. Pixspan’s solution is based on its bit-exact compression technology, where each image is compressed into a smaller data file while retaining all the information from the original image, demonstrating how the processing power of the Quadro M6000 can be put to new uses in imaging storage and networking to save time and help users  meet tight deadlines.

Colorist Society International launches for color pros

Kevin Shaw

Kevin Shaw

At the opening of NAB, motion picture and television colorists Jim Wicks and Kevin Shaw announced Colorist Society International (CSI), the first the first professional association for colorists devoted exclusively to furthering and honoring the professional achievements of the colorist community. A non-profit organization, CSI represents professional colorists and promotes the creative art and science of color grading, restoration and finishing by advancing the craft, education, and public awareness of the art and science of color grading and color correction.

The Colorist Society International is a paid membership organization that will seek to increase the entertainment value of film and digital projects by attaining artistic pre-eminence and scientific achievement in the creative art of color; and to bring into close alliance those color artists who desire to advance the prestige and dignity of the color profession as educational and cultural resource rather than a labor union or guild.

“The colorist community has been growing for quite some time,” says Shaw. “We believe that a society by, for, and about colorists is long overdue. Current representation for colorists is fragmented and we feel that the industry would be better served with the coherent voice of the Colorist Society International”

Jim Wicks

Jim Wicks

Wicks added, “The notion of a colorist society is not farfetched. In much the same way, directors, cinematographers, and editors — the artists that we work closely with — have their own professional associations, each with similar mission statements and objectives.”

Membership is open to professional colorists, editor/colorists, DITs, telecine operators, color timers, finishers, and color scientists. Corporate sponsors and members from alliance organizations, such as cinematographers, directors, producers, are also welcome.