Tag Archives: Daniel Restuccio

Lost in Time game show embraces ‘Interactive Mixed Reality’

By Daniel Restuccio

The Future Group — who has partnered with Fremantle Media, Ross Video and Epic Games — have created a new super-agile entertainment platform that blends linear television and game technology into a hybrid format called “Interactive Mixed Reality.”

The brainchild of Bård Anders Kasin, this innovative content deployment medium generated a storm of industry buzz at NAB 2016, and their first production Lost in Time — a weekly primetime game show — is scheduled to air this month on Norwegian television.

The Idea
The idea originated more than 13 years ago in Los Angeles. In 2003, at age 22, Kasin, a self-taught multimedia artist from Notodden, Norway, sent his CV and a bunch of media projects to Warner Bros. in Burbank, California, in hopes of working on The Matrix. They liked it. His interview was on a Wednesday and by Friday he had a job as a technical director.

Kasin immersed himself in the cutting-edge movie revolution that was The Matrix franchise. The Wachowskis visionary production was a masterful inspiration and featured a compelling sci-fi action story, Oscar-winning editing, breakthrough visual effects (“bullet-time”) and an expanded media universe that included video games and an animè-style short The Animatrix. The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions were shot at the same time, as well as more than an hour of footage specifically designed for the video game. The Matrix Online, an Internet gaming platform, was a direct sequel to The Matrix Revolutions.

L-R: Bård Anders Kasin and Jens Petter Høili.

Fast forward to 2013 and Kasin has connected with software engineer and serial entrepreneur Jens Petter Høili, founder of EasyPark and Fairchance. “There was this producer I knew in Norway,” explains Kasin, “who runs this thing called the Artists’ Gala charity. He called and said, ‘There’s this guy you should meet. I think you’ll really hit it off.’” Kasin met Høili had lunch and discussed projects they each were working on. “We both immediately felt there was a connection,” recalls Kasin. No persuading was necessary. “We thought that if we combined forces we were going to get something that’s truly amazing.”

That meeting of the minds led to the merging of their companies and the formation of The Future Group. The mandate of Oslo-based The Future Group is to revolutionize the television medium by combining linear TV production with cutting-edge visual effects, interactive gameplay, home viewer participation and e-commerce. Their IMR concept ditches the individual limiting virtual reality (VR) headset, but conceptually keeps the idea of creating content that is a multi-level, intricate and immersive experience.

Lost in Time
Fast forward again, this time to 2014. Through another mutual friend, The Future Group formed an alliance with Fremantle Media. Fremantle, a global media company, has produced some of the highest-rated and longest-running shows in the world, and is responsible for top international entertainment brands such as Got Talent, Idol and The X Factor.

Kasin started developing the first IMR prototype. At this point, the Lost in Time production had expanded to include Ross Video and Epic Games. Ross Video is a broadcast technology innovator and Epic Games is a video game producer and the inventor of the Unreal game engine. The Future Group, in collaboration with Ross Video, engineered the production technology and developed a broadcast-compatible version of the Unreal game engine called Frontier, shown at NAB 2016, to generate high-resolution, realtime graphics used in the production.

On January 15, 2015 the first prototype was shown. When Freemantle saw the prototype, they were amazed. They went directly to stage two, moving to the larger stages at Dagslys Studios. “Lost in Time has been the driver for the technology,” explains Kasin. “We’re a very content-driven company. We’ve used that content to drive the development of the platform and the technology, because there’s nothing better than having actual content to set the requirements for the technology rather than building technology for general purposes.”

In Lost in Time, three studio contestants are set loose on a greenscreen stage and perform timed, physical game challenges. The audience, which could be watching at home or on a mobile device, sees the contestant seamlessly blended into a virtual environment built out of realtime computer graphics. The environments are themed as western, ice age, medieval times and Jurassic period sets (among others) with interactive real props.

