Tag Archives: Deluxe

Deluxe VFX

Craig Zerouni joins Deluxe VFX as head of technology

Deluxe has named Craig Zerouni as head of technology for Deluxe Visual Effects. In this role, he will focus on continuing to unify software development and systems architecture across Deluxe’s Method studios in Los Angeles, Vancouver, New York and India, and its Iloura studios in Sydney and Melbourne, as well as LA’s Deluxe VR.

Based in LA and reporting to president/GM of Deluxe VFX and VR Ed Ulbrich, Zerouni will lead VFX and VR R&D and software development teams and systems worldwide, working closely with technology teams across Deluxe’s Creative division.

Zerouni has been working in media technology and production for nearly three decades, joining Deluxe most recently from DreamWorks, where he was director of technology at its Bangalore, India-bsed facility overseeing all technology. Prior to that he spent nine years at Digital Domain, where he was first head of R&D responsible for software strategy and teams in five locations across three countries, then senior director of technology overseeing software, systems, production technology, technical directors and media systems. He has also directed engineering, products and teams at software/tech companies Silicon Grail, Side Effects Software and Critical Path. In addition, he was co-founder of London-based computer animation company CFX.

Zerouni’s work has contributed to features including Tron: Legacy, Iron Man 3, Maleficent, X-Men: Days of Future Past, Ender’s Game and more than 400 commercials and TV IDs and titles. He is a member of BAFTA, ACM/SIGGRAPH, IEEE and the VES. He has served on the AMPAS Digital Imaging Technology Subcommittee and is the author of the technical reference book “Houdini on the Spot.”

Says Ulbrich on the new hire: “Our VFX work serves both the features world, which is increasingly global, and the advertising community, which is increasingly local. Behind the curtain at Method, Iloura, and Deluxe, in general, we have been working to integrate our studios to give clients the ability to tap into integrated global capacity, technology and talent anywhere in the world, while offering a high-quality local experience. Craig’s experience leading global technology organizations and distributed development teams, and building and integrating pipelines is right in line with our focus.”

Deluxe hires Walter Schonfeld as president of digital cinema global ops

Walter Schonfeld, formerly CEO of SDI Media Group and president of Technicolor Entertainment Services, has joined Deluxe as president, digital cinema global operations (DTDC).

DTDC, a joint venture between entertainment services companies Deluxe and Technicolor, handles digital mastering, distribution and key management for feature film titles released worldwide.

Schonfeld is the former CEO of localization company SDI Media Group, where he introduced technology-based tools and services to maximize its scale and scope, integrating global operations. Previously, he was also president of Technicolor’s worldwide entertainment services group for six years, and was instrumental in transitioning the company to digital services and expanding the geographic scope of its operations. Prior to Technicolor, Schonfeld was a SVP at MCI Telecommunications, heading international business development and developing global strategies and partnerships for the S&P 500 firm. He is also a veteran, having served as a US Air Force officer during the first Gulf War.

Schonfeld, based in Burbank, takes over the leadership role of DTDC as Deluxe veteran executive Warren Stein departs at the end of the year. Stein and Schonfeld will work closely during this time to ensure a consistent and smooth transition of all projects, processes and operations.

Schonfeld said, “DTDC is highly regarded throughout the industry and well known for the quality of their work. The organization and its professionals around the world are top notch, and I’m looking forward to being part of the team John has been assembling and the new energy and vision he has brought to Deluxe.”

Schonfeld will guide operations and teams across DTDC facilities worldwide — Los Angeles, London, Toronto, Sydney and Madrid.

Lobo opens NYC animation studio, EP Luis Ribeiro at helm

Lobo, a São Paulo-based design and animation studio, has opened an office in New York, its first US location. Industry veteran Luis Ribeiro has been named partner and executive producer of the New York office, where he will spearhead all of Lobo’s US operations.

Brazil native Ribeiro has a diverse resume that spans 25 years of work in the US. Most recently, Ribeiro was executive producer at Framestore NY, where he oversaw business development for the studio’s four main integrated advertising divisions. Prior to that, he worked as the US consultant for FilmBrazil, was new business developer at Whitehouse Post and VP of the Latin Division for Deluxe Entertainment. He also held MD and VP of biz dev positions at Speedshape, Method Studios, Beast and Co3.

Founded in 1994, by Nando Cohen and Mateus de Paula Santos, Lobo offers a range of media and techniques, including 2D animation, stop motion, 3D, VFX and live action.

