Tag Archives: Lost Planet

Capturing the Olympic spirit for Coke

By Randi Altman

There is nothing like the feeling you get from a great achievement, or spending time with people who are special to you. This is the premise behind Coke’s Gold Feelings commercial out of agency David. The spot, which aired on broadcast television and via social media and exists in 60-, 30- and 15-second iterations, features Olympic athletes at the moment of winning. Along with the celebratory footage, there were graphics that feature quotes about winning and an update of the iconic Coke ribbon.

The agency brought in Lost Planet, Black Hole’s parent company for graphics, editing and final finishing. Lost Planet provided editing while Black Hole provided graphics and finishing.

Tim Vierling

Still feeling the Olympic spirit, we reached out to Black Hole producer Tim Vierling to find out more.

How early did you get involved in the project?
Black Hole became involved early on in the offline edit when initially conceptualizing how to integrate graphics. We worked with the agency creatives to layout the supers and helped determine what approach would be best.

How far along was it in terms of the graphics at that point?
Whereas the agency established the print portion of the creative beforehand, much of the animation was undiscovered territory. For the end tag, Black Hole animated various iterations of the Coke ribbon wiping onto screen and carefully considered how this would interact with each subject in the end shots.

We then had to update the existing disc animation to complement the new and improved/iconic Coke ribbon. The titles/supers that appear throughout the spot were under constant scrutiny — from tracking to kerning to font type. We held to a rule that type could never cross over an athlete’s face, which led to some clever thinking. Black Hole’s job was to locate the strongest moments to highlight and rotoscope various body parts of the athletes, having them move over and behind the titles throughout the spot.

What was the most challenging part of the project? Olympics projects tend to have a lot of moving parts, and there were some challenges caused by licensing issues, forcing us to adapt to an unusually high amount of editorial changes. This, in turn, resulted in constant rotoscoping. Often a new shot didn’t work well with the previous supers, so they were changing as frequently as the edit. This forced us to the push the schedule, but in the end we delivered something we’re really proud of.

What tools did you use?
Adobe After Effects and Photoshop, Imagineer Mocha and Autodesk Flame were all used for finishing and graphics.

A question for Lost Planet’s assistant editor Steven san Miguel: What direction were you given on the edit?
The spots were originally boarded with supers on solid backgrounds, but Lost Planet editors Kimmy Dube and Max Koepke knew this wouldn’t really work for a 60-second. It was just too much to read and not enough footage. Max was the first one to suggest a level of interactivity between the footage and the type, so from the very beginning we were working with Black Hole to lay out the type and roto the footage. This started before the agency even sat down with us. And since the copy and the footage were constantly changing there had to be really close communication between Lost Planet and Black Hole.

Early on the agency provided YouTube links for footage they used in their pitch video. We scoured the YouTube Olympic channel for more footage, and as the spot got closer to being final, we would send the clips to the IOC (International Olympic Committee) and they would provide us with the high-res material.

Check out the spot!

Quick Chat: Lost Planet editor Federico Brusilovsky

By Randi Altman

Buenos Aires native Federico Brusilovsky works as an editor at Lost Planet’s Los Angeles office, leading efforts on campaigns for Cadillac, Dodge, Heineken and HP. He joined Lost Planet’s New York studio four years ago as an intern, with production and assistant editorial experience already under his belt. From there, he worked his way up, learning from experienced editors, including the company’s Oscar-nominated editor and owner Hank Corwin (The Big Short).

Cadillac

We reached out to Brusilovsky, who studied film at New York’s City College after coming to the US, to talk about his path, the way he likes to work and tips for those just starting out.

How long have you been editing?
That’s a tough question. I guess my first experiences editing were all in-camera when I was shooting movies on VHS as a kid. Working in that linear format taught me a lot, especially how to recognize happy accidents: those coincidences and subconscious decisions that end up being some of the cooler parts of a film.

Once I was in college, I was working with Super 8 and 16mm and cutting with a guillotine. Working with your hands with such delicate materials teaches you a lot, too. There’s a craftsmanship to physically altering and moving around film that requires really sophisticated organization and patience. Those experiences are important to me now that I edit using digital, nonlinear systems. So, the short answer is probably “as long as I can remember.”