The audience can watch the contestants play the game or participate in the contest as players on their mobile device at home, riding the train or literally anywhere. They can play along or against contestants, performing customized versions of the scripted challenges in the TV show. The mobile content uses graphics generated from the same Unreal engine that created the television version.

“It’s a platform,” reports partner Høili, referring to the technology behind Lost in Time. A business model is a way you make money, notes tech blogger Jonathan Clarks, and a platform is something that generates business models. So while Lost in Time is a specific game show with specific rules, built on television technology, it’s really a business technology framework where multiple kinds of interactive content could be generated. Lost in Time is like the Unreal engine itself, software that can be used to create games, VR experiences and more, limited only by the imagination of the content creator. What The Future Group has done is create a high-tech kitchen from which any kind of cuisine can be cooked up.

Soundstages and Gear
Lost in Time is produced on two greenscreen soundstages at Dagslys Studios in Oslo. The main “gameplay set” takes up all of Studio 1 (5,393 square feet) and the “base station set” is on Studio 3 (1,345 square feet). Over 150 liters (40 gallons) of ProCyc greenscreen paint was used to cover both studios.

Ross Video, in collaboration with The Future Group, devised an integrated technology of hardware and software that supports the Lost in Time production platform. This platform consists of custom cameras, lenses, tracking, control, delay, chroma key, rendering, greenscreen, lighting and switcher technology. This system includes the new Frontier hardware, introduced at NAB 2016, which runs the Unreal game engine 3D graphics software.

Eight Sony HDC-2500 cameras running HZC-UG444 software are used for the production. Five are deployed on the “gameplay set.” One camera rides on a technocrane, two are on manual pedestal dollies and one is on Steadicam. For fast-action tracking shots, another camera sits on the Furio RC dolly that rides on a straight track that runs the 90-foot length of the studio. The Furio RC pedestal, controlled by SmartShell, guarantees smooth movement in virtual environments and uses absolute encoders on all axes to send complete 3D tracking data into the Unreal engine.

There is also one Sony HDC-P1 camera that is used as a static, center stage, ceiling cam flying 30 feet above the gameplay set. There are three cameras in the home base set, two on Furio Robo dollies and one on a technocrane. In the gameplay set, all cameras (except the ceiling cam) are tracked with the SolidTrack IR markerless tracking system.

All filming is done at 1080p25 and output RGB 444 via SDI. They use a custom LUT on the cameras to avoid clipping and an expanded dynamic range for post work. All nine camera ISOs, separate camera “clean feeds,” are recorded with a “flat” LUT in RGB 444. For all other video streams, including keying and compositing, they use LUT boxes to invert the signal back to Rec 709.

Barnfind provided the fiber optic network infrastructure that links all the systems. Ross Video Dashboard controls the BarnOne frames as well as the router, Carbonite switchers, Frontier graphics system and robotic cameras.

A genlock signal distributed via OpenGear syncs all the gear to a master clock. The Future Group added proprietary code to Unreal so the render engine can genlock, receive and record linear timecode (LTC) and output video via SDI in all industry standard formats. They also added additional functionality to the Unreal engine to control lights via DMX, send and receive GPI signals, communicate with custom sensors, buttons, switches and wheels used for interaction with the games and controlling motion simulation equipment.

In order for the “virtual cameras” in the graphics systems and the real cameras viewing the real elements to have the exact same perspectives, an “encoded” camera lens is required that provides the lens focal length (zoom) and focus data. In addition the virtual lens field of view (FOV) must be properly calibrated to match the FOV of the real lens. Full servo digital lenses with 16-bit encoders are needed for virtual productions. Lost in Time uses three Canon lenses with these specifications: Canon Hj14ex4.3B-IASE, Canon Hj22ex7.6B-IASE-A and Canon Kj17ex7.7B-IASE-A.

The Lost in Time camera feeds are routed to the Carbonite family hardware: Ultrachrome HR, Carbonite production frame and Carbonite production switcher. Carbonite Ultrachrