Tag Archives: Game of Thrones

Arrival, La La Land among winners at 67th ACE Eddies

The ACE Eddies, the awards celebrating the best in editing — and voted on by editors themselves — took place last week at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Arrival (edited by Joe Walker, ACE) won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and La La Land (edited by Tom Cross, ACE) won Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy). During the 67th Annual ACE Eddie Awards, trophies were handed out recognizing the best editing of 2016 in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries.

ACE President Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities with actress Rachel Bloom (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend) serving as the evening’s host.

Director/producer J.J. Abrams received the organization’s prestigious ACE Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year honor, which was presented to him by friend and collaborator Jeff Garlin. Abrams joins an impressive list of filmmakers who have received ACE’s highest honor, including Norman Jewison, Nancy Meyers, Francis Ford Coppola, Clint Eastwood, Robert Zemeckis, Alexander Payne, Ron Howard, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg, Christopher Nolan, Frank Marshall and Richard Donner, among others.

Janet Ashikaga, ACE, and Thelma Schoonmaker, ACE, were presented with Career Achievement awards by Thomas Schlamme and Martin Scorsese, respectively. Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their tremendous contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

Other presenters at the ACE Eddie Awards included Moonlight star Trevante Rhodes, Fences stars Mykelti Williamson and Saniyya Sidney, This Is Us actress Chrissy Metz and actor Tim Matheson.

Arrival editor Joe Walker, ACE

A full list of winners follows:


BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):

Arrival
Joe Walker, ACE


BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
La La Land
Tom Cross, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Zootopia
Fabienne Rawley & Jeremy Milton

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
O.J.: Made in America
Bret Granato, Maya Mumma & Ben Sozanski

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION):
Everything Is Copy – Nora Ephron: Scripted & Unscripted
Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

Veep editor Steven Rasch, ACE.

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION:
Veep: “Morning After”
Steven Rasch, ACE

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
This Is Us: “Pilot”
David L. Bertman, ACE

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Game of Thrones: “Battle of the Bastards”
Tim Porter, ACE

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
All the Way
Carol Littleton, ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown: “Senegal”
Mustafa Bhagat


Main Image: La La Land editor Tom Cross, ACE

Rogue One/ILM

VES nominees announced, Rogue One gets most nods for features

The Visual Effects Society has announed the the nominees for the 15th Annual VES Awards, which recognizes outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games as well as the VFX supervisors, VFX producers and hands-on artists who work on the projects 

This year, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story received the most feature film nominations with seven; Doctor Strange and The Jungle Book follow with six each. Kubo and the Two Strings is the top animated film contender with six nominations. Game of Thrones leads the broadcast field and scores the most nominations overall with 11.

The nominees in the 24 categories are:

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A PHOTOREAL FEATURE

Doctor Strange

Stephane Ceretti, Susan Pickett, Richard Bluff, Vincent Cirelli, Paul Corbould

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Christian Manz, Olly Young, Tim Burke, Pablo Grillo, David Watkins

Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children

Frazer Churchill, Hal Couzens, Andrew Lockley, Jelmer Boskma, Hayley Williams

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

John Knoll, Erin Dusseault, Hal Hickel, Nigel Sumner, Neil Corbould

The Jungle Book

Robert Legato, Joyce Cox, Andrew R. Jones, Adam Valdez, JD Schwalm

Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature

Allied

Kevin Baillie, Sandra Scott, Brennan Doyle, Viktor Muller, Richard Van Den Bergh

Deepwater Horizon

Craig Hammack, Petra Holtorf-Stratton, Jason Snell, John Galloway, Burt Dalton

Jason Bourne

Charlie Noble, Dan Barrow, Julian Gnass, Huw Evans, Steve Warner

Silence

Pablo Helman, Brian Barlettani, Ivan Busquets, Juan Garcia, R. Bruce Steinheimer

Sully

MIchael Owens, Tyler Kehl, Mark Curtis, Bryan Litson, Steven Riley

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE

Finding Dory

Angus MacLane, Lindsey Collins- p.g.a., John Halstead, Chris J. Chapman

Kubo and the Two Strings

Travis Knight, Arianne Sutner, Steve Emerson, Brad Schiff

Moana

Kyle Odermatt, Nicole P. Hearon, Hank Driskill, Ian Gooding

The Little Prince

Mark Osborne, Jinko Gotoh, Pascal Bertrand, Jamie Caliri

Zootopia

Scott Kersavage, Bradford S. Simonsen, David Goetz, Ernest J. Petti

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A PHOTOREAL EPISODE

Black Mirror: Playtest

Justin Hutchinson-Chatburn, Russell McLean, Grant Walker, Christopher Gray

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards

Joe Bauer, Steve Kullback, Glenn Melenhorst, Matthew Rouleau, Sam Conway

Stranger Things: Demogorgon

Marc Kolbe, Aaron Sims, Olcun Tan

The Expanse: Salvage

Robert Munroe, Clint Green, Kyle Menzies, Tom Turnbull

Westworld: The Bicameral Mind

Jay Worth, Elizabeth Castro, Bobo Skipper, Gustav  Ahrén 

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A PHOTOREAL EPISODE

Black Sails: XX

Erik Henry, Terron Pratt, Aladino Debert, Yafei Wu, Paul Stephenson

Penny Dreadful: The Day Tennyson Died

James Cooper, Bill Halliday, Sarah McMurdo, Mai-Ling Lee

Roots: Night One

Simon Hansen, Paul Kalil, Theo le Roux Preist, Wicus Labuschagne, Max Poolman

The Man in the High Castle: Volkshalle

Lawson Deming, Cory Jamieson, Casi Blume, Nick Chamberlain

Vikings: The Last Ship

Dominic Remane, Mike Borrett, Ovidiu Cinazan, Paul Wishart, Paul Byrne

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A REALTIME PROJECT

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare

Brian Horton, Keith Pope, David Johnson, Tobias Stromvall

Dishonored 2: Crack in the Slab

Sebastien Mitton, Guillaume Curt, Damien Laurent, Jean-Luc Monnet

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: Virtual Reality

Andy Rowans-Robinson, Karen Czukerberg, John Montefusco, Corrina Wilson, Resh Sidhu

Gears of War 4

Kirk Gibbons, Zoe Curnoe, Aryan Hanbeck, Colin Penty

Quantum Break

Janne Pulkkinen, Elmeri Raitanen, Matti Hamalainen, Ville Assinen

Uncharted 4

Bruce Straley, Eben Cook, Iki Ikram

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A COMMERCIAL

Coke Mini; A Mini Marvel

Vincent Cirelli, Michael Perdew, Brendan Seals, Jared Simeth

For Honor

Maxime Luere, Leon Berelle, Dominique Boidin, Remi Kozyra

John Lewis; Buster the Boxer

Diarmid Harrison-Murray, Hannah Ruddleston, Fabian Frank, William Laban

Titanfall 2: Become One

Dan Akers, Tiffany Webber, Chris Bedrosian

Waitrose: Coming Home

Jonathan Westley -Wes-, Alex Fitzgerald, Jorge Montiel, Adam Droy

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A SPECIAL VENUE

Dream of Anhui

Chris Morley, Lee Hahn, Alex Hessler, Kent Matheson

Pirates of the Caribbean; Battle for the Sunken Treasure

Bill George, Amy Jupiter, Hayden Landis, David Lester

Soarin’ Over the Horizon

Marianne McLean, Bill George, Hayden Landis, Dorne Huebler, Thomas Tait

Skull Island: Reign of Kong

John Gibson, Arish Fyzee, Sachin Shrestha, Anshul Mathuria

Voyage of Time: The IMAX Experience

Dan Glass, Brett Harding, Tom Debenham, Brian Delmonico, Matt Pulliam

OUTSTANDING ANIMATED PERFORMANCE IN A PHOTOREAL FEATURES

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: Niffler

Laurent Laban, Gabriel Beauvais-Tremblay, Luc Girard, Romain Rico

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story; Grand Moff Tarkin

Sven Jensen, Jee Young Park, Steve Walton, Cyrus Jam

The Jungle Book: King Louie

Paul Story, Dennis Yoo, Jack Tema, Andrei Coval

The Jungle Book: Shere Khan

Benjamin Jones. Julio Del Rio Hernandez, Jake Harrell, James Hood

Warcraft: Durotan

Sunny Wei, Brian Cantwell, Brian Paik, Jee Young Park

OUTSTANDING ANIMATED PERFORMANCE IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE

Finding Dory: Hank

Jonathan Hoffman, Steven Clay Hunter, Mark Piretti, Audrey Wong

Kubo and the Two Strings: Kubo

Jeff Riley, Ian Whitlock, Adam Lawthers, Jeremy Spake

Kubo and the Two Strings: Monkey

Andy Bailey, Dobrin Yanev, Kim Slate, Jessica Lynn

Moana: The Mighty Maui

Mack Kablan, Nikki Mull, Matthew Schiller, Marc Thyng

Outstanding Animated Performance in an Episode or Real-Time Project

Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare; Omar

Bernardo Antoniazzi

Aaron Beck

Jason Greenberg

Chris Barnes

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

John Montefusco

Michael Cable

Shayne Ryan

Andy Rowan-Robinson

Game of Thrones; Battle of the Bastards: Drogon

James Kinnings, Michael Holzl, Matt Derksen, Joeseph Hoback

Game of Thrones; Home: Emaciated Dragon

Sebastian Lauer, Jonathan Symmonds, Thomas Kutschera, Anthony Sieben

OUTSTANDING ANIMATED PERFORMANCE IN A COMMERCIAL

John Lewis: Buster the Boxer

Tim van Hussen, David Bryan, Chloe Dawe, Maximillian Mallman

Opel Motorsport: Racing Faces; Lion

Jorge Montiel, Jacob Gonzales, Sauce Vilas, Alberto Lara

SSE: Neon House: Baby Pixel

Jorge Montiel, Daniel Kmet, Sauce Vilas, Peter Agg

Waitrose: Coming Home

Jorge Montiel, Nick Smalley, Andreas Graichen, Alberto Lara

Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature

Deadpool: Freeway Assault

Seth Hill, Jedediah Smith, Laurent Taillefer, Marc-Antoine Paquin

Doctor Strange: London

Brendan Seals, Raphael A. Pimentel, Andrew Zink, Gregory Ng

Doctor Strange: New York City

Adam Watkins, Martijn van Herk, Tim Belsher, Jon Mitchell

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Scarif Complex

Enrico Damm, Kevin George, Olivier Vernay-Kim, Yanick Dusseault

OUTSTANDING CREATED ENVIRONMENT IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE

Finding Dory: Open Ocean Exhibit

Stephen Gustafson, Jack Hattori, Jesse Hollander, Michael Rutter

Kubo and the Two Strings: Hanzo’s Fortress

Phil Brotherton, Nick Mariana, Emily Greene, Joe Strasser

Kubo and the Two Strings: Waves

David Horsley, Eric Wachtman, Daniel Leatherdale, Takashi Kuboto

Moana: Motonui Island

Rob Dressel, Andy Harkness, Brien Hindman, Larry Wu

OUTSTANDING CREATED ENVIRONMENT IN AN EPISODE, COMMERCIAL OR REALTIME PROJECT

Black Sails: XXVIII: Maroon Island

Thomas Montminy-Brodeur, Deak Ferrand, Pierre Rousseau, Mathieu Lapierre

Dishonored 2: Clockwork Mansion

Sebastien Mitton, Guillaume Curt, Damien Laurent, Jean-Luc Monnet

Game of Thrones; Battle of the Bastards; Meereen City

Deak Ferrand, Dominic Daigle, François Croteau , Alexandru Banuta

Game of Thrones: The Winds of Winter: Citadel

Edmond Engelbrecht, Tomoka Matsumura, Edwin Holdsworth, Cheri Fojtik

The Man in the High Castle: Volkshalle

Casi Blume, David Andrade, Nick Chamberlain, Lawson Deming

OUTSTANDING VIRTUAL CINEMATOGRAPHY IN A PHOTOREAL PROJECT

Doctor Strange: New York Mirror Dimension

Landis Fields, Mathew Cowie, Frederic Medioni, Faraz Hameed

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards

Patrick Tiberius Gehlen, Michelle Blok, Christopher Baird, Drew Wood-Davies

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Space Battle

John Levin, Euisung Lee, Steve Ellis, Barry Howell

The Jungle Book

Bill Pope, Robert Legato, Gary Roberts, John Brennan

OUTSTANDING MODEL IN A PHOTOREAL OR ANIMATED PROJECT

Deepwater Horizon: Deepwater Horizon Rig

Kelvin Lau, Jean Bolte, Kevin Sprout, Kim Vongbunyong

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Princess Leia

Paul Giacoppo, Gareth Jensen, Todd Vaziri, James Tooley

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Star Destroyer

Jay Machado, Marko Chulev, Akira Orikasa, Steven Knipping

Star Trek Beyond: Enterprise

Daniel Nicholson, Rhys Salcombe, Chris Elmer, Andreas Maaninka

OUTSTANDING EFFECTS SIMULATIONS IN A PHOTOREAL FEATURE

Alice Through the Looking Glass; Rust

Klaus Seitschek, Joseph Pepper, Jacob Clark, Cosku Turhan

Doctor Strange; Hong Kong Reverse Destruction

Florian Witzel, Georges Nakhle, Azhul Mohamed, David Kirchner

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: Jedha Destruction

Miguel Perez Senent, Matt Puchala, Ciaran Moloney, Luca Mignardi

The Jungle Book: Nature Effects

Oliver Winwood, Fabian Nowak, David Schneider, Ludovic Ramisandraina

OUTSTANDING EFFECTS SIMULATIONS IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE

