Tag Archives: NAB 2018

NAB 2018: My key takeaways

By Twain Richardson

I traveled to NAB this year to check out gear, software, technology and storage. Here are my top takeaways.

Promise Atlas S8+
First up is storage and the Promise Atlas S8+. The Promise Atlas S8+ is a network attached storage solution for small groups that features easy and fast NAS connectivity over Thunderbolt3 and 10GB Ethernet.

The Thunderbolt 3 version of the Atlas S8+ offers two Thunderbolt 3 ports, four 1Gb Ethernet ports, five USB 3.0 ports and one HMDI output. The 10g BaseT version swaps in two 10Gb/s Ethernet ports for the Thunderbolt 3 connections. It can be configured up to 112TB. The unit comes empty, and you will have to buy hard drives for it. The Atlas S8+ will be available later this year.

Lumaforge

Lumaforge Jellyfish Tower
The Jellyfish is designed for one thing and one thing only: collaborative video workflow. That means high bandwidth, low latency and no dropped frames. It features a direct connection, and you don’t need a 10GbE switch.

The great thing about this unit is that it runs quiet, and I mean very quiet. You could place it under your desk and you wouldn’t hear it running. It comes with two 10GbE ports and one 1GbE port. It can be configured for more ports and goes up to 200TB. The unit starts at $27,000 and is available now.

G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD
The G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is blazing-fast storage with data transfer rates of up to 2800MB/s. It was said that you could transfer as much as a terabyte of media in seven minutes or less. That’s fast. Very fast.

It provides up to three-meter drop protection and comes with a single Thunderbolt 3 port and is bus powered. It also features a 1000lb crush-proof rating, which makes it ideal for being used in the field. It will be available in May with a capacity of 500GB. 1TB and 2TB versions will be available later this year.

OWC Thunderblade
Designed to be rugged and dependable as well as blazing fast, the Thunderblade has a rugged and sleek design, and it comes with a custom-fit ballistic hard-shell case. With capacities of up 8TB and data transfer rates of up to 2800MB/s, this unit is ideal for on-set workflows. The unit is not bus powered, but you can connect two ThunderBlades that can reach speeds of up to 3800MB/s. Now that’s fast.

OWC Thunderblade

It starts at $1,199 for the 1TB and is available now for purchase.

OWC Mercury Helios FX External Expansion Chassis
Add the power of a high-performance GPU to your Mac or PC via Thunderbolt 3. Performance is plug-and-play, and upgrades are easy. The unit is quiet and runs cool, making it a great addition to your environment.

It starts at $319 and is available now.

Flanders XM650U
This display is beautiful, absolutely beautiful.

The XM650U is a professional reference monitor designed for color-critical monitoring of 4K, UHD, and HD signals. It features the latest large-format OLED panel technology, offering outstanding black levels and overall picture performance. The monitor also features the ability to provide a realtime downscaled HD resolution output.

The FSI booth was showcasing the display playing HD, UHD, and UHD HDR content, which demonstrates how versatile the device is.

The monitor goes for $12,995 and is available for purchase now.

DaVinci Resolve 15
What could arguably be the biggest update yet to Resolve is version 15. It combines editing, color correction, audio and now visual effects all in one software tool with the addition of Fusion. Other additions include ADR tools in Fairlight and a sound library. The color and edit page has additions such as a LUT browser, shared grades, stacked timelines, closed captioning tools and more.

You can get DR15 for free — yes free — with some restrictions to the software and you can purchase DR15 Studio for $299. It’s available as a beta at the moment.

Those were my top take aways from NAB 2018. It was a great show, and I look forward to NAB 2019.


Twain Richardson is a co-founder of Frame of Reference, a boutique post production company located on the beautiful island of Jamaica. Follow the studio and Twain on Twitter: @forpostprod @twainrichardson

NAB 2018: A closer look at Firefly Cinema’s suite of products

By Molly Hill

Firefly Cinema, a French company that produces a full set of post production tools, premiered Version 7 of its products at NAB 2018. I visited with co-founder Philippe Reinaudo and head of business development Morgan Angove at the Flanders Scientific booth. They were knowledgeable and friendly, and they helped me to better understand their software.

Firefly’s suite includes FirePlay, FireDay, FirePost and the brand-new FireVision. All the products share the same database and Éclair color management, making for a smooth and complete workflow. However, Reinaudo says their programs were designed with specific UI/UXs to better support each product’s purpose.

