Tag Archives: Harbor Picture Company

The A-List: Jim Jarmusch on his latest film Paterson

By Iain Blair

Over the past few decades, writer/director Jim Jarmusch has followed the beat of his own drum and built up a body of idiosyncratic films that include Permanent Vacation (1980), Stranger Than Paradise (1984), Down by Law (1986), Mystery Train (1989), Night on Earth (1991), Dead Man (1995), Year of the Horse (1997), Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999), Coffee and Cigarettes (2003), Broken Flowers (2005), The Limits of Control (2009), Only Lovers Left Alive (2013) and Gimme Danger (2016).

Jim Jarmusch and Iain Blair.

His new film, Paterson, fits firmly in that tradition. Paterson (Adam Driver) is a bus driver in the city of Paterson, New Jersey — he is also a poet. Each day he adheres to a simple routine: he drives his daily route observing the city as it drifts across his windshield and while overhearing fragments of conversations swirling around him; he writes poetry into a notebook; he walks his dog; he stops in a bar and drinks exactly one beer; he goes home to his wife, Laura (Golshifteh Farahani).

By contrast, Laura’s world is ever changing. New dreams come to her almost daily, each a different and inspired project. They have a happy marriage and love each other. He supports her newfound ambitions and she champions his gift for poetry. The film quietly observes the small triumphs and defeats of daily life, along with the poetry evident in its smallest details. As Jarmusch himself says, it’s “a kind of antidote to dark, heavily dramatic or action-oriented cinema.” No kidding. The film’s big action scene is when Paterson’s bus breaks down.

In a rare interview — he doesn’t like doing press or promotion — I met up with Jarmusch about making the film, his workflow and poetry.

You’ve always been interested in poetry?
Yes, since I was a teenager. I studied poetry at Columbia and I read a lot of Rimbaud and the French poets. I then got into the American poets like Walt Whitman and William Carlos Williams, who came from Paterson, so it all ties together. This is my first film where the main character’s a poet, but I’ve woven references to poetry into a lot of my films, such as Mystery Train and Ghost Dog and Dead Man, so there’s a thread there.

How long had this idea been gestating?
A long time. Some 20 years ago I took a trip to Paterson because of William Carlos Williams, and the whole idea of it being a utopian idea for an industrial city. Allen Ginsberg had also grown up there, and when I got home I made notes about a possible story about a guy named Paterson who lives in Paterson and writes poetry. I also got very interested in the history of the city, which is fascinating. Then I finally wrote the script about six years ago.

Fair to say it’s a wry look at the simple pleasures of domestic life?
Absolutely. I think it’s a comedy, like almost all my films — or at least, they have comedic elements. It’s a story about details, all the little mundane stuff of daily life, the slight variations in the days of the week, that might inspire a poet that is of that school. It’s not the poetry of exclamation. I intentionally avoided conflict, action and, to some degree, plot. For some time I’ve been trying to make films where you’re hopefully not always thinking about what’s going to happen next — Zen-like things where you’re just in the present all the time.

What did Adam Driver and Golshifteh Farahani bring to their roles, as you usually write with specific actors in mind?
Nearly always, but not this time, which was very strange for me. I’d seen him in just a few things and I love his look. Once we met I intuitively knew he’d be just right, because he has this very subtle, good sense of humor, he’s quiet and very observant. He’s not analytical, he’s intuitive like me, and I was so lucky to get him and create this character together. I wrote Laura as this all-American girl, but someone I know said, “Why don’t you cast Golshifteh Farahani, since you love her work?” Once we met, I thought, why not? And the city of Paterson is very ethnically diverse, so it made sense.

Do you like the post process?
I love editing and post. I love all parts of filmmaking, except getting the financing, which can be agonizing. But the rest is so much fun, and post is where you really make the film. Shooting for me, since I don’t have it all figured out, is just gathering all the material. In post is where you find the film and finesse it into the form it tells you it wants to be.

Where did you do the post?
We did it all — editing, sound and the DI — in New York at Harbor Picture Company.

You worked with editor Affonso Gonçalves, whose credits include Beasts of the Southern Wild, Winter’s Bone and who cut Only Lovers Left Alive for you. Tell us about that relationship?
He doesn’t usually come on the set — maybe a couple of times on this one. He got familiar with the dailies as we shot, but he didn’t really start cutting (via Avid Media Composer) until we were done shooting. Then a very important part of my job is to select the takes, as I’ve collaborated for a long time with the actors, and that’s not always obvious in the editing room. You could make a totally different film by taking, say, all the most light-hearted takes. So we go through all the takes and mark what I like, and then we start working and shaping it. He starts in the mornings and then I come in after lunch and we work together. Sometimes I get ahead of him, so some days I don’t come in, but generally it’s a daily thing.

Can you talk about the importance of music and sound in the film?
I have incredible sound designers I’ve worked with on many films over the years — sound designer Robert Hein and re-recording mixer Tony Volante — and it’s all incredibly important to me. Sound is half the film, so it’s very delicate and evocative, and the big thing I love about it is it’s the closest thing humans create to dreaming, drifting into this parallel world.

Robert Hein is this amazing artist, and we discuss things as detailed as, how many trees are close to the house? What types of birds and how many would be audible at dawn? Or you hear a distant motorcycle go by. We discuss exactly what type of bike is it, and what does that mean. What kind of people are around? The audience isn’t conscious of all that, but all these details form the fabric of the film and accumulate over all the scenes. The visual seems more important, more dominant, but it’s the sound and music that often tell the real story of what’s going on in a film. So I love love love working on all the sound. (At part of his process, Hein used Avid Pro Tools 12.5 Native during editorial, Pro Tools 12.5 HD in the mix studio and the Avid System 5 mixing console during the mix.)

