Tag Archives: editing

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

Editor William Hoy — working on VFX-intensive War for the Planet of the Apes

By Mel Lambert

For William Hoy, ACE, story and character come first. He also likes to use visual effects “to help achieve that idea.” This veteran film editor points to director Zack Snyder’s VFX-heavy I, Robot, director Matt Reeves’ 2014 version of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and his new installment, War for the Planet of the Apes, as “excellent examples of this tenet.”

War for the Planet of the Apes, the final part of the current reboot trilogy, follows a band of apes and their leader as they are forced into a deadly conflict with a rogue paramilitary faction known as Alpha-Omega. After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, their leader begins a quest to avenge his kind, and an epic battle that determines the fate of both their species and the future of our planet.

Marking the picture editor’s second collaboration with Reeves, Hoy recalls that he initially secured an interview with the director through industry associates. “Matt and I hit it off immediately. We liked each other,” Hoy recalls. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes had a very short schedule for such a complicated film, and Matt had his own ideas about the script — particularly how the narrative ended. He was adamant that he ‘start over’ when he joined the film project.

“The previous Dawn script, for example, had [the lead ape character] Caesar and his followers gaining intelligence and driving motorized vehicles,” Hoy says. “Matt wanted the action to be incremental which, it turned out, was okay with the studio. But a re-written script meant that we had a very tight shoot and post schedule. Swapping its release date with X-Men: Days of Future Past gave us an additional four or five weeks, which was a huge advantage.”

William Hoy, ACE (left), Matt Reeves (right).

Such a close working relationship on Dawn of the Planet of the Apes meant that Hoy came to the third installment in the current trilogy with a good understanding of the way that Reeves likes to work. “He has his own way of editing from the dailies, so I can see what we will need on rough cut as the filmed drama is unfolding. We keep different versions in Avid Media Composer, with trusted performances and characters, and can see where they are going” with the narrative. Having worked with Reeves over the past two decades, Stan Salfas, ACE, served as co-editor on the project, joining prior to the Director’s Cut.

A member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences, Hoy also worked with director Randall Wallace on We Were Soldiers and The Man in the Iron Mask, with director Phillip Noyce on The Bone Collector and director Zack Snyder on Watchmen, a film “filled with emotional complexity and heavy with visual effects,” he says.

An Evolutionary Editing Process
“Working scene-by-scene with motion capture images and background artwork laid onto the Avid timeline, I can show Matt my point of view,” explains Hoy. “We fill in as we go — it’s an evolutionary process. I will add music and some sound effects for that first cut so we can view it objectively. We ask, ‘Is it working?’ We swap around ideas and refine the look. This is a film that we could definitely not have cut on film; there are simply too many layers as the characters move through these varied backgrounds. And with the various actors in motion capture suits giving us dramatic performances, with full face movements [CGI-developed facial animation], I can see how they are interacting.”

To oversee the dailies on location, Hoy set up a Media Composer editing system in Vancouver, close to the film locations used for principal photography. “War for the Planet of the Apes was shot on Arri Alexa 65 digital cameras that deliver 6K images,” the editor recalls. “These files were down-sampled to 4K and delivered to Weta Digital [in New Zealand] as source material, where they were further down-sampled to 2K for CGI work and then up-sampled back to 4K for the final release. I also converted our camera masters to 2K DNxHD 32/36 for editing color-timed dailies within my Avid workstation.”

In terms of overall philosophy, “we did not want to give away Caesar’s eventual demise. From the script, I determined that the key arc was the unfolding mystery of ‘What is going on?’ And ‘Where will it take us?’ We hid that Caesar [played by Andy Serkis] is shot with an arrow, and initially just showed the blood on the hand of the orangutan, Maurice [Karin Konoval]; we had to decide how to hide that until the key moment.”

Because of the large number of effect-heavy films that Hoy has worked on, he is considered an action/visual effects editor. “But I am drawn to performances of actors and their characters,” he stresses. “If I’m not invested in their fate, I cannot be involved in the action. I like to bring an emotional value to the characters, and visualize battle scenes. In that respect Matt and I are very much in tune. He doesn’t hide his emotion as we work out a lot of the moves in the editing room.”

For example, in Dawn of The Planet of The Apes, Koba, a human-hating Bonobo chimpanzee who led a failed coup against Caesar, is leading apes against the human population. “It was unsatisfying that the apes would be killing humans while the humans were killing apes. Instead, I concentrated on the POV of Caesar’s oldest son, Blue Eyes. We see the events through his eyes, which changed the overall idea of the battle. We shot some additional material but most of the scene — probably 75% — existed; we also spoke with the FX house about the new CGI material,” which involved re-imaged action of horses and backgrounds within the Virtual Sets that were fashioned by Weta Digital.

Hoy utilized VFX tools on various layers within his Media Composer sessions that carried the motion capture images, plus the 3D channels, in addition to different backgrounds. “Sometimes we could use one background version and other times we might need to look around for a new perspective,” Hoy says. “It was a trial-and-error process, but Matt was very receptive to that way of working; it was very collaborative.”

Twentieth Century Fox’s War for the Planet of the Apes.

Developing CGI Requests for Key Scenes
By working closely with Weta Digital, the editor could develop new CGI requests for key scenes and then have them rendered as necessary. “We worked with the post-viz team to define exactly what we needed from a scene — maybe to put a horse into a blizzard, for example. Ryan Stafford, the film’s co-producer and visual effects producer, was our liaison with the CGI team. On some scenes I might have as many as a dozen or more separate layers in the Avid, including Caesar, rendered backgrounds, apes in the background, plus other actors in middle and front layers” that could be moved within the frame. “We had many degrees of freedom so that Matt and I could develop alternate ideas while still preserving the actors’ performances. That way of working could be problematic if you have a director who couldn’t make up his mind; happily, Matt is not that way!”

Hoy cites one complex scene that needed to be revised dramatically. “There is a segment in which Bad Ape [an intelligent chimpanzee who lived in the Sierra Zoo before the Simian Flu pandemic] is seen in front of a hearth. That scene was shot twice because Matt did not consider it frenetic enough. The team returned to the motion capture stage and re-shot the scene [with actor Steve Zahn]. That allowed us to start over again with new, more frantic physical performances against resized backgrounds. We drove the downstream activities – asking Weta to add more snow in another scene, for example, or maybe bring Bad Ape forward in the frame so that we can see him more clearly. Weta was amazing during that collaborative process, with great input.”