Storage Workflows for 4K and Beyond

Technicolor-Postworks and Deluxe Creative Services share their stories.

By Beth Marchant

Once upon a time, an editorial shop was a sneaker-net away from the other islands in the pipeline archipelago. That changed when the last phases of the digital revolution set many traditional editorial facilities into swift expansion mode to include more post production services under one roof.

The consolidating business environment in the post industry of the past several years then brought more of those expanded, overlapping divisions together. That’s a lot for any network to handle, let alone one containing some of the highest quality and most data-dense sound and pictures being created today. The networked storage systems connecting them all must be robust, efficient and realtime without fail, but also capable of expanding and contracting with the fluctuations of client requests, job sizes, acquisitions and, of course, evolving technology.

There’s a “relief valve” in the cloud and object storage, say facility CTOs minding the flow, but it’s still a delicate balance between local pooled and tiered storage and iron-clad cloud-based networks their clients will trust.

Technicolor-Postworks
Joe Beirne, CTO of Technicolor-PostWorks New York, is probably as familiar as one can be with complex nonlinear editorial workflows. A user of Avid’s earliest NLEs, an early adopter of networked editing and an immersive interactive filmmaker who experimented early with bluescreen footage, Beirne began his career as a technical advisor and producer for high-profile mixed-format feature documentaries, including Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 and the last film in Godfrey Reggio’s KOYAANISQATSI trilogy.

Joe Beirne

Joe Beirne

In his 11 years as a technology strategist at Technicolor-PostWorks New York, Beirne has also become fluent in evolving color, DI and audio workflows for clients such as HBO, Lionsgate, Discovery and Amazon Studios. CTO since 2011, when PostWorks NY acquired the East Coast Technicolor facility and the color science that came with it, he now oversees the increasingly complicated ecosystem that moves and stores vast amounts of high-resolution footage and data while simultaneously holding those separate and variously intersecting workflows together.

As the first post facility in New York to handle petabyte levels of editorial-based storage, Technicolor-PostWorks learned early how to manage the data explosion unleashed by digital cameras and NLEs. “That’s not because we had a petabyte SAN or NAS or near-line storage,” explains Beirne. “But we had literally 25 to 30 Avid Unity systems that were all in aggregate at once. We had a lot of storage spread out over the campus of buildings that we ran on the traditional PostWorks editorial side of the business.”

The TV finishing and DI business that developed at PostWorks in 2005, when Beirne joined the company (he was previously a client), eventually necessitated a different route. “As we’ve grown, we’ve expanded out to tiered storage, as everyone is doing, and also to the cloud,” he says. “Like we’ve done with our creative platforms, we have channeled our different storage systems and subsystems to meet specific needs. But they all have a very promiscuous relationship with each other!”

TPW’s high-performance storage in its production network is a combination of local or semi-locally attached near-line storage tethered by several Quantum StorNext SANs, all of it air-gapped — or physically segregated —from the public Internet. “We’ve got multiple SANs in the main Technicolor mothership on Leroy Street with multiple metadata controllers,” says Beirne. “We’ve also got some client-specific storage, so we have a SAN that can be dedicated to a particular account. We did that for a particular client who has very restrictive policies about shared storage.”

TPW’s editorial media, for the most part, resides in Avid’s ISIS system and is in the process of transitioning to its software-defined replacement, Nexis. “We have hundreds of Avids, a few Adobe and even some Final Cut systems connected to that collection of Nexis and ISIS and Unity systems,” he says. “We’re currently testing the Nexis pipeline for our needs but, in general, we’re going to keep using this kind of storage for the foreseeable future. We have multiple storage servers that serve that part of our business.”

Beirne says most every project the facility touches is archived to LTO tape. “We have a little bit of disc-to-tape archiving going on for the same reasons everybody else does,” he adds. “And some SAN volume hot spots that are all SSD (solid state drives) or a hybrid.” The facility is also in the process of improving the bandwidth of its overall switching fabric, both on the Fibre Channel side and on the Ethernet side. “That means we’re moving to 32Gb and multiple 16Gb links,” he says. “We’re also exploring a 40Gb Ethernet backbone.”

Technicolor-Postworks 4K theater at their Leroy Street location.

This backbone, he adds, carries an exponential amount of data every day. “Now we have what are like two nested networks of storage at a lot of the artist workstations,” he explains. “That’s a complicating feature. It’s this big, kind of octopus, actually. Scratch that: it’s like two octopi on top of one another. That’s not even mentioning the baseband LAN network that interweaves this whole thing. They, of course, are now getting intermixed because we are also doing IT-based switching. The entire, complex ecosystem is evolving and everything that interacts with it is evolving right along with it.”

The cloud is providing some relief and handles multiple types of storage workflows across TPW’s various business units. “Different flavors of the commercial cloud, as well as our own private cloud, handle those different pools of storage outside our premises,” Beirne says. “We’re collaborating right now with an international account in another territory and we’re touching their storage envelope through the Azure cloud (Microsoft’s enterprise-grade cloud platform). Our Azure cloud and theirs touch and we push data from that storage back and forth between us. That particular collaboration happened because we both had an Azure instance, and those kinds of server-to-server transactions that occur entirely in the cloud work very well. We also had a relationship with one of the studios in which we made a similar connection through Amazon’s S3 cloud.”

Given the trepidations most studios still have about the cloud, Beirne admits there will always be some initial, instinctive mistrust from both clients and staff when you start moving any content away from computers that are not your own and you don’t control. “What made that first cloud solution work, and this is kind of goofy, is we used Aspera to move the data, even though it was between adjacent racks. But we took advantage of the high-bandwidth backbone to do it efficiently.”

Both TPW in New York and Technicolor in Los Angeles have since leveraged the cloud aggressively. “We our own cloud that we built, and big Technicolor has a very substantial purpose-built cloud, as well as Technicolor Pulse, their new storage-related production service in the cloud. They also use object storage and have some even newer technology that will be launching shortly.”

The caveat to moving any storage-related workflow into the cloud is thorough and continual testing, says Beirne. “Do I have more concern for my clients’ media in the cloud than I do when sending my own tax forms electronically? Yea, I probably do,” he says. “It’s a very, very high threshold that we need to pass. But that said, there’s quite a bit of low-impact support stuff that we can do on the cloud. Review and approval stuff has been happening in the cloud for some time.” As a result, the facility has seen an increase, like everyone else, in virtual client sessions, like live color sessions and live mix sessions from city to city or continent to continent. “To do that, we usually have a closed circuit that we open between two facilities and have calibrated displays on either end. And, we also use PIX and other normal dailies systems.”

“How we process and push this media around ultimately defines our business,” he concludes. “It’s increasingly bigger projects that are made more demanding from a computing point of view. And then spreading that out in a safe and effective way to where people want to access it, that’s the challenge we confront every single day. There’s this enormous tension between the desire to be mobile and open and computing everywhere and anywhere, with these incredibly powerful computer systems we now carry around in our pockets and the bandwidth of the content that we’re making, which is high frame rate, high resolution, high dynamic range and high everything. And with 8K — HDR and stereo wavefront data goes way beyond 8K and what the retina even sees — and 10-bit or more coming in the broadcast chain, it will be more of the same.” TPW is already doing 16-bit processing for all of its film projects and most of its television work. “That’s piles and piles and piles of data that also scales linearly. It’s never going to stop. And we have a VR lab here now, and there’s no end of the data when you start including everything in and outside of the frame. That’s what keeps me up at night.”

Deluxe Creative Services
Before becoming CTO at Deluxe Creative Services, Mike Chiado had a 15-year career as a color engineer and image scientist at Company 3, the grading and finishing powerhouse acquired by Deluxe in 2010. He now manages the pipelines of a commercial, television and film Creative Services division that encompasses not just dailies, editorial and color, but sound, VFX, 3D conversion, virtual reality, interactive design and restoration.

MikeChiado

Mike Chiado

That’s a hugely data-heavy load to begin with, and as VR and 8K projects become more common, managing the data stored and coursing through DCS’ network will get even more demanding. Branded companies currently under the monster Deluxe umbrella include Beast, Company 3, DDP, Deluxe/Culver City, Deluxe VR, Editpool, Efilm, Encore, Flagstaff Studios, Iloura, Level 3, Method Studios, StageOne Sound, Stereo D, and Rushes.

“Actually, that’s nothing when you consider that all the delivery and media teams from Deluxe Delivery and Deluxe Digital Cinema are downstream of Creative Services,” says Chiado. “That’s a much bigger network and storage challenge at that level.” Still, the storage challenges of Chiado’s segment are routinely complicated by the twin monkey wrenches of the collaborative and computer kind that can unhinge any technology-driven art form.

