Tag Archives: Marvel

The VFX Industry: Where are the women?

By Jennie Zeiher

As anyone in the visual effects industry would know, Marvel’s Victoria Alonso was honored earlier this year with the Visual Effects Society Visionary Award. Victoria is an almighty trailblazer, one of whom us ladies can admire, aspire to and want to be.

Her acceptance speech was an important reminder to us of the imbalance of the sexes in our industry. During her speech, Victoria stated: “Tonight there were 476 of you nominated. Forty-three of which are women. We can do better.”

Over the years, I’ve had countless conversations with industry people — executives, supervisors and producers — about why there are fewer women in artist and supervisory roles. A recent article in the NY Times suggested that female VFX supervisors made up only five percent of the 250 top-grossing films of 2014. Pretty dismal.

I’ve always worked in male-dominated industries, so I’m possibly a bit blasé about it. I studied IT and worked as a network engineer in the late ‘90s, before moving to the United States where I worked on 4K digital media projects with technologists and scientists. One of a handful of women, I was always just one of the boys. To me it was the norm.

Moving into VFX about 10 years ago, I realized this industry was no different. From my viewpoint, I see about 1/8 ratio of female to male artists. The same is true from what I’ve seen through our affiliated training courses. Sadly, I’ve heard of some facilities that have no women in artist roles at all!

Most of the females in our industry work in other disciplines. At my workplace, Australia’s Rising Sun Pictures, half of our executive members are women (myself included), and women generally outweigh men in indirect overhead roles (HR, finance, administration and management), as well as production management.

Women bring unique qualities to the workplace: they’re team players, hard working, generous and empathetic. Copious reports have found that companies that have women on their board of directors and in leadership positions perform better than those that don’t. So in our industry, why do we see such a male-dominated artist, technical and supervisory workforce?

By no means am I undervaluing the women in those other disciplines (we could not have functioning businesses without them), I’m just merely trying to understand why there aren’t more women inclined to pursue artistic jobs and, ultimately, supervision roles.

I can’t yet say that one of the talented female artists I’ve had the pleasure of working with over the years has risen to the ranks of being a VFX supervisor… and that’s not to say that they couldn’t have, just that they didn’t, or haven’t yet. This is something that disappoints me deeply. I consider myself a (liberal) feminist. Someone who, in a leadership position, wants to enable other women to become the best they can be and to be equal among their male counterparts.
So, why? Where are the women?

Men and Women Are Wired Differently
A study by LiveScience suggests men and women really are wired differently. It says,  “Male brains have more connections within hemispheres to optimize motor skills, whereas female brains are more connected between hemispheres to combine analytical and intuitive thinking.”

Apparently this difference is at its greatest during the adolescent years (13-17 years), however with age these differences get smaller. So, during the peak of an adolescent girl’s education, she’s more inclined to be analytical and intuitive. Is that a direct correlation to them not choosing a technical vocation? But then again I would have thought that STEM/STEAM careers would be something of interest to girls if they’re brains are wired to be analytical?

This would also explain women having better organizational and management skills and therefore seeking out more “indirectly” associated roles.

Lean Out
For those women already in our industry, are they too afraid to seek out higher positions? Women are often more self-critical and self-doubting. Men will promote themselves and dive right in, even if they’re less capable. I have experienced this first hand and didn’t actual recognize it in myself until I read Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In.

Or, is it just simply that we’re in a “boys club” — that these career opportunities are not being presented to our female artists, and that we’d prefer to promote men over women?

The Star Wars Factor
Possibly one of the real reasons that there is a lack of women in our industry is what I call “The Star Wars factor.” For the most part, my male counterparts grew up watching (and being inspired by) Star Wars and Star Trek, whereas, personally, I was more inclined to watch Girls Just Want to Have Fun and Footloose. Did these adolescent boys want to be Luke or Han, or George for that matter? Were they so inspired by John Dykstra’s lightsabers that they wanted to do THAT when they grew up? And if this is true, maybe Jyn, Rae and Captain Marvel —and our own Captain Marvel, Victoria Alonso — will spur on a new generation of women in the industry. Maybe it’s a combination of all of these factors. Maybe it’s none.

I’m very interested in exploring this further. To address the problem, we need to ask ourselves why, so please share your thoughts and experiences. At least now the conversation has started.