The editor also received a number of sound files for use within his Avid workstation. “In the beginning, I used some library effects and some guide music — mostly some cues of composer Michael Giacchino’s Dawn score music from music editor Paul Apelgren. Later, when the picture was in one piece, I received some early sketches from the sound design team. For the Director’s Cut we had a rough cut with no CGI from Weta Digital. But when we received more sound design, I would create temp mixes on the Avid, with a 5.1-channel mix for the sound-editorial team using maybe 24 tracks of effects, dialog and music elements. It was a huge session, but Media Composer is versatile. After turning over that mix to Will Files, the film’s sound designer, supervising sound editor and co-mixer, I was present with Matt on the re-recording stage for maybe six weeks of the final mix as the last VFX elements came in. We were down to the wire!”

Hoy readily concedes that while he loves to work with new directors — “and share their point of view” — returning to a director with whom he has collaborated previously is a rewarding experience. “You develop a friendly liaison because it becomes easier once you understand the ways in which a director works. But I do like to be challenged with new ideas and new experiences.” He may get to work again with Reeves on the director’s next outing, The Batman, “but since Matt is still writing the screenplay, time will tell!”


Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLAHe is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

 

Jimmy Helm upped to editor at The Colonie

The Colonie, the Chicago-based editorial, visual effects and motion graphics shop, has promoted Jimmy Helm to editor. Helm has honed his craft over the past seven years, working with The Colonie’s senior editors on a wide range of projects. Most recently, he has been managing ongoing social media work with Facebook and conceptualizing and editing short format ads. Some clients he has collaborated with include Lyft, Dos Equis, Capital One, Heineken and Microsoft. He works on both Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere.

A filmmaking major at Columbia College Chicago, Helm applied for an internship at The Colonie in 2010. Six months later he was offered a full-time position as an assistant editor, working alongside veteran cutter Tom Pastorelle on commercials for McDonald’s, Kellogg’s, Quaker and Wrangler. During this time, Helm edited numerous projects on his own, including broadcast commercials for Centrum and Kay Jewelers.

“Tom is incredible to work with,” says Helm. “Not only is he a great editor but a great person. He shared his editorial methods and taught me the importance of bringing your instinctual creativity to the process. I feel fortunate to have had him as a mentor.”

In 2014, Helm was promoted to senior assistant editor and continued to hone his editing skills while taking on a leadership role.

“My passion for visual storytelling began when I was young,” says Helm “Growing up in Memphis, I spent a great deal of time watching classic films by great directors. I realize now that I was doing more than watching — I was studying their techniques and, particularly, their editing styles. When you’re editing a scene, there’s something addictive about the rhythm you create and the drama you build. I love that I get to do it every day.”

Helm joins The Colonie’s editorial team, comprised of Joe Clear, Keith Kristinat, Pastorelle and Brian Salazar, along with editors and partners Bob Ackerman and Brian Sepanik.

 

 

Baby Driver editors — Syncing cuts to music

By Mel Lambert

Writer/director Edgar Wright’s latest outing is a major departure from his normal offering of dark comedies. Unlike his Three Flavours Cornetto film trilogy — Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World’s End — and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, TriStar Pictures’ Baby Driver has been best described as a romantic musical disguised as a car-chase thriller.

Wright’s regular pair of London-based picture editors, Paul Machliss, ACE, and Jonathan Amos, ACE, also brought a special brand of magic to the production. Machliss, who had worked with Wright on Scott Pilgrim, The World’s End and his TV series Spaced for Channel 4, recalls that, “very early on, Edgar decided that I should come along on the shoot in Atlanta to ensure that we had the material he’d already storyboarded in a series of complex animatics for the film [using animator Steve Markowski and editor Evan Schiff]. Jon Amos joined us when we returned to London for sound and picture post production, primarily handling the action sequences, at which he excels.”

Developed by Wright over the past two decades, Baby Driver tells the story of an eponymous getaway driver (Ansel Elgort), who uses earphones to drown out the “hum-in-the-drum” of tinnitus — the result of a childhood car accident — and to orchestrate his life to carefully chosen music. But now indebted to a sinister kingpin named Doc (Kevin Spacey), Baby becomes part of a seriously focused gang of bank robbers, including Buddy and Darling (Jon Hamm and Eiza González), Bats (Jamie Foxx) and Griff (Jon Bernthal). Debora, Baby’s love interest (Lily James), dreams of heading west “in a car I can’t afford, with a plan I don’t have.” Imagine, in a sense, Jim McBride’s Breathless rubbing metaphorical shoulders with Tony Scott’s True Romance.

The film also is indebted to Wright’s 2003 music video for Mint Royale’s Blue Song, during which UK comedian/actor Noel Fielding danced in a stationery getaway car. In that same vein, Baby Driver comprises a sequence of linked songs that tightly choreograph the action and underpin the dramatic arcs being played out, often keying off the songs’ lyrics.

The film’s opener, for example, features Elgort partly lipsyncing to “Bellbottoms,” by the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, as the villains commit their first robbery. In subsequent scenes, our hero’s movements follow the opening bass riffs of The Damned’s “Neat Neat Neat,” then later to Golden Earring’s “Radar Love” before Queen’s “Brighton Rock” adds complex guitar cacophony to a key encounter scene.

Even the film’s opening titles are accompanied by Baby performing a casual coffee run in a continuous three-minute take to Bob & Earl’s “Harlem Shuffle” — a scene that reportedly took 28 takes on the first day of practical photography in Atlanta. And the percussion and horns of “Tequila” provide syncopation for a protracted gunfight. Fold in “Egyptian Reggae,” “Unsquare Dance,” and “Easy,” followed by “Debora,” and it’s easy to appreciate that Wright is using music as a key and underpinning component of this film. The director also brought in music video choreographer Ryan Heffington to achieve the timing precision he needed.

The swift action is reflected in a fast style of editing, including whip pans and crash zooms, with cuts that are tightly synchronized to the music. “Whereas the majority of Edgar’s previous TV series and films have been parodies, for Baby Driver he had a very different idea,” explains Machliss. Wright had accumulated a playlist of over 30 songs that would inspire various scenes in his script. “It’s something that’s very much a part of my previous films,” says director Wright, “and I thought of this idea of how to take that a stage further by having a character who listens to music the entire time.”

“Edgar had organized a table read of his script in the spring of 2012 in Los Angeles, at which he recorded all of the dialog,” says Machliss. “Taking that recording, some sound effects and the music tracks, I put together a 100-minute ‘radio play’ that was effectively the whole film in audio-only form that Edgar could then use as a selling tool to convince the studios that he had a viable idea. Remember, Baby Driver was a very different format for him and not what he is traditionally known for.”