Finding Dory

Stephen Gustafson, Allen Hemberger, Joshua Jenny, Matthew Kiyoshi Wong

Kubo and the Two Strings; Water

David Horsley, Peter Stuart, Timur Khodzhaev, Terrance Tornberg

Moana

Marc Henry Bryant, David Hutchins, John M. Kosnik, Dale Mayeda

Zootopia

Nicholas Burkard, Moe El-Ali, Claudia Chung Sanii, Thom Wickes

OUTSTANDING EFFECTS SIMULATIONS IN EPISODE, COMMERCIAL OR REALTIME PROJECT

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards

Kevin Blom, Sasmit Ranadive, Wanghua Huang, Ben Andersen

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards: Meereen City

Thomas Hullin, Dominik Kirouac, James Dong, Xavier Fourmond

John Lewis: Buster the Boxer

Diarmid Harrison-Murray, Tushar Kewlani, Radu Ciubotariu, Ben Thomas

Sky: Q

Michael Hunault, Gareth Bell, Paul Donnellan, Joshua Curtis

OUTSTANDING COMPOSITING IN A PHOTOREAL FEATURE

Doctor Strange: New York City

Matthew Lane, Jose Fernandez, Ziad Shureih, Amy Shepard

Independence Day: Resurgence: Under The Mothership

Mathew Giampa, Adrian Sutherland, Daniel Lee, Ed Wilkie

The Jungle Book

Christoph Salzmann, Masaki Mitchell, Matthew Adams, Max Stummer

X-Men: Apocalypse: Quicksilver Rescue

Jess Burnheim, Alana Newell, Andy Peel, Matthew Shaw

OUTSTANDING COMPOSITING IN A PHOTOREAL EPISODE

Black Sails: XX: Sailing Ships

Michael Melchiorre  , Kevin Bouchez, Heather Hoyland, John Brennick

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards: Meereen City

Thomas Montminy-Brodeur, Patrick David, Michael Crane, Joe Salazar

Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards: Retaking Winterfell

Dominic Hellier, Morgan Jones, Thijs Noij, Caleb Thompson

Game of Thrones: The Door: Land of Always Winter

Eduardo Díaz, Aníbal Del Busto, Angel Rico, Sonsoles López-Aranguren

OUTSTANDING COMPOSITING IN A PHOTOREAL COMMERCIAL

Canal: Kitchen

Dominique Boidin, Leon Berelle, Maxime Luere, Remi Kozyra

John Lewis; Buster the Boxer

Tom Harding, Alex Snookes, David Filipe, Andreas Feix

Kenzo: Kenzo World

Evan LangleyBenjamin Nowak  , Rob Fitzsimmons, Phylicia Feldman

LG: World of Play

Jay Bandlish, Udesh Chetty, Carl Norton

Waitrose: Coming Home

Jonathan Westley -Wes, Gary Driver, Milo Paterson, Nina Mosand

OUTSTANDING VISUAL EFFECTS IN A STUDENT PROJECT

Breaking Point

Johannes Franz, Nicole Rothermel, Thomas Sali, Alexander Richter

Elemental

Adrian Meyer, Lena-Carolin Lohfink, Denis Krez, David Bellenbaum

Garden Party

Victor Caire, Gabriel Grapperon, Théophile Dufresne, Lucas Navarro

Shine

Mareike Keller, Dennis Mueller, Meike Mueller

2016 HPA Award winners

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) held its annual awards this week at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. The HPA Awards recognize individuals and companies for outstanding contributions made in the creation of feature films, television, commercials, and entertainment content enjoyed around the world.

Awards were bestowed in creative craft categories honoring behind-the-scenes artistry, and a host of special awards were also presented.

The winners of the 2016 HPA Awards are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Feature Film

Carol
John Dowdell // Goldcrest Post Productions Ltd

WINNER – The Revenant
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor Production Services

Brooklyn
Asa Shoul // Molinare

The Martian
Stephen Nakamura // Company 3

The Jungle Book
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor Production Services

Outstanding Color Grading – Television

Vinyl – E.A.B
Steven Bodner // Deluxe/Encore NY

Fargo – The Myth of Sysiphus
Mark Kueper // Technicolor

Outlander – Faith
Steven Porter // MTI Film

WINNER – Gotham – By Fire
Paul Westerbeck // Encore Hollywood

Show Me A Hero – Part 1
Sam Daley // Technicolor PostWorks NY

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial
Fallout 4The Wanderer
Siggy Ferstl / Company 3

Toyota Prius – Poncho
Sofie Borup // Company 3

NASCAR – Team
Lez Rudge // Nice Shoes

Audi R8 – Commander
Stefan Sonnenfeld // Company 3

Apple Music – History of Sound
Gregory Reese // The Mill

Pennzoil – Joyride Circuit
Dave Hussey // Company 3

WINNER – Hennessy – Odyssey
Tom Poole // Company 3

Outstanding Editing – Feature Film

The Martian
Pietro Scalia, ACE

The Big Short

The Revenant
Stephen Mirrione, ACE

WINNER – The Big Short
Hank Corwin, ACE

Sicario
Joe Walker, ACE

Spotlight
Tom McArdle, ACE

Outstanding Editing – Television (TIE)

Body Team 12
David Darg // RYOT Films

Underground – The Macon 7
Zack Arnold, Ian Tan // Sony Pictures Television

Vinyl – Pilot
David Tedeschi

martin-nicholson-ace-greg-babor-editing-for-tv-winners-at-2016-hpa-awards

Roots winners for editing, Martin Nicholson, ACE, Greg Babor

WINNER – Roots – Night One
Martin Nicholson, ACE, Greg Babor

WINNER – Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Tim Porter, ACE

Outstanding Editing – Commercial

WINNER – Wilson – Nothing Without It
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Nespresso – Training Day
Chris Franklin // Big Sky Edit

Saucony – Be A Seeker
Lenny Mesina // Therapy Studios

Samsung – Teresa
Kristin McCasey // Therapy Studios

Outstanding Sound – Feature Film

Room
Steve Fanagan, Niall Brady, Ken Galvin // Ardmore Sound

Eye In The Sky
Craig Mann, Adam Jenkins, Bill R. Dean, Chase Keehn // Technicolor Creative Services

Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice
Scott Hecker // Formosa Group
Chris Jenkins, Michael Keller // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Zootopia
David Fluhr, CAS, Gabriel Guy, CAS, Addison Teague // Walt Disney Company

