Tag Archives: Lucky Post

Behind the Title: Lucky Post editor Elizabeth V. Moore

NAME: Elizabeth V. Moore

COMPANY: Lucky Post

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The studio combines creative editorial, graphic design, sound design, mixing, color, compositing,VFX and finish

I feel very lucky to call Lucky my home for the past five and a half years. It’s a collection of driven co-workers who truly interact like a team. Together, we infuse art and care into the projects that come through our office.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am one of the four editors here.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to take their concept and make it a reality. With the footage I’m provided, I get to be a storyteller. I add my creative perspective and collaborate with clients to craft a story or message that is hopefully even better than what they had envisioned possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a cut we’re all happy with. It’s not just me in a room by myself, editing. There’s a responsibility to your clients not just to edit something for them, but also to help facilitate a space where they feel comfortable and are happy to come to every day. My goal is to have them leave Lucky Post at the end of the day confident in the cut and feeling good in general… with smiles on their faces.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is seeing the edit take shape… to get to the end of a project and see the final resul, and reflect on what it took for that to manifest. That is a very satisfying feeling.

This CostaDelMar Slam spot is a recent project edited by Moore.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I try not to focus too much on my least favorite aspects of anything, but if pressed I’d have to say going through footage and making selects. I feel anxious to start my favorite part of the job — seeing the edit take shape — but in order to get the best result you have to focus and find the best pieces amidst all the content.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I wouldn’t consider myself a morning person, so I’d have to say early afternoon. When I have a deadline to hit, however, late at night is when I can really surprise myself with the amount and quality of work I can produce under pressure.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve asked myself that question, and I honestly can’t think of a better answer than what I’m doing now. Even though I had no idea when I was younger that this is where I’d end up, in retrospect, it makes the most sense.

My personal set of talents and interests throughout my development have helped give me the arsenal of skills it takes to enjoy editing and do it well.

SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t have any idea I would end up in this career until college. I was originally a business major with a minor in film, because I always loved movies. Quickly into my first semester it dawned on me that I could actually pursue a career in something I was passionate about, not just what I thought was expected of me. I switched to film and, as I learned more about all the different departments, I knew editing was where my talents and skills could thrive. And the more I did it, the more I fell in love with the art.

AS A WOMAN EDITOR, WHO DID YOU LOOK UP TO WHEN STARTING OUT?
I didn’t think too much about who I looked up to based on being a woman. I had my films and editors that inspired me and I aspired to emulate editorially. However, I would say that my biggest female inspiration was editor Sally Menke (who died in an accident in 2010). Pulp Fiction was one of my favorite movies at the time, and the way the story was edited and structured was a large part of that.

Once I looked deeper into her career, I realized she was the editor for all of Quentin Tarantino’s films. It inspired me greatly that she was able to not only be an editor during a time that was very much a male-dominated field, but also maintain an ongoing, collaborative relationship that shaped both of their careers. I wanted to be the kind of editor that was not only worth working with, but worth working with again and again.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE MEDIA CHAMPIONING MORE FEMALE CREATIVES AND LEADERS IN OUR INDUSTRY?
I think it’s extremely important. To continue to push our industry to greater heights, new and different perspectives are needed to keep things evolving and growing. Media plays a big role in our society and culture, and women need to be well represented and their voices heard. Similar to my own story, a lot of opportunities are missed if they’re unknown or seem impossible. More women in leadership and creative positions will help young women see themselves in these roles.

WHAT SHOULD OR CAN WE DO TO ENCOURAGE MORE WOMEN TO BECOME EDITORS?
To be an editor, you have to be passionate about it and love the process. We can’t make women be interested in the art, but we can reinforce the confidence in the ones who are. We have to be the ones to say, “There’s no reason to be intimidated by pursuing this career path. This industry is always looking for fresh, original perspectives and we, as women, have a unique voice to offer. The quality of your craft will speak for itself and that is what will draw clients to work with you.”

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Within the past year I’ve worked on campaigns for Crate & Barrel, Charles Schwab, AT&T and Soraa.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I wouldn’t say that I wear a different hat when working on different genres, because at the end of the day the goal is the same: to tell a good story in as creative a way as the content allows.