Here is how they break down:
FirePlay: This is an on-set media player that supports most any format or file. The player is free to use, but there’s a paid option to include live color grading.

FireDay: Firefly Cinema’s dailies software includes a render tree for multiple versions and supports parallel processing.

FirePost: This is Firefly Cinema’s proprietary color grading software. One of its features was a set of “digital filters,” which were effects with adjustable parameters (not just pre-set LUTs). I was also excited to see the inclusion of curve controls similar to Adobe Lightroom’s Vibrance setting, which increases the saturation of just the more muted colors.

FireVision: This new product is a cloud-based review platform, with smooth integration into FirePost. Not only do tags and comments automatically move between FirePost and FireVision, but if you make a grading change in the former and hit render, the version in FireVision automatically updates. While other products such as Frame.io have this feature, Firefly Cinema offers all of these in the same package. The process was simple and impressive.

One of the downsides of their software package is its lack of support for HDR, but Raynaud says that’s a work in progress. I believe this will likely begin with ÉclairColor HDR, as Reinaudo and his co-founder Luc Geunard are both former Éclair employees. It’s also interesting that they have products for every step after shooting except audio and editing, but perhaps given the popularity of Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere and Avid Pro Tools, those are less of a priority for a young company.

Overall, their set of products was professional, comprehensive and smooth to operate, and I look forward to seeing what comes next for Firefly Cinema.


Molly Hill is a motion picture scientist and color nerd, soon-to-be based out of San Francisco. You can follow her on Twitter @mollymh4.

NAB 2018: How Fortium’s MediaSeal protects your content

By Jonathan Abrams

Having previously used Fortium‘s MediaSeal, and seeing it as the best solution for protecting content, I set up a meeting with the company’s CEO, Mathew Gilliat-Smith, at NAB 2018. He talked with me about the product’s history and use cases, and he demonstrated the system in action.

Fortium’s MediaSeal was created at the request of NBCUniversal in 2014, so it was a product born out of need. NBCUniversal did not want any unencrypted files to be in use on sound stages. The solution was to create a product that works on any file residing on any file system and that easily fits existing workflows. The use of encryption on the files would eliminate human error and theft as methods of obtaining usable content.

MediaSeal’s decryptor application works on Mac OS, Linux and Windows (oh my!). The decryptor application runs at the file level of the OS. This is where the objective of easily fitting an existing workflow is achieved. By running on the file level of the OS, any file can be handed off to any application. The application being used to open a file has no idea that the file it is opening has been encrypted.

Authentication is the process of proving who you are to the decryptor application. This can be done three ways. The simplest way is to only use a password. But if this is the only method that is used, anyone with the password can decrypt the file. This is important in terms of protection because nothing prevents the person with the password from sharing both the file and the decryptor password with someone else. “But this is clearly a lot better than having sensitive files sitting unprotected and vulnerable,” explained Gilliat-Smith during my demo.

The second and more secure method of authenticating with the decryptor application is to use an iLok license. Even if a user shares the decryptor password, the user would need an iLok with the appropriate asset attached to their computer in order to decrypt the file.

The third and most secure method of authenticating with the decryptor application is to use a key server. This can be hosted either locally or on Amazon Web Services (AWS). “Authentication on AWS is secure following MPAA guidelines,” said Gilliat-Smith. The key server has an address book of authorized users and allows the content owner to dictate who can access the protected content and when. With the password and the iLok license combined, this gives the person protecting their content great control. A user would need to know the decryption password, have the iLok license and be authorized by the key server in order to access the protected file.

Once a file is decrypted, the decryptor application sends access logs to a key server. These log entries include file copy and export/save operations. Can a file be saved out of encryption while it is in a decrypted state? Yes it can. The operation will be logged with the key server. A rogue user will have the content they seek, though the owners of the content will know that the security has been circumvented. There is no such thing as perfect security. This scenario shows the balance between a strong level of security, where the user has to provide up to three authentication levels for access, and usability, where the OS has no idea that an encrypted file is being decrypted for access.

During the demonstration, the iLok with the decryption license was removed from the computer (Windows OS). Within seconds, a yellow window with black text appeared and access to the encrypted asset was revoked. MediaSeal also works with iLok licenses assigned to a machine instead of a physical iLok. This would make transferring the asset more difficult. Each distributed decryptor asset is unique.