Australia-native Machliss was on set to ensure that the gunshots, lighting effects, actors and camera movements, plus car hits, all happened to the beat of the accompanying music. “We were working with music that we could not alter or speed up or slow down,” he says. “We were challenged to make sure that each sequence fit in the time frame of the song, as well as following the cadence of the music.”

Almost 95% of music included in the first draft of Wright’s script made it into the final movie according to Machliss. “I laid up the relevant animatic as a video layer in my Avid Media Composer and then confirmed how each take worked against the choreographed timeline. This way I always had a reference to it as we were filming. It was a very useful guide to see if we were staying on track.”

Editing On Location
During the Atlanta shoot, Machliss used Apple ProRes digital files captured by an In2Core QTake video assist that was recording taps from the production’s 35mm cameras. “I connected to my Mac via Ethernet so I could create a network to the video assist’s storage. I had access to his QuickTime files the instant he stopped recording. I could use Avid’s AMA function to place the clip in the timeline without the need for transcoding. This allowed almost instantaneous feedback to Edgar as the sequence was built up.”

Paul Machliss on set.

While on location, Machliss used a 15-inch MacBook Pro, Avid Mojo DX and a JVC video monitor “which could double as a second screen for the Media Composer or show full-screen video output via the Mojo DX.” He also had a Wacom tablet, an 8TB Thunderbolt drive, a LaCie 500GB rugged drive — “which would shuttle my media between set and editorial” — and an APU “so that I wouldn’t lose power if the supply was shut down by the sparks!”

LA’s Fotokem handled film processing, with negative scanning by Efilm. DNX files were sent to Company 3 in Atlanta for picture editorial, “where we would also review rushes in 2K sent down the line from Efilm,” says Machliss. “All DI on-lining and grading took place at Molinare in London.” Bill Pope, ASC, was the film’s director of photography.

Picture and Sound Editorial in London
Instead of hiring out editorial suites at a commercial facility in London, Wright and his post teams opted for a different approach. Like an increasing number of London-based productions, they elected to rent an entire floor in an office building.

They located a suitable location on Berners Street, north of the Soho-based film community. As Machliss recalls: “That allowed us to have the picture editorial team in the same space as the sound crew,” which was headed up by Wright’s long-time collaborator Julian Slater, who served as sound designer, supervising sound editor and re-recording engineer on Baby Driver. “Having ready access to Julian and his team meant that we could collaborate very closely — as we had on Edgar’s other films — and share ideas on a regular basis,” as the 10-week Director’s Cut progressed.

British-born Slater then moved across Soho to Goldcrest Films for sound effects pre-dubs, while his co-mixer, Tim Cavagin, worked on dialog and Foley pre-mixes at Twickenham Studios. Print mastering of the Dolby Atmos soundtrack occurred in February 2017 at Goldcrest, with Slater handling music and SFX, while Cavagin oversaw dialog and Foley. “Following Edgar’s concept of threading together the highly choreographed songs with linking scenes, Jon and I began the cut in London against the pre-assembled material from Atlanta,” says Machliss.

To assist Machliss during his picture cut, the film’s sound designer had provided a series of audio stems for his Avid. “Julian [Slater] had been working on his sound effects and dialog elements since principal photography ended in Atlanta. He had prepared separate, color-coded left-center-right stems of the music, dialog and SFX elements he was working on. I laid these [high-quality tracks] into Media Composer so I could better appreciate the intricacies of Julian’s evolving soundtrack. It worked a lot better than a normal rough mix of production dialog, rough sound effects and guide music.”

“From its inception, this was a movie for which music and sound design worked together as a whole piece,” Slater recalls. “There is a large amount of syncopation of the diegetic sounds [implied by the film’s action] to the music track Baby is listening to. Sometimes it’s obvious because the action was filmed with that purpose in mind. For example, walking in tempo to the music track or guns being fired in tempo. But many times it’s more subtle, including police sirens or distant trains that have been pitched and timed to the music,” and hence blend into the overall musical journey. “We strived to always do this to support the story, and to never distract from it.”

Because of the lead character’s tinnitus, Slater worked with pitch changes to interweave elements of the film’s soundtrack. “Whenever Baby is not listening to music, his tinnitus is present to some degree. But it became apparent very soon in our design process that strident, high-pitched ‘whistle tones’ would not work for a sustained period of time. Working closely with composer Steven Price, we developed a varied set of methods to convey the tinnitus — it’s rarely the same sound twice. Much of the time, the tinnitus is pitched according to either the outgoing or incoming music track. This then enabled us to use more of it, yet at the same time be quite subtle.”

Meticulous Planning for Set Pieces and Car Chases
Picture editor Amos joined the project at the start of the Director’s Cut to handle the film’s set pieces. He says, “These set pieces were conceptually very different from the vast majority of action scenes in that they were literally built up around the music and then visualized. Meticulous development and planning went into these sequences before the shoot even began, which was decisive in making the action become musical. For example, the ‘Tequila’ gunfight started as a piece of music by Button Down Brass. It was then laced with gunfire and SFX pitched to the music, and in time with the drum hits — this was done at the script stage by Mark Nicholson (aka, Osymyso, a UK musician/DJ) who specializes in mashup/bastard pop and breakbeat.”

Storyboards then grew around this scripted sound collage, which became a precise shot list for the filmed sequences. “Guns were rigged to go off in time with the music; it was all a very deliberate thing,” adds Amos. “Clearly, there was a lot of editing still to be done, but this approach illustrates that there’s a huge difference between something that is shot and edited to music, and something that is built around the music.”

“All the car chases for Baby Driver were meticulously planned, and either prevised or storyboarded,” Amos explains. “This ensured that the action would always fit into the time slot permitted within the music. The first car chase [against the song ‘Bellbottoms’] is divided into 13 sections, to align to different progressions in the music. One of the challenges resulted from the decision to never edit the music, which meant that none of these could overrun. Stunts were tested and filmed by second unit director Darrin Prescott, and the footage passed back to editorial to test against the timing allowed in the animatic. If a stunt couldn’t be achieved in the time allowed, it was revised and tweaked until it worked. This detailed planning gave the perfect backbone to the sequences.”

Amos worked on the sequences sequentially, “using the animatic and Paul’s on-set assembly as reference,” and began to break down all the footage into rolls that aligned to specific passages of the music. “There was a vast amount of footage for all the set pieces, and things are not always shot in order. So generally I spent a lot of time breaking the material down very methodically. I then began to make selects and started to build the sequences from scratch, section by section. Once I completed a pass, I spent some time building up my sound layers. I find this helps evolve the cut, generating another level of picture ideas that further tighten the syncopation of sound and picture.”