However, what I’m looking for out of the footage will change depending on the type of project. So much of my select-making process is based on feelings that arise while viewing a scene. I select the pieces that give me the reaction I want the audience to feel based on the genre of the piece.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a different sense of pride for all the projects I work on. Sometimes it’s because of the level of quality of the work, and sometimes it’s because of the challenges that had to be overcome. But I’d say that I’m still most proud of one of my first pieces I did at Lucky Post. It was back when I was an assistant editor; I was given access to footage for a music video for a musician named Jesse Woods and was told to just have fun with it and use it as an opportunity to practice.

Even though I wasn’t the official editor on it, I took the challenge seriously and spent hours exploring possibilities, pushing my craft farther than I ever had to that point. The director was impressed enough that it became the final cut he and the artist used. I still look back on that as one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve produced. It was the turning point in my career, where not only did others see and recognize my talent, but I saw what I was capable of and this gave me the confidence that led me to where I am now.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I’ve used a few different editing software programs throughout my career and my favorite, and what I currently use, is Adobe Premiere Pro.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Even though I’m only asked to edit, a big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a final cut. Sometimes that means being a good listener or a positive force for them when things get stressful.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A computer is number one, since I can’t edit without it. I’d like to believe I’d still be interested in the art of editing if I had to do it via the cut and splice method, but it would be a very different process and experience for me. Second would be my television. I love watching great movies, shows and well-done commercials, so it’s both a leisure activity and it inspires me as an editor. Lastly, my cell phone because we now live in a society where it’s becoming hard to work and stay connected without it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Besides my passion for the visual arts, like movies, my favorite escape is music. I love to go to shows to see live bands or get lost in music being played by DJs and dance. When I’m in those moments, all the stress from the week is forgotten and I’m living in the present.

Neil Anderson upped to colorist at Lucky Post, talks inspiration

Neil Anderson has been promoted to colorist at Dallas’ Lucky Post after joining the company in 2013 right out of film school. Anderson’s projects include national brands such as Canada Dry, Costa, TGI Friday’s, The Salvation Army and YETI. His latest feature work was featured at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in Augustine Frizzell’s comedy, Never Goin’ Back. He works on Blackmagic Resolve 14.

Anderson’s interest in cameras and color science inspired his career as a colorist, but he says his inspiration changes all the time, depending on where his mind is at. “Sometimes I’ll see a commercial on TV and think, ‘Wow. There was great care put into that piece, I wonder how they did that?’ Then I’ll go back and rewatch it over and over again trying to pick it apart and see what I can glean. Or if I’m developing a specific workflow/look and I’m struggling to get exactly what I’m after, I’ll find interesting frames from films that pop into my head for guidance.”

In terms of colorists who inspire him, Anderson points to Peter Doyle (who most recently colored Darkest Hour). “He’s incredibly technical, and he exploits his thorough knowledge of color science to guide films through a color pipeline in an almost algorithmic fashion. I’m at awe by his expertise and, in a way, use him as a model of how I want to approach projects.

“I also admire Steven Scott for maybe the opposite reason. While technical like Peter, to me he approaches projects with a painter’s eye first. I’ve heard him say the best inspiration is to simply pay attention to the world around us. His work and approach remind me to branch out artistically just as much as I try technically.”

When he thinks about cinematographers, Roger Deakins comes to mind. “He’s a DP that really captures almost the entire look of the film in-camera, and the color grading is supposedly very simple and minor in the end. This is because he and his colorist work hand in hand before the shoot, developing a look they’ll see and use on set,” explains Anderson. “This workflow is a critical tool for modern colorists, and Roger is a reminder of the importance of having a good relationship with your DP.”

Tim Nagle, a Lucky Post finishing artist, describes Anderson as a “quiet and ardent observer of life’s design, from light and shadow on a city street to bold color blocks in a Wong Kar-wai film. His attention to detail and process are implacable.”

“Color is like magic to most people; the process feels like happenstance and you don’t realize how it’s supporting the narrative until it’s not,” concludes Anderson. “I love the challenge of each project and mining through color theory to achieve the best results for our clients.”