How did you get started in this business?
I was lucky to know editor Julie Monroe (Lolita, The Patriot), who offered me the chance to intern on the film she was working on, Mud. From there, Julie introduced me to Saar Klein (The Bourne Identity, Almost Famous), who introduced me to the studio that he’s on roster with, Hank Corwin’s Lost Planet.

After joining Lost Planet as an intern, it was easy stay focused on my goal of becoming an editor. I knew an internship wouldn’t naturally evolve into a lucrative editing career. I did lots of technical training on my own, so that the moment they needed me to step into a more challenging role, I would already have the skills.

Heineken

Heineken

How early did you know this would be your path?
I didn’t recognize it as a path early on, even though it was in front of me for a while, and I was always editing one way or another. It wasn’t until after meeting and talking to a bunch of feature editors that I was able to see it.

Was it much of a transition in terms of editing moving from Argentina to the US?
Speaking strictly in the commercial world, the biggest difference between the US and Argentina (and I guess most other countries as well) is the role of the editor and the director. For some reason, directors in the US are not as involved from start to finish as they are abroad. They tend to shoot and walk away, not always because they want to but because they have to.

Although we work with them at the beginning of the process, a lot of decisions that may be directorial end up in the hands of the editor. Which is great for me from a creative standpoint.

Overseas, directors are a good deal more involved in post production, and editors in production, which can be an advantage for strong collaborations but a disadvantage for editing objectively. It’s fun to get a feel for each shot while it’s happening on set, then work closely with the director in post, but that experience can make you married to footage that you would otherwise toss out in the edit room.

What system do you use?
Mostly Avid Media Composer. It’s the least user-friendly piece of software, probably because it pre-dates functions like drag-and-drop being available in every single app. But, with patience and the right training, it’s the most robust and attractive piece of non-linear software out there.

What’s your favorite shortcut?
CMD+Z (or CTRL+Z for the Windows crowd). Not only is “undo” possibly the most useful hotkey on a technical level, it has huge symbolic importance. Undo is a digital safety net. Knowing that I’m never more than two keys away from reverting to a previous version gives me the freedom and efficiency to take risks and experiment with different styles.

Cadillac

Cadillac

Do you use plug-ins?
With Avid I try not to, unless a specific project calls for it. If I’m using plug-ins, that means I’ve probably moved to After Effects.

What are some recent projects you have worked on?
Heineken’s “Soccer is Here” and Cadillac’s “CT6 Forward” are my two most recent campaigns. Cadillac was fantastic to be a part of. The material I had to work with was so rich and delicate. Each individual shot was successful on so many levels — color, light, movement, composition and so on. Some projects require a bit of strategy in the edit so high quality shots don’t call attention to less successful ones, but not with this project. It was like playing chess with a board full of queens and no pawns.

Do you have a favorite genre? If so, why?
Comedy. I know it’s a cliché to say that it’s my favorite because it’s the hardest genre to work in, but that’s probably why. One unique challenge to comedy is that the margin for error is so wide compared to other genres. The impact of a not-so-exciting fight scene is much less than the impact of a not-so-funny joke. Getting an audience to laugh is one of the biggest challenges in the industry, and so satisfying when you’re successful.

It’s also easy to get caught in an echo chamber of bad comedy in a writers’ room or on set. When you’re working with comedic premises and characters, trying out concepts and laughing with your coworkers, you can easily lose objectivity and convince yourself something is funny when it definitely isn’t.

I read somewhere that on the set of Sydney Pollack’s Tootsie, there was a real sense of seriousness and tension, despite it being one of Dustin Hoffman and Bill Murray’s funniest movies. Maybe that’s a secret to great comedy… approach it seriously.

Any tips for new editors just starting out?
Listen! Not listening is a classic rookie mistake. Also, it’s more important to be in the right place than to be doing the most glamorous or rewarding tasks. Better to be low on the totem pole for a good film with good people than at the top directing for a bad film. Try to be around companies and projects you admire, then work hard to grow in those communities.