How important was the DI on this?
We did it with colorist Joe Gawler, who did Arrival. In my opinion he’s the greatest on this planet. He is the man! I had the master Fred Elmes as my DP, and when I got the two of them together — I was thinking, “How did I trick these great artists into working with me?!” So I sat in on the timing, but I defer to them as they really elevate the look, which is really quite beautiful. (Gawler used Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.)

What’s the state of indies today?
Financing is much harder now, and there are fewer companies, especially in the States. And the theatrical release used to be the big business part of it, and then the video release and so on was just ancillary. But now that’s totally flipped, and the theatrical release is just the promotion for the VOD and so on. It’s mind-boggling for me, though it doesn’t affect how you make a film. When people say, ‘The novel’s dead, it’s the end of cinema,’ that’s all nonsense. These art forms change and fluctuate and mutate, but they don’t die.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

The sound of two worlds for The Lost City of Z

By Jennifer Walden

If you are an explorer, your goal is to go where no one has gone before, or maybe it’s to unearth and re-discover a long-lost world. Director James Gray (The Immigrant), takes on David Grann’s non-fiction novel The Lost City of Z, which follows the adventures of British explorer Colonel Percival Fawcett, who in 1925 disappeared with his son in the Amazon jungle while on a quest to locate an ancient lost city.

Gray’s biographical film, which premiered October 15 at the 54th New York Film Festival, takes an interpretive approach to the story by exploring Fawcett’s inner landscape, which is at odds with his physical location — whether he’s in England or the Amazon, his thoughts drift between the two incongruent worlds.

Once Gray returned from filming The Lost City of Z in the jungles of Colombia, he met up with supervising sound editor/sound designer Robert Hein at New York’s Harbor Picture Company. Having worked together on The Immigrant years ago, Hein says he and Gray have an understanding of each other’s aesthetics. “He has very high goals for himself, and I try to have that also. I enjoy our collaboration; we keep pushing the envelope. We have a mutual appreciation for making a film the greatest it can be. It’s an evolution, and we keep pushing the film to new places.”

The Sound of Two Worlds
Gray felt Hein and Harbor Picture Company would be the perfect partner to handle the challenging sound job for The Lost City of Z. “It involved the creation of two very different worlds: Victorian England, and the jungle. Both feature the backdrop of World War I. Therefore, we wanted someone who naturally thinks outside the box, someone who doesn’t only look at the images on the screen, but takes chances and does things outside the realm of what you originally had in mind, and Bob [Hein] and his crew are those people.”

Bob Hein

Gray tasked Hein with designing a soundscape that could merge Fawcett’s physical location with his inner world. Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) is presented with physical attacks and struggles, but it’s his inner struggle that Gray wanted to focus on. Hein explains, “Fawcett is a conflicted character. A big part of the film is his longing for two worlds: the Amazon and England. When he’s in one place, his mind is in the other, so that was very challenging to pull off.”

To help convey Fawcett’s emotional and mental conflicts, Hein introduced the sounds of England into the Amazon, and vice-versa, subtly blending the two worlds. Through sound, the audience escapes the physical setting and goes into Fawcett’s mind. For example, the film opens with the sounds of the jungle, to which Hein added an indigenous Amazonian battle drum that transforms into the drumming of an English soldier, since Fawcett is physically with a group of soldiers preparing for a hunt. Hein explains that Fawcett’s belief that the Amazonians were just as civilized as Europeans (maybe even more so) was a controversial idea at the time. Merging their drumming wasn’t just a means of carrying the audience from the Amazon to England; it was also a comment on the two civilizations.

“In a way, it’s kind of emblematic of the whole sound design,” explains Hein. “It starts out as one thing but then it transforms into another. We did that throughout the film. I think it’s very beautiful and engaging. Through the sound you enter into his world, so we did a lot of those transitions.”

In another scene, Fawcett is traveling down a river in the jungle and he’s thinking about his family in England. Here, Hein adds an indigenous bird calling, and as the scene develops he blends the sound of that bird with an English church bell. “It’s very subtle,” he says. “The sounds just merge. It’s the merging of two worlds. It’s a feeling more than an obvious trick.”

During a WWI battle scene, Fawcett leads a charge of troops out of their trench. Here Hein adds sounds related to the Amazon in juxtaposition of Fawcett’s immediate situation. “Right before he goes into war, he’s back in the jungle even though he is physically in the trenches. What you hear in his head are memories of the jungle. You hear the indigenous Amazonians, but unless you’re told what it is you might not know.”

A War Cry
According to Hein, one of the big events in the film occurs when Fawcett is being attacked by Amazonians. They are shooting at him but he refuses to accept defeat. Fawcett holds up his bible and an arrow goes tearing into the book. At that moment, the film takes the audience inside Fawcett’s mind as his whole life flashes by. “The sound is a very big part of that because you hear memories of England and memories of his life and his family, but then you start to hear an indigenous war cry that I changed dramatically,” explains Hein. “It doesn’t sound like something that would come out of a human voice. It’s more of an ethereal, haunted reference to the war cry.”

As Fawcett comes back to reality that sound gets erased by the jungle ambience. “He’s left alone in the jungle, staring at a tribe of Indians that just tried to kill him. That was a very effective sound design moment in this film.”

To turn that war cry into an ethereal sound, Hein used a granular synthesizer plug-in called Paulstretch (or Paul’s Extreme Sound Stretch) created by Software Engineer by Paul Nasca. “Paulstretch turns sounds almost into music,” he says. “It’s an old technology, but it does some very special things. You can set it for a variety of effects. I would play around with it until I found what I liked. There were a lot of versions of a lot of different ideas as we went along.”