“Each area of the business has its own specific problems that recur: television has its issues, commercial work has its issues and features its issues. For us, commercials and features are more alike than you might think, partly due to the constantly changing visual effects but also due to shifting schedules. Television is much more regimented,” he says. “But sometimes we get hard drives in on a commercial or feature and we think, ‘Well that’s not what we talked about at all!”

Company 3’s file-based digital intermediate work quickly clarified Chiado’s technical priorities. “The thing that we learned early on is realtime playback is just so critical,” he says. “When we did our very first file-based DI job 13 years ago, we were so excited that we could display a certain resolution. OK, it was slipping a little bit from realtime, maybe we’ll get 22 frames a second, or 23, but then the director walked out after five minutes and said, ‘No. This won’t work.’ He couldn’t care less about the resolution because it was only always about realtime and solid playback. Luckily, we learned our lesson pretty quickly and learned it well! In Deluxe Creative Services, that still is the number one priority.”

It’s also helped him cut through unnecessary sales pitches from storage vendors unfamiliar with Deluxe’s business. “When I talk to them, I say, ‘Don’t tell me about bit rates. I’m going to tell you a frame rate I want to hit and a resolution, and you tell me if we can hit it or not with your solution. I don’t want to argue bits; I want tell you this is what I need to do and you’re going to tell me whether or not your storage can do that.’ The storage vendors that we’re going to bank our A-client work on better understand fundamentally what we need.”

Because some of the Deluxe company brands share office space — Method and Company 3 moved into a 63,376-square-foot former warehouse in Santa Monica a few years ago — they have access to the same storage infrastructure. “But there are often volumes specially purpose-built for a particular job,” says Chiado. “In that way, we’ve created volumes focused on supporting 4K feature work and others set up specifically for CG desktop environments that are shared across 400 people in that one building. We also have similar business units in Company 3 and Efilm, so sometimes it makes sense that we would want, for artist or client reasons, to have somebody in a different location from where the data resides. For example, having the artist in Santa Monica and the director and DP in Hollywood is something we do regularly.”

Chiado says Deluxe has designed and built with network solution and storage solution providers a system “that suits our needs. But for the most part, we’re using off-the-shelf products for storage. The magic is how we tune them to be able to work with our systems.”

Those vendors include Quantum, DDN Storage and EMC’s network-attached storage Isilon. “For our most robust needs, like 4K feature workflows, we rely on DDN,” he says. “We’ve actually already done some 8K workflows. Crazy world we live in!” For long-term archiving, each Deluxe Creative Service location worldwide has an LTO-tape robot library. “In some cases, we’ll have a near-line tier two volume that stages it. And for the past few years, we’re using object storage in some locations to help with that.”

Although the entire group of Deluxe divisions and offices are linked by a robust 10GigE network that sometimes takes advantage of dark fiber, unused fiber optic cables leased from larger fiber-optic communications companies, Chiado says the storage they use is all very specific to each business unit. “We’re moving stuff around all the time but projects are pretty much residing in one spot or another,” he says. “Often, there are a thousand reasons why — it may be for tax incentives in a particular location, it may be for project-specific needs. Or it’s just that we’re talking about the London and LA locations.”

With one eye on the future and another on budgets, Chiado says pooled storage has helped DCS keep costs down while managing larger and larger subsets of data-heavy projects. “We are always on the lookout for ways to handle the next thing, like the arrival of 8K workflows, but we’ve gained huge, huge efficiencies from pooled storage,” he says. “So that’s the beauty of what we build, specific to each of our world locations. We move it around if we have to between locations but inside that location, everybody works with the content in one place. That right there was a major efficiency in our workflows.”

Beyond that, he says, how to handle 8K is still an open question. “We may have to make an island, and it’s been testing so far, but we do everything we can to keep it in one place and leverage whatever technology that’s required for the job,” Chiado says. “We have isolated instances of SSDs (solid-state drives) but we don’t have large-scale deployment of SSDs yet. On the other end, we’re working with cloud vendors, too, to be able to maximize our investments.”

Although the company is still working through cloud security issues, Chiado says Deluxe is “actively engaging with cloud vendors because we aren’t convinced that our clients are going to be happy with the security protocols in place right now. The nature of the business is we are regularly involved with our clients and MPAA and have ongoing security audits. We also have a group within Deluxe that helps us maintain the best standards, but each show that comes in may have its own unique security needs. It’s a constant, evolving process. It’s been really difficult to get our heads and our clients’ heads around using the cloud for rendering, transcoding or for storage.”

Luckily, that’s starting to change. “We’re getting good traction now, with a few of the studios getting ready to greenlight cloud use and our own pipeline development to support it,” he adds. “They are hand in hand. But I think once we move over this hurdle, this is going to help the industry tremendously.”

Beyond those longer-term challenges, Chiado says the day-to-day demands of each division haven’t changed much. “Everybody always needs more storage, so we are constantly looking at ways to make that happen,” he says. “The better we can monitor our storage and make our in-house people feel comfortable moving stuff off near-line to tape and bring it back again, the better we can put the storage where we need it. But I’m very optimistic about the future, especially about having a relief valve in the cloud.”

Our main image is the shared 4K theater at Company 3 and Method.

Quick Chat: New president/GM Deluxe TV post services Dom Rom

Domenic Rom, a fixture in the New York post community for 30 years, has been promoted to president and GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services. Rom was most recently managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which incorporates Encore/Company 3/Method. He will now be leading Deluxe’s global services for television, specifically, the Encore and Level 3 branded companies. He will be making the move to Los Angeles.

Rom’s resume is long. He joined DuArt Film Labs in 1984 as a colorist, working his way up to EVP of the company, running both its digital and film lab divisions. In 2000, he joined stock footage/production company Sekani (acquired by Corbis), helping to build the first fully digital content distribution network. In 2002, he founded The Lab at Moving Images, the first motion picture lab to open in in New York in 25 years. It was acquired by PostWorks, which named Rom COO overseeing its Avid rentals, remote set-ups, audio mixing, color correction and editorial businesses. In 2010, Rom joined Technicolor NY as SVP post production. When PostWorks NY acquired Technicolor NY, Rom again became COO of the now-larger company. He joined Deluxe in 2013 as GM of its New York operations.

“I love what I’m seeing today in the industry,” he says. “It has been said many times, but we’re truly in a golden age of television. The best entertainment in the world is coming from the networks and a whole new generation of original content creators. It’s exciting to be in a position to service that work. There are few, if any, companies that have invested in the research, technology and talent to the degree Deluxe has, to help clients take advantage of the latest advancements — whether it’s HDR, 4K, or whatever comes next, to create amazing new experiences for viewers.”

postPerspective reached out to Rom, as he was making his transition to the West Coast, to find out more about his new role and his move.

What does this position mean to you?
This position is the biggest honor and challenge of my career. I have always considered Encore and Level 3 to be the premier television facilities in the world, and to be responsible for them is amazing and daunting all at the same time. I am so looking forward to working with the facilities in Vancouver, Toronto, New York and London.

What do you expect/hope to accomplish in this new role?
To bring our worldwide teams even closer and grow the client relationships even stronger than they already are, because at the end of the day this is a total relationship business and probably my favorite part of the job.

How have you seen post and television change over the years?
I was talking about this with the staff out here the other day. I have seen the business go from film to 2-inch tape to 1-inch to D2 to D5 to HDCAM (more formats than I can remember) to nonlinear editing and digital acquisition — I could go on and on. Right now the quality and sheer amount of content coming from the studios, networks, cablenets and many, many new creators is both exciting and challenging. The fact that this business is constantly changing helps to keep me young.

How is today’s production and post technology helping make TV an even better experience for audiences?
In New York we just completed the first Dolby Vision project for an entire episodic television season (which I can’t name yet), and it looks beautiful. HDR opens up a whole new visual world to the artists and the audience.

Are you looking forward to living in Los Angeles?
I have always danced with the idea of living in LA throughout my career, and to do so this far in is interesting timing. My family and, most importantly, my brand new grandson are all on the east coast so I will maintain my roots there while spreading them out west as well.

Rushes promotes Simona Cristea to head of creative color

After three years working as a senior colorist at Deluxe’s Rushes in London, Simona Cristea has been upped to head of creative color. She started her career at Abis Studios in Bucharest, her native country, and moved to London in 2005 where she has worked at Prime Focus, Technicolor, Reliance MediaWorks and Smoke & Mirrors. During her career Cristea, has worked on hundreds of major international campaigns, with directors such as Mert & Marcus, Sam Taylor-Wood, Trevor Robinson, Nick Knight and Rankin.

