Tag Archives: editing

Behind the Title: Lucky Post editor Elizabeth V. Moore

NAME: Elizabeth V. Moore

COMPANY: Lucky Post

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The studio combines creative editorial, graphic design, sound design, mixing, color, compositing,VFX and finish

I feel very lucky to call Lucky my home for the past five and a half years. It’s a collection of driven co-workers who truly interact like a team. Together, we infuse art and care into the projects that come through our office.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am one of the four editors here.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to take their concept and make it a reality. With the footage I’m provided, I get to be a storyteller. I add my creative perspective and collaborate with clients to craft a story or message that is hopefully even better than what they had envisioned possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a cut we’re all happy with. It’s not just me in a room by myself, editing. There’s a responsibility to your clients not just to edit something for them, but also to help facilitate a space where they feel comfortable and are happy to come to every day. My goal is to have them leave Lucky Post at the end of the day confident in the cut and feeling good in general… with smiles on their faces.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is seeing the edit take shape… to get to the end of a project and see the final resul, and reflect on what it took for that to manifest. That is a very satisfying feeling.

This CostaDelMar Slam spot is a recent project edited by Moore.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I try not to focus too much on my least favorite aspects of anything, but if pressed I’d have to say going through footage and making selects. I feel anxious to start my favorite part of the job — seeing the edit take shape — but in order to get the best result you have to focus and find the best pieces amidst all the content.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I wouldn’t consider myself a morning person, so I’d have to say early afternoon. When I have a deadline to hit, however, late at night is when I can really surprise myself with the amount and quality of work I can produce under pressure.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve asked myself that question, and I honestly can’t think of a better answer than what I’m doing now. Even though I had no idea when I was younger that this is where I’d end up, in retrospect, it makes the most sense.

My personal set of talents and interests throughout my development have helped give me the arsenal of skills it takes to enjoy editing and do it well.

SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t have any idea I would end up in this career until college. I was originally a business major with a minor in film, because I always loved movies. Quickly into my first semester it dawned on me that I could actually pursue a career in something I was passionate about, not just what I thought was expected of me. I switched to film and, as I learned more about all the different departments, I knew editing was where my talents and skills could thrive. And the more I did it, the more I fell in love with the art.

AS A WOMAN EDITOR, WHO DID YOU LOOK UP TO WHEN STARTING OUT?
I didn’t think too much about who I looked up to based on being a woman. I had my films and editors that inspired me and I aspired to emulate editorially. However, I would say that my biggest female inspiration was editor Sally Menke (who died in an accident in 2010). Pulp Fiction was one of my favorite movies at the time, and the way the story was edited and structured was a large part of that.

Once I looked deeper into her career, I realized she was the editor for all of Quentin Tarantino’s films. It inspired me greatly that she was able to not only be an editor during a time that was very much a male-dominated field, but also maintain an ongoing, collaborative relationship that shaped both of their careers. I wanted to be the kind of editor that was not only worth working with, but worth working with again and again.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE MEDIA CHAMPIONING MORE FEMALE CREATIVES AND LEADERS IN OUR INDUSTRY?
I think it’s extremely important. To continue to push our industry to greater heights, new and different perspectives are needed to keep things evolving and growing. Media plays a big role in our society and culture, and women need to be well represented and their voices heard. Similar to my own story, a lot of opportunities are missed if they’re unknown or seem impossible. More women in leadership and creative positions will help young women see themselves in these roles.

WHAT SHOULD OR CAN WE DO TO ENCOURAGE MORE WOMEN TO BECOME EDITORS?
To be an editor, you have to be passionate about it and love the process. We can’t make women be interested in the art, but we can reinforce the confidence in the ones who are. We have to be the ones to say, “There’s no reason to be intimidated by pursuing this career path. This industry is always looking for fresh, original perspectives and we, as women, have a unique voice to offer. The quality of your craft will speak for itself and that is what will draw clients to work with you.”

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Within the past year I’ve worked on campaigns for Crate & Barrel, Charles Schwab, AT&T and Soraa.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I wouldn’t say that I wear a different hat when working on different genres, because at the end of the day the goal is the same: to tell a good story in as creative a way as the content allows.

However, what I’m looking for out of the footage will change depending on the type of project. So much of my select-making process is based on feelings that arise while viewing a scene. I select the pieces that give me the reaction I want the audience to feel based on the genre of the piece.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a different sense of pride for all the projects I work on. Sometimes it’s because of the level of quality of the work, and sometimes it’s because of the challenges that had to be overcome. But I’d say that I’m still most proud of one of my first pieces I did at Lucky Post. It was back when I was an assistant editor; I was given access to footage for a music video for a musician named Jesse Woods and was told to just have fun with it and use it as an opportunity to practice.