Amos’ biggest challenge, despite all the planning, was finding ways to condense the material into its pre-determined time slot. “The real world never moves quite like animatics and boards. We had very specific points in every track where certain actions had to take place; we called these anchor points. When working on a section, we would often work backwards from the anchor point knowing, for instance, that we only had 20 seconds to tell a particular part of the story. Initially, it can seem quite restrictive, but the edits become so precise.

Jonathan Amos

“The time restriction led to a level of kineticism and syncopation that became a defining feature of the movie. While the music may be the driving force of the action scenes, editorial choices were always rooted in the story and the characters. If you lose sight of the characters, the audience will disengage with the sequence, and you’ll lose all the tension you’ve worked so hard to create. Every shot choice was therefore very considered, and we worked incredibly hard to ensure we never wasted a frame, telling the story in the most compelling, rhythmic and entertaining way we could.”

“Once we had our cut,” Machliss summarizes, “we could return the tracks to Julian for re-conforming,” to accommodate edit changes. “It was an excellent way of working, with full-sounding edit mixes.”

Summing up his experience in Baby Driver, Machliss considers the film to be “the hardest job I’ve ever done, but the most fun I’ve ever had. Ultimately, our task was to create a film that on one level could be purely enjoyed as an exciting/dramatic piece of cinema, but, on repeated viewing, would reveal all the little elements ‘under the surface’ that interlock together — which makes the film unique. It’s a testament to Edgar’s singular vision and, in that regard, he is a tremendously exciting director to work with.”


Mel Lambert has been involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He is principal of Content Creators, a LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

Confessions of a crime-porn editor

Over the years I’ve edited many things — drama, comedy, reality, newsmagazine shows — and I’ve earned six Emmys as a result. But lately I’ve been concentrating on the increasingly popular true-crime genre often referred to cynically as “crime porn.”

For this piece, I debated using my byline, but opted against it for fear of loss of work. I felt telling the story was important though, so here I am.

Working in a medium that is predominately escapist, I edit for drama, emotion and impact… taking liberties with reality and accuracy to provide as much bang for the buck to the viewer (and networks I work for) that I can muster.

As I got deeper and deeper into true crime work, I discovered that the ability to insulate myself from the real horrors and devastation these stories inflict upon the survivors was becoming easier and easier to manage. I became desensitized and cynical (after all, I am an editor and we are generally tough, right?).

It is only when I stepped back from the tight scripts, the carefully selected bites, the well-executed and masterfully-shot recreations and delved deeper into the emotional transcripts and on-camera interviews that reveal the silent, painful moments and lost, numb expressions of the survivors and victims that I realized the responsibility myself and others have to honor them, to contemplate what it is we are actually doing. These are real people who have suffered devastating damage. It is so easy to forget that this is TRUE crime.

Modern reality television didn’t invent the genre. To be sure, the dramatization of crime and grief has been around as long as storytelling has existed. The earliest Greek and Roman tales examined real crimes of passion. My problem is how easily and unconsciously we have trivialized and glamorized the most horrendous crimes that represent the lowest levels of human morality. We do it SO well.

As an editor, I have reveled in piecing together a masterful scene of death, destruction and raw basic emotion, using the sexiest techniques, tools and visual effects, the best-shot angles, sound effects and the entire arsenal of tricks modern technology has afforded me as an editor. And when I finally sit back, after hours of finessing and watch with objective eyes a scene I’ve just cut that frightens, builds suspense and tension and feels like an action movie, I know have done my best job to deliver the goods and satisfy the juices… but maybe have just lost a little more of my humanity in the process.

I realize I should not easily and gleefully take such delight in the visceral response from an audience of a well-cut murder — again, it’s too easy to forget that these represent real people. Real victims. Real tragedy. Real loss.
Several years ago I was editing one of these shows — another well-produced, well-shot and (I believe) well-edited story of a home invasion in which an innocent family was slaughtered, but not before being horrendously violated, burned alive and tortured — of crimes too horrible to contemplate. Yet, here I was portraying their true, albeit, reenacted story.

I used all the cool tricks of the trade — flash frames, booms, subliminal cuts, etc. But, inexplicably, after all these years of doing this over and over again, I found myself bothered by what a fine job I was doing.

I felt in making this horror watchable, glamorizing it, sanitizing it, commercializing it — I was dishonoring and diminishing the memory of these very real, lost and tortured human beings. Yet, I was just doing my job… I was earning a living for my family, and doing it the best way I could. After all, I am a professional and to do less than my best would have been disingenuous, dishonest and unprofessional. But I realized that, even though I had a professional duty, I didn’t have to take so much glee in it.

Let me say here this is in no way an indictment of my fellow editors. Maybe I’m late to the table and many of you who cut these shows have realized the responsibility we shoulder…all I can relate is my story.

Coming to Terms With the Reality
So I did some things to try to make amends and to re-sensitize myself to what I had to do for a living. One Saturday afternoon I drove to visit the site of the horror I described above. It was haunting. Seeing the actual street sign of the block where the crime occurred was the first stab of impact. It made it very real. It was no longer a name on a script or a cut. I got out of the car and sat in quiet meditation in the park created to honor that family.

I looked out at the neighborhood imagining the chaos, the noise, the screams and the horror. I imagined the people in the surrounding houses — who still live there. They lived through it. I could imagine the echoes through the trees, which made the calmness and beauty of the location disturbing.

I contemplated the murders, imagined the seared emotions of the victims and then tried to realize: there was once normalcy here. A loving family. I imagined the love and the beauty of the unique human beings that comprised that decimated family — they should not be defined by their tragic deaths but by the way they lived their lives.

I offered my prayers and even asked for a bit of forgiveness for glamorizing their story, and I promised to be more aware in the future. Then I got into my car and returned to my relatively normal life.

How I Changed
Since then I’ve added a few more steps to my editing workflow. The main thing was reading more fully the transcripts of the friends and survivors. I need to look at the raw interviews beyond the culled soundbites in the script in order to get a more comprehensive (and human) view of these people and how they were affected by these crimes and what they could say about the victims or recipients of violence.

I now always Google the stories to see the real faces of these people whose story I’m retelling — normal, unglamorous, smiling or unsmiling — in order to break the Hollywoodization; the casting of sexy actors and actresses to portray the victims or the devastatingly and banal handsomeness of most killers and villains.

I don’t think there is a real way of completely respecting the sanctity, and honoring the lives, of those we retell stories about in this odd genre. Documentaries are more tailored to that end — there are no actors and there are generally more subtle and sensitive representations of true events — but that is not what this true-crime genre is about, is it? We have to make a living after all, right?