For content providers looking to encrypt their assets, the process is as simple as right-clicking a file and selecting encrypt. Those looking to encrypt multiple files can choose to encrypt a folder recursively. If content is added to a watch folder, it is encrypted without user intervention. Encryption can also be nested. This allows the content provider to send a folder of files to
users and allow one set of users access to some files while allowing a second set of users access to additional files. “MediaSeal uses AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption, which is tested by NGS Secure and ISE,” said Gilliat-Smith. He went on to explain that “Fortium has a system for monitoring the relatively easy steps of getting users onboard and helping them out as
needed.”

MediaSeal can also be integrated with Aspera Faspex. The use of MediaSeal would allow a vendor to meet MPAA DS 11.4, which is to encrypt content at rest and in motion using a scalable approach where full file system encryption (such as\ FileVault 2 on Mac OS) is not desirable. Content providers who want their key server on premises can setup an MPAA Approved system with firewalls and two proxy servers. Vendors have a similar setup when the content provider uses a key server.

While there are many use cases for MediaSeal, the one use case we discussed was localization. If a content provider needs multiple language versions of their content, they can distribute the mix-minus language to localization vendors and assign each vendor a unique decryptor key. If the content provider uses all three authentication methods (password, iLok, key server), they can control the duration of the localization vendor’s access.

My own personal experience with MediaSeal was as simple as one could hope for. I downloaded an iLok license to the iLok being used to decrypt the content, and Avid’s Pro Tools worked with the decrypted asset as if it were any other file.

Fortium’s MediaSeal achieves the directive that NBCUniversal issued in 2014 with aplomb. It is my hope that more content providers who trust vendors with their content adopt this system because it allows the work to flow, and that benefits everyone involved in the creative process.


Jonathan S. Abrams is the chief technical engineer at Nutmeg, a New York City-based creative marketing, production and post studio.

Colorfront supports HDR, UHD, partners again with AJA

By Molly Hill

Colorfront released new products and updated current product support as part of NAB 2018, expanding their partnership with AJA. Both companies had demos of the new HDR Image Analyzer for UHD, HDR and WCG analysis. It can handle 4K, HDR and 60fps in realtime and shows information in various view modes including parade, pixel picker, color gamut and audio.

Other software updates include support for new cameras in On-Set Dailies and Express Dailies, as well as the inclusion of HDR analysis tools. QC Player and Transkoder 2018 were also released, with the latter now optimized for HDR and UHD.

Colorfront also demonstrated its tone-mapping capabilities (SDR/HDR) right in the Transkoder software, without the FS-HDR hardware (which is meant more for broadcast). Static (one light) or dynamic (per shot) mapping is available in either direction. Customization is available for different color gamuts, as well as peak brightness on a sliding scale, so it’s not limited to a pre-set LUT. Even just the static mapping for SDR-to-HDR looked great, with mostly faithful color reproduction.

The only issues were some slight hue shifts from blue to green, and clipping in some of the highlights in the HDR version, despite detail being available in the original SDR. Overall, it’s an impressive system that can save time and money for low-budget films when there isn’t the budget to hire a colorist to do a second pass.

Samsung’s 360 Round for 3D video

Samsung showed an enhanced Samsung 360 Round camera solution at NAB, with updates to its live streaming and post production software. The new solution gives professional video creators the tools they need — from capture to post — to tell immersive 360-degree and 3D stories for film and broadcast.

“At Samsung, we’ve been innovating in the VR technology space for many years, including introducing the 360 Round camera with its ruggedized design, superior low light and live streaming capabilities late last year,” says Eric McCarty of Samsung Electronics America.

The Samsung 360 Round offers realtime 3D video to PCs using the 360 Round’s bundled software so video creators can now view live video on their mobile devices using the 360 Round live preview app. In addition, the 360 Round live preview app allows creators to remotely control the camera settings, via Wi-Fi router, from afar. The updated 360 Round PC software now provides dual monitor support, which allows the editor to make adjustments and show the results on a separate monitor dedicated to the director.