“Simona is my go-to colorist,” says Rankin. “With her wonderful personality and innate ability to enhance my work, her meticulous attention to detail makes her an integral part of my post production process. Simona is incredibly talented and hard working at creating beautiful cinematic looks each time. Her outstanding eye for color is evidenced by her body of work.”

Nike

Nike

Cristea — who uses Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve with Dolby monitors — has recently worked on campaigns for Nike, Gillette, Geox, Armani and Honda.  She is part of a color team that includes Marty McMullan and Denny Cooper.

Matt Breitenbach to lead digital conform at Post Factory NY

Post Factory NY has hired post vet Matt Breitenbach as director of digital conform. In his new role, he will oversee the finishing process for feature films, a growing part of Post Factory’s business.

Breitenbach comes from Deluxe, where he was senior DI editor. His credits there included The Wolf of Wall Street, Rosewater, Run All Night, Kill the Messenger and the hit CBS crime drama Blue Bloods. He joined Deluxe in 2009, where he worked as a telecine assistant, DI/finishing assistant and DI editor before being promoted to senior DI editor last year. His background also includes four years as a new media producer and technical operator at Nice Shoes, New York.

“Many clients find digital post production to be overly complex,” says Breitenbach. “We want to simplify the process for them and make it as easy as possible to finish and deliver their projects.”

The A-List: Director Cary Fukunaga on posting ‘Beasts of No Nation’

By Iain Blair

Writer/director/camera operator/cinematographer Cary Fukunaga has literally been one of the hottest — and coldest — directors in the business, thanks to making shorts, docs and movies everywhere from the Arctic Circle to Haiti and East Africa.

Now he’s hot again, in every sense of the word, having written/directed/produced and shot the harrowing new war drama Beasts of No Nation, set in the sweltering lands of West Africa, and shot in Ghana. It tells the story of Agu (Abraham Attah), a young villager, whose happy family life and childhood are shattered when army troops from the capital city arrive to squelch a rebellion against the country’s corrupt regime.

After seeing his father and brother killed, he escapes to the forest where he’s discovered by a company of young rebels led by the charismatic Commandant (Idris Elba). There, he undergoes a gauntlet of harsh treatment, initiation rituals and fiery speeches from the Commandant, and as the ragtag army sets off on a series of battles, Agu is eventually promoted from ammo carrier to rifle-toting soldier, gaining respect but losing his innocence as he’s turned into a killing machine. The film is available exclusively on Netflix.

Writer Iain Blair and filmmaker Cary Fukunaga.

Writer Iain Blair and filmmaker Cary Fukunaga.

I spoke with Fukunaga — whose credits include his acclaimed feature-writing and directing debut Sin Nombre, Jayne Eyre and the first season of HBO’s crime drama True Detective (for which he won the Emmy for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series) — about making the film, post and his respect for film sound.

Did you have a vision for how this film would look?
Yes, and it’s the film I wrote (laughs), but I don’t really visualize my films ahead of time. I’m not even sure about the music, so I start off definitely from a writing perspective and when scouting locations I start getting visual ideas. Obviously, I do have some visual ideas in my head or I couldn’t write it, but it’s such a work in progress… every step of the way. It was such a hard, brutal shoot — the hardest I’ve ever done, anywhere, and I’ve shot in some very difficult places around the world.

So post must have been a very calm respite after the grueling locations of West Africa?
I like post. It’s where you really make and finish the film, but I’m so used to being very hands-on in all the other production departments — writing, directing, camera operating and so on — that by the time I get to post, it feels very strange to be relegated to the role of almost an observer. And the rhythm is always fits and starts. You get in there and it seems like nothing’s happening for weeks, and then finally you make some progress, and then that all repeats. So post is definitely not my favorite part of the whole process, just because of the sheer time it all takes and how much I’m not hands-on anymore.

Beasts of No Nation DSC_4260.jpg

How did it work in the editing room with two editors —Mikkel E.G. Nielsen (A Royal Affair) and Pete Beaudreau (All Is Lost, The Gambler)?
Originally, a third editor, Elliot Graham (Steve Jobs, Milk) was on the shoot with us, but he hurt his back and had to drop out. We had roughly 75 hours of raw footage from Ghana, so Mikkel took over and had to completely learn all that footage again and then started re-cutting and re-assembling the film a couple of months after we wrapped. That was at Outpost Digital in New York. Then after five months on it, he had to leave for another job, so Pete took over — and we thought it would just be clean up by that point, but he ended up working on it for another five months. If you think of Mikkel’s work as hammering out the shape of the sword, Pete put on the fine edge to every scene.