But maybe, sometime after we cut that massacre scene or rape-murder, we can sit back, reflect and give a moment of time, homage and respect to the real people whose lives we are making our careers and livelihood from.

And pray for them… even if you are a cynic like me


The author is a 30-year editing veteran who has cut series for Discovery ID, A&E, Animal Planet and TV One network, to name a few.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Matt Posey

NAME: Matt Posey

COMPANY: PS260 (@ps260nyc)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
PS260 is a boutique editorial house (with offices in Venice, California and New York City) specializing in commercials, music videos and features. We also have a motion graphics and visual effects department. We’re a small team that fosters real creativity and experimentation in the work that we do.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Editing is essentially taking video, audio and images and crafting them into the most effective telling of a story. It is an extremely collaborative process that involves many components — understanding the technology, working with directors/writers/creatives, coordinating sound and effects — but at its heart, editing is telling a compelling visual story over time.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I suppose for people who aren’t a part of the post process the most surprising thing might be how drastically a story can change in the edit. There’s that saying that a film (or short, or commercial, or whatever) is written three times: first as a script, then as it ends up being shot and finally as it’s edited. Very rarely does a final product end up as “boarded,” and I still find it amazing how such small changes can completely change the viewer’s idea of what’s happening on the screen — what if we held this shot so the character blinks weirdly one more time? Or how about we add a sound effect of his keys rustling? What if we open with the other character so now we’re in their POV for the rest of the scene?

Depeche Mode

Editors can frequently act as fixers — with the stress and unpredictability of productions, things don’t often go the way they’re planned and the editors are then tasked with making sense of a puzzle with missing pieces. I love being challenged to find some outrageous way to tell the story, and we want to tell it with the material that’s in front of us.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sometimes these creative solutions to production problems work really well and sometimes they feel a bit lacking. It’s at these times you know these problems could have been solved if editorial was involved earlier in the process. I’ve been lucky to be involved in some projects through pre and post production and, along with minimizing prep in post and allowing for more time to be spent on creative editorial, potential issues were caught and ironed out before they became bigger concerns.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunchtime is always a pretty great thing. PS260 makes sure we’re all well fed.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably desperately trying to garner YouTube hits for my speculative fiction essay videos.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I’ve been editing since I was a kid, re-editing Star Wars audio books on cassette tape to tell new stories. Later, I began capturing analog video that I shot or recorded from the TV with a Dazzle Movie Star box and editing in Adobe Premiere 5.0 (I never thought I’d go back to Premiere almost 20 years later, but I did). I always knew I wanted to work with video and loved to experiment with new effects and ways to craft a story, so I went to art school and got a degree in video art. After that I found I needed to make rent, so getting paid to do what I love was the easiest decision I’ve ever made.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Recently, I’ve done a lot of video work for Depeche Mode. The director Tim Saccenti and I created the live visuals for their current tour, along with two performance music videos and three 360 music videos, which should be out very soon!

I’ve also just finished a wonderful feature documentary, Illustrated Man (left), about tattooed men and the history of tattooing in NYC, with director Sophy Holland. Currently, I’m working on some videos for Elizabeth Arden, starring Reese Witherspoon.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
The goal of every project is the same: to make the audience feel what you want them to feel, whether it’s laughter or sadness, or that rush of adrenaline as they’re making their way home from the theater. But each project comes with its own set of limitations.

With TV spots, you’re confined to 30 or 60 seconds and you have to temper your grand ideas of how best to tell the story with the economy of time, not to mention the sometimes limiting concerns of the brand or product you’re representing. Long form and features can allow you all the time you may need, but you have to be mindful of the audience’s attention span.

The best thing you can do is continually learn, and have at-the-ready techniques to help you with a specific form or genre, like knowing when to be in a wide or a close-up shot, using the camera’s distance to create tension or reveal emotion. Or in a comedy, for example, knowing not to reveal new information right after a big joke because the audience will miss it while they’re laughing (thanks Ren & Stimpy).

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
My first feature, We’ve Forgotten More Than We Ever Knew, was an incredible learning experience for me. It taught me so much about how to cut dialogue, build out a scene and carry a character’s emotional arc across 90 minutes. Plus, it’s just a really cool film.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
Right now I’m using Adobe Premiere CC 2017. The recent updates have finally stolen me away from Avid and Final Cut.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUG-IN?
This is like asking someone what their favorite book or movie is, so it’ll probably change depending on the day of week. Right now I’m into using stock reverb plug-ins, or things like iZotope Vinyl to mix in sound elements in interesting ways. Tomorrow it could be star wipes.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? IF SO, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU ASKED TO DO?
Definitely. Because of the progression of technology, clients are expecting more and more, and the divide between offline and online is narrowing. I do a lot of the online effects in the edit, whether it’s motion graphics, correcting eye lines when the actors stray, or comping split screens.

In the features and music videos I work on, I have a lot of freedom to work on bigger CG shots and effects set pieces, which is always a lot of fun.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Of course, no one can live without their phone nowadays. It does help a lot for my job as well, allowing me to remote in to my workstation to check on a render or reference an EDL at a session.

The other two would be my corded Apple full-size keyboard and Logitech M500 mouse. They’re amazingly simple tools, but they make things so much easier.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It’s all about having a good work-life balance, which is an issue most editors have to grapple with. Fortunately, I have some amazing people in my life who make sure to occasionally pull me away from all the screens.

Ed Cooper upped to editor at London’s The Assembly Rooms

London-based The Assembly Rooms has promoted Edward Cooper to editor. He has been at this seven-suite Soho-based studio since 2011, where he has been steadily making the progression from assistant editor to editor. When he first joined, Cooper cut his teeth on music videos like Nimmo’s Unyoung. Promos for Jake Bugg, Birdy and Donae’O shortly followed.

Recent work includes a TVC for Rubik’s, content for Beats featuring Rag ‘n’ Bone Man, a promo for BBC Sound of 2017 artist Ray BLK and a much more narrative and story-driven video for Jorja Smith’s latest single.

In his new position, Cooper will be building on his current working relationships, growing his list of collaborations and expanding into more commercial work. He works on the Avid Media Composer.

The Assembly Rooms was established in 2004 by Nik Hindson and Sam Rice-Edwards, with Eve Ashwell joining as partner in 2015. They are located in a town house in London’s Soho.

Paris Can Wait director Eleanor Coppola

By Iain Blair

There are famous Hollywood dynasties, and then there’s the Coppolas, with such giant talents as Francis, Sofia, Roman, Nic Cage and the late Carmine.