It’s all part of the creative process, which Gray is happy to explore. “What’s great is that James [Gray] is excited about sound,” says Hein. “He would hang out and we would play things together and we would talk about the film, about the main character, and we would arrive at sounds together.”

Drones
Additionally, Hein sound designed drones to highlight the anxiety and trepidation that Fawcett feels. “The drones are low, sub-frequency sounds but they present a certain atmosphere that conveys dread. These elements are very subtle. You don’t get hit over the head with them,” he says.

The drones and all the sound design were created from natural sounds from the Amazon or England. For example, to create a low-end drone, they would start with jungle sounds — imagine a bee’s nest or an Amazonian instrument — and then manipulate those. “Everything was done to immerse the audience in the world of The Lost City of Z in its purest sense,” says Hein, who worked closely with Harbor’s sound editors Glenfield Payne, Damian Volpe and Dave Paterson. “They did great work and were crucial in the sound design.”

The Amazon
Gray also asked that Hein design the indigenous Amazon world exactly the way that it should be, as real as it could be. Hein says, “It’s very hard to find the correct sound to go along with the images. A lot of my endeavor was researching and finding people who did recordings in the Amazon.”

He scoured the Smithsonian Institute Archives, and did hours of research online, looking for audio preservationists who captured field recordings of indigenous Amazonians. “There was one amazing coincidence,” says Hein. “There’s a scene in the movie where the Indians are using an herbal potion to stun the fish in the river. That’s how they do it so as not to over-fish their environment. James [Gray] had found this chant that he wanted to have there, but that chant wasn’t actually a fishing chant. Fortunately, I found a recording of the actual fishing chant online. It’s beautifully done. I contacted the recordist and he gave us the rights to use it.”

Filming in the Amazon, under very difficult conditions presented Hein with another post production challenge. “Location sound recording in the jungle is challenging because there were loud insects, rain and thunder. There were even far-afield trucks and airplanes that didn’t exist at the time.”

Gray was very concerned that sections of the location dialogue would be unusable. “The performances in the film are so great because they went deep into the Amazon jungle to shoot this film. Physically being in that environment I’m sure was very stressful, and that added a certain quality to the actors’ performances that would have been very difficult to replace with ADR,” says Hein, who carefully cleaned up the dialogue using several tools, including iZotope’s RX 5 Advanced audio restoration software. “With RX 5 Advanced, we could microscopically choose which sounds we wanted to keep and which sounds we wanted to remove, and that’s done visually. RX gives you a visual map of the audio and you can paint out sounds that are unnecessary. It’s almost like Photoshop for sound.”

Hein shared the cleaned dialogue tracks with Gray, who was thrilled. “He was so excited about them. He said, “I can use my location sound!” That was a big part of the project.”

ADR and The Mix
While much of the dialogue was saved, there were still a few problematic scenes that required ADR, including a scene that was filmed during a tropical rainstorm, and another that was shot on a noisy train as it traveled over the mountains in Colombia. Harbor’s ADR supervisor Bobby Johanson, who has worked with Gray on previous films, recorded everything on Harbor’s ADR stage that is located just down the hall from Hein’s edit suite and the dub stage.

Gray says, “Harbor is not just great for New York; it’s great, period. It is this fantastic place where they’ve got soundstages that are 150 feet away from the editing rooms, which is incredibly convenient. I knew they could handle the job, and it was really a perfect scenario.”

The Lost City of Z was mixed in 5.1 surround on an Avid/Euphonix System 5 console by re-recording mixers Tom Johnson (dialogue/music) and Josh Berger (effects, Foley, backgrounds) in Studio A at Harbor Sound’s King Street location in Soho. It was also reviewed on the Harbor Grand stage, which is the largest theatrical mix stage in New York. The team used the 5.1 environment to create the feeling of being engulfed by the jungle. Fawcett’s trips, some which lasted years, were grueling and filled with disease and death. “The jungle is a scary place to be! We really wanted to make sure that the audience understood the magnitude of Percy’s trips to the Amazon,” says Berger. “There are certain scenes where we used sound to heighten the audience’s perspective of how erratic and punishing the jungle can be, i.e. when the team gets caught in rapids or when they come under siege from various Indian tribes.”

Johnson, who typically mixes at Skywalker Sound, had an interesting approach to the final mix. Hein explains that Johnson would first play a reel with every available sound in it — all the dialogue and ADR, all the sound effects and Foley — and the music. “We played it all in the reel,” says Hein. “It would be overwhelming. It would be unmixed and at times chaotic. But it gave us a very good idea of how to approach the mix.”

As they worked through the film, the sound would evolve in unexpected ways. What they heard toward the end of the first pass influenced their approach on the beginning of the second pass. “The film became a living being. We became very flexible about how the sound design was coming in and out of different scenes. The sound became very integrated into the film as a whole. It was really great to experience that,” shares Hein.

As Johnson and Berger mixed, Hein was busy creating new sound design elements for the visual effects that were still coming in at the last minute. For example, the final version of the arrows that were shot in the film didn’t come in until the last minute. “The arrows had to have a real special quality about them. They were very specific in communicating just how dangerous the situation actually was and what they were up against,” says Hein.

Later in the film, Amazonians throw tomahawks at Fawcett and his son as they run through the jungle. “Those tomahawks were never in the footage,” he says. “We had just an idea of them until days before we finished the mix. There was also a jaguar that comes out of the jungle and threatens them. That also came in at the last minute.”

While Hein created new sound elements in his edit suite next to the dub stage, Gray was able to join him for critique and collaboration before those sounds were sent next door to the dub stage. “Working with James is a high-energy, creative blast and super fun. He’s constantly coming up with new ideas and challenges. He spends every minute in the mix encouraging us, challenging us and, best of all, making us laugh a lot. He’s a great storyteller, and his knowledge of film and film history is remarkable. Working with James Gray is a real highlight in my career,” concludes Hein.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. 