The A-List: The Big Short’s Oscar-nominated editor Hank Corwin

By Jean Lane

Editor Hank Corwin is no stranger to receiving accolades for his work — he has been recognized by the ACE, the Los Angeles Film Critics Society and the AICE — but this year he is nominated for the granddaddy of awards: the Best Editing Oscar for The Big Short.

Corwin has a diverse resume, having worked with Terrence Malick on The Tree of Life and The New World, Robert Redford on The Legend of Bagger Vance and Oliver Stone on Natural Born Killers, Uturn and Nixon. He also owns Lost Planet, a commercial editorial shop that has offices in Los Angeles and New York, where he keeps his hand in spot work and music videos.

Hank Corwin

Hank and I have a history together in the commercial world — once upon a time I worked for Lost Planet in New York as head producer — so after many years out of touch, we caught up about life, editing and the complex story of The Big Short, the Oscar-nominated film directed by Adam McKay (Anchorman, Step Brothers).

Congratulations on the Oscar nomination, your first! Are you planning to attend the ceremony?
I think my wife Nancy would kill me if we don’t go. I’ve toyed with not attending, just to see how she would react, but yes I plan on attending.

Had you worked with Adam McKay before?
Never. He had already started shooting and my agent contacted me about the film. They sent me the script and it was exquisite. It’s an adaptation of the Michael Lewis book and it’s heady stuff, which I didn’t understand completely, but I saw it as a wonderful challenge.

What is Adam’s style of working? Was there a lot of improvisation on set?
He does come from an improv place and that world. What he would do, unlike many directors I’ve worked with, was first he would get the coverage he needed from the script and then he would allow his actors to start improvising. He would throw out new lines and new scenarios and have them riff off those. I would get loads and loads of footage, which I was able to use. I was able to use the mistakes as well as the scripted stuff.

Were you on set during the shoot or near set?
Adam was five or six weeks into the shoot when I came in. I had a commercial job in Prague, so I flew into New Orleans to meet him for the day. I think he wanted to make sure I had two hands and two eyes. He made reference to the Michael Winterbottom movie called 24 Hour Party People, which had some similarities to breaking the fourth wall. He wanted me to see it, which showed me that he was really open to trying new stuff. The most important thing with a director and an editor is the trust and feelings of safety in the relationship. The director ultimately has to trust the editor, and the editor has to feel safe to try things without worrying about getting fired.

I try things and sometimes directors don’t like them. I was very fortunate that I tried stuff and Adam liked it. We talked through the stuff he wasn’t happy with and it became a very musical relationship, like we were playing jazz. He would play one instrument and I’d play the other.

That’s a great analogy. So how did you tackle this multi-character, multi-story film?
What do they say? A journey of a thousand miles starts with one step. The financial part of the script is heady stuff and hard to understand. I figured the best way I could start is to try to understand and develop the characters and give each character his (and his group) editorial signature. The Steve Carell character, Mark Baum, was very angry and explosive, and I tried to reflect that in the editing. The Christian Bale character was very introverteLeft to right: Tracy Letts plays Lawrence Fields, Wayne Pere plays Martin Blaine and Christian Bale plays Michael Burry in The Big Short from Paramount Pictures and Regency Enterprisesd and introspective, and I tried to make his editing very internal, almost like on a biological level. You know the real Mike Burry has Asperger’s, and Christian Bale, after meeting the guy, really captured him. I tried in the editorial to get very focused into details, the way he might be experiencing the world. I think the operative idea on the cutting of the film was it had to be experiential. I was trying to get us inside of them.

It sounds like you were focusing on Burry and Baum — your main instruments — and then you’ve got your other characters that fill in the composition. Am I on the right track?
You know, I’ve never thought of it quite that way, but absolutely. I was thinking of it more like a collaboration of ideas. We were working on a number of different levels. First of all, you have the levels of each character and each grouping, but then you have the flow of the film.

It starts with a surreal moment with the old bankers, then we go into the montage of the crash; it’s kind of wacky and funny, but tinged with anxiety. The film starts comically, and then toward the middle of the film, it becomes a dramatic film.

In the third act, after they come back from Las Vegas, you have this disintegration… the scene with Carell and Marisa Tomei shows all his anger has been washed away, like he’s gone through a breakdown. I tried, very deliberately, to fragment his conversation. That’s a very pivotal scene. It’s a scene I love very much — he completely changes. That act, toward the end of the film, funnels into this tragedy. Each chapter in the film had a different emotional valance. You started with a comedy, you went to a drama and then you ended up in a tragedy. It’s very sad actually, the movie is very sad.