While Eleanor, the matriarch of the clan and Francis’ wife, has long been recognized as a multi-talented artist in her own right, thanks to her acclaimed documentaries and books (Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, Notes on the Making of Apocalypse Now, Notes on a Life), it’s only recently — at the grand age of 81 — that she’s written, produced and directed her feature film debut, Paris Can Wait.

Eleanor Coppola on set in France.

It stars Oscar-nominee Diane Lane as a woman who unexpectedly takes a trip through France, which reawakens her sense of self and her joie de vivre. At a crossroads in her life, and long married to an inattentive movie producer (Alec Baldwin), she finds herself taking a car trip from Cannes to Paris with a garrulous business associate of her husband. What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a journey of discovery involving mouthwatering meals, spectacular wines and picturesque sights.

Maybe it’s something in the water — or the famed Coppola wine, or her genes — but like her many family members, Eleanor Coppola seems to have a natural gift for capturing visual magic, and the French road trip unfolds like a sun-drenched adventure that makes you want to pack your bags and join the couple immediately.

I recently spoke with Coppola about making the film.

You began directing feature films at an age when most directors have long since retired. What took you so long?
I made documentaries, and my nature is to be an observer, so I never thought about doing a fiction film. But I had this true story, this trip I took with a Frenchman, and it felt like a really good basis for a road movie — and I love road movies — so I began writing it and included all these wonderful, picturesque places we stopped at, and someone suggested that we break down. Then my son said, “You should fix it,” so I gradually added all these textures and colors and flavors that would make it as rich as possible.

I heard it took a long time to write?
I began writing, and once I had the script together I began looking for a director, but I couldn’t quite find the right person. Then one morning at breakfast (my husband) Francis said, “You should direct it.” I’d never thought of directing it myself, so I took classes in directing and acting to prepare, but it ended up taking six years to bring all the elements together.

I assume getting financing was hard?
It was, especially as I’m not only a first-time feature director, but my movie has no aliens, explosions, kidnappings, guns, train wrecks — and nobody dies. It doesn’t have any of the usual elements that bankers want to invest in, so it took a long time to patch together the money — a bit here, a bit there. That was probably the hardest part of the whole thing. You can’t get the actors until you have the financing, and you can’t get the financing until you have the actors. It’s like Catch-22, and you’re caught in this limbo between the two while you try and get it all lined up.

After Francis persuaded you to direct it, did he give you a lot of encouragement and advice?
I asked him a lot about working with actors. I’ve been on so many sets with him and watched him directing, and he was very helpful and supportive, especially when we ran into the usual problems every film has.

I heard that just two weeks into shooting, the actor originally set to play Michael was unable to get out of another project?
Yes, and I was desperate to find a replacement, and it was such short notice. But by some miracle, Alec Baldwin called Francis about something, and he was able to fly over to France at the last moment and fill in. And other things happened. We were going to shoot the opening at the Hotel Majestic in Cannes, but a Saudi Arabian prince arrived and took over the entire hotel, so we had to scramble to find another location.

How long was the shoot?
Just 28 days, so it was a mad dash all over France, especially as we had so many locations I wanted to fit in. Pretty much every day, the AD and the production manager would come over to me after lunch and say, “Okay, you had 20 shots scheduled for today, but we’re going to have to lose four or five of them. Which ones would you like to cut?” So you’re in a constant state of anxiety and wondering if the shots you are getting will even cut together.Since we had so little time and money, we knew that we could never come back to a location if we missed something and that we’d have to cut some stuff out altogether, and there’s the daily race to finish before you lose light, so it was very difficult at times.

Where did you do the post?
All back at our home in Napa Valley, where we have editing and post production facilities all set up at the winery.

You worked with editor Glen Scantlebury, whose credits include Godfather III and Bram Stoker’s Dracula for Francis, Michael Bay’s The Rock, Armageddon and Transformers, Conair, The General’s Daughter and Tomb Raider. What did he bring to the project?
What happened was, I had a French editor who assembled the film while we were there, but it didn’t make financial sense to then bring her back to Napa, so Francis put me together with Glen and we worked really well together. He’s so experienced, but not just cutting these huge films. He’s also cut a lot of indies and smaller films and documentaries, and he did Palo Alto for (my granddaughter) Gia, so he was perfect for this. He didn’t come to France.

What were the main editing challenges?As they say, there are three films you make: the one you wrote, the one you shot and the one you then edit and get onto the screen. It’s always the same challenge of finding the best way of telling the story, and then we screened versions for people to see where any weaknesses were, and then we would go back and try to correct them. Glen is very creative, and he’d come up with fresh ways of dealing with any problems. We ended up spending a couple of months working on it, after he spent an initial month at home doing his own assembly.

I must say, I really enjoyed the editing process more than anything, because you get to relax more and shape the material like clay and mold it in a way you just can’t see when you’re in the middle of shooting it. I love the way you can move scenes around and juxtapose things that suddenly work in a whole new way.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music?
They’re so important, and can radically alter a scene and the emotions an audience feels. I had the great pleasure of working with sound designer Richard Beggs, who won the Oscar for Apocalypse Now, and who’s done the sound for so many great films, including Rain Man and Harry Potter, and he’s worked with (my daughter) Sofia on some of her films like Lost in Translation and Marie Antoinette.

He’s a master of his craft and helped bring the film alive. Also, he recommended the composer Laura Karpman, who’s won several Emmys and worked with Spielberg and John Legend and all sorts of people. Music is really the weakest part for me, because I just don’t know what to do, and like Glen, Laura was just a perfect match for me. The first things she wrote were a little too dark, I felt, as I wanted this to be fun and light, and she totally got it, and also used all these great finger-snaps, and the score just really captures the feeling I wanted. We mixed everything up in Napa as well.

Eleanor Coppola and writer Iain Blair.

Do you want to direct another feature now, or was once enough?
I don’t have anything cooking that I want to make, but I’ve recently made two short story films, and I really enjoyed doing that since I didn’t have to wait for years to get the financing. I shot them in Northern California, and they were a joy to do.

There’s been a lot of talk about the lack of opportunity for women directors. What’s your advice to a woman who wants to direct?
Well, first off, it’s never too late! (Laughs) Look at me. I’m 81, and this is my first narrative film. Making any film is hard, finding the financing is even harder. Yes, it is a boy’s club, but if you have a story to tell never give up. Women should have a voice.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Sight Sound & Story 2017: TV editing and Dylan Tichenor, ACE

By Amy Leland

This year, I was asked to live tweet from Sight Sound & Story on behalf of Blue Collar Post Collective. As part of their mission to make post events as accessible to members of our industry as possible, they often attend events like this one and provide live blogging, tweeting and recaps of the events for their members via their Facebook group. What follows are the recaps that I posted to that group after the event and massaged a bit for the sake of postPerspective.