Quick Chat: Lucky Post’s Sai Selvarajan on editing Don’t Fear The Fin

Costa, makers of polarized sunglasses, has teamed up with Ocearch, a group of explorers and scientists dedicated to generating data on the movement, biology and health of sharks, in order to educate people on how saving the sharks will save our oceans. In a 2.5-minute video, three shark attack survivors — Mike Coots, Paul de Gelder, and Lisa Mondy — explain why they are now on a quest to help save the very thing that attacked them, took their limbs and almost their lives.

The video edited by Lucky Post’s Sai Selvarajan for agency McGarrah Jessee and Rabbit Food Studios, tells the viewer that the number of sharks killed by long-lining, illegal fishing and the shark finning trade exceeds human shark attacks by millions. And as go the sharks, so go our oceans.

For editor Selvarajan, the goal was to strike a balance with the intimate stories and the global message, from striking footage filmed in Hawaii’s surf mecca, the North Shore. “Stories inside stories,” describes Selvarajan, who reveres the subjects’ dedication to saving the misunderstood creatures, despite having their life-changing encounters.

We spoke with the Texas-based editor to find out more about this project.

How early on did you become involved in the project?
I got a call when the project was greenlit and Jeff Bednarz the creative head at Rabbit Foot walked me through the concept. He wanted to showcase the whole teamwork aspect of Costa, Ocearch and shark survivors all coming together and using their skills to save sharks.

Did working on Don’t Fear The Fin change your perception of sharks?
Yes it did.  Before working on the project I had no idea that sharks were in trouble. After working on Don’t Fear the Fin, I’m totally for shark conservation, and I admire anyone who is out there fighting for the species.

What equipment did you use for the edit?
Adobe Premiere on Mac Tower.

What were the biggest creative challenges?
The biggest creative challenge was how to tell the shark survivors’ stories and then the shark’s story, and then Ocearch/Costa’s mission story. It was stories inside stories, which made it very dense and challenging to cut into a three-minute story. I had to do justice to all the stories and weave them into each other. The footage was gorgeous, but there had to be a sense of gravity to it all, so I used pacing and score to give us that gravity.

What do you think of the fact that sharks are not shown much in the film?
We made a conscious effort to show sharks and people in the same shot. The biggest misconception is that sharks are these big man-eating monsters. Seeing people diving with the sharks tied them to our story and the mission of the project.

What’s your biggest fear, and how would/can you overcome it?
Snakes are my biggest fear. I’m not sure how I’ll ever overcome it. I respect snakes and keep a safe distance. Living in Texas, I’ve read up on which ones are poisonous, so I know which ones to stay away from. But if I came across a rat snake in the wild, I’m sure to jump 20 feet in the air.

Check out the full video below…

 

Behind the Title: Lucky Post lead editor Marc Stone

NAME: Marc Stone

COMPANY: Dallas-based Lucky Post

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Lead Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Crafting and composing the best story for the brand with the footage I have been given.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
While this won’t surprise editors, the amount of options that are available in terms of the way something can be shaped.

Also, I do a lot of my own sound design. Sound and music, or absence thereof, are integral to the edit …finding the right tone or enhancing the action is the marriage of those elements.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Storytelling — specifically, telling something in the right way so that it is most effective. I want to experience the emotion of the piece and help others to feel it in the same way.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Despite the constant and rapid need for content, there are still stories that die on the vine. Ideas you know could have been incredible but for myriad reasons never see the light of day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would like to try teaching. I love seeing new editors hone their craft and enjoy helping them find their voice in the industry. I’m also about to start coaching my son’s little league team, so check back in with me in a few months to see what I think of teaching.

Dodge Ram “Born Here”

HOW EARLY DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I did not initially know this would be my path. I was in various bands and recorded them, but the moment I felt the impact of adding picture to sound, I started tinkering with Avid and taught myself how to edit.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Spots for GameStop, Dodge Ram and The Salvation Army.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The most inspiring project to date was Dodge Wisdom for the Super Bowl featuring people who are all around 100 years old. I listened to hours of footage of people from all walks of life who have lived through pivotal eras — The Great Depression, WWII and the Battle of the Bulge — equality movements then and now. Hearing the direct experiences from these historic events was unforgettable.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I need to stay busy, and exercise helps me decompress — I play ice hockey, tennis… basically, I am happy to play almost everything. Beach volleyball, if only I could find a beach.