One More Thing!
I am very proud that one of my female colleagues, Alana Newell (pictured with her fellow nominees), was nominated for a VES Award this year for Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature for X-Men: Apocalypse. She was one of the few, but hopefully as time goes by that will change.

Main Image: The woman of Rising Sun Pictures.
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Jennie Zeiher is head of sales & business development at Adelaide, Australia’s Rising Sun Pictures.

Credit: Film Frame ©2016 Marvel. All Rights Reserved.

Digging Deeper: Doctor Strange VFX supervisor Stephane Ceretti

By Daniel Restuccio

Marvel’s Doctor Strange — about an arrogant neurosurgeon who loses the use of his hands in an accident and sets off on a self-obsessed journey to find a cure — has been doing incredibly well in terms of box office. You’ve got the winning combination of Benedict Cumberbatch, Marvel, a compelling story and a ton of visual effects created by some of the biggest houses in the business, including ILM (London, San Francisco, Vancouver), Method (LA, Vancouver), Luma (LA, Melbourne) Framestore London, Lola, Animal Logic, Crafty Apes, Exceptional Minds and Technicolor VFX.

Stephane Ceretti

Leading the VFX charge was visual effects supervisor Stephane Ceretti, whose credit list reads like a Top 10 list for films based on Marvel comics, including Guardians of the Galaxy, Thor: The Dark World, Captain America: The First Avenger and X-Men: First Class. His resume is long and impressive.

We recently reached out to Ceretti to find out more about Doctor Strange‘s VFX process…

When did you start on the project? When were all the shots turned in?
I started in September 2014 as Scott Derrickson, the director, was working on the script. Production got pushed a few months while we waited for Benedict Cumberbatch to be available, but we worked extensively on previz and visual development during all this time. Production moved to London in June 2015 and shooting began in November 2015 and went until March 2016. Shots and digital asset builds got turned over as we were shooting and in post, as the post production period was very short on the film. We only had 5.5 months to do the visual effects. We finished the film sometime in October, just a few weeks before the release.

What criteria did you use to distribute the shots among the different VFX companies?  For example, was it based on specialty areas?
It’s like a casting; you try to pick the best company and people for each style of effects. For example, ILM had done a lot of NYC work before, especially with Marvel on Avengers. Plus they are a VFX behemoth, so for us it made sense to have them on board the project for these two major sequences, especially with Richard Bluff as their supervisor. He worked with my VFX producer Susan Pickett on the New York battle sequence in Avengers and she knew he would totally be great for what we wanted to achieve.

What creative or technical breakthroughs were there on this project? For example, ILM talked about the 360 Dr. Strange Camera. What were some of the other things that had never been done before?
I think we pushed the envelope on a lot of visual things that had been touched before, but not to that level. We also made huge use of digital doubles extremely close to camera, both in the astral world and the magic mystery tour. It was a big ask for the vendors.

ILM said they did the VFX at IMAX 2K, were any of the VFX shots done at 4K? If yes, why?
No we couldn’t do a 4K version for the IMAX on this project. IMAX takes care, upresing the shots to IMAX resolution with their DMR process. The quality of the Alexa 65, which we used to shoot the movie, makes it a much smoother process. Images were much sharper and detailed to begin with.

It may be meaningless to talk about how many effects shots there were in the movie when it seems like every shot is a VFX shot.  Is there a more meaningful way to describe the scale of the VFX work? 
It is true that just looking at the numbers isn’t a good indication … we had 1,450 VFX shots in the film, and that’s about 900 less than Guardians of the Galaxy, but the shot complexity and design was way more involved because every shot was a bit of a puzzle, plus the R&D effort.

Some shots with the Mandelbrot 3D fractals required a lot of computing power, having a full bending CG NY required tons of assets and the destruction simulation in Hong Kong had to be extremely precise as we were really within the entire street being rebuilt in reversed time. All of these were extremely time and process consuming and needed to be choreographed and designed precisely.

Can you talk about the design references Marvel gave you for the VFX work done in this movie?
Well most of the references that Marvel gave us came from the comics, especially the ones from Steve Ditko, who created all the most iconic psychedelic moments in Doctor Strange in the ‘60s and ‘70s. We also looked at a Doctor Strange comic called “The Oath,” which inspired some of the astral projection work.