Behind the Title: Harbor Picture’s head of dailies Jamie Payne

COMPANY: Harbor Picture Company (@HarborPicture)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
A NYC-based post house offering a mix of artists and technical specialists collaborating to a common goal.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Head of Dailies

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In the dailies department there are many bases that need to be covered, and each is of equal importance. Guaranteeing the integrity of the acquired digital material, while maintaining the vision of the cinematographer is key. An in-depth knowledge of color and workflow helps to understand the technical and artistic language that occurs between the lab, the cinematographer and the production as a whole.

Our day-to-day tasks include initial acquisition, color timing, archival, asset management and tracking, and old-fashioned human interaction. “Guardian of the image” may be an esoteric title, but one I feel that encompasses what we aim for and deliver.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A skilled team of operators now have ownership of an awfully large amount of digital material. Digital acquisition has always been about flexibility, speed and convenience (not to mention ongoing technological advancement). And not necessarily artistic vision and longevity, which we aim to help provide.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The responsibility for the camera original material, a camera card or hard drive is treated with the same respect as an unexposed reel of film. I enjoy the demands of being answerable to all the various departments within production and post production.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Installing yet another daily Adobe Acrobat Reader update.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Either looking at the material for the first time or Saturday mornings.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I studied photography in college and would have almost certainly continued on that path if I hadn’t watched A Matter of Life and Death (1946).

I worked as a photographer’s assistant for still life/food photography working on medium 5×4 and 10×8 formats, which paid for my entry into reportage photography. How many people can say that they have shot 10×8-inch polaroids for exposure tests?!

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
See above. A Matter of Life and Death (starring David Niven) watched on a heavily used VHS opened my eyes to things that were possible. It was quite startling.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I started as most people do in our industry, as an intern (or a runner in the UK) making tea, etc. As soon as I stepped into a telecine suite I knew immediately I had to color time. That was almost 18 years ago. I was simply in the right place at the right time when asked to create a dailies department many years ago in London. It was a fortuitous meeting that let to a position that has continued to this day.

Billions

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The last five projects that I have worked on The Wizard of Lies, Beat-Up Little Seagull, Billions, Limitless and Paterson. It’s a nice balance of episodics and features, with some great performances and spectacular photography.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT (OR PROJECTS) THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Most projects I have worked on have featured a little surprise that made me smile, whether technically or aesthetically. I once had an Oscar-winning DP express gratitude after they flew 2,000 miles round trip to check the dailies due to an issue I raised and caught.

I once used a trick an assistant editor taught me that mightily impressed a senior editor.

Each moment in its own way is very rewarding, but I must say that color timing the IMAX negative for The Dark Knight Rises was pretty special.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The internal combustion engine, modern plumbing and the Internet.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
A smidgen of Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Not anymore now I’m immersed in dailies. When I color-timed for finishing, clients and I always listened to music.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I honestly don’t think that work is stressful. It’s stressful if the technology or client expectation is misunderstood or misinterpreted, which isn’t an option in a digital lab. I become stressed when I’m not busy, and that’s the truth.

In my spare time I hike and appreciate immensely this wonderfully beautiful country.

 

Behind the Title: Harbor Picture’s senior editor Chris Mackenzie

NAME: Chris Mackenzie

COMPANY: Harbor Picture Company (@HarborPIcture)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Harbor Picture Company is a New York-based post house known for our flexibility with workflows and our relationships with clients. We offer a complete range of post services — from offline editorial to Dolby Atmos audio mixing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Digital conform, visual effects, titles and some problem solving. My work usually comes under the umbrella of final picture finishing. I’m responsible for getting the picture components to the final state for presentation, be that theatrical, broadcast television or Internet streaming.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It would surprise most people that I do a lot of VFX work. Often, this happens to be last-minute fixes to address production issues that were overlooked. I am also often asked to address problems flagged during the quality control review of the final deliverables — a little unexpected visual effects work is usually necessary to get the project accepted for its final distribution.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I like being able to fix a problem quickly and easily, or at least offer a creative solution to an issue. There are times — especially on lower budget productions — where a little digital paint or simple VFX compositing can resolve a big issue that may have resulted in a shot or scene being scrapped from the edit.

Chris Mackenzie at work.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The dreaded recut is my least favorite. This often means that work that was complete and approved now needs to be dismantled and redone. Unlocking an edit (changing the content of a project) used to be a rare event in post production. In recent years, however, having some continued editorial right up to the last minute before delivery has become more and more common.

The tools are a lot faster now. And, generally, operators are a lot faster and more flexible, but projects continue to push the envelope with major editorial revisions sometimes being made very close to the deadline for completion.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Probably mid-morning — I feel best after I’ve had my first cup of coffee, and I know I’ve got most of the day ahead of me. There’s rarely a 10am deadline, so at this point in the day I can concentrate on completing the work without the sense of being rushed to deliver a file.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
At the same time I got interested in television and picture post, I was interested in art and photography. I considered going back to school to pursue an MFA related to digital image making.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I was working as a bicycle messenger in Vancouver when I first graduated college. During this time, I made a few deliveries to some burgeoning post facilities and caught a glimpse at what I thought were interesting jobs. I imagined that those editors and colorists were creating the fanciest Super Bowl commercials and high-end music videos on a regular basis. Working indoors on an online editing system seemed like a much better (at least drier) career path for me.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Close to 20 years ago — which seems hard to believe — I saw early versions of Photoshop and Avid editing systems and was amazed by the capability of these technologies. I knew there was a great future for developments in this area and it was something that immediately interested me — for a brief period I was interested in other aspects of filmmaking, but it was post that really captivated me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Our team at Harbor just completed a few television series: The Knick, The Girlfriend Experience and Billions. We also recently completed Spike Lee’s feature Chi-Raq. Recently, we’ve adopted a divide and conquer strategy at Harbor — there are three of us working in Digital Conform and we usually share the duties of putting these projects together.