WINNER – Sicario
Alan Murray, Tom Ozanich, John Reitz // Warner Bros. Post Production Services

Outstanding Sound – Television

WINNER – Outlander – Prestonpans
Nello Torri, Alan Decker, Brian Milliken, Vince Balunas  // NBCUniversal Post Sound

Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Tim Kimmel, MPSE, Paula Fairfield, Mathew Waters, CAS, Onnalee Blank, CAS, Bradley C. Katona, Paul Bercovitch // Formosa Group

Preacher – See
Richard Yawn, Mark Linden, Tara Paul // Sony Sound

Marco Polo – One Hundred Eyes
David Paterson, Roberto Fernandez, Alexa Zimmerman, Glenfield Payne, Rachel Chancey // Harbor Picture Company

House of Cards – Chapter 45
Jeremy Molod, Ren Klyce, Nathan Nance, Scott R. Lewis, Jonathan Stevens // Skywalker Sound

Outstanding Sound – Commercial

WINNER – Sainsbury’s – ­Mog’s Christmas Calamity
Anthony Moore, Neil Johnson // Factory

Save the Children UK – Still The Most Shocking Second A Day
Jon Clarke // Factory

Wilson – Nothing Without It
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Honda – Paper
Phil Bolland // Factory

Honda – Ignition
Anthony Moore // Factory

Outstanding Visual Effects – Feature Film

Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Jay Cooper, Yanick Dusseault, Rick Hankins, Carlos Munoz, Polly Ing // Industrial Light & Magic

WINNER – The Jungle Book
Robert Legato, Andrew R. Jones
Adam Valdez, Charley Henley // MPC
Keith Miller // Weta Digital

Captain America: Civil War
Russell Earl, Steve Rawlins, Francois Lambert, Pat Conran, Rhys Claringbull // Industrial Light & Magic

The Martian
Chris Lawrence, Neil Weatherley, Bronwyn Edwards, Dale Newton // Framestore

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Pablo Helman, Robert Weaver, Kevin Martel, Shawn Kelly, Nelson Sepulveda // Industrial Light & Magic

Outstanding Visual Effects – Television

Supergirl – Pilot
Armen V. Kevorkian, Andranik Taranyan, Gevork Babityan, Elaina Scott, Art Sayan // Encore VFX

Ripper Street – The Strangers’ Home
Ed Bruce, Nicholas Murphy, Denny Cahill, John O’Connell // Screen Scene

Black Sails – XXI
Erik Henry // Starz
Matt Dougan // Digital Domain
Martin Ogren, Jens Tenland, Nicklas Andersson // ILP

The Flash – Guerilla Warfare
Armen V. Kevorkian, Thomas J. Conners, Andranik Taranyan, Gevork Babityan, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

Holly Shiffman and Mike Chapman with VFX winner for Game of Thrones, Matthew Rouleau.

WINNER – Game of Thrones – Battle of the Bastards
Joe Bauer, Eric Carney // Fire & Blood Productions
Derek Spears // Rhythm & Hues 
Glenn Melenhorst // Iloura
Matthew Rouleau // Rodeo FX

Outstanding Visual Effects – Commercial

Sainsbury’s – Mog’s Christmas Calamity
Ben Cronin, Grant Walker, Rafael Camacho // Framestore

WINNER – Microsoft Xbox – Halo 5: The Hunt Begins
Ben Walsh, Ian Holland, Brian Delmonico, Brian Burke // Method

AT&T – Power of &amp
James Dick, Corrina Wilson, Euna Kho, Callum McKeveny // Framestore

Kohler – Never Too Next
Andy Boyd, Jake Montgomery, Zachary DiMaria, David Hernandez // JAMM

Gatorade – Sports Fuel
JD Yepes, Richard Shallcross // Framestore

Emerging Leader Award

2016 Winners- Jesse Korosi, Jennifer Zeidan

The following special awards, which were previously announced, were also presented this evening:

HPA Engineering Excellence Award

Sponsored by NAB Show

The HPA Engineering Excellence Award is recognized as one of the most important technology honors in the industry, spotlighting companies and individuals who draw upon technical and creative ingenuity to develop breakthrough technologies.  Submissions for this peer-judged award may include products or processes, and must represent a step forward for its industry beneficiaries.

2016 Winners 

Aspera: FASPStream

Grass Valley: GV Node Real Time IP Processing and Edge Routing Platform

RealD: Ultimate Screen

SGO: Mistika

Honorable mentions:
Grass Valley: LDX 86N Native 4K Series Camera

Canon USA, Inc.: 4K / UHD / 2K / HD display

HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation

The HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation recognizes companies and individuals who have demonstrated excellence, whether in the development of workflow and process to support creative storytelling or in technical innovation. The Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation is conferred by a jury of industry experts.