So post was pretty long?
Yes, we did it all at Outpost. We were there almost a year, and we started on post while we were shooting in Ghana. Our associate editor, Victoria Lesiw, started off as an assistant editor in Ghana and was there all the way through and completely invested, from production to the very last days of post. We lost people along the way, so post wasn’t at all easy; people had to bow out because of previous commitments. We lost our original sound designer just weeks before we started our mix, and we had to completely redo it all in a very short time — just five weeks, which wasn’t really enough for the film — but we were able to create something out of nothing.

Although the film feels like cinéma vérité, obviously you used VFX, especially in all the battles scenes. How many visual effects shots are there?
Quite a few. There was a lot of clean up, and a lot of artifacts of war — bullet hits on walls, blood squibs — which we didn’t have time to do as usual physical effects, as well as muzzle flashes and augmenting explosions and so on. Then we had the big infra-red sequence. I’d written the screenplay back in 2006, and I loved the infrared sequence Oliver Stone and Rodrigo Prieto had done in Alexander, so I always wanted to do it. I wanted to shoot some infrared in True Detective, but we just couldn’t find the film stock — we just did it as a VFX sequence for this. Siren Lab did most of them,  but The Artery also did some shots.Beasts of No Nation

Sound and music both play a huge role in this, right?
I actually think they’re more important than the visuals. I had this great video class teacher in high school, who said, “People will forgive bad visuals, but they’ll never forgive bad sound,” and that’s so true. If there’s something wrong with the sound, it can be the most grating part of watching any kind of media, but if you do it right you can really elevate the storytelling. Look at what Walter Murch did…  and Orson Welles, who came from radio. They really understood how much sound can tell a story, and have been a big influence for me. So when I do sound design, sometimes I’ll do entire sequences where that’s driving the entire story. We did all the mixing at Harbor Picture Company in New York. (The mix crew at Harbor included supervising sound editor Glenfield Payne, re-recording Mixer Martin Czembor, assistant sound re-recording mixer Josh Berger and re-recording mix technician Ian Gaffney Rosenfeld. The film was mixed using a Euphonix S5 Fusion console. The Euphonix was controlling 2 Pro Tools systems running Pro Tools 11.)

Where was the DI?
At Deluxe in New York with Steve Bodner (who uses DaVinci Resolve), the same colorist I used on True Detective. He’s the guy I go to for anything. We did some looks before I left, but more than anything we just get in the room and figure it all out. I love the DI, and by that stage I feel much more hands-on. We did a lot of work because the whole issue with digital is that you spend so much time trying to get back to a film look. So you sit there, massaging and massaging it, trying to get the color space right, and every film stock’s different.

Cary Fukunago shooting with the Arri Alexa.

Cary Fukunago shooting with the Arri Alexa.

I really love old photo journalism reversal stock. If I could have shot Sin Nombre on Kodachrome I would have — and part of that is the unforgiving nature of reversal stock. There’s no reciprocity there. Now, six, seven years later, shooting with the Arri Alexa, I was again looking how to approximate that slightly under-exposed reversal look for this film. I found that by shooting one stop under —and bringing in a lot of cyans and the blacks, but keeping the saturation up, and then figuring out how to make all the greens, yellows and browns really pop — it gave me the look I wanted.

There’s a lot of talk that you’ll do another TV project, a miniseries based on Caleb Carr’s novel The Alienist. So what’s next?
I’m definitely involved with The Alienist, but I may do something else before then. It depends on the timing.

Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors and artists in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Behind the Title: Efilm senior colorist Tim Stipan

NAME: Tim Stipan (@timstipan)

COMPANYEfilm (@EFILMDigitalLab)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE EFILM?
Efilm, a Deluxe company, is a feature film finishing house. We are a sister facility to Company 3, and that allows me access to a great wealth of knowledge. When I recently did something in UHD for the first time, I was able to call up CO3 senior colorist Stephen Nakamura, who is one of the few in the world who has experience in UHD, and ask him how he set everything up.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The technical component involves working at a color correction console in a theater with the filmmakers. I make adjustments to the overall color palette. We do it to refine the look and give the movie a certain feeling with color. I take shots that were captured at different times, under different conditions — sometimes with different cameras — and match them with color and contrast.