Gone With the Bullets

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
There are two. The first would be Gone With the Bullets, an epic 3D feature that was released to great fanfare in China. It was my first time conforming in 3D, and it was a massive project — thousands of cuts and hundreds of visual effects.

It was a huge challenge and steep learning curve, but during its run in China it received great reviews for its 3D quality. The second is Pan’s Labyrinth. This was one of the first films I had the opportunity to work on. I was inexperienced and really had to stretch my abilities to accomplish what was needed to finish the project, but the fact the film turned out so well really gave me a lot of confidence.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Autodesk Smoke, Blackmagic Resolve and the Apple PowerMac.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook and a little Instagram

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes and no.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I listen to a lot of NPR — occasionally it will be their music stream, but more often than not I listen to the current affairs or news programming. I like to feel like I’m learning something while I’m working away.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
To de-stress I’ve gotten back into cycling in a serious way.  Unfortunately, I recently had a cycling accident and am currently recovering from a broken hip, so it might be time to find a new hobby for a while.

I find being physically active and part of a demanding sport helps me to focus and increase my energy levels at work. It took some time management to find a schedule that works, but it’s definitely been beneficial and a nice way to balance the work I do in the office.

 

 

Harbor Picture Company opens theatrical sound mixing division

Harbor Picture Company has launched Harbor Grand, a multi-million-dollar studio servicing audio mixing for theatrical projects. This comes after a year of planning and construction and with support from the Empire State Development.

Harbor Sound is the sound post division of Harbor Picture Company, which offers dailies, offline editorial, VFX, picture post, sound post, digital deliverables and commercial production services. Harbor occupies 50,000 square feet in SoHo New York and offers talent, technical infrastructure and engineering to the feature film, television and commercial industries.

HARBOR_GRAND_theater_screen_0050_2133x1422

The new facility features 26-foot ceilings, a private lounge, editorial space and kitchen. The mix stage itself is equipped to mix Dolby Atmos, IMAX and 7.1 and 5.1 surround sound with 2K, 4K and 3D projection capability. They use a Euphonix System 5 console

According to Harbor, this opening not only represents the most significant expansion of a post company since the New York State Post-Production Tax Credit was strengthened in 2012, it is also the largest sound mixing stage of its kind in New York.

“Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, a strengthened Film Tax Credit Program has made New York a top destination for both production and post-production work, creating job opportunities for thousands of people and contributing significantly to the state’s economy,” says Empire State Development president/CEO/Commissioner Howard Zemsky. “Harbor Picture Company’s expansion, from 30 to 65 employees helps demonstrate the industry’s continued growth in New York State.”

“Having a mix stage of this level in New York City will be a powerful tool to continuously attract Hollywood-level features and TV shows to complete their post-production in New York City. We now have the infrastructure, the technology and the experience to deal with projects at a premier level.” says Harbor’s president, Zak Tucker. “As larger productions choose to locate the post-production process in New York, a significant number of artistic, technical and management jobs will become available in the city, supporting the idea that New York is a primary destination for post production.”

To encourage Harbor Sound to increase employment at its headquarters in Manhattan, Empire State Development. has offered $550,000 in performance-based Excelsior Jobs Program Tax Credits, which are tied directly to the creation of new jobs in the post-production industry. This specific incentive complements the impact of the legislation that Governor Cuomo signed in 2012 to strengthen the State’s existing post incentive program in order to attract additional film post activity to all regions of New York State.

This law increased the percentage of tax credits available for projects that did not film in New York but qualify for credits for post-production work done in New York State. The qualified film and television post-production credit increased from 10 percent to 30 percent in the New York metropolitan commuter region.

Harbor’s facility expansion is part of an emerging trend of private companies boosting the creative economy by looking to New York as a home for their content-driven enterprises. For instance, Amazon’s Alpha House and Netflix’s Orange is the New Black are both being filmed at Kaufman Astoria Studios, while YouTube opened a 20,000-square-foot facility in Chelsea. New York’s largest film studio, The Weinstein Company, also struck a deal with Netflix, bringing $60 Million into NYC to produce a sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

The A-List: Director Cary Fukunaga on posting ‘Beasts of No Nation’

By Iain Blair

Writer/director/camera operator/cinematographer Cary Fukunaga has literally been one of the hottest — and coldest — directors in the business, thanks to making shorts, docs and movies everywhere from the Arctic Circle to Haiti and East Africa.

Now he’s hot again, in every sense of the word, having written/directed/produced and shot the harrowing new war drama Beasts of No Nation, set in the sweltering lands of West Africa, and shot in Ghana. It tells the story of Agu (Abraham Attah), a young villager, whose happy family life and childhood are shattered when army troops from the capital city arrive to squelch a rebellion against the country’s corrupt regime.

After seeing his father and brother killed, he escapes to the forest where he’s discovered by a company of young rebels led by the charismatic Commandant (Idris Elba). There, he undergoes a gauntlet of harsh treatment, initiation rituals and fiery speeches from the Commandant, and as the ragtag army sets off on a series of battles, Agu is eventually promoted from ammo carrier to rifle-toting soldier, gaining respect but losing his innocence as he’s turned into a killing machine. The film is available exclusively on Netflix.

Writer Iain Blair and filmmaker Cary Fukunaga.

Writer Iain Blair and filmmaker Cary Fukunaga.

