Tag Archives: NAB 2014

Archiving solutions at NAB: saving more for later

By Tom Coughlin

With all the 4K content being created for new media workflows and more demonstrations of higher frame rate, image depth, multiple camera projects and even higher future resolutions all that rich content has to live somewhere. The 2014 NAB gave some indications of the future of media archiving. This article will look at developments at several companies providing products for the media archiving industry.

Active Archive Alliance’s chair Floyd Christofferson, director of storage product marketing at SGI, gave me a briefing on their recent activities and the current state of active archiving. I also attended a session at the NAB focused on active archiving. Floyd said that 80-85% of all data, Continue reading

Cinnafilm, Wohler offer file-based media retiming solution

At NAB, Cinnafilm and Wohler Technologies released Cinnafilm’s Tachyon Wormhole, an automated file-based retiming solution that enables up to a plus or minus 10 percent runtime adjustment while preserving video and audio quality as well as closed caption integrity.

Based on Cinnafilm’s Tachyon standards transcoding plug-in for the Wohler RadiantGrid Intelligent Media Transformation Platform, Tachyon Wormhole gives time back to broadcasters (and others who want to re-time content), allowing them, according to Cinnafilm and Wohler, “to realize new revenue opportunities without materially altering the viewer’s experience of their media assets.”

In addition to enabling automated retiming, Tachyon Wormhole also offers all of the features/functionality of the award-winning Tachyon Standards Transcoding Appliance. The features and functionality include standards conversion, high-quality de-interlacing, superlative resolution conversion, inverse telecine, broken cadence removal/correction, and options such as audio loudness correction, color legalization, and watermarking.

Wohler’s RadiantGrid software platform serves as the processing framework for the Tachyon Wormhole appliance. Equipped with Nvidia Tesla GPUs, the technology also facilitates retiming of closed captioning data and integration of audio retiming into the Cinnafilm Tachyon Wormhole video processing workflow. The turnkey system can process up to two HD streams in realtime, handles unlimited channels of audio and resynchronizes CEA-608 and -708 and SMPTE 436M and 360M caption data. Users select their target run time by choosing a specific length or by entering a percentage adjustment.



Eyeon at NAB with new Generation 4K

Toronto — Visual effects and post solutions developer Eyeon Software was at NAB with Generation 4K, its new playback and production solution for 4K HFR up to 120fps stereoscopic.

Incorporating full 7.1 HD audio as well as the ability to drive cinema projectors, such as the Christie Cinema and Mirage series, Generation 4K provides a path to an advanced HFR playback workflow.

Facilities such as Blur Studio, Legend3D, Muse VFX, and VFX director, Douglas Trumbull, have contributed a variety of production requirements to help define another user-driven offering in the escalated 4K workflow.

“I chose to work with Eyeon because they are the only outfit already prepared to go 3D 4K at 120fps,” says Douglas Trumbull. In fact, Eyeon Software and Trumbull Studios have announced the first public screenings of UFOTOG — a 10-minute technology demonstration of a 4K 3D movie at 120 frames per second. Directed Trumbull and produced at Trumbull Studios, this experimental sci-fi tale demonstrates Trumbull’s new process called MAGI; a new cinematic language that invites the audience to experience a powerful sense of immersion and impact that is not possible using conventional 24FPS or 3D standards.

UFOTOG will premiere at Paul Allen’s iconic Seattle Cinerama Theater as the headlining event at the annual Science Fiction Film Festival Sunday May 11, 2014.

See the end of this piece for the UFOTOG trailer.

Here are some features:
• High Frame Rate playback
• Image format support for DPX, EXR, QuickTime, JPG, RED, Canon C500, and more
• CDL and LUT color support
• Per clip and overall color tuning
• Stereo adjustments via inter-ocular alignment and edge cropping
• Editing and trimming
• EDL import, linking directly to the production workflow

Working with Generation AM for the studio desktop workflow, the Generation 4K offers
• Version control and the ability to compare many different versions of shots
• Annotations and Notes for organization of production workload
• Logical effects stacks
• Event scripting to support other pipelines, such as Nuke, AE, Cinema 4D, Houdini, Maya
• Specific stereoscopic tools for both conversion and visual effects
• Advanced scripting environment of Python and Lua
• Ability to extend existing proprietary technologies

Eyeon Generation 4K retails at $9,995 for the software-only version. It’s $19,995 for a loaded system.

NAB: Some 4K storage offerings

By Tom Coughlin

Digital technology has accelerated the push to higher resolution and higher frame rates. Faster processors, higher data rate networking and larger storage capacities are primary enablers for these developments. This demand brought major infrastructure companies to the NAB show, such as Intel, AMD and Microsoft, but it also brought over 70 companies offering some digital storage technology.