That’s the coloring aspect of the job, but that’s really only half of it. The other part is being able to read minds, in a sense. If a cinematographer or director says, “I’m not sure what I don’t like about this,” then I need to think about their taste and personality and what they’ve liked and disliked previously, try to come up with a solution and then perform it quickly as possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think some people might be surprised by how many hours we spend in the room. Color correction takes time. We will color the movie once, usually in about five days, and then spend another five days refining “the look.” On big VFX shows it can take twice that time.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?

I had worked on [Autodesk] Lustre for over 10 years. Now I working with the FilmLight Baselight and I’m also getting my feet wet with the Blackmagic Resolve. They all essentially do the same thing — they let you adjust the color, contrast and saturation and all of the things that affect the look of the image. Some are more flexible in terms of how they work with different file formats and resolutions than others, but knowing them all is a good way to stay on top of the technology.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
The role of the final colorist means you are usually involved in the project before principal photography begins. This includes working with the cinematographer on picking lenses, exposures, lighting units, filters, wardrobes, wall colors, makeup, look up tables and much more. It’s good to test as much as possible before principal photography so if you have to push the image in exposure or color you know how the elements will react.




WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?

I feel I’m helping to create something that might be around in 50 or 100 years, which is cool. My favorite part of the job though is working with such talented and creative people.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?

My 100 percent least favorite thing is not working. It can be grueling putting in 18-hour days, but I would take that over not working any day of the week!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunch! That’s when I have the opportunity to get to know the people I am working with better. You get to digress, talk and just be human. The more I know my client the better I am at reading their mind, which makes the color correction process smoother and faster.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
If I wasn’t a colorist I would like to be a director. When I went to film school at Columbia College in Chicago, I thought I was going to be an actor, but I wanted to learn every role in the filmmaking process. Eventually I gravitated to the camera department and received a degree in cinematography.

However, the most exhilarating thing I ever did in film school was when I directed my thesis film. You’re dealing with script, locations, actors, cinematographer, grips everybody. If I wasn’t a colorist, that’s what I’d want to be doing today.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE COLOR GRADING?
During college I was working as a camera assistant and crane operator on a Stage. This led to getting hired a lot as a grip for commercials and short films. Working on set was fun, but I was thinking about having a family and freelancing scared the hell out of me. My adviser suggested I visit Filmworkers Club in Chicago. I went in, started learning about color grading and fell in love with it.



CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?

I just finished Me Earl and the Dying Girl, which won best film at Sundance. I also completed a film called The Family Fang, directed by the actor Jason Bateman and shot by my friend Ken Seng, who I went to film school with. It was. It’s a great film and shot with multiple capture formats. Next is Creed, which will get everyone’s blood pumping!




WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I like to look at old photographic books. Not any photographer in particular. A lot of people you’ve never heard of. I’m also fascinated by old printing processes, like autochrome, or by the look of a Polaroid when someone ripped it apart too quickly. I love to watch movies, commercials and TV shows, too. A lot of TV today is as cinematic as movies are.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.

GPS. How did we get anywhere before? My color corrector and projector. I’m not married to any particular brand as long as they do what I need them to do. But the color corrector and projector have to be running perfectly or I can’t do my work. I’m very fortunate that Deluxe has an incredible technical and support staff, and state of the art equipment.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?

Facebook and Instagram, and occasionally Twitter. But I like Facebook the best. There are so many videos on there. I am friends with a lot of cinematographers, and they post great images and interesting articles. If you follow Chivo [Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC] on Instagram (@chivexp) — it’s jaw-dropping the things he’s producing. It’s also a great way to keep in touch with DPs who are working on location.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL? 
I ride a motorcycle daily, and it prepares me mentally and physically for my job. I am an avid runner, which helps combat sitting in a chair for long periods of time. Reading is a great way to zone off into another world and forget about any stress, but the best thing in life is spending time with my family!

Deluxe and Technicolor launch d-cinema joint venture 

Deluxe and Technicolor have entered into a binding agreement to create a new digital cinema joint venture, Deluxe Technicolor Digital Cinema, which will specialize in theatrical digital cinema mastering, distribution, and key management services.

Deluxe Technicolor Digital Cinema will bring together best-in-class technologies, personnel, work processes, and facilities to provide seamless digital cinema services to customers globally. The new business will be managed by Deluxe and based in Burbank. All other lines of business will continue to operate independently of one another.

This joint venture is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close in the second quarter of 2015.