I spoke with Fukunaga — whose credits include his acclaimed feature-writing and directing debut Sin Nombre, Jayne Eyre and the first season of HBO’s crime drama True Detective (for which he won the Emmy for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series) — about making the film, post and his respect for film sound.

Did you have a vision for how this film would look?
Yes, and it’s the film I wrote (laughs), but I don’t really visualize my films ahead of time. I’m not even sure about the music, so I start off definitely from a writing perspective and when scouting locations I start getting visual ideas. Obviously, I do have some visual ideas in my head or I couldn’t write it, but it’s such a work in progress… every step of the way. It was such a hard, brutal shoot — the hardest I’ve ever done, anywhere, and I’ve shot in some very difficult places around the world.

So post must have been a very calm respite after the grueling locations of West Africa?
I like post. It’s where you really make and finish the film, but I’m so used to being very hands-on in all the other production departments — writing, directing, camera operating and so on — that by the time I get to post, it feels very strange to be relegated to the role of almost an observer. And the rhythm is always fits and starts. You get in there and it seems like nothing’s happening for weeks, and then finally you make some progress, and then that all repeats. So post is definitely not my favorite part of the whole process, just because of the sheer time it all takes and how much I’m not hands-on anymore.

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How did it work in the editing room with two editors —Mikkel E.G. Nielsen (A Royal Affair) and Pete Beaudreau (All Is Lost, The Gambler)?
Originally, a third editor, Elliot Graham (Steve Jobs, Milk) was on the shoot with us, but he hurt his back and had to drop out. We had roughly 75 hours of raw footage from Ghana, so Mikkel took over and had to completely learn all that footage again and then started re-cutting and re-assembling the film a couple of months after we wrapped. That was at Outpost Digital in New York. Then after five months on it, he had to leave for another job, so Pete took over — and we thought it would just be clean up by that point, but he ended up working on it for another five months. If you think of Mikkel’s work as hammering out the shape of the sword, Pete put on the fine edge to every scene.

So post was pretty long?
Yes, we did it all at Outpost. We were there almost a year, and we started on post while we were shooting in Ghana. Our associate editor, Victoria Lesiw, started off as an assistant editor in Ghana and was there all the way through and completely invested, from production to the very last days of post. We lost people along the way, so post wasn’t at all easy; people had to bow out because of previous commitments. We lost our original sound designer just weeks before we started our mix, and we had to completely redo it all in a very short time — just five weeks, which wasn’t really enough for the film — but we were able to create something out of nothing.

Although the film feels like cinéma vérité, obviously you used VFX, especially in all the battles scenes. How many visual effects shots are there?
Quite a few. There was a lot of clean up, and a lot of artifacts of war — bullet hits on walls, blood squibs — which we didn’t have time to do as usual physical effects, as well as muzzle flashes and augmenting explosions and so on. Then we had the big infra-red sequence. I’d written the screenplay back in 2006, and I loved the infrared sequence Oliver Stone and Rodrigo Prieto had done in Alexander, so I always wanted to do it. I wanted to shoot some infrared in True Detective, but we just couldn’t find the film stock — we just did it as a VFX sequence for this. Siren Lab did most of them,  but The Artery also did some shots.Beasts of No Nation

Sound and music both play a huge role in this, right?
I actually think they’re more important than the visuals. I had this great video class teacher in high school, who said, “People will forgive bad visuals, but they’ll never forgive bad sound,” and that’s so true. If there’s something wrong with the sound, it can be the most grating part of watching any kind of media, but if you do it right you can really elevate the storytelling. Look at what Walter Murch did…  and Orson Welles, who came from radio. They really understood how much sound can tell a story, and have been a big influence for me. So when I do sound design, sometimes I’ll do entire sequences where that’s driving the entire story. We did all the mixing at Harbor Picture Company in New York. (The mix crew at Harbor included supervising sound editor Glenfield Payne, re-recording Mixer Martin Czembor, assistant sound re-recording mixer Josh Berger and re-recording mix technician Ian Gaffney Rosenfeld. The film was mixed using a Euphonix S5 Fusion console. The Euphonix was controlling 2 Pro Tools systems running Pro Tools 11.)

Where was the DI?
At Deluxe in New York with Steve Bodner (who uses DaVinci Resolve), the same colorist I used on True Detective. He’s the guy I go to for anything. We did some looks before I left, but more than anything we just get in the room and figure it all out. I love the DI, and by that stage I feel much more hands-on. We did a lot of work because the whole issue with digital is that you spend so much time trying to get back to a film look. So you sit there, massaging and massaging it, trying to get the color space right, and every film stock’s different.

Cary Fukunago shooting with the Arri Alexa.

Cary Fukunago shooting with the Arri Alexa.

I really love old photo journalism reversal stock. If I could have shot Sin Nombre on Kodachrome I would have — and part of that is the unforgiving nature of reversal stock. There’s no reciprocity there. Now, six, seven years later, shooting with the Arri Alexa, I was again looking how to approximate that slightly under-exposed reversal look for this film. I found that by shooting one stop under —and bringing in a lot of cyans and the blacks, but keeping the saturation up, and then figuring out how to make all the greens, yellows and browns really pop — it gave me the look I wanted.

There’s a lot of talk that you’ll do another TV project, a miniseries based on Caleb Carr’s novel The Alienist. So what’s next?
I’m definitely involved with The Alienist, but I may do something else before then. It depends on the timing.

Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors and artists in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Behind the Title: Harbor’s Roman Hankewycz

NAME: Roman Hankewycz

COMPANY: New York City’s  Harbor Picture Company @harborpicture

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Harbor Picture Company is a high-end post-production and production house. We offer post production services across the full spectrum of picture and sound disciplines for feature film, television and commercial projects. Specifically our services include digital dailies, offline editorial, VFX, DI/color correction, sound editorial, mix and ADR and digital and tape deliverables, as well as an accomplished commercial production department.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Once the edit is locked the project enters the finishing phase, which includes color correction among other things like sound mixing, titling, etc.  As a colorist you work with the director and cinematographer to come up with a “look” for the project. We watch the film and discuss it in terms of color; there may be color motifs that need to be highlighted or specific instances where something needs to be accentuated through color.  Sometimes we share photos or refer to other films that served as inspiration during production to aid the dialog. Using all of that information, we develop the look and then work through the film to create consistency between shots and scenes. The colorist is also one of the last people to work on a project, so part of the job is catching and fixing errors that may have fallen through the cracks so the final deliverable is as perfect as possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It may be surprising to consider that it’s a very people-oriented job. You spend your days in very close quarters with the filmmakers whose projects you’re working on. Each client and project is different, and you need to be able to clearly communicate very subjective concepts while also creating a friendly environment that makes the workday enjoyable.

Public Morals 2 Public Morals

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Without question it’s making beautiful images [like the ones above for Public Morals]. Nothing beats the satisfaction of seeing a beautiful piece and knowing that I had a hand in making it look that way.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sitting in a dark room all day limits your ability to develop a nice tan.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
What kind of question is this? 11:52am! (Editor’s Note: We like that time of day too. Right before lunch, yet still officially morning. Good pick.)

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve wondered about this myself.  I’m not sure, but I’d like to build furniture or own a surf shop on some tropical island.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
After college I set my sights on the film industry, although in hindsight I didn’t know anything about it.  In my first few years of interning and working, I was lucky enough to meet and learn from a few gracious and talented people. I tried my hand at many roles in post production but with time I gravitated toward online editing and, finally, color correction specifically. I was really drawn to the power of being able to manipulate the image, but also to the craftsmanship involved. Every project is an opportunity to refine your craft, to experiment with new looks and techniques, and in this way the work is always challenging and therefore compelling.

AdderallDiaries_Press_1

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
It was a few years into my career in post production that I decided to specifically pursue being a colorist.

 

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Public Morals is a show currently airing on TNT, Adderall Diaries (pictured right) is a film I worked on that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in April, and I Smile Back is a feature film to be released this month.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In addition to the ones I mentioned we can include I Smile Back, which just released it’s official trailer (below) and will be coming out soon.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I don’t have a specific project that I’m most proud of. I’m proud of any project where the grade is solid and the client is happy… those are the most important things to me.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Phone, tablet, TV.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m very bad at social media.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I have music on almost all the time.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
It’s easy to get tired of even your favorite music when it’s constantly playing in the background, so I’m always switching it up and choosing playlists that I haven’t heard of.  I surprise myself with days filled with bluegrass or island jams. But if I’m by myself and getting pumped up for the weekend I go with the classics… GNR.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It can get stressful, but I love the work and in the end I’d take my bad days over other people’s good days. That and a cold beer keeps me on an even keel.

Behind the Title: Harbor Picture Company colorist Joe Gawler

NAME:  Joe Gawler

COMPANY:  New York City’s Harbor Picture Company (@harborpicture)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE HARBOR?  
Harbor Picture Company is a large, artist owned-and-operated post production studio in NYC. Harbor is an awesome place to work.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior colorist and partner

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I spend the majority of my day in my theater collaborating with filmmakers. There’s a technical aspect of balancing shots to match one another, but, most importantly, there’s a level of taste and artistry that the colorist needs to help bring the most out of an image.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It’s a full-time job, and then some. Successful colorists are always there for their clients. I’ve worked countless weekends and 24-hour sessions.

suite shot grading theater

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The relationships I’ve developed with amazing cinematographers and directors. It’s very humbling and motivating to have a filmmaker seek you out to help complete their vision.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When there are too many cooks in the kitchen and a beautiful image gets compromised for no good reason. The ability to manage a room full of clients successfully can be what separates a good colorist from a great colorist.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Getting to Harbor in the morning on day one of a new show or film.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Something creative that involves collaborating with a team and working on my craft.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I’ll never forget my first experience editing a project for school. I was in the editing suite for 16 hours and it felt like one hour. That’s when I knew post production was for me.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I was fortunate to assist a very talented telecine colorist early in my career. He made the whole process so much fun that I couldn’t imagine doing anything else.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Magic Mike XXL, Ricki and the Flash, The Knick.

Ricki and the Flash

Ricki and the Flash

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Well, I may be best known for Midnight in Paris, but I have also graded three films that won best cinematography at Sundance and have helped restore many, many classic films for The Criterion Collection.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, DaVinci Resolve, my car.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook and Instagram. DPs, such as Reed Morano, Tas Michos and Chivo, are posting amazing images daily. Truly inspirational.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Absolutely.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
It depends on who I’m working with. Picking the music for the day is usually the first decision the clients and I make together.

THIS IS A HIGH STRESS JOB. WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Quality time with my family is precious and all too rare. So we try to get away on cool trips, somewhere international whenever possible.

The A-List: Peter Bogdanovich on directing ‘She’s Funny That Way’

By Iain Blair

The legendary director/writer/producer/actor/author and film historian Peter Bogdanovich hit Hollywood like a tornado when his 1971 masterpiece, The Last Picture Show, scored eight Oscar nominations, winning two of those golden boys. He followed that up with more hits, including What’s Up, Doc? and Paper Moon. The latter won the Oscar for then 10-year-old Tatum O’Neal.