2016 Winner- The Mill: Blackbird

HPA Lifetime Achievement Award

The HPA Lifetime Achievement Award is given to an individual who is recognized for his or her service and commitment to the professional media content industry. The mission of the award is to give recognition to individuals who have, with great service, dedicated their careers to the betterment of the industry. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given at the discretion of the HPA Board of Directors and the HPA Awards Committee. It is not bestowed every year.

herb-dow

Herb Dow

2016 Honoree- Herb Dow, ACE

The Charles S. Swartz Award

The Charles S. Swartz Award is conferred on a person, group, or company that has made significant artistic, technological, business or educational impact across diverse aspects of the media industry. The award was named in honor of the late Charles S. Swartz, who led the Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California from 2002 until 2006, building it into the industry’s premiere testing bed for new digital cinema technologies.

2016 Honoree – Michelle Munson, Founder and CEO of Aspera

Behind the Title: Iloura lead animator Dean Elliott

NAME: Dean Elliott

COMPANY: Iloura (@iloura_vfx)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR ILOURA?
Based in Melbourne and Sydney, Iloura houses a collective of animation and VFX artists.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Lead Animator

THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE: SPONGE OUT OF WATER

The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My role can change depending on the project that I’m working on at the time. On a production with only a small scope for character animation like Mad Max: Fury Road, I will work purely as an animator producing shots for the film, whereas on a larger character-based film like SpongeBob SquarePants I would work as a more traditional lead — helping other animators to hit required notes, communicating direction and working as a sounding board for any performance ideas they may have.

Then on a production like Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards, l spent most of my time supervising the complex crowd system we developed to extend the scope of our hero keyframe animation.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Somehow l seem to have ended up spending a lot of time in the mocap suit over the past 12 months. This isn’t something l had intended, but it does make it a lot easier when l can plan and generate complex performances that would be otherwise very difficult to achieve directing other actors, or purely by keyframing.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN VFX?
I’ve been working as an animator for over 15 years now at various studios.

HOW HAS YOUR PART OF THE INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE TIME YOU’VE BEEN WORKING? 
As an animator, I haven’t seen any great advances in the technology we use to do our job. At the end of the day, animators only really have to deal with timing and poses. The biggest change has been the career becoming more accessible as a profession, and it’s been a good one. The tools have leveled the playing field, and now when we look for animators we don’t need to look for traditional art skills like drawing. As long as they understand performance and movement they can produce amazing work.

DID A PARTICULAR FILM INSPIRE YOU ALONG THIS PATH IN ENTERTAINMENT?
Like most people in the industry I had a lot of influences that led me in this direction, but the main film that finally tipped me over was A Bug’s Life. I could see a very strong future for 3D animation watching that film; that was when l thought l could make a career out of a hobby.

DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL FOR ANIMATION?
Not for animation. There were no courses available for animation when l left school. So instead l studied illustration to build my creative skills, and in my spare time researched animation on the Internet and taught myself at home.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I really enjoy the start of each production. Doing motion tests to establish how a character will move and looking at the storyboards or previs for the first time.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When you’re getting close to the deadline and the schedule becomes more important than reworking the shot because you came up with a better idea for the character.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d love to say l would be a pilot. But then again, l spent so much time drawing in school that my grades weren’t very good, so l doubt anyone would have let me fly 50 tons of metal across the sky. (Which is probably best, now that l think of it.)

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently finished production on Underworld 5, and before that we completed the Battle of the Bastards sequence in Season 6, Episode 9 of Game of Thrones.

The Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards

WHAT IS THE PROJECT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I think Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards has been the most rewarding. We set out to greatly improve our crowd animation for the sequence, and it’s probably the only project l’ve worked on where the final result looked as good what I had imagined it would be when I started.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
Along with a number of in-house tools, we rely on Maya day to day for all of our keyframe animation. We have also recently started using Massive for crowds and iPi Motion Capture in a small in-house mocap space.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
Many places. It’s very easy to find your way to a lot of very impressive work on the Internet these days. I’m probably most inspired by work in other films, and I follow a lot of illustrators and artists as well.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Leave work and go home.

The Third Floor’s Eric Carney on the evolution of previs

When people hear the word previs, they likely think of visual effects, but today’s previs goes way beyond VFX. Our industry is made up of artists who think visually, so why not get a mock-up of what a scene might look like before it’s shot, whether it includes visual effects or not?

Eric Carney is a previs supervisor and co-founder of The Third Floor, which has studios in Los Angeles, Montreal and London. He defines today’s previs as a Swiss army knife that helps define the vision and solutions for all departments on a project. “Previs is not exclusively for visual effects,” he explains. “Previs teams work with producers, directors, cinematographers, stunt coordinators, special effects crews, grips, locations, editorial and many other collaborators, including visual effects, to help map out ideas for scenes and how they can be effectively executed on the day.”

Eric Carney

Let’s find out more from Carney about previs’ meaning and evolution.

How has the definition of previs changed over the years?
While previs is often categorized as a visual effects tool, it’s really a process for the entire production and is being regularly used that way. In a heads-of-department meeting, where scenes are being discussed with a large group of people, it can be hard to describe with words something that is a moving image. Being able to say, “Why don’t we mock up something in previs?” makes everyone happy because they know everyone will get something they can watch and understand, and we can move on to the next item in the meeting.