How did you draw the line stylistically and creatively between impressively mind-blowing and over-the-top psychedelic?
It was always our concern to push the limits but not break them. We want to take the audience to these new places but not lose them on the way. It was a joint effort between the VFX artists and the director, editors and producers to always keep in mind what the goal of the story was and to make sure that the VFX wouldn’t take over when it was not necessary. It’s important that the VFX don’t overtake the story and the characters at any time. Sometimes we allow ourselves to shine and show off but it’s always in the service of pushing the story further.

What review and submission technology did you use to coordinate all the VFX houses? Was there a central server?
We used CineSync to review all the submissions live with the vendors. Marvel has a very strong IT department and servers that allow the various vendors to send their submission securely and quickly. We used a system called Signiant that allows all submissions to be automatically sorted and put in a database for review. It’s very efficient and necessary when you get a huge amount of submissions daily as we did toward the end of the project. Our team of amazing coordinators made sure everything was reviewed and presented to the studio so we could give immediate feedback to our vendors, who worked 24/7 around the globe to finish the movie.

What project management software did you use?
Our database is customized and we use Filemaker. Our review sessions are a mixture of CineSync (QuickTime and interactive reviews) and Tweak RV for 2K viewing and finalizing.

In talking to ILM about the film, they mentioned previs, production and postvis. Can you talk a bit about that whole workflow?
We do extensive previz/techviz and stuntviz before production, but as soon as the shots are in the can editors cut them in the movie. They are then turned over to our postviz team so we can quickly check that everything works and the editors can cut in a version of the shot that represents the idea of what it will be in the end. It’s a fantastic tool that allows us to shape the film before we turn it over to the vendors, so we nail basic ideas and concepts before they get executed. Obviously, there is lots that the vendors will add on top of the postviz, but this process is necessary for a lot of reasons (editing, R&D, preview screening) and is very efficient and useful.

Collectively how many hundreds of people worked on the VFX on this movie?
I would say about 1,000 people in the VFX overall. That does not count the 3D conversion people.

What was the personal challenge for you? How did you survive and thrive while working on this one project?
I worked two years on it! It was really difficult, but also very exciting. Sometimes mentally draining and challenging, but always interesting. What makes you survive is the excitement of making something special and getting to see it put together by such a talented group of people across the board. When you work on this kind of film everybody does their best, so the outcome is worth it. I think we definitely tried to do our best, and the audience seems to respond to what we did. It’s incredibly rewarding and in the end, it’s the reason why we make these movies — so that people can enjoy the ride.


In addition to being a West Coast correspondent for postPerspective, Daniel Restuccio is the multimedia department chair at California Lutheran University and former Walt Disney Imagineer.

Sarofsky adds VFX/finishing artist Cory Davis, designer Dan Tiffany

Chicago-based Sarofsky, a design-heavy production company, has added creative VFX and finishing artist Cory Davis and designer Dan Tiffany to its staff. A Chicago-based freelance VFX artists for many years, Davis’ Sarofsky resume includes work on the title sequences for the Marvel’s Ant-Man, Captain America: Civil War and Doctor Strange, as well as the main titles for TNT’s Animal Kingdom and a variety of Super Bowl ads. He is a BFA graduate of Ohio University and pursued advanced studies at The Illinois Institute of Art.

“Cory has been working with us for years now as our go-to finishing artist… and I really mean artist, because he is beyond a masterful technician,” says ECD Erin Sarofsky. “He is also a creative force with a distinct point of view.”

Tiffany has been freelancing for Sarofsky and other creative industry firms in Chicago since 2015. A BFA graduate of the Illinois Institute of Art, Tiffany began his career as an intern for creative agency Leviathan before landing a staff position with Daily Planet in 2011. Since going freelance, he has worked on high-profile commercial, broadcast and theatrical projects for Comcast, Leo Burnett and mcgarrybowen, to name but a few. He was also an integral part of Sarofsky’s design team behind the main titles for both Captain America: Civil War and Doctor Strange.

Main Title Caption (L-R) Cory Davis and Dan Tiffany.