Steve Carell plays Mark Baum in The Big Short from Paramount Pictures and Regency Enterprises

I think that’s why it’s so beautifully edited — it really does take you through this experience. I was able to follow all the finance stuff, which I’m not familiar with at all.
It comes so much from Adam. One of the really big ideas editorially was if you are able to understand emotionally where these people were coming you would be able to understand the terms and stuff, as opposed to just talking about financial instruments that are abbreviations or initials, like CDOs and synthetic CDOs.

When postPerspective spoke to Adam about making The Big Short, he mentioned that the composer was housed next to your cutting room, and that he would score as you cut. Whose idea was that?
The composer is this young guy named Nicholas Britell. Nick and I just sort of evolved it. We would look at dailies and talk about them even before Adam got involved. I would tell him the emotions I wanted to feel and he would tell me the emotions he felt. He would sit at his computer and come up with tones and we would play it against some of the shots. He was developing the music as I was cutting. He became my co-editor on a certain level.

I’ve never heard of a process that unique.
I’ve never had that kind of collaboration before. I think Adam, Nick and I wish all our film projects could stay this way. I would love to work this way again.

Were you involved in the DI? Were you present for the color?
A little, but Adam primarily did that. Our DP Barry Ackroyd was working on a film out of the country, but he was looking at stuff. One of the neat things about this movie was that it was shot on film! There were just little elements that I loved that you don’t get anymore because digital is so clean. I was able to use the flash frames so we could flare out. I could take a flash frame and slow those frames down and make an impressionistic moment. The cuts themselves didn’t have to be classically beautiful, but they had to work very well on an emotional level.

You’re taking a character and trying to feel what they’re feeling and making connections via images. It’s sort of the way I see the world. It’s not linear, but most people don’t see the world in a linear way.

You definitely don’t see the world in a linear way!
You’ll walk in the street and hear a horn from a car on your left, then somebody’s baby will be crying on the right then there’ll be an old lady with a walker. These are all just impressions. The sum total of it makes your experience, so why not do that on film? Film gives you the ultimate opportunity to take those events. This is where you need a really smart director so you can create a more whole character, a more three-dimensional character as opposed to a one-dimensional third-person character that you’re looking at.

Clearly, he captured a lot of footage that you were happy with.
I’m so lucky. Adam is such a student of film, so he was able to get that stuff.

What is your favorite part of finishing after you lock picture? Color, visual effects, sound?
I love the mix. Traditionally it’s where film really comes alive. We had a sound supervisor named Becky Sullivan who was just wonderful and understanding. It’s tough being a mixer or a sound person because everybody has different aspirations. I wanted her to try things kind of ass backwards and she indulged me in some places and then came up with ideas that were fantastic.

The work itself was the best part of cutting this movie. I was trying stuff and felt safe. Again I attribute that to Adam. I would see things and they would be the culmination of ideas that I‘d been working on for years.

You worked solo on The Big Short as opposed to The Tree of Life, where you were one of five editors. Which do you prefer and why?
I did have an additional editor, Liza Espinas, who cut a couple of scenes. When you work with multiple editors, like with Terry Malick, it was very collegial. He only had people in one at a time. Oliver Stone, would throw in multiple editors and pass scenes around.

You share your time between features and commercials, and you pick your features carefully. How do you decide which ones to do?
I’ll read the script and if I really love the script, if I love something about it, then maybe I’ll go for it. I get great rewards out of doing commercials occasionally as well. The process can be very similar. I’ve had wonderful times doing commercials.

I envy that you’re able to choose projects because it’s what thrills you.
Thank you. I love working with film and I can’t believe that people are actually paying me to do what I do! It’s not like playing a guitar, where if you have the guitar, you can play it. Somebody’s gotta pay for this. Making films is an expensive proposition, so I am blessed in that sense and that my wife puts up with me.

Jean Lane is a post production supervisor based in New York. She was head producer at Lost Planet NY from 2003 to 2005.