Limiting luminance levels to 16-135, noise reduction and sharpness adjustments, as well as a hardware IR filter make it possible to get a clear shot in almost no light. The 360 Round also offers advanced stabilization software and the ability to color-correct on the fly, with an intuitive, easy-to-use histogram. In addition, users can set up profiles for each shot and save the camera settings, cutting down on the time required to prep each shot.

The 360 Round comes with Samsung’s advanced Stitching software, which weaves together video from each of the 360 Round’s 17 lenses. Creators can stitch, preview and broadcast in one step on a PC without the need for additional software. The 360 Round also enables fine-tuning of seamlines during a live production, such as moving them away from objects in realtime and calibrating individual stitchlines to fix misalignments. In addition, a new local warping feature allows for individual seamline calibrations in post, without requiring a global adjustment to all seamlines, giving creators quick and easy, fine-grain control of the final visuals.

The 360 Round delivers realtime 4K x 4K (3D) streaming with minimal latency. SDI capture card support enables live streaming through multiple cameras and broadcasting equipment with no additional encoding/decoding required. The newest update further streamlines the switching workflow for live productions with audio over SDI, giving producers less complex events (one producer managing audio and video switching) and a single switching source as the production transitions from camera to camera.

Additional new features:

  • Ability to record, stream and save RAW files simultaneously, making the process of creating dailies and managing live productions easier. Creators can now save the RAW files to make further improvements to live production recordings and create a higher quality post version to distribute as VOD.
  • Live streaming support for HLS over HTTP, which adds another transport streaming protocol in addition to the RTMP and RTSP protocols. HLS over HTTP eliminates the need to modify some restrictive enterprise firewall policies and is a more resilient protocol in unreliable networks.
  • Ability to upload direct (via 360 Round software) to Samsung VR creator account, as well as Facebook and YouTube, once the files are exported.

NAB Day 2 thoughts: AJA, Sharp, QNAP

By Mike McCarthy

During my second day walking the show floor at NAB, I was able to follow up a bit more on a few technologies that I found intriguing the day before.

AJA released a few new products and updates at the show. Their Kumo SDI switchers now have options supporting 12G SDI, but their Kona cards still do not. The new Kona 1 is a single channel of 3G SDI in and out, presumably to replace the aging Kona LHe since analog is being phased out in many places.

There is also a new Kona HDMI, which just has four dedicated HDMI inputs for streaming and switching. This will probably be a hit with people capturing and streaming competitive video gaming. Besides a bunch of firmware updates to existing products, they are showing off the next step in their partnership with ColorFront in the form of a 1RU HDR image analyzer. This is not a product I need personally, but I know it will have an important role to fill as larger broadcast organizations move into HDR production and workflows.

Sharp had an entire booth dedicated to 8K video technologies and products. They were showing off 8Kp120 playback on what I assume is a prototype system and display. They also had 8K broadcast-style cameras on display in operation, outputting Quad 12G SDI that eventually fed an 8K TV with Quad HDMI. They also had a large curved video wall, composed of eight individual 2Kx5K panels. It obviously had large seams, but it had a more immersive feel that the LED based block walls I see elsewhere.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that NAS vendor QNAP has released a pair of 10GbE switches, with both SFP+ and RJ45 ports. I was quoted a price under $600, but I am not sure if that was for the eight- or 12-port version. Either way, that is a good deal for users looking to move into 10GbE, with three to 10 clients — two clients can just direct connect. It also supports the new NBASE-T standard that connects at 2.5Gb or 5Gb instead of 10Gb, depending on the cables and NICs involved in the link. It is of course compatible with 1Gb and 100Mb connections as well.

On a related note, the release of 25GbE PCIe NICs allows direct connections between two systems to be much faster, for not much more cost than previous 10GbE options. This is significant for media production workflows, as uncompressed 4K requires slightly more bandwidth than 10GbE provides. I also learned all sorts of things about the relationship between 10GbE and its quad-channel variant 40GbE, which with the newest implementations is 25GbE, allowing 100GbE when four channels are combined.