Behind the Title: Executive Creative Director Erin Sarofsky

NAME: Erin Sarofsky

COMPANY: Chicago’s Sarofsky Corp. (@sarofsky)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
I always say we are a design-driven production company… but that’s my way of trying to consolidate a bunch of information into four words. The long and the short of it is that we produce work using live action, visual effects, 3D development, design, animation and editorial. We have clients in both the commercial and entertainment arenas. Ultimately, though, we are a collection of artists and producers that are problem solvers. Every day, clients call us with a task: to come up with the fastest, cheapest*, most innovative and beautiful way of producing their project.

* I’m not saying we are cheap. Actually, we are quite pricey, but budgets are what they are and we need to maximize the money clients have. We like to make sure the money winds up on screen and is not wasted.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am the owner and executive creative director. I am also live-action director, which is technically a small part of my job if you look at it by time spent, but it is a big focus as we become more and more entrusted with that aspect as a part of the studio’s capabilities.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My role is essentially to oversee the creative development of our jobs.

That probably seems like a lot of work, especially because we have multiple jobs of varying sizes happening simultaneously. Luckily, our projects are always in various stages of development. The beginning of a job tends to take up the majority of my time. It’s important that the client and I are on the same page, so that translates to a lot of communication and previsualization. We then kick it off in the studio with the right producer and artists attached. My executive producer Steven Anderson and I spend a lot of time discussing our teams and who is appropriate for what project.

The studio

After that, it’s really just keeping an eye on things and making sure the team has the resources and guidance they need. Luckily, I have a very talented group here. Our communication is better here than at any other company I’ve worked, which is essential to being flexible for our clients, and also supportive of each other.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think that the most surprising thing is that I can never really focus on anything. The most intensive work I do happens after hours at home or on a plane (which, now that we have Internet, is sort of a wash). There are always people needing to talk through things… clients, producers, artists, lawyers, accountants, contractors, business development, etc.

As the ECD and owner, I have the big responsibility of managing not only the day-to-day projects but also the company’s bigger strategy, which includes making sure my employees’ careers are on track and that we are making informed business decisions.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love my team. We collaborate all day… and there’s always a lot of laughter.

Really, it’s just amazing that we all make a living in the arts. I imagine that as we all went to art and film school we wondered if we would ever be able to balance the need to make a living with the desire to produce work that fuels our souls. Luckily, everyday we get to do that.

I also love that I can snack all day. I’m a bit of a grazer.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When one of my artists is struggling and I know how to fix it, I have to give them the information, support and direction for them to figure it out themselves. I think as a CD, it’s important to embrace your role as a mentor, but sometimes all I want to do is grab the mouse and a pair of headphones with some cheesy ‘80s channel playing and do their work for them. Though, at the end of the day, that would make me a terrible CD, so I don’t.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I love the moment before I fall asleep. When I am cozy in bed, feeling like the day was rewarding in some unexpected way (usually prompting a silly giggle) and thinking about tomorrow… and how it’s going to be crazy, wondering how are we going to get it all done.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I love, love, love American crafts. I am a knitter… not professional, but I can hold my own. All of my baby-making friends get little sweaters for their munchkins. So I think I would be doing something in the crafts, like pottery or woodworking or pattern making or even basket weaving. I love using raw materials and making stuff.

I’d like to think that my work would be shown in museums, but I’d probably be rocking a corset (begrudgingly) at a Renaissance festival selling my wares.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I began as a graphic design major but started folding in more technical courses early on. By the time I was a senior, I knew I wanted to stay to get my Masters in computer graphics, which at the time (1999-2001) at Rochester Institute of Technology was a combo of early After Effects, directing (LOL) and 3D. The second I could animate my designs, I knew that’s what I wanted to do for a living. I honestly had no idea what that even meant in terms of a career. I just knew that I loved that there could be a narrative aspect to my designs.

Captain America 2

Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The last couple of years we have been producing main title sequences for Marvel. That work has really invigorated the studio and increased our visibility.

Our first project with them was Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier. When Anthony and Joe Russo went to Marvel to direct Captain America 2 they introduced us to the executive team there and asked us to pitch on the main-on-end. I had been working with the Russos since we produced the Community main title for them in 2009. Even though we had a great relationship, we knew we were the dark horse, having never worked with Marvel or been through their intensive security process. Ultimately, they loved the creative we presented and we got the gig.