We’re also seeing previs used more frequently to develop the storytelling and to visualize a large percentage of a film — 80 to 100 percent on some we’ve collaborated on. If you can sit down and “see” a version of the movie, what works (or doesn’t) really comes to light.

Can you give an example?
Maybe a certain scene doesn’t play very well when placed after a certain other scene — maybe the order should be flipped. Maybe there are two scenes that are too similar. Maybe the pacing should be changed, or maybe the last part of the scene is unnecessary. You used to have to wait until the first cut to have this type of insight, but with previs filmmakers and studios can discover these things much earlier, before visual effects may have been ordered and oftentimes before the scenes get filmed.

Ultron

Postvis for Age of Ultron

What is the relationship between previs and production?
Previs helps to produce a blueprint for production from which everything can be planned. Once all departments have a good idea of the desired scene, they can apply their specialized knowledge for how to accomplish that — from the equipment and personnel they are going to need on the day to figuring out how many days they will be filming or where they are going to shoot. All of the nuts and bolts become easier and more efficient when the production has invested in accurate previs.

What is the relationship between previs and post production?
In post production, previs becomes something called “postvis,” which can be the editorial department’s best friend. Many big-budget movies have so many visual effects that it can be challenging to produce a truly representative cut prior to visual effects delivery if your footage is mostly greenscreen. Postvis is able to fill the live plates with temp effects, characters or environments so the creatures, backgrounds or other elements that are important to the shot appear in context. Because postvis can be done quickly, editors can request shots on the fly to help them try out and drop in different options. It’s such a useful process that we’re spending as much and sometimes more time on postvis as we do on previs.

Can you describe the creative aspect of previs?
Previs involves all aspects of filmmaking, and there are no creative boundaries. This is why directors love previs; it’s a giant sandbox, free from the realities of physical production. A previs team is typically small, so the work can be very collaborative. Operating in service of the director, frequently also including producers, visual effects supervisors or other collaborators, creative visualization helps find effective ways to visually tell the story, to show the key beats and the way a scene goes together. The previs team’s starting point is often the script or storyboards, but this can also be general descriptions of the action that needs to occur. Through previs, we often have the latitude to explore possible flows of action and brainstorm different details or gags that might be a creative fit.

While previs supports having a very fully realized creative vision, it’s also important that what is visualized translates into shots and scenes that are possible for real-world production and budgets. It’s all well and good to come up with great ideas, but eventually someone has to actually film or post produce the shot.

Can you talk about the technical aspects of previs?
Previs has an important function in helping plan complicated technical aspects of production. We call it “techvis.” This is where we incorporate input and information from all the key departments to produce detailed shooting logistics and plans. By working collaboratively to bring these details into the previs, any number of shooting and visual effects details can be determined and shots can be rehearsed virtually with a good deal of technical accuracy corresponding to the setup for the shooting day.

Many things can be figured out using techvis, including positions for the camera, how far and fast it should move, which lenses are needed and where the actors need to be. It’s also possible to define equipment needs and a host of specific details. Can the shot be done on a Fisher Dolly or will you need a jib arm or a Technocrane? Should it be Techno 30 or Techno 50? Where should it go and how much track are you going to need? Or maybe the move is too fast for a crane and you’d be better off with a Spidercam?

By interfacing with all the departments and bringing together the collective wisdom about the scene at hand, we can produce on-set specifications ahead of time so everyone can refer to the diagrams that have been created without spending time figuring it out on the day.

One area where previs and techvis artists often contribute is in scenes with motion control work. We might be charged with visualizing the types of moves that the motion control crane can achieve, or looking at the best places to position the rig. We’ve built a large library of motion control cranes in 3D that can be dropped into the virtual scene to aid this process. Not only can the move be calculated in advance, the camera path from the computer can be loaded directly to the physical rig to have the on-set equipment execute the same move.

We are at a point where virtual planning and on-set production can really work hand in hand, each process feeding the other to realize the vision more effectively.

Previs for Ant-man.

Name some common challenges that can be solved via the previs process.
One common request for previs is in planning large-scale fight scenes. Knowing what each character, creature or ship, etc. is doing at any given movement is important for the story as well as in orchestrating filming and visual effects. Scenes like the final car chase in Mad Max: Fury Road, armies clashing in Game of Thrones or the epic action in a Marvel film like Avengers: Age of Ultron or Captain America: Civil War are good examples. Visualizing heroes, villains and the inevitable destruction that will happen can be lots of fun.

As mentioned, previs also comes up to help with things that pose specific technical challenges, such as those that rely on representing physics or scale. If you’re depicting astronauts in zero gravity, a fleet of hover cars or a superhero shrinking from human to ant-size, you are likely using previs to help conceptualize, as well as realize, the scene.

What are some less common ways previs is used?
A newer trend is using previs within a virtual camera system to explore frame-ups of the shot. Previs visuals appear in a display that the director can control and reposition to see what type of coverage works best. On The Walk, postvis composites actually fed a virtual camera that was used to explore shot plates and extend practical camera moves. On some shows, previs versions of real locations or CG environments might be used to virtually “scout” and more extensively develop the shots, or a location might be sought matching the size or description suggested in a previs mockup of the scene.