I didn’t previously know that 40GbE ports and 100GB ports on switches could be broken into four independent connections with just a splitter cable, which offers some very interesting infrastructure design options — especially as facilities move towards IP video workflows, and SDI over IP implementations and products.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

NAB First Thoughts: Fusion in Resolve, ProRes RAW, more

By Mike McCarthy

These are my notes from the first day I spent browsing the NAB Show floor this year in Las Vegas. When I walked into the South Lower Hall, Blackmagic was the first thing I saw. And, as usual, they had a number of new products this year. The headline item is the next version of DaVinci Resolve, which now integrates the functionality of their Fusion visual effects editor within the program. While I have never felt Resolve to be a very intuitive program for my own work, it is a solution I recommend to others who are on a tight budget, as it offers the most functionality for the price, especially in the free version.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K looks more like a “normal” MFT DSLR camera, although it is clearly designed for video instead of stills. Recording full 4K resolution in RAW or ProRes to SD or CFast cards, it has a mini-XLR input with phantom power and uses the same LP-E6 battery as my Canon DSLR. It uses the same camera software as the Ursa line of devices and includes a copy of Resolve Studio… for $1,300.  If I was going to be shooting more live-action video anytime soon, this might make a decent replacement for my 70D, moving up to 4K and HDR workflows. I am not as familiar with the Panasonic cameras that it is closely competes with in the Micro Four Thirds space.

AMD Radeon

Among other smaller items, Blackmagic’s new UpDownCross HD MiniConverter will be useful outside of broadcast for manipulating HDMI signals from computers or devices that have less control over their outputs. (I am looking at you, Mac users.) For $155, it will help interface with projectors and other video equipment. At $65, the bi-directional MicroConverter will be a cheaper and simpler option for basic SDI support.

AMD was showing off 8K editing in Premiere Pro, the result of an optimization by Adobe that uses the 2TB SSD storage in AMD’s Radeon Pro SSG graphics card to cache rendered frames at full resolution for smooth playback. This change is currently only applicable to one graphics card, so it will be interesting to see if Adobe did this because it expects to see more GPUs with integrated SSDs hit the market in the future.

Sony is showing crystal light emitting diode technology in the form of a massive ZRD video wall of incredible imagery. The clarity and brightness were truly breathtaking, but obviously my camera rendered to the web hardly captures the essence of what they were demonstrating.

Like nearly everyone else at the show, Sony is also pushing HDR in the form of Hybrid Log Gamma, which they are developing into many of their products. They also had an array for their tiny RX0 cameras on display with this backpack rig from Radiant Images.

ProRes RAW
At a higher level, one of the most interesting things I have seen at the show is the release of ProRes RAW. While currently limited to external recorders connected to cameras from Sony, Panasonic and Canon, and only supported in FCP-X, it has the potential to dramatically change future workflows if it becomes more widely supported. Many people confuse RAW image recording with the log gamma look, or other low-contrast visual interpretations, but at its core RAW imaging is a single-channel image format paired with a particular bayer color pattern specific to the sensor it was recorded with.

This decreases the amount of data to store (or compress) and gives access to the “source” before it has been processed to improve visual interpretation — in the form of debayering and adding a gamma curve to reverse engineer the response pattern of the human eye, compared to mechanical light sensors. This provides more flexibility and processing options during post, and reduces the amount of data to store, even before the RAW data is compressed, if at all. There are lots of other compressed RAW formats available; the only thing ProRes actually brings to the picture is widespread acceptance and trust in the compression quality. Existing compressed RAW formats include R3D, CinemaDNG, CineformRAW and Canon CRM files.

None of those caught on as a widespread multi-vendor format, but this ProRes RAW is already supported by systems from three competing camera vendors. And the applications of RAW imaging in producing HDR content make the timing of this release optimal to encourage vendors to support it, as they know their customers are struggling to figure out simpler solutions to HDR production issues.

There is no technical reason that ProRes RAW couldn’t be implemented on future Arri, Red or BMD cameras, which are all currently capable of recording ProRes and RAW data (but not the combination, yet). And since RAW is inherently a playback-only format, (you can’t alter a RAW image without debayering it), I anticipate we will see support in other applications, unless Apple wants to sacrifice the format in an attempt to increase NLE market share.

So it will be interesting to see what other companies and products support the format in the future, and hopefully it will make life easier for people shooting and producing HDR content.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

NAB: AJA intros HDR Image Analyzer, Kona 1, Kona HDMI

AJA Video Systems is exhibiting a tech preview of its new waveform, histogram, vectorscope and Nit level HDR monitoring solution at NAB. The HDR Image Analyzer simplifies monitoring and analysis of 4K/UltraHD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content in production, post, quality control and mastering. AJA has also announced two new Kona cards, as well as Desktop Software v14.2. Kona HDMI is a PCIe card for multi-channel HD and single-channel 4K HDMI capture for live production, streaming, gaming, VR and post production. Kona1 is a PCIe card for single-channel HD/SD 3G-SDI capture/playback. Desktop Software v14.2 adds support for Kona 1 and Kona HDMI, plus new improvements for AJA Kona, Io and T-TAP products.