Shortly after that project, we were asked to pitch again on Guardians of the Galaxy. We did the typography for the main title sequence as well as some fun locator cards. It was so wonderful to work with James Gunn. That movie was really, really special.

      am01pp

The last project we finished for Marvel was the main-on-end for Ant-Man. That was for sure the most challenging, because the development process ate a lot of our production time away. As a studio, we are so proud of the work we produced. The look is so unique and our process was so well developed that we really hold it in high regard. Also, for me personally, I know director Peyton Reed was really happy with the final piece. It’s really rewarding when the director is just super excited about the work you create for their film.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Whatever I am working on at the moment.

This may be terrible, but as soon as I deliver a job, I am over it. I am already excited about whatever is cueing up. I am very “in the moment” when it comes to my work, and it doesn’t matter if it is a big feature main title or a commercial for a new herpes cream. I love the challenge of making something as amazing as it can be… so if someone is excited to work with me, and willing to pay me, I am all in.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My car (I love driving).
My remote control (I am lazy).
My laptop (I got work to do).

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Honestly, just Facebook. It’s basically a collection of photos of my dogs and some PR about whatever my latest work is. I have to be very careful about not being political or religious. I don’t limit my friends and I assume everything is public. When you own a company you have to understand that your opinions and behavior reflect on the company.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
When I focus and do design work, I like to choose a song and listen to it on repeat. It is crazy, I know. When I write or do admin, I usually have a Harry Potter movie on in the background. I’d like to believe my patronus would be a honey badger.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
If it get’s overwhelming, then a weekend where I just run errands with the cell phone left at home does the trick. But I find that the day-to-day stress can be easily managed when you have a lot of fun people around you who naturally laugh a lot. We all take our jobs seriously… but we certainly know how to make a joke about anything.

Marvel’s Victoria Alonso headlines upcoming ’Breaking into VFX’ panel

By Randi Altman

This coming Wednesday in New York City, VES New York and HBO are presenting ”Breaking into VFX: A Discussion With Women in the Visual Effects Industry,” in association with the Post NY Alliance and the School of Visual Arts.

The event’s main speaker is Marvel’s Victoria Alonso, who was recently upped from EVP of Visual Effects and Production to Head of Physical Production, overseeing all physical production, post production and production technical operations.

After a conversation between Alonso and the moderator — yours truly — there will be a panel discussion with the following female visual effects pros: Visual Effects Supervisor Leslie Robson Foster (The Knick and HBO’s upcoming Vinyl series); Gong Myung Lee, VFX Supervisor and Head of CG at Mr. X Gotham; Sabine Heller, Character Development Supervisor at Blue Sky Studios; Vivian Connolly, CEO/Executive Producer at Phosphene; and Leslie Chung, a freelance live action and CG compositor who owns her own show called Spline VFX.

The night will feature a conversational flow, with audience members asking questions throughout the discussion. Above all, Alonso is hoping for an open discussion that allows everyone’s voice to be heard.

According to HBO’s VP, Digital Production Services, Barbara Ford Grant, a VES board member, she sees this event being for anyone interested in how the speakers managed to succeed in this business. “As VFX globalizes and we are starting to see growth opportunities in New York City, Montreal and elsewhere around the world, it is a good time to hear from those succeeding in this business to share their stories in hopes of encouraging a new generation to enter the field. Our panel exemplifies the ever-diversifying nature of the work and roles involved in producing VFX.”

Why the focus on how women have succeeded? “Global production and potential for displacement is hard on families in general,” explains Ford Grant. “Having more women in positions of leadership, in positions of production and technology, can perhaps help reshape the nature of this business by exerting greater influence over choices made. It’s a difficult industry to rise up in and, if we judge by the numbers, even more so for women to stay in. Why is that, and how did these speakers defy the odds?”

She’s interested in hearing the personal stories of the speakers, lessons learned and getting a sense that opportunity exists if you are willing to look for the need and fill it. “Perhaps the audience will tackle perception versus reality when it comes to finding work and keeping jobs.  We will likely need to examine why anyone would want to encourage anybody, woman or man, to join the turbulent VFX industry.”