Lucky Post helps with the funny for McDonald’s McPick 2 spots

Lucky Post editor Travis Aitken and sound designer Scottie Richardson were part of the new campaign for McDonald’s, via agency Moroch, that reminds us that there are many things you cannot choose, but you can “McPick 2.”

The campaign — shot by production house Poster with directors Plástico and Sebastian Caporelli — highlights humor in the subtleties of life. Parents features a not-so-cool, but well-meaning, dad and his teenage son talking about texts and “selfies” while enjoying McPick 2 meal from McDonald’s. His son explains the picture he is showing him isn’t a selfie, but his father defends, saying, “Yeah, it is. I took it myself.”

Passengers features a little guy sandwiched between two big, muscular guys in a three-seater row on an airplane. The only thing that makes him feel better is that he chose to bring a McPick 2 meal with him.

“Performance comedy, like these spots, is at its best when you’re seeing people interacting in frame,” says editor Aitken, who cut using Adobe Premiere. “You don’t want to manipulate too much in the edit — it is finding the best performances and allowing them to play out. In that sense, editing with dialogue comedy is punctuation. It’s vastly different than other genres — beauty, for example, where you are editing potentially unrelated images and music to create the story. Here, the story is in front of you.”

According to sound designer Richardson, “My job was to make sure dialogue was clear and create ambient noise that provided atmosphere but didn’t overwhelm the scenes. I used Avid Pro Tools with Soundminer and Sony Oxford noise reduction to provide balance and let the performances shine.”

The executive producer for Dallas-based Lucky Post was Jessica Berry. MPC’s Ricky Gausis provided the color grade.

Quick Chat: Lucky Post’s Scottie Richardson on ‘Reclaim the Kitchen’

Wolf Appliances and agency The Richards Group recently launched the “Reclaim the Kitchen” campaign meant to inspire families to prepare and eat meals together. At the center of this initiative is a film that shows audiences the joys of home cooking. Lucky Post’s Scottie Richardson, based in Dallas, created the sound design, music edit and the final mix for the three-minute, stop-motion piece directed by Brikk.

In Reclaim the Kitchen the viewer’s perspective is sitting at a dinner table or making tasty dishes. There are statistics, meal suggestions and recipes. You can see the film on http://www.reclaimthekitchen.com, a site created to offer “tools to cook with confidence.”

We checked in with Richardson in order to dig a bit deeper into the sound and music.

When did you first meet with the agency?
I was put on hold by The Richards Group producer David Rucker, but didn’t truly know what the job would be. I only knew that I was working on a video for Wolf and I had two days to work on my own before the creative team would come in.  David and I had just worked on a huge Chrysler campaign so there was a strong trust factor going in.

Scottie Richardson

Scottie Richardson

What direction did they give or were they open to ideas?
The concept behind the Wolf project is “reclaim the kitchen,” getting people together to share home-cooked meals. It’s not meant to badger viewers; it’s more like, “Wow, what have I been missing? I can do this!” Inspiring and whimsical. In terms of the sound, I was just told to “do what I do.” That’s a dream on any project — to have the time to immerse yourself in the narrative. I wanted the sound design to match the integrity of this initiative.

There are many layers of sounds — the home, cooking, technology. What were you trying to convey with the audio?
The creatives did an unbelievable job creating a sweeping yet simple message. Preparing a meal isn’t just about the food. Time is ticking, money matters and family are all important. These factors are influenced by myriad circumstances, but rather than ignore them, they’re addressed head-on. The sounds outside the kitchen are designed to resonate with viewers, to put them in these moments that influence their meal decisions. Phones are often seen as tools that distract us from our family time, but they can be used to help with family participation — Googling recipes, meal-planning apps, converting measurements — there are ways to use these tools mindfully and together.  Fast food may be a modern solution to creating more time with your family, but if that time is allocated to a mission in the kitchen, your time is invested in camaraderie.

In some cases the sound was meant to add atmosphere, while in other cases it was to specifically key off of what was happening on screen. We used it to interplay with the voiceover script. There is a scene nearing the end that is a tight close-up of a food scale. Meanwhile, you hear a ticking from a stopwatch as the camera pulls out to reveal that it is a food scale. That sound was to accent the voiceover talking about “time” rather than the image, but it provides a nice juxtaposition. Overall, the goal was to key off of the verbal cues and visuals with both sound design and music edits so they were additional characters in the narrative. In some sections, we chose an absence of sound to allow moments to breathe and stand out. This piece was designed to inspire people to recalibrate, be somewhat introspective and learn, but not feel intimidated, so creating moments to process were crucial.