Post production drives significant demand for storage capacity. We will look at the storage offerings of several companies for post work in this article. Let’s start with Avid and their introduction of Avid Everywhere. This is a content sharing and distribution platform leveraging cloud services and offering more flexible software licensing plans. On the storage Continue reading

The whirlwind known as NAB

By Randi Altman

Welcome to our NAB-themed weekly newsletter. While this space is typically filled with different types of articles, including artist Q&As, product reviews and user stories, this edition features product news and videos from the recent NAB Show in Las Vegas.

This NAB was postPerspective’s first, and it was a good one. We had a booth in South Hall Upper, where it was just quiet enough for our daily interviews with manufactures such as Avid, AJA, Blackmagic, Autodesk and Silverdraft, and users like as Terry Curren of AlphaDogs, Mark Raudonis of Bunim-Murray Productions, Todd Kilponen of The Colbert Report and Oscar-winning editor of Gravity Mark Sanger.

After our video interviews were done, Chris Fenwick and Alex MacLean of the Digital Cinema Continue reading

NAB: Autodesk debuts Flame and Smoke 2015

Las Vegas —At NAB 2014, Autodesk debuted Flame 2015 – the latest iteration of its visual effects and creative finishing system, which offers new creative tools, faster performance, and an end-to-end 4K workflow. Autodesk also unveiled the latest version of its video editing software Smoke 2015, but more on that later. First Flame…

Flame 2015 allows artists to work interactively in 4K resolution and offers industry standard 4K formats: 4K/UHD color management supporting ACES and Rec-2020 color spaces; realtime monitoring and playback via SDI of 4K/UHD material at 50p and 60p; timeline effects and batch nodes performance optimization and 4K capable substance textures; and 16Gb Fiber Channel controllers in high-performance storage for realtime throughput of high-resolution images.

Continue reading

Thunderbolt 2 sightings at NAB 2014

By Tom Coughlin

Thunderbolt 2.0 has emerged not just as a direct connect interface with many products on display at the 2014 NAB show, but also as a possible networking technology.

Thunderbolt 2 raised the data rate of this active interconnect technology from 10Gbps to 20Gbps of raw data rate. Thunderbolt 2, developed by Intel, was introduced in September 2013. Earlier in this year there was talk of networking capability for Thunderbolt 2, but at the 2014 NAB show Intel clarified their intentions — Thunderbolt as a network architecture.

In addition to supporting 20Gbps connections for peripheral devices such as storage systems and displays, Thunderbolt 2 will support Ethernet traffic up to 10Gbps. This Ethernet functionality is achieved using an emulated environment that acts as a 10GbE port for data Continue reading

NAB: Maxon’s Paul Babb checks in with partnership news

Las Vegas — At the NAB show, Maxon, makers of Cinema 4D, talked up some partnerships with companies like Thinkbox and Vizrt. They also hosted 20 CG artists on the main stage of its booth, taking people through their most recent projects and how Cinema 4D played a part.

Getting back to the partnership news, Thinkbox has released the Krakatoa particle renderer as a plug-in for Cinema 4D R14 and R15 users. Highlights include:

  • Point or voxel representation of particle data with various filter modes, motion blur and depth of field camera effects, and HDRI render passes output to OpenEXR files.
  • Concurrent support for additive and volumetric shading models, with per-particle control over data, including color, emission, absorption, density and more.
  • Integration with the native particle systems of Cinema 4D as well as with third-party Continue reading

NAB: AJA’s Bryce Button talks about the new Cion 4K camera

Las Vegas — At NAB, AJA turned heads with the introduction of its new camera. That’s right, an AJA camera: the Cion. While there were some rumblings prior to AJA’s announcement just before the show opened, it was still a kick to hear president Nick Rasby describe the shoulder-mount 4K/UHD/2K/HD offering. And when they announced the price ($8,995) there was an audible gasp in the room… a room filled with your typically cynical journalists. The camera will be available for purchase this summer.

Cion, which is based on the Apple ProRes family of codecs — including 12-bit 444 — comes with Thunderbolt connectivity and allows for PL Mount glass. According to the company, they opted for ProRes codecs because they are well established in many post workflows and offer wide compatibility with editing, color correction and finishing apps. Continue reading

NAB: CatDV’s Dave Clack previews upcoming new tools

Las Vegas — Dave Clack, CEO of UK-based CatDV, chatted with postPerspective during the NAB show about some new offerings the company was previewing at the convention.

One of those products is CatDV 11, which features a 64-bit architecture and a new playback engine supporting the latest broadcast formats and native Red Epic footage. These are enabled by the addition of player plug-ins for QuickTime, Libavcodec (the technology behind VLC and FFMPEG) and Red. The MXF wrapper option is also extended to include Red metaclip support.

CatDV 11 also features enhanced support for large installations with global metadata fields. At the same time CatDV 11 delivers key usability improvements including the introduction of colored labels in search results, to help make finding media even easier.

Continue reading