HDR Image Analyzer
A waveform, histogram, vectorscope and Nit level HDR monitoring solution, the HDR Image Analyzer combines AJA’s video and audio I/O with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1RU chassis. The HDR Image Analyzer is a flexible solution for monitoring and analyzing HDR formats including Perceptual Quantizer, Hybrid Log Gamma and Rec.2020 for 4K/UltraHD workflows.

The HDR Image Analyzer is the second technology collaboration between AJA and Colorfront, following the integration of Colorfront Engine into AJA’s FS-HDR. Colorfront has exclusively licensed its Colorfront HDR Image Analyzer software to AJA for the HDR Image Analyzer.

Key features include:

— Precise, high-quality UltraHD UI for native-resolution picture display
— Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
— Support for SDR (Rec.709), ST2084/PQ and HLG analysis
— CIE graph, Vectorscope, Waveform, Histogram
— Out-of-gamut false color mode to easily spot out-of-gamut/out-of-brightness pixels
— Data analyzer with pixel picker
— Up to 4K/UltraHD 60p over 4x 3G-SDI inputs
— SDI auto-signal detection
— File base error logging with timecode
— Display and color processing look up table (LUT) support
— Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
— Loop-through output to broadcast monitors
— Still store
— Nit levels and phase metering
— Built-in support for color spaces from ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, RED and Sony

“As 4K/UltraHD, HDR/WCG productions become more common, quality control is key to ensuring a pristine picture for audiences, and our new HDR Image Analyzer gives professionals an affordable and versatile set of tools to monitor and analyze HDR productions from start to finish, allowing them to deliver more engaging visuals for viewers,” says Rashby.

Adds Aron Jazberenyi, managing director of Colorfront, “Colorfront’s comprehensive UHD HDR software toolset optimizes the superlative performance of AJA video and audio I/O hardware, to deliver a powerful new solution for the critical task of HDR quality control.”

HDR Image Analyzer is being demonstrated as a technology preview only at NAB 2018.

Kona HDMI
An HDMI video capture solution, Kona HDMI supports a range of workflows, including live streaming, events, production, broadcast, editorial, VFX, vlogging, video game capture/streaming and more. Kona HDMI is highly flexible, designed for four simultaneous channels of HD capture with popular streaming and switching applications including Telestream Wirecast and vMix.

Additionally, Kona HDMI offers capture of one channel of UltraHD up to 60p over HDMI 2.0, using AJA Control Room software, for file compatibility with most NLE and effects packages. It is also compatible with other popular third-party solutions for live streaming, projection mapping and VR workflows. Developers use the platform to build multi-channel HDMI ingest systems and leverage VL42 compatibility on Linux. Features include: four full-size HDMI ports; the ability to easily switch between one channel of UltraHD or four channels of 2K/HD; and embedded HDMI audio in, up to eight embedded channels per input.

Kona 1
Designed for broadcast, post production and ProAV, as well as OEM developers, Kona 1 is a cost-efficient single-channel 3G-SDI 2K/HD 60p I/O PCIe card. Kona 1 offers serial control and reference/LTC, and features standard application plug-ins, as well as AJA SDK support. Kona 1 supports 3G-SDI capture, monitoring and/or playback with software applications from AJA, Adobe, Avid, Apple, Telestream and more. Kona 1 enables simultaneous monitoring during capture (pass-through) and includes: full-size SDI ports supporting 3G-SDI formats, embedded 16-channel SDI audio in/out, Genlock with reference/ LTC input and RS-422.