Even though I wasn’t the official editor on it, I took the challenge seriously and spent hours exploring possibilities, pushing my craft farther than I ever had to that point. The director was impressed enough that it became the final cut he and the artist used. I still look back on that as one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve produced. It was the turning point in my career, where not only did others see and recognize my talent, but I saw what I was capable of and this gave me the confidence that led me to where I am now.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I’ve used a few different editing software programs throughout my career and my favorite, and what I currently use, is Adobe Premiere Pro.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Even though I’m only asked to edit, a big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a final cut. Sometimes that means being a good listener or a positive force for them when things get stressful.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A computer is number one, since I can’t edit without it. I’d like to believe I’d still be interested in the art of editing if I had to do it via the cut and splice method, but it would be a very different process and experience for me. Second would be my television. I love watching great movies, shows and well-done commercials, so it’s both a leisure activity and it inspires me as an editor. Lastly, my cell phone because we now live in a society where it’s becoming hard to work and stay connected without it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Besides my passion for the visual arts, like movies, my favorite escape is music. I love to go to shows to see live bands or get lost in music being played by DJs and dance. When I’m in those moments, all the stress from the week is forgotten and I’m living in the present.

NYC’s Wax adds editor Kate Owen

Kate Owen, an almost 20-year veteran who has cut both spots and films, has joined the editorial roster of New York’s Wax. The UK-born but New York-based Owen has edited projects across fashion, beauty, lifestyle and entertainment for brands such as Gucci, Victoria Beckham, Vogue, Adidas, Sony, Showtime and Virgin Atlantic.

Owen started editing in her teens and subsequently worked with top-tier agencies like Mother, Saatchi NY, McGarryBowen, Grey Worldwide and Y&R. She has also worked at editing houses Marshall Street Editors and Whitehouse Post.

In terms of recognition, Owen had been BAFTA-nominated for her short film Turning and has won multiple industry awards, including One Show, D&AD, BTAA as well as a Gold Cannes Lions for her work on the “The Man Who Walked Around the World” campaign for Johnnie Walker.

Owen believes editing is a “fluid puzzle. I create in my mind a somewhat Minority Report wall with all the footage in front of me, where I can scroll through several options in my mind to try out and create fluid visual mixes. It’s always the unknown journey at the start of every project and the fascination that comes with honing and fine tuning or tearing an edit upside down and viewing it from a totally different perspective that is so exciting to me”.

Regarding her new role, she says, “There is a unique opportunity to create a beauty, fashion and lifestyle edit arm at Wax. The combination of my edit aesthetic and the company’s legacy of agency beauty background is really exciting to me.”

Owen calls herself “a devoted lifetime Avid editor.” She says, for her, it’s the most elegant way to work. “I can build walls of thumbnails in my Selects Bins and create living mood boards. I love how I can work in very detailed timelines and speed effects without having to break my workflow.”

She also gives a shout out to the Wax design and VFX team. “If we need to incorporate After Effects or Maxon Cinema 4D, I am able to brief and work with my team and incorporate those elements into my offline. I also love to work with the agency or director to work out a LUT before the shoot so that the offline looks premium right from the start.”

Tips for Editors: How to get the job

By David Jasse

As a veteran editor and video producer, I’ve held many different positions since I started in the industry — I’ve been the hired help and I’ve been the one doing the hiring. Looking back on these experiences has put me in a good position to share my wisdom. Some of these might seem super-obvious, but they are all based on my recent experience interviewing editors for job openings at my studio…

1. Do your homework about the company you’re meeting with, and think about the client first. Before you tell them where you became really good at your craft (which you should do at the right time) and certainly before you tell them that you’ve been making films since you were five years old, talk about their needs first and read the ad carefully. Research the company and the work they do before you go. Help them make the connection between your skill set and what they do. Sounds obvious, but it’s scary how many editors show inappropriate work for what we do here.

2. Know the software. Go beyond intuitive editing. A lot of people can cut around the timeline. Do you know the shortcuts? Do you have your own personal settings? Maybe you don’t even know what personal setting are. It’s frightening to see people who call themselves professional editors need three key strokes to do something that should take one. Learn the software not just how to edit.

3. Know templates. If you want to be a professional editor, you should leverage templates out there and practice using them. It’s important to employers that you give them a polished look without having to pay for an expensive graphic artist. On the other hand if you’re the storyteller, predator type and you know how to create good content while being the editor, then its fine stick to that – your ability for graphics is irrelevant. I highly recommend becoming expert at templates, whether they be for show opens, lower thirds, or just throughout the video.

4. Living things must grow. Show that you too are growing and advancing. Do you read books? Do you do online tutorials? Do you get to seminars? Software changes all the time. Are you keeping up and advancing?

5. Be tech savvy. You should know how to use a computer and get around the keyboard and Internet. Sounds incredibly obvious, but when an editor sits down at the computer it only takes about 10 seconds to know if they are comfortable. Also, keep your hands on the controls when at a computer or edit station. Take your hands out of your pockets and be ready to edit. It’s like a PA on a set with their hands in their pockets. It’s bad set etiquette… the same goes for editing. Be ready to make changes in the edit.