TV is the New Black
Panelists included Kabir Akhtar, ACE, Suzy Elmiger, ACE, Julius Ramsay and moderator Michael Berenbaum, ACE.

While I haven’t made it a professional priority to break into scripted TV editing because my focus is on being a filmmaker, with editing as “just” a day job, I still love this panel, and every year it makes me reconsider that goal. This year’s was especially lively because two of the panelists, Kabir Akhtar and Julius Ramsay, have known each other from very early on in their careers and each had hilarious war stories to share.

Kabir Akhtar

The panelists were asked how they got into scripted TV editing, and if they had any advice for the audience who might want to do the same. One thing they all agreed on is that a good editor is a good editor. They said having experience in the exact same genre is less important than understanding how to interpret the style and tone of a show correctly. They also all agreed that people who hire editors often don’t get that. There is a real danger of being pigeonholed in our industry. If you start out editing a lot of reality TV and want to crossover to scripted you’ll almost definitely have to take a steep pay cut and start lower down on the ladder. There is still the problem in the industry of people assuming if you’ve cut comedy but not drama, you can’t cut drama. The same can be said for film versus TV and half-hour versus hour, etc. They all emphasized the importance of figuring out what kind of work you want to do, and pursuing that. Don’t just rush headlong into all kinds of work. Find as much focus as you can. Akhtar said, “You’re better off at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb than high up on one that doesn’t interest you.”

They all also said to seek out the people doing the kind of work you want to do, because those are the people who can help you. Ramsay said the most important networking tool is a membership to IMDB Pro. This gives you contact information for people you might want to find. He said the first time someone contacts him unsolicited he will probably ignore it, but if they contact him more than once, and it’s obvious that it’s a real attempt at personal contact with him, he will most likely agree to meet with that person.

Next they discussed the skills needed to be a successful editor. They agreed that while being a fast editor with strong technical knowledge of the tools isn’t by itself enough to be a successful editor, it is an important part of being one. If you have people in the room with you, the faster and more dexterously you can do what they are asking, the better the process will be for everyone.

There was agreement that, for the most part, they don’t look at things like script notes and circle takes. As an editor, you aren’t hired just for your technical skills, but for your point of view. Use it. Don’t let someone decide for you what the good takes are. You have to look at all of the footage and decide for yourself. They said what can feel like a great take on the set may not be a great take in the context of the cut. However, it is important to understand why something was a circle take for the director. That may be an important aspect of the scene that needs to be included, even if it isn’t on that take.

The panel also spoke about the importance of sound. They’ve all met editors who aren’t as skilled at hearing and creating good sound. That can be the difference between a passable editor and a great editor. They said that a great assistant editor needs to be able to do at least some decent sound mixing, since most producers expect even first cuts to sound good, and that task is often given to the assistant. They all keep collections of music and sound to use as scratch tracks as they cut. This way they don’t have to wait until the sound mix to start hearing how it will all come together.

The entire TV is the New Black panel.

All agreed that the best assistant editors are those who are hungry and want to work. Having a strong artistic sense and drive are more important to them than specific credits or experience. They want someone they know will help them make the show the best. In return, they have all given assistants opportunities that have led to them rising to editor positions.

When talking about changes and notes, they discussed needing that flexibility to show other options, even if you really believe in the choices you’ve made. But they all agreed the best feeling was when you’ve been asked to show other things, and in the long run, the producer or director comes back to what you had in the first place. They said when people give notes, they are pointing out the problems. Be very wary when they start telling you the solutions or how to fix the problems.

Check out the entire panel here. The TV panel begins at about 20:00.

Inside the Cutting Room
This panel focused on editor Dylan Tichenor, ACE, and was moderated by Bobbie O’Steen .

Of all of the Sight Sound & Story panels, this is by far the hardest to summarize effectively. Bobbie O’Steen is a film historian. Her preparation for interviews like this is incredibly deep and detailed. Her subject is always someone with an impressive list of credits. Dylan Tichenor has been Paul Thomas Anderson’s editor for most of his films. He has also edited such films as Brokeback Mountain, The Royal Tenenbaums and Zero Dark Thirty.

With that in mind, I will share some of the observations I wrote down while listening raptly to what was said. From the first moment, we got a great story. Tichenor’s grandfather worked as a film projector salesman. He described the first time he became aware of the concept of editing. When he was nine years old, he unspooled a film reel from an Orson Welles movie that his grandfather had left at the house and looked carefully at all of the frames. He noticed that between a frame of a wide shot and a frame of a close-up, there was a black line. And that was his first understanding of film having “cuts.” He also described an early love for classic films because of those reels his grandfather kept around, especially Murnau’s Nosferatu.

Much of what was discussed was his longtime collaboration with P.T. Anderson. In discussing Anderson’s influences, they described the blend of Martin Scorsese’s long tracking shots with Robert Altman’s complex tapestry of ensemble casts. Through his editing work on those films, Tichenor saw how Anderson wove those two things together. The greatest challenges were combining those long takes with coverage, and answering the question, “Whose story are we telling?” To illustrate this, he showed the party scene in Boogie Nights in which Scotty first meets Dirk Diggler.

Dylan Tichenor and Bobbi O’Steen.

For those complex tapestries of characters, there are frequent transitions from one person’s storyline to another’s. Tichenor said it’s important to transition with the heart and not just the head. You have to find the emotional resonance that connects those storylines.

He echoed the sentiment from one of the other panels (this will be covered in my next recap) about not simply using the director’s circle takes. He agreed with the importance of understanding what they were and what the director saw in them on set, but in the cut, it was important to include that important element, not necessarily to use that specific take.

O’Steen brought up the frequent criticism of Magnolia — that the film is too long. While Tichenor agreed that it was a valid criticism, he stood by the film as one that took chances and had something to say. More importantly, it asked something of the audience. When a movie doesn’t take chances and asks the audience to work a little, it’s like eating cotton candy. When the audience exerts effort in watching the story, that effort leads to catharsis.

In discussing The Royal Tenenbaums, they talked about the challenge of overlapping dialogue, illustrated by a scene between Gene Hackman and Danny Glover. Of course, what the director and actors want is to have freedom on the set, and let the overlapping dialogue flow. As an editor this can be a nightmare. In discussions with actors and directors, it can help to remind them that sometimes that overlapping dialogue can create situations where a take can’t be used. They can be robbed of a great performance by that overlap.