Since those heady days, Bogdanovich has had his ups and downs, and he’s largely spent most of the last 15 years working in TV, both behind and in front of the camera — he was a regular on The Sopranos and also directed an episode. Now he’s back with a new film, She’s Funny That Way, a screwball comedy about the interconnected personal lives of the cast and crew of a Broadway production, starring an ensemble cast that includes Jennifer Aniston, Owen Wilson, Will Forte, Kathryn Hahn, Rhys Ifans and Imogen Poots.

Peter Bogdanovich and writer Iain Blair during their recent meeting in LA.

Peter Bogdanovich and writer Iain Blair during their recent meeting in Hollywood.

I met with the director — whose films include Mask, Texasville and Noises Off… — recently in Hollywood to talk about making the film, the challenges of posting it, and his take on cinema today.

The film was co-produced by some real heavyweights, including Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach, and in addition to the A-list cast, you also got cameos from Quentin Tarantino, Tatum O’Neal and Joanna Lumley. Did you just call them up?
Wes and Noah are good friends and helped me get this made, and with Quentin I called him. But he’s the most impossible person to reach on the phone, and I usually leave many messages before he finally calls back, but this time he just picked up the phone, said “yes” immediately and that he’d love to be in a Peter Bogdanovich film.

You shot and posted in New York?
Yes. We had a great time shooting it in New York. And while I like post and all the editing, I think my favorite part of the whole filmmaking process is the shoot itself and working with all the actors. I don’t like preproduction, and in post you can get into problems — you disagree with the producer or you don’t see eye-to-eye with the editor and you have arguments. So it can be very frustrating sometimes.

Was the post on this frustrating?
(Laughs) No, not as bad as some films I’ve done! We did all the post work at Harbor Picture Company in downtown New York. They’ve worked on a lot of great movies, like The Hundred-Foot Journey, as well as TV shows like Game of Thrones, and they did all the sound editorial, ADR and mixing as well as the DI. They did a great job. Robert Hein was our supervising sound editor. [Bobby Johanson was the ADR mixer and the ADR recordist was Mike Rivera.] For the DI they worked with the DP Yaron Orbach, as it was pretty straightforward. [Joe Gawler was the main colorist, with additional help from Roman Hankewycz. They both used DaVinci Resolve.]

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You used two editors on the film: Pax Wassermann, who has cut a lot of documentaries, including “Knuckleball!, and Nick Moore, who cut Notting Hill, About a Boy and Along Came Polly. Tell us about that relationship and how it worked?
Well, Pax was in New York and then we hired Nick when we came out to LA to finish the film, so they didn’t work together at all. Pax was there while we were shooting and did virtually the whole picture. So we had that cut, and we felt it needed a bit more work, and I was coming out to LA, so it just made sense to get another editor then, and we made some changes and shifted stuff around.

I quite enjoy the editing, but I shoot my films so they’ll cut a certain way. So the only thing that’s really left to argue about is what scenes should be in or out. Sometimes you win the fight, other times someone has a better point.

Did you get into fights this time in post?
Not with the editors. The producers disagreed a little bit, but it all worked out okay in the end. It’s just a natural part of the process.

There are a few visual effects shots in the film. What was involved?
There aren’t many… mainly those super-impositions at the start when Imogen’s talking about Tracy and Hepburn, and Bogart and Bacall. They were all done by The Molecule, which is based in New York and LA. Luke DiTommaso was the VFX supervisor. I’m not that big on VFX work, but they did a great job. [The Molecule provided around 15 shots. Effects created include set alterations, such as sign replacements, speed ramps, split screens and one shot where they connected a guy’s fist to someone’s face. The mostly used Nuke and Mocha Pro.]

You’ve been doing this a long time. What are the biggest changes in post — and movies in general — that you’ve seen since you started?
I figured out I’ve been in showbiz for 60 years, since 1955, and digital has been the biggest change. That’s made post – and shooting – so much easier, and faster, so I’m a fan. Digital editing systems were a true revolution.

I’m not a fan of all the superhero comic book movies they make now. They bore the shit out of me! If you’ve seen one, you’ve seen ‘em all, but Hollywood’s always been, “monkey see, money do.” Remember when Jim Cameron made Titanic? Everyone said it would be a disaster, with this huge budget of $150 million. “What’s he doing? He’s crazy! Out of his fucking mind!” Now, that’s Hollywood’s solution to everything — spend $150 million on some cartoon superhero. That’s why I don’t go to the movies much anymore. There’s so few I want to see, which is a bit sad.

Check out the trailer for She’s Funny That Way:

Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Kevin Vale to head feature post at Harbor Picture Company

New York-based Harbor Picture Company has added Kevin Vale as its director of motion picture post production. He has over 51 feature film credits and a decade in the film industry.

Prior to joining Harbor, Vale worked as a digital intermediate producer on a range of feature films, including Triple 9 (2015), Freeheld (2015), Noah (2014) and Lee Daniels’ The Butler (2013). Vale was also responsible for overseeing the DI post on Wes Anderson’s Oscar-nominated film Moonrise Kingdom in 2012 as well as Darren Aronofsky’s Oscar-winning Black Swan in 2010.

“His experience with high-end feature films is a perfect fit for Harbor right now. Kevin will be the driving force behind the picture post department and his skills will be a great addition to all of our post-production services,” says Zak Tucker, president, Harbor Picture Company.

In his role as director of motion picture post, Vale will focus on creating seamless transitions with the array of services offered within Harbor’s DI department including transcoding, conform, VFX, color and deliverables.

“Recently, Harbor has also become the largest post-sound facility in New York, and I’m looking forward to being able to deliver on projects where all post services are offered here at Harbor,” says Vale.

Vale knows Harbor well, having previously collaborated with Harbor’s head colorist Joe Gawler on projects like Darjeeling Limited (2007), as well as working with Harbor’s head of post-production Darrell Smith, on Lee Daniel’s The Butler (2013).