6. Be prepared to show your work. The “Oh wait, I just have to download it” doesn’t impress.

In addition to the above here are some more general tips:

  • Don’t dress like a slob. Sure you’re creative, and maybe you can work your way to slob once you have the job, but when you come in for the first time dress respectively. Some people get grossed out by bad personal grooming, so don’t rub the person the wrong way with something that later on won’t matter. Look presentable.
  • Stay in touch. When I interview you, I’m immersed in you and getting to know you. Once you’re out the door I’m focused on things that make me money. I don’t remember everybody who comes in the door. There’s a good chance I might forget you, no matter how friendly and engaged I was when you were in my office. If you think you’re a good fit, stay in touch and send work from time to time.
  • Ask questions. I expect candidates to have questions for me, just not ones like this: “Do you pay for my train ticket?” I’m expecting you to ask about what is required of the position, and typical turnaround times, not about your days off and if I will I pay for this or that for you. Ask about advancement in the company, maybe performance-based raises.

 


David Jasse is the owner and creative director of New York-based DMJ Studios.

Kathrin Lausch joins Uppercut as EP

New York post shop Uppercut has added Kathrin Lausch as executive producer. Lausch has over two decades of experience as an executive producer for top production and post production companies such as MPC, Ntropic, B-Reel, Nice Shoes, Partizan and Compass Films, among others. She has led shops on the front lines for the outset of digital, branded content, reality television and brand-direct production.

“I joined Uppercut after being very impressed with Micah Scarpelli’s clear understanding of the advertising market, its ongoing changes and his proactive approach to offer his services accordingly,” explains Lausch. “The new advertising landscape is offering up opportunities for boutique shops like Uppercut, and interesting conversations and relationships can come out of having a clear and focused offering. It was important to me to be part of a team that embraces change and thrives on being a part of it.”

Half French, half German-born, Lausch followed dual pursuits in law and art in NYC before finding her way to the world of production. She launched Passport Films, which later became Compass Films. After selling the company, she followed the onset of the digital advertising marketplace, landing with B-Reel. She made the shift to post production, further embracing the new digital landscape as executive producer at Nice Shoes and Ntropic before landing as head of new business at MPC.

Behind the Title: Arcade Edit’s Ali Mao

NAME: Ali Mao

COMPANY: Arcade Edit in New York City

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Arcade is a film and television editorial house with offices located in Los Angeles and New York City.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being an editor is all about storytelling. Whether that means following the script and boards as designed or playing outside the parameters of those guidelines, we set the pace and tone of a piece in hopes that our audience reacts to it. Sometimes it’s super easy and everything just falls into place. Other times it requires a bit more problem solving on my end, but I’m always striving to tell the story the best I can.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
For a lot of people who don’t work in the industry, they think editors just sit in a dark room alone all the time, and we do sometimes! But what I love most about editing is how collaborative a process it is. So much of what we do is working with the director and the creatives to find just the right pieces that help tell their story the most effectively.

Aflac

Once in awhile the best cuts are not even what was originally boarded or conceived, but what was found through the exploration of editing. When you fall in love with a character, laugh at a joke, or cry at an emotional moment it’s a result of the directing, the acting and the editing all working perfectly in sync with one another.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love going through dailies for the first time and seeing how the director and the cinematographer compose a particular scene or how an actor interprets lines, especially when you pick up on something in a take that you as an editor love – a subtle twitching of an eye or the way the light captures some element of the image – that everyone forgot about until they see it in your edit.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Not having enough time to really sit with the footage before I start working with the director or agency.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early in the morning even though I’m not really a morning person…but in our industry, that’s probably the quietest time of the day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Bumming it at the beach back home in Hawaii.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
During the summer before my junior year of high school, I stumbled upon Vivacious Lady (with Jimmy Stewart and Ginger Rogers) on AMC. I don’t know what it was about that movie, but I stayed up until 2am watching the whole thing.

For the next two years, every Sunday I’d grab the TV guide from the morning newspaper and review the AMC and TCM lineups for the week. Then I’d set my VCR to record every movie I wanted to see, which at the time were mostly musicals and rom-coms. When my dad asked me what I wanted to study in college I said film because at 5’4” getting paid to play basketball probably wasn’t going to happen, and those old AMC and TMC movies were my next favorite thing.

When I got to college, I was taught the basics of FCP in a digital filmmaking class and fell in love with editing instantly. I liked how there was a structure to the process of it, while simultaneously having a ton of creative freedom in how to tell the story.

Tide

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In January I worked with Saatchi on their Tide Super Bowl Campaign, editing the television teasers and 15s. This was the second year in a row that I got to work with them for the Super Bowl, and it’s one of my favorite jobs every year. They do some really fun and creative work for their teasers, and there’s so much opportunity to experiment and get a little weird

There was the Aflac Ski Patrol spot, and I also just finished a Fage Campaign with Leo Burnett, which went incredibly well. Matt Lenski from Arts & Science did such an incredible job with the shoot and provided me with so many options of how to tell the story for each spot.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I think you put on a different hat whenever you start any project, regardless of genre. Every comedy piece or visual piece is unique in its story, rhythm, etc. I definitely try to put myself in the right head space for editing a specific genre, whether that be from chatting with the director/agency or doing a deep dive on the Internet looking for inspiration from films, ads, music videos — anything really.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked as an editor on a documentary called Undroppable. It was about the school dropout rate across the US and followed students from different parts of the country, focusing on the challenges of graduating high school.

The film had already been edited by the time I got involved, but the producer felt it needed fresh eyes. I loved a lot of what the previous editors had done, and felt like the one thing I could bring to the film was focus. There were so many compelling stories that it sometimes felt like you never had a chance to really take any of it in. I wanted the audience to not just fall in love with these students and root for them, but to also leave the theater in active pursuit of ways they could be involved in our country’s education system.

As someone who was cutting mostly commercials and short films in Final Cut Pro at the time, doing a feature length documentary on Avid Media Composer was daunting, but so very, very exciting and gratifying.

WHAT DO YOU EDIT ON THESE DAYS?
Avid Media Composer.

ARE YOU EVER ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Every once in awhile I get a job where I’m asked to create an edit that is not in line with the footage that was shot. In those instances, I’ll have to comp takes together in order to get a desired set of performances or a desired shot. I try not to make the comps too clean because I don’t want to put our Flame artist out of a job.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, computer, Roomba

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just had a baby, so coming home to my son and my baby daddy is a great way to end the day. I also play on an all-women’s flag football team in a co-ed league on the weekends. The first game we ever won I QB’d while I was eight weeks pregnant; it was my Serena Williams moment!

Cutter Mark Burnett returns to his Australian roots and The Editors

Editor Mark Burnett has returned home to Australia and The Editors after nine years of cutting in London, most recently at The Whitehouse. Launching his career in Sydney, working at The Post Office before joining The Editors back in 2007, Burnett moved to London in 2009 to edit at Speade, joining The Whitehouse in 2014.

Burnett’s style and comedic timing have brought him industry recognition with Clios, BTA Arrows, Cannes Lions and APA Crystal Awards. Last year he won a Bronze Kinsale Shark Award for his work on McCain’s We Are Family and his quirky approach has seen him cut for comedy directors such as Jim Hosking, Zach Math and Hamish Rothwell.

Also behind this year’s Sundance film An Evening With Beverly Luff and the Palm Springs Film Festival 2017 opening film Edmund The Magnificent, Burnett is no stranger to longform and has delivered on past Sundance hits The Greasy Strangler (2016) and the LCD Soundsystem documentary Shut Up and Play The Hits (2012).

On his recent signing, Burnett says, “After nine years in the UK and after many long winters, many teas, many pints, many new friends, a child, a lot of travel and a bit of whinging, the time felt right to head home. It made sense to head back to the company that has always been a home away from home, and I am stoked to be welcomed back to The Editors and to be surrounded by not only amazing talent, but amazing people.”

Oscar-winner Jordan Peele on directing Get Out

By Iain Blair

Get Out, the feature film debut of comedian-turned-director Jordan Peele, is chock full of shocks and surprises. This multi-layered horror film also shocked a lot of people in the industry when it went on to gross over a quarter of a billion dollars — on a $4.5 million budget — making it one of the most profitable films in Hollywood history. But those shocks are nothing compared to the ones Peele and his movie generated when it scooped up four major Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director (in a very strong Best Director year, Peele beat out the likes of Steven Spielberg, Ridley Scott and Martin McDonagh). He won for Best Original Screenplay.

The writer/director honed his cinematic skills on the Comedy Central sketch show Key and Peele, which quickly became a television and Internet sensation, earning 12 Primetime Emmy Award nominations and over 900 million online hits. For his first film, which stars Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams, Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford, he assembled a stellar group of collaborators, including director of photography Toby Oliver (Insidious: Chapter 4), production designer Rusty Smith (Meet the Fockers), editor Gregory Plotkin (the Paranormal Activity series), costume designer Nadine Haders (Into the Badlands) and composer Michael Abels.

With the huge critical and commercial success of Get Out, Peele has now joined the big leagues. I recently caught up with Peele who talked about the Oscars, making the film, and his love of post.

This is your directorial movie debut, and it’s not only Oscar-nominated for Best Picture but also for Best Director. Are you still pinching yourself?
Oh yeah, 100 percent! It’s not something I feel I’ll ever get used to. It’s way beyond any expectations I had.