O’Steen described Wes Anderson as a mathematical editor. Tichenor agreed, and showed a clip with a montage of flashbacks from Tenenbaums. He said that Wes Anderson insisted that each shot in the montage be exactly the same duration. In editing, what Tichenor found was that those moments of breaking away from the mathematical formula, of working slightly against the best of the music, were what gave it emotional life.

Tichenor described Brokeback Mountain as the best screenplay adaptation of a short story he had ever seen. He talked about a point during the editing when they all felt it just wasn’t working, specifically Heath Ledger’s character wasn’t resonating emotionally the way he should be. Eventually they realized the problem was that Ledger’s natural warmth and affectionate nature were coming through too much in his performance. He had moments of touching someone on the arm or the shoulder, or doing something else gentle and demonstrative.

He went back through and cut out every one of those moments he could find, which he admitted meant in some cases leaving “bad” cuts in the film. To be fair, in some cases that difference was maybe half a second of action and the cuts were not as bad as he feared, but the result was that the character suddenly felt cold and isolated in a way that was necessary. Tichenor also referred back to Nosferatu and how the editing of that film had inspired him. He pointed to the scene in which Jack comes to visit Ennis; he mimicked an editing trick from that film to create a moment of rush and surprise as Ennis ran down the stairs to meet him.

Dylan Tichenor

One thing he pointed out was that it can feel more vulnerable to cut a scene with a slower pace than an action scene. In an action scene, the cuts become almost a mosaic, blending into one another in a way that helps to make each cut a bit more anonymous. In a slower scene, each cut stands out more and draws more attention.

When P.T. Anderson and Tichenor came together again to collaborate on There Will Be Blood, they approached it very differently from Boogie Nights and Magnolia. Instead of the parallel narratives of that ensemble tapestry, this was a much more focused and, often, operatic, story. They decided to approach it, in both shooting and editing, like a horror film. This meant framing shots in an almost gothic way, which allowed for building tension without frequent cutting. He showed an example of this in a clip of Daniel and his adopted son H.W. having Sunday dinner with the family to discuss buying their land.

He also talked about the need to humanize Daniel and make him more relatable and sympathetic. The best path to this was through the character of H.W. Showing how Daniel cared for the boy illuminated a different side to this otherwise potentially brutal character. He asked Anderson for additional shots of him to incorporate into scenes. This even led to additional scenes between the two being added to the story.

After talking about this film, though there were still so many more that could be discussed, the panel sadly ran out of time. One thing that was abundantly clear was that there is a reason Tichenor has worked with some of the finest filmmakers. His passion for and knowledge of film flowed through every moment of this wonderful chat. He is the editor for many films that should be considered modern classics. Undoubtedly between the depth of preparation O’Steen is known for, and the deep well of material his career provided, they could have gone on much longer without running dry of inspirational and entertaining stories to share.

Check out the entire panel here. The interview begins at about 02:17:30.

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Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, Echoes, is now available on Amazon Video. Her feature doc, Ambassador of Rhythm, is in post. She also has a feature screenplay in development and a new doc in pre-production. She is also an editor for CBS Sports Network. Find out more about Amy on her site http://amyleland.net and follow her on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Oscar-winning editor Pietro Scalia to speak at EditFest London

Pietro Scalia, ACE, has joined the lineup for EditFest London, which takes place on June 24 at BFI Southbank. Scalia will participate in a one-on-one conversation that will cap a day of panels featuring insights from editors working in television, feature film and documentary programming.

Scalia has won two Academy Awards (Black Hawk Down, JFK), two BAFTA Awards (Gladiator, JFK), a Satellite Award (American Gangster) and three ACE Eddies (Black Hawk Down, JFK and Gladiator). For over 25 years, Scalia has worked with directors such as Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci, Gus Van Sant, Rob Marshall and Sam Raimi. His films include Good Will Hunting, Memoirs of a Geisha, Kick-Ass, The Amazing Spiderman and The Martian. His latest collaboration with director Ridley Scott is Alien: Covenant, which is in theaters now.

Scalia began his career as an assistant editor on Oliver Stone’s Wall Street and Talk Radio, then went on to contribute as an associate editor on Born on the Fourth of July and as an additional editor on The Doors. He has also co-edited documentaries, including 40 Years of Silence: An Indonesian Tragedy, The Eleventh Hour and Ashes and Snow. Scalia’s efforts also include stints as music producer with composer Hans Zimmer on three of Scott’s films.

Born in Sicily in 1960 and educated in Switzerland, Scalia came to Los Angeles to attend UCLA where he received his MFA in film and theater arts.

EditFest which was launched in LA in 2008, presents top-level film and television editors talking about their work and editing careers. The event features panels, clips and conversation, and attendees engage with panelists throughout the day. This year marks the fifth EditFest London.

Panelists at this year’s EditFest UK include (Avatar); Sylvia Landra, ACE, (Léon: The Professional); Jake Roberts, ACE, (Hell or High Water); Job ter Burg (Elle); and William Oswald (Doctor Who). ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, will be moderator. As in previous years, EditFest will feature film and television panels, the one-on-one conversation (this time with Scalia), lunch and a cocktail reception.

This year, EditFest will present a special fourth panel devoted to documentary programming featuring Chris King, ACE, (Amy, Exit Through the Gift Shop); Gordon Mason, ACE, (Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train a Comin’, Revolution: New Art for a New World); and others.

Nomad Editing adds Nate Cali

Santa Monica’s Nomad has added editor Nate Cali to its roster. Cali, who will be based out of the Santa Monica office, has edited campaigns for Nike, Reebok, Red Bull, Taco Bell, Capital One and Funny or Die. Cali edits on Adobe Premiere.

Most recently, he was freelancing out of Saatchi LA working on Toyota. Prior to that, while he frequently worked out of the Optimus Chicago office and spent a lot of time there, he was based out of Optimus LA, where he moved up the ranks from assistant editor to a partner in the company. He also spent time at Union Editorial.

While at the Los Angeles Film School, he studied under Danford B. Greene, who cut Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles. “My mother was a stand-up comedian,” he says. “I always knew I wanted to cut comedy. Danford taught me how to make people laugh by highlighting reactions instead of actions.”

“I feel so lucky to have a career that requires me to collaborate with other people who have the same passion and drive as I do. I connect very well with people who care deeply about their work. I love working on cars and extreme sports projects and while I think the flashy stuff is cool, I’m most interested in bringing the best emotions out of a piece. I want people to feel a personal connection to that spot.”