Tag Archives: Jay Nelson

Quick Chat: Cut + Run’s Jay Nelson on editing ‘The Bronze’

Who doesn’t like the story of someone overcoming a physical injury in sport and succeeding? (Think Curt Schilling’s bloody ankle during the 2004 World Series.) It’s how legends are made, but what happens after the applause has stopped and the reporters stop requesting interviews? Well this is the premise of the new comedy, The Bronze, by Bryan Buckley.

The film focuses a light on gymnast Hope Ann Greggory (Melissa Rauch), whose performance on a ruptured Achilles during the Olympics clinched a bronze medal for the US team — but things went downhill from there. In the years since capturing the medal, she’s still living in her father’s basement, still wearing her Team USA gym suit and sporting some crazy bangs, a ponytail and a scrunchie. She spends most days at the mall enjoying her minor celebrity while being unpleasant and rude. All of that changes when she is asked to coach her hometown’s newest gymnastics prodigy.

Jay Nelson

Jay Nelson

Director Buckley called on Cut + Run’s Jay Nelson to edit The Bronze, from Sony Pictures Classics. We reached out to LA-based Nelson, who used Avid Media Composer on the film, to find out more about the workflow and how he collaborated with the director.

How did you get involved in the film?
I had been working with Bryan for a couple of years, and he had been developing the idea with Melissa and Winston Rauch for about six months and he asked me if I’d want to be involved. He gave me the script, but I didn’t really need to read it — if Bryan asks if you want to do a film with him, you do it. Then I read the script and I thought it was hilarious and bold.

What are some things you enjoy about working with Buckley?
He is always available for you, no matter how busy he is. Also, he covers exactly what I need to make an edit great, which makes my job a heck of a lot easier. We have a really amazing shorthand with each other. We have the same taste in comedy. But my favorite part about working with Bryan is that I am constantly learning from him, and not just about filmmaking… about life. And we laugh a hell of a lot

Can you talk about any challenges during the editing process?
The approval process was very long. We had to answer to a lot of masters. I showed an edit a week after they finished shooting, then we spent six months revising that cut. The hardest part about the revisions was shaving the last four minutes out of the film. It was a very painful process getting it to 90 minutes.

How was it to premiere at Sundance?
Exhilarating. I’ve submitted four films to Sundance over the years and none of them ever made the cut for one reason or another. It’s always a roll of the dice; there are so many factors that contribute to a films success with their review process. To finally be there after all these years and experience seeing a first run of the film with a massive crowd was truly incredible. And to see lines of people just to be on the waiting list to get in was total vindication for all the work we put into it.

What’s the biggest lesson you learned?
The lessons I learned on this film weren’t so much about the process of making a film, but rather the process of bringing a film to market. Just making a great movie doesn’t mean a film is going to have success. It was almost 16 months from the time we premiered at Sundance to the final release of The Bronze, and a lot of stuff happened during that time. Relativity went out of business, then Sony Classics rescued the film, and then there were several delays pertaining to the release date.

I say it on every film I do — there are no guarantees. If you’re going to do a film, you gotta be willing to do it for the love of making a picture. Success is not imminent. In the end, I’m really proud of The Bronze, and proud we were able to share it with a wide audience. I think it’s going to have a great long life down the road. I think that sex scene alone will be kept in a hall of fame of some sort (laughs). That is the great thing about making movies: you have the opportunity to create something that can stay around after your gone.

If you could compete in the Olympics, your sport would be?
I always dreamed of winning a gold in hockey. It certainly wouldn’t be gymnastics. After sitting in an editing chair for as long as I have been, maybe I’d be better off pursuing curling or something like that.

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Check out The Bronze’s trailer.