You were also Oscar-nominated for Best Original Screenplay, making you only the third person ever — after Warren Beatty and James L. Books — to score that and Best Director, Best Picture nods for your debut film. You realize it’s all downhill from here?
(Laughs) Yeah, I might as well quit making movies now while I’m still ahead, because I’m in big trouble. And that’s pretty ironic as the best award and reward for making my first movie is the fact that I get to make another.

You’re only the fifth African-American filmmaker to earn a Best Director nom and none have won. Is change coming fast enough?
I think change should have come a long time ago, but at least now we see some real progress, with such directors as Ryan Coogler, Ava DuVernay, Gary Gray, Barry Jenkins and Dee Rees. It’s this new class of amazing black directors, and people have worked very hard to get to this point, and it’s thanks to all the work of previous filmmakers. What’s blossoming in the industry now is very beautiful, so I’m very hopeful for the future.

When it comes to the Oscars, horror and comedy are two genres that don’t seem to get much respect. Why do you think that is?
I think it’s because they’re genres that are typically focused on getting a monetary return, so they get put in that box and are seen as lightweight and movies that are not art — even though there are many examples of elevated horror and elevated comedy that are extremely artistic films. So there’s that stigma. And if people don’t like horror, they just don’t like it, so it’s not a genre that you can expect everyone to want to see, unlike comedy. Everyone pretty much loves comedy, but when people tell me they don’t like horror, I tell them to seek it out, that it won’t scare them that much, and that it might surprise them.

Did you write this thinking, “I want to direct it too?”No, I never planned to direct it, but then about half-way through writing it I realized I was the only person who could actually direct it. I feel that being both the writer and director is easier than not doing both, because they’re done at separate times, so you don’t have to overlap, and then later if you want to change something on set, you know that you’re not missing or mistaking what the writer intended.

What sort of film did you set out to make, because it’s not just a straightforward horror film, is it?
No. I wanted to make a film I’d never seen before. It’s been called many things, and I myself have called it both a horror film and a social thriller. I was aiming at the genre somewhere between Rosemary’s Baby and Scream, so it’s about a lot of things — the way America deals with race and the idea that racism itself is a monster, and that we can’t neglect abuses and just stand by while atrocities happen. So I tried to incorporate a lot of layers and make something people would want to see more than once.

How did you prepare for directing your first film? It’s got to be pretty daunting.
It’s actually terrifying since you don’t know what you don’t know. I talked to everyone I could — Edgar Wright, Ben Affleck, Leigh Whannell, Peter Atencio who did our show and Keanu, and any other director I could — to try and prepare as much as possible.

How was the shoot?
We shot in Mobile, Alabama, and it was probably the most fun I’ve ever had working on anything. It was so hard and so intense. I was very prepared, but then you also have to be open to adapting and making changes, and too much preparation can work against you if you’re not careful.

Do you like the post process?
I absolutely loved it, and one big reason is because after so long just imagining what the film might look like, all of a sudden you have all the pieces of the puzzle in front of you, and you’re finally making the film. Post teaches you so much about what the film is meant to be and what it wants to be.

Where did you edit and post this?
At Blumhouse in LA.

Tell us about working with editor Gregory Plotkin, who cut most of the Paranormal Activity franchise for Paramount and Blumhouse Productions.
He’s a very accomplished editor and a real horror fan like me, so we bonded immediately over that. He could break down the script and all my influences from Hitchcock and Kubrick to Spielberg and Jonathan Demme. He did his pass and then I came in and did my director’s pass, and then we went over it all with a fine-tooth comb, tightening scenes up and so on and focusing on pace and timing, which are crucial in horror and comedy.

Is it true you shot multiple endings for the film? How did you decide on the right one?
We actually shot two, and the first one was not a happy one. When we edited it all together we realized it wasn’t working for an audience. They thought it was a downer, and then I realized it needed a hero and a happy ending instead, so that after going through all the stress, the audience could come out happy. So we asked for more money and went off and did a reshoot of the ending, which added another layer and worked far better.

Sound and music are so important in horror. Can you talk about that?
I look at it as at least half the movie since you can scare audiences so much with just clever sound design. I paid a lot of attention to it during the writing process, and then once we got into post it all became a very meticulous process. We were careful not to overdo all the sound design. We did it all at Wildfire, and they are such pros and were up for trying anything. They really understood my vision.

Can you talk about the VFX?
Ingenuity Studios did them and the big one was creating “The Sunken Place,” and it was tricky to do it as we didn’t have a bearing on this world apart from what I’d originally imagined. There was no up or down. Should the camera be fixed or floating? In the end, we shot Daniel Kaluuya against a black background on cables, and then Gregory played around in the Avid a lot, resizing the image. Then we added some CG stuff to give it that sort of underwater feel. We had a bunch of other shots, like the car hitting the deer and the father being impaled on the deer horns, which was all CGI.