Desktop Software v14.2
Desktop Software v14.2 introduces support for Kona HDMI and Kona 1, as well as a new SMPTE ST 2110 IP video mode for Kona IP, with support for AJA Control Room, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, part of the Adobe Creative Cloud, and Avid Media Composer. The free software update also brings 10GigE support for 2K/HD video and audio over IP (uncompressed SMPTE 2022-6/7) to the new Thunderbolt 3-equipped Io IP and Avid DNxIP, as well as additional enhancements to other Kona, Io and T-TAP products, including HDR capture with Io 4K Plus. Io 4K Plus and DNxIV users also benefit from a new feature allowing all eight analog audio channels to be configured for either output, input or a 4-In/4-Out mode for full 7.1 ingest/monitoring, or I/O for stereo plus VO and discrete tracks.

“Speed, compatibility and reliability are key to delivering high-quality video I/O for our customers. Kona HDMI and Kona 1 give video professionals and enthusiasts new options to work more efficiently using their favorite tools, and with the reliability and support AJA products offer,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

Kona HDMI will be available this June for $895, and Kona 1 will be available in May for $595. Both are available for pre-order now. Desktop Software v14.2 will also be available in May, as a free download from AJA’s support page.

CatDV MAM expands support for enterprise workflows

Square Box Systems has introduced several enhancements geared to larger-scale enterprise use of its flagship CatDV media asset management (MAM) solution. These include expanded customization capabilities for tailored MAM workflows, new enhancements for cloud and hybrid installations, and expanded support for micro-services and distributed deployments.

CatDV now can operate seamlessly in hybrid IT environments consisting of both on-premises and cloud-based resources, enabling transparent management and movement of content across NAS, SAN, cloud or object storage tiers.

New customization features include enhanced JavaScript support and an all-new custom user interface toolkit. Both the desktop and web versions of CatDV and the system’s Worker automation engine now support JavaScript, and the user interface toolkit enables customers to build completely new user experiences for every CatDV component. Recent CatDV customizations, built on these APIs, include a document analyzer that can extract text from PDFs, photos, and MS Office documents for indexing by CatDV; and a tool for uploading assets to YouTube.

CatDV’s new cloud/hybrid enhancements include integration with file acceleration tools from Aspera, as well as extended support for AWS S3 archive, such as KMS encryption and Glacier support with configurable expedited restores. CatDV has also built an all-new AWS deployment template with proxy playback from S3. CatDV also now includes support for Backblaze B2 archive and Contigo object storage.

In addition, the latest version of CatDV now supports deployment of server plug-in components on separate servers. Examples include data movers for archive plug-ins such as Black Pearl, S3, Azure, and B2.

EditShare intros software-only Flow MAM, more at NAB

During NAB 2018, EditShare launched a new standalone version of its Flow MAM software, designed for non-EditShare storage environments such as Avid Nexis, Storage DNA and Amazon S3. Flow adds an intelligent media management layer to an existing storage infrastructure that can manage millions of assets across multiple storage tiers in different locations.

EditShare will spotlight the new Flow version as well as a new family of solutions in its QScan Automated Quality Control (AQC) software line, offering cost-effective compliance and delivery check capabilities and integration across production, post and delivery. In addition, EditShare will unveil its new XStream EFS auditing dashboard, aligned with Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) best practices to promote security in media-engineered EFS storage platforms.

The Flow suite of apps helps users manage content and associated metadata from ingest through to archive. At the core of Flow are workflow engines that enable collaboration through ingest, search, review, logging, editing and delivery, and a workflow automation engine for automating tasks such as transcoding and delivery. Flow users are able to review content remotely and also edit content on a timeline with voiceover and effects from anywhere in the world.

Along with over 500 software updates, the latest version of Flow features a redesigned and unified UI across web-based and desktop apps. Flow also has new capabilities for remotely viewing Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere edits in a web browser; range markers for enhanced logging and review capabilities; and new software licensing with a customer portal and license management tools. A new integration with EditShare’s QScan AQC software makes AQC available at any stage of the post workflow.

Flow caters to the increased demand for remote post workflows by enabling full remote access to content, as well as integration with leading NLEs such as Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere. Comments James Richings, EditShare managing director, “We are seeing a huge demand from users to interact and collaborate with each other from different locations. The ability to work from anywhere without incurring the time and cost of physically moving content around is becoming much more desirable. With a simple setup, Flow helps these users track their assets, automate workflows and collaborate from anywhere in the world. We are also introducing a new pay-as-you-go model, making asset management affordable for even the smallest of teams.”

Flow will be available through worldwide authorized sales partners and distributors by the end of May, with monthly pricing starting at $19 per user.