The event takes place on September 30 at 7pm at the School of Visual Arts Beatrice Theater in New York City. Invite link is here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/breaking-into-vfx-a-discussion-with-women-in-the-visual-effects-industry-tickets-18503619825.

Quick Chat: Encore Colorist Paul Westerbeck Talks ‘Gotham’

Fox’s Gotham gives viewers a look at the early days of some of your favorite, and not-so-favorite, Batman characters, mostly focusing on a young detective named Jim Gordon… way before he became the Commissioner Gordon most of us are familiar with.

Gotham tells some dark stories, and the look of the show matches that dark narrative. To talk more about the color of the show, which will shortly come back from hiatus, Encore colorist Paul Westerbeck was kind enough to take time out and answer some or our questions.

What unique challenges does Gotham present?
Starting with the pilot, we were required to do rolling conforms. We colored each version as if it Continue reading

‘Marvel’s Agent Carter’ TV series using ArriRaw/Codex workflow

ABC’s Agent Carter, the newest television series from Marvel, has been getting great reviews and lots of eyeballs. It is also using a distinctive production workflow — footage is captured on Arri Alexa XTs, and ArriRaw is being used for main unit photography.

In order to enable this workflow, Codex has provided digital recording for director of photography Gabriel Beristain’s cameras, and has consulted with visual effects supervisor Sheena Duggal on the lens mapping, to assist VFX production.

The show, which is set in the 1940s, focuses agent Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) a secretary who has been recruited by Howard Stark to take on secret missions. One episode is produced over the course of eight days, with roughly half shot on stages and half at Los Angeles locations that double for the show’s ‘40s New York setting.

The use of ArriRaw on Agent Carter is typical of Beristain (Magic City, Dolores Claiborne, The Spanish Prisoner, The Ring Two, Blade: Trinity), who was also among the first to pair vintage glass and Alexa XT digital cameras for a television series. On Marvel’s Agent Carter, Beristain worked without a DIT, saying that the Codex/ArriRaw workflow has allowed him to focus on aesthetics and stay involved with the cast.

“It’s analogous to the film system in some ways, where I know how my negative is going to behave,” says Beristain. “It’s going back to a system that always worked really well for us, and we’re getting phenomenal results. Codex recording technology provides us with the technology to capture everything, and get the best possible image.”

The Codex/ArriRaw workflow also helps with post and the VFX shots. Over the course of the eight-episode season, an estimated 1,000 visual effects shots will be created. ILM, Base Effects and Double Negative are working on the show.

“It was always our intention that the VFX should look photorealistic and seamless and, since we had already done a Marvel One-Shot short, the bar was set to a high standard,” explains Duggal (Thor: The Dark World, Iron Man 3, The Hunger Games). “The challenge was how to create large volumes of photorealistic VFX shots, at Marvel-feature-quality, but on a network TV post schedule, which ranges from 16 to 20 days, once the picture is locked.

“Gabby decided that we should shoot ArriRaw to capture the best quality images, something that had not been done for network TV before, to my knowledge,” continues Duggal. “And when it came to camera shooting formats, we decided together that we would like to shoot open gate for the VFX plates and 16:9 for the non-VFX shots. I consulted with Codex and we came up with camera graticules and a VFX workflow for the image extraction. I had also been working on a lens mapping initiative with Codex, and camera rental house Otto Nemenz, to map the lenses for VFX, and I’m happy to say that we implemented this for the first time on Marvel’s Agent Carter.”

Tim Miller and Blur create prologue for ‘Marvel’s Thor: The Dark World’

Blur_Thor2_prologue_06-1

Culver City — Tim Miller, co-founder of Blur Studio, was tapped by Marvel Studios to head up the three-minute prologue sequence that sets the stage for its upcoming sequel Thor: The Dark World. Miller created the sequence, which is almost entirely CG.

“Blur and Tim Miller have a distinct understanding of the Marvel Universe,” said producer Kevin Feige. “That alone, not to mention their storytelling and CG expertise, made the opening and end titles standout sequences in the film.”

Narrated by Anthony Hopkins (Odin), the prologue establishes context for the story of Marvel’s Thor: The Dark World. The sequence is set in Svartalfheim, during an alignment of the Nine Realms 5000 years ago, when Malekith (Christopher Eccleston) battled Odin’s father, King Bor.

Continue reading