Who was the colorist, and where did you do the DI?
It was all at Blumhouse, with Aidan Stanford, and I was pretty involved. It was tricky, and you can quickly go overboard with color, but the DP, Toby, did such a great job on the shoot that we mainly just tried to match his original color and not push it too far.

I assume you can’t wait to direct again?
Oh yeah! There’s nothing more fun. It’s the biggest artistic collaboration I can imagine, with all these moving parts, and I loved every minute of it.

What’s next?
I’m working on another screenplay, which I’ll direct for Universal. I just love Hitchcockian thrillers, so I’m staying in the same genre and zone.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

David Walton Smith joins digital agency Grow as head of film

Norfolk, Virginia-based digital agency Grow has expanded its film and production capabilities with the addition of David Walton Smith, who will take on the newly created role of head of film. Walton Smith will be charged with overseeing all content development and video production for the agency’s clients, which include Google, Spotify, Adidas and Adult Swim.

A multidisciplinary filmmaker and creative, Walton Smith has produced commercials, as well as branded and documentary content, for brands like Google, Volvo, Mass Mutual, Hyundai and Aleve. Prior to joining Grow, he was a director and producer at CNN’s branded content division, Courageous Studio, where he created broadcast and web content for CNN’s global audiences. He was also editor of Born to Explore with Richard Wiese, an Emmy Award-winning show that aired on ABC, as well as creative lead/director at London and Brooklyn-based LonelyLeap, where he spearheaded campaigns for Google and Tylenol.

Grow works with brands including Google, Spotify, NBC, Adidas, Homes.com, Oxygen Network and Adult Swim, to create digital experiences, products and interactive installations. Notable recent projects include Window Wonderland for Google Shopping, Madden Giferator for EA Sports, as part of Google’s Art, Copy & Code initiative, as well as The Pursuit, an interactive, crime thriller game created with Oxygen Media.

Configuring an iMac Pro for video editing

By Larry Jordan

Ever since Apple released the iMac Pro, my inbox has been clogged with people asking advice on how to configure their system. This article is designed to help you make more informed decisions when you don’t have an unlimited budget. Also, while the iMac Pro is designed for many different markets, I’m focusing here on digital media.

If money is no object, buy the top of the line. It will be blindingly fast, it will work great and you’ll have enormous bragging rights. But… if money IS an object, then you need to make trade-offs, balancing the performance you need with the money you have. The good news is that you don’t need to buy the top-of-the-line to get a system today that can meet your editing needs for the next several years.

Some background
When Apple rebuilt Final Cut to create FCP X, they focused on upgrading its underlying architecture to take advantage of coming advances in hardware. This includes an all-64-bit architecture, optimization for core technologies including Metal, tight integration with both CPU and GPU and the ability to take advantage of faster I/O — both to the processors and storage.

There are no optimizations in Final Cut, Motion or Compressor that focus specifically on the iMac Pro. Instead, Apple’s media apps take advantage of whatever technology or performance benefits are provided in the hardware. In other words, there are no new features in FCP X that appear if it is running on an iMac Pro. What does appear is faster performance.

This is from the Apple website, comparing the iMac Pro to the fastest Quad core iMac:

“The iMac Pro takes Mac performance to a new level, even when compared to our fastest quad-core iMac.”

  • Photographers can work with enormous files and perform image processing up to 4.1 times faster.
  • Music producers can export massive multi-track projects up to 4.6 times faster and use up to 12.4 times as many real-time plug-ins.
  • Video editors can edit up to eight streams of 4K video, or edit 4.5K RED RAW video and 8K ProRes 4444 at full resolution in realtime without rendering. The iMac Pro can also export HEVC video three times faster.

Keep in mind that Apple reports these performance numbers are based on: “Testing conducted by Apple in November 2017 using pre-production 2.3GHz 18-core Intel Xeon W-based 27-inch iMac Pro systems with 128GB of RAM and pre-production 3.0GHz 10-core Intel Xeon W-based 27-inch iMac Pro systems with 64GB of RAM, both configured with Radeon Pro Vega 64 graphics with 16GB of HBM2.”

Do You Really Need an iMac Pro?
Well, “need” is a relative term. If you principally work with SD or HD material, an iMac will be perfectly fine. The performance benefits of the iMac Pro don’t justify the expense. If you are hobbyist, no, you don’t need an iMac Pro. You might “want” one, but you don’t “need” one.

However, if the bulk of your work involves 4K or greater frame sizes, 360-degree VR, RAW files, or HDR, the performance benefits of this new system make it worth considering, because the design of the iMac Pro significantly speeds working with larger frame sizes, faster frame rates, more effects and more processor-intensive codecs (such as HEVC).

With that being said, let’s take a look at the specific components to see which ones make the most sense for video editing.

Display
The iMac Pro uses the same display technology as the 5K iMac. So everything you see on a current iMac looks the same on the iMac Pro:

– 5K display
– One billion colors
– P3 wide color gamut
– 500 nits

But, while the display of the iMac Pro is the same as an iMac, the display capability of the iMac Pro is greater:
– It can drive two other 5K displays or up to four other 4K displays.
– It has enhanced external connectivity and more Thunderbolt 3 ports (so you still have Thunderbolt ports left over for other accessories after connecting a display).

CPU
Before the shouting starts, let me say again that if money is no object, buy the top-of-the-line iMac Pro. However, for most of the editing that most of us are doing, we don’t need to buy the top-of-the-line system to get significantly improved editing performance.

The 8-core system is fine for most editing and compression. For example, H.264 compression takes advantage of a hardware encoder that is built into all current Macs. This hardware encoder is independent of CPU cores. However, there are benefits to more cores, especially when decoding and encoding heavily threaded codecs like ProRes or HEVC. Also, the 10-core system offers a higher Turbo Boost speed of 4.5GHz versus 4.2GHz for the 8-core CPU. This additional speed benefits rendering and exporting.

The 14- and 18-core systems are designed for applications other than video editing. I would invest my money elsewhere in the system because video editors will see greater benefits in upgrading RAM and GPU when using Final Cut Pro on an iMac Pro.

An exception to staying within a 10-core system is that editors using Red Raw media or working with multiple streams of ProRes — for example, multicam work — will see improved performance with higher-core systems.

I recommend 8 cores for general editing and 10 cores for multicam editing and RAW video workflows.

Performance vs. Heat 
One of the issues I’ve heard about the current Mac Pro is that it has a problem with heat under heavy load. What I discovered is that, even more than the Mac Pro, the iMac Pro internals are designed specifically to dissipate heat under heavy load.

Outside, the iMac Pro is millimeter for millimeter the same size and shape as a standard 27-inch iMac with Retina 5K display; outside of the space gray color and a few extra vents on the back. But, on the inside, it’s radically different.

One of the key things Apple was able to do is make the system all flash-based; 3GB/s of fast SSD is pretty darn fast! Switching to all flash allowed Apple to remove the 3.5” hard drive and use that large space for a dual blower design and a massive heatsink and heat pipe architecture.

This delivers 75% more airflow and 80% more thermal capacity, enabling far more CPU and GPU power in the box over a traditional iMac. It is also worth noting that it does all this while still being super quiet (it is an iMac, after all), letting you focus on your work.

GPUs
In general, cutting video tends to use more of the CPU while effects and graphics tend to rely more heavily on the GPU. Increasingly, both FCP X and Premiere rely on the GPU for more and more tasks. Also, the greater the VRAM, the better the GPU performance. Whether you use Motion, After Effects, Premiere or Final Cut, investing in the best GPU will be a wise choice.

While VRAM is important, it is not the only determinant of a superior graphics card. For example, the Vega 64 is significantly faster in addition to the larger amount of VRAM. Also, more VRAM offers benefits when working with large frame sizes, multiple video streams (i.e. multicam), multiple displays and complex motion graphics.

RAM
The 32GB default RAM is fine for virtually all editing. If, on the other hand, you run multiple applications at once — say FCP X, Motion, Compressor, Photoshop and a web browser — 64GB of RAM is better.

While there is value in more RAM beyond 6GB, you won’t get enough bang for your buck to justify the additional cost.

Storage
The iMac Pro ships with a 1TB SSD. I haven’t measured it, but it is probably way past blindingly fast. (Apple says 3GB/second!) The problem is that most media projects today far exceed 1TB in storage. You will need an external high-speed, Thunderbolt 3 RAID system for even medium-sized projects.

Video Compression
Unlike video editing, video compression has its own requirements for system resources. While this is worth its own article here are some thoughts.

Both H.264 and HEVC are relatively highly compressed formats. This compression, of course, leads to smaller file sizes, but the resulting compression requires more processing power. With H.264 and HEVC, decoding and most encoding actions are processed via dedicated H.264 hardware within the system.

A select set of custom H.264 encodes in Compressor may use the H.264 software encoder, which is threaded across multiple cores. So while ProRes encoding benefits from faster, higher-core CPUs, H.264 and HEVC are not similarly CPU bound. Also, it’s important to note that video compression often includes other operations including retiming, scaling, and color conversion — all of which use the GPU.

If you are interested in HDR, 8-bit HEVC does, in fact, support HDR. Still, 10-bit encoding is recommended for the highest quality HDR output when using the HEVC codec. The reason this is important is that current Macs only support hardware acceleration of 8-bit HEVC. This makes the iMac Pro about 3x faster in HEVC encoding than an iMac.

For 10-bit encoding, the HEVC software codec is threaded and can therefore take advantage of multiple CPU cores when encoding; more cores means faster video encoding.

Wait, What About the Mac Pro?
First, Apple has announced and reiterated that they are working on a new, modular Mac Pro. However, they haven’t announced specs nor a release date.