Beyond showing the action, previs artists are sometimes asked to develop and test the characteristics of a character, environment, prop or type of effect. In Godzilla, we did animation tests for our director with possible fighting styles for Godzilla and the Mutos, cueing off large animals from nature. For Thor, we looked at things like how the hero’s hammer and cape would fly and behave. On Total Recall, we considered different sets of rules that might apply to cities and vehicles in a futuristic world. On special venue projects, we’ve tested things like the flow of a ride from the audience’s POV.

Previs for Game of Thrones

While previs is used a lot on CG-heavy scenes, it’s worth noting that visualization can also be vital for scenes largely based on practical filming. This is especially true for coordinating complex stunts. On Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation, for example, stunt and camera teams tightly coordinated their work with previs to identify requirements for safely and effectively pulling off in-camera stunts that ranged from Tom Cruise riding on the wing of an Airbus to being rotated in an underwater chamber. The same is true on Season 5 of Game of Thrones where the approach to realizing the ambitious arena scene in Episode 9 relied on syncing up the actions of a digital dragon with real pyrotechnics and stunt performances on the location set.

What do you see for the future of previs?
In film, we’re seeing higher proportions of movies being previsualized and previs being requested by directors and studios on productions of all sizes and scale. We’re doing more techvis, virtual production and visualization from on set. We’re looking into how modern game engines can support the process with increased interactivity and visual quality. And we are applying skills, tools and collaborations from the previs process to create content for platforms like VR.

You’ve won two Emmys as part of the Game of Thrones team. Can you talk about your work on the show?
We don’t actually think about it as a television program but more like a 10-hour movie. The trick is that we have a smaller team and less time than we would on a two-hour big film. To be able to visualize the large set-piece sequences —like Drogon in the arena or the battle at Hardhome — is an indispensable part of the production process and it’s difficult to imagine being able to achieve such sequences without this type of process. Everything involving visual effects can be planned down to the inch, with it all being done in half the time of normal films.

All of the contributors on the show — from the producers to the directors, special effects, stunts, camera, visual effects teams headed up by Joe Bauer and Steve Kullback — are so very collaborative.

Being on a show like this only inspires innovation even more. Last season, we had a flame-throwing Technodolly playing a CG dragon with real actors in a real location in Spain. This season…stay tuned!

FuseFX adds VFX vet Chad Hudson in producer role

Burbank’s FuseFX, which provides shots for Fox’s Sleepy Hollow and pilots for CBS and Amazon, among other TV projects, has added veteran VFX producer Chad Hudson. Hudson comes to FuseFX from Rhythm & Hues, where he worked on a variety of television and commercial projects.

He was a visual effects producer on the Game of Thrones episode The Dance of Dragons, which won a 2016 Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Visual Effects. He also contributed to 10 episodes of The Walking Dead, as well as the theme park attraction The Marvel Experience.

Hudson’s background includes visual effects roles with Lionsgate and Universal Pictures, where his credits included Jurassic World and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Parts 1 & 2, and a previous three-year stint at Rhythm & Hues. During that earlier tenure, he served as a VFX coordinator on the Academy Award-winning Life of Pi, Grown Ups 2 and Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters.

Veteran colorist Joe Finley joins Chainsaw

With over 20 years of experience in features and episodic television, colorist Joe Finley has joined Chainsaw. He will be working out of a DaVinci Resolve DI theater at the company’s Hollywood facility. Currently working on the fifth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones, show he started working on the show while at his last job at Modern Videofilm.

Finley, whose career began at Laser Pacific,  was a senior colorist at Modern for almost two decades. His credits there comprise over 100 feature films, including The Descendants¸ 3:10 to Yuma and Walk the Line. A three-time HPA Award nominee, he won the HPA Award for Color Grading in the TV category in 2012 for the Game of Thrones episode “The Prince of Winterfell.”

In discussing his move to Chainsaw (a division of the SIM Group), Finley says, “The facility has a great location and a great vibe, and caters to everything my clients ask for. I want to help Chainsaw to continue to grow its scripted television department and to seek out more very high-end scripted television shows.”

Saying that the best part of his job is “collaborating with other creative people,” Finley asserted that there has never been a better time to work in scripted television. “Creative people enjoy more freedom in television today,” he concludes. “A lot of great cinematographers and directors are moving to TV today because they want that freedom.”

ASC TV nominees and their reactions

The American Society of Cinematographers has named its nominees for the 29th Annual Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography Awards. The winners will be given their statuettes on February 15, during a ceremony in Los Angeles.

“Our members had a very difficult time choosing these nominees from such an incredible field of submissions,” said ASC president Richard Crudo. “They have done superlative work in a very challenging medium, and we salute them.”

The nominees for Episode of a Regular Series are: P.J. Dillon for Vikings, “Blood Eagle” (History); Jonathan Freeman, ASC, for Boardwalk Empire, “Golden Days for Boys and Girls” (HBO); Anette Haellmigk for Game of Thrones, “The Children” (HBO); Christopher Norr for Gotham, “Spirit of the Goat” (Fox); Richard Rutkowski for Manhattan, “Perestroika” (WGN Continue reading