Can you talk about creating the sounds?
I have a large sound effects library that I’ve built over the last 20 years. I start with using the logical pre-recorded, time-tested sounds as a baseline. On this particular job I pulled from my stock library but also Foley’d lots of sounds. I like to be musical with sound design, so I am constantly making sure the sounds work with the music track in tone or pitch. Sometimes that’s using verb and delay to match the music and its space, or pitching things up or down. Being a musician I like to use musical effects like cymbals or shakers to accent things as well.  These elements integrated well on this project because Breed’s music track was so lively and elegant.

What about the mix?
At the end of the day what the voiceover is saying is important, like the vocals to a great song. I made sure all of that was clear, then I experimented with the music and sound design. I built a nice bed for the voice to lay in that would hopefully let the poignancy of the message resonate. Sometimes it’s best to just feel the sound and not actually be able to articulate what it is. You miss it if it is gone but you can’t actually say, “That was a scooter running over an umbrella.”

You wore a few different hats on this one. Can you talk about that?
Well at first it was as a sound designer. I created a sound scape from beginning to end of the cut. Then I brought in the editor’s sound design and went through to see if anything clashed or to see what needed to be replaced or enhanced. When agency creative Dave Longfield came into the session, he had very specific things he wanted to try with the music, so we spent a half-day cutting up the music stems and trying out things to hit with picture. Breed’s music was amazing. It balanced the narrative with energy and the intelligence of the message. After that, we edited dialog, trying out various takes and pacing that felt right. This was followed by the mixing stage to bring it all together.

What tools do you call on?
This was all built and mixed in Avid Pro Tools. One tool I use often on sound design is Omnisphere by Spectrasonics. This allows me to make more music sound effects and really transform them into something new.

ReclaimTheKitchenmain

Where do you find inspiration?
Honestly all over. Art, movies, music. One of my favorite groups as a young kid was The Art Of Noise. I just loved how they made music out of door slams and breaking glass. I love how layering many sounds together make one solid sound. I enjoy seeing a good movie and hearing how they use a sound you wouldn’t think of for what you are seeing, or how the absence of sound speaks better than having one.

Finally, how did this project influence you personally?
I am truly the healthiest I have been in a long, long time. I have not had fast food in over three months and we have been cooking as a family every night for dinner. I’m avidly researching recipes and trying to one-up the next meal. This is a project that changed my lifestyle for the better. I didn’t see that coming.

Lucky Post hires finishing artist Tim Nagle

Dallas-based Lucky Post has added Tim Nagle as finishing artist. Nagle’s first collaboration with Lucky Post began as the engineering designer of the studio back in 2012, designing the studio’s all-important technology backbone.

In 2002 Nagle founded Creative Integrations, a full-service engineering and integration firm specializing in post, recording, animation and broadcast facilities. For over a decade, Nagle helped companies design, improve and streamline workflows of all types, including facility design for companies throughout the country. Among them, Red Car in Dallas and NY, Union Editorial, 1st Avenue Machine, Smoke & Mirrors and Passion Pictures in NY, DigitalFX in Baton Rouge and Cook Children’s Hospital in Fort Worth.

He began his career as an engineer for Solid State Logic (1997-2000) working with the company’s many clients, including Fox, Warner Bros., Skywalker Ranch, EA Games, Wonderland and ABC, among others. Since 2002, he has also lent his talent to the sound department of studio feature films and television before making this transition to online editing.

“I’ve always loved the independence of consultancy but when I wasn’t at Lucky Post I found I really missed the environment and the people. When I reflected on my future, I kept returning to Lucky Post.”

Since joining Lucky, Nagle has collaborated with agencies McGarrah Jessee, Moroch and The Richards Group. View his spot reel here.

In addition to assuming the artist’s chair, Nagle leads the company’s assistant training program, providing those working alongside Lucky Post’s editors, designers and sound designers with the necessary technology knowledge and experience.