The current Mac Pro is getting long in the tooth. In terms of performance, the iMac Pro is a better choice.

That being said, there are still two reasons to consider the existing Mac Pro:
– You can add any monitor you want
– Many of the components inside are upgradeable

For me, while these benefits are not trivial, the hardware inside the system has not be upgraded in several years. If you are focused on video editing, the existing Mac Pro is not the best current choice.

Summary
Here are my two recommendations for an iMac Pro for video editing: A budget version and a top-of-the-line version for editors. (The mouse and keyboard come standard, so I make no recommendations about either of these.)

Budget Version:


Top of the Line

Here are two other configuration articles you may find useful:


Larry Jordan is a trainer, writer, editor, producer and director who’s been explaining technology since, well, forever.This article first appeared in his website: LarryJordan.com

Behind the Title: Weta Workshop editor Betsy Bauer

NAME: Betsy Bauer

COMPANY: Weta Workshop (@WetaWorkshop)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The official company description is a creative development that creates weapons, props, creatures, make-up, miniatures, public art and merchandise for films such as The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, Avatar, Elysium, District 9, Godzilla and The Amazing Spider-Man 2.

My description is it’s a hive of creativity and creation, filled with the most talented and humble people I have ever met. It’s a place that, as a 13-year-old girl in rural England, I dreamed of catching a glimpse of one day — and now I get to stroll right in every day!

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
At Workshop my role involves many aspects, but first and foremost it’s about supporting the crew and company however I can. I create production videos for our crew and clients to review the progress of things like props and costumes; promotional videos to show off our creations and collectibles; AV content for our CEO’s presentations around the world; video content for internal and external clients, such as our Tourism department or the National Museum of New Zealand; and managing and maintaining the beast that is our media server.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think the breadth of influence an editor can have over the final product would surprise many people. Though each job has a creative director and producer, more often than not the story is found, firmed or finalized within the edit. Something else people might not realize is that a big part of editing is problem-solving. On any given day you’re up against seemingly endless technical issues or difficulties with the script, performances and story. As editor, it’s my job to wade through it all and come out the other side with solutions.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There’s always that turning point in every job where it goes from chaos to order, from a thousand muddled-up jigsaw pieces to starting to see the picture it’s supposed to form. I love that moment of clarity when you can knuckle down and craft the story that you can see amongst the footage. There’s also a great satisfaction in delivering a product that exceeds your client’s expectations.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The anti-social nature of the job can be a bit of a downside. Especially at Workshop, where I literally spend all day looking at footage of my colleagues, who are in the same building as me, but in many instances I have never even met them!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Unfortunately, my internal clock is out of whack with my work schedule and I find so often I obtain clarity on a project in the late afternoon, when everything magically clicks into place and I only have a few short hours to put this newfound purpose into action. Inevitably, I just end up staying late.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I haven’t a clue! I never thought I’d find a “career,” so I consider myself beyond lucky to have stumbled into my craft. I think I would still want to work in the entertainment business, possibly in some kind of organizational or production role as that would suit my strengths.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I think this profession chose me. I knew I wanted to work in film and live in New Zealand so I chose a film internship in Wellington at the production house Martinsquare. Within the first week I knew that editing was it for me. It all clicked into place like nothing ever had before. I was also fortunate enough to have a wonderful mentor, Jeff Hurrell, whose endless patience and generosity helped kick-start my career from nothing.

Cleaver

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I recently had a great time editing the short film Cleaver with the brilliant Alex McKenna which should hopefully be released early this year. I’m also very excited that Status Pending, a feature film I edited, will be having it’s world premiere at Cinequest festival in March. And I’ve just signed on to edit a short documentary called Finding Venus with an amazing team of people. At Weta Workshop recently I have worked on videos for master sculptor Sabin Howard, Tencent Games’ Path of Exile and Thor: Ragnarok.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
All of them. No matter the job and the content I always strive to achieve work I’m proud of. I love storytelling, be that in the classic drama cutting of the short films and feature I have edited, telling the story of an incredible piece of art our artisans at Workshop have made or bringing a smile to my colleagues’ faces by visually capturing their journey throughout the year.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Bose noise-cancelling headphones, my Wacom tablet (my wrists thank you!) and big-ass monitors.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I try not to become too reliant on social media, but on Facebook I do follow some editing/filmmaking groups, which, when working in such an isolated role, can really help make you feel part of the larger community. I also probably spend far too much time on Reddit.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Try to laugh it off as much as possible. It may be stressful, but it doesn’t need to be life threatening. Another editor friend of mine recently showed me the benefits of popping to the gym in our lunch breaks to de-stress. I try to switch off in the evenings and not take my work home with me… but that doesn’t stop me from often waking up in the night thinking about “that edit.” I find the best solution is talking to people, getting perspective and remembering that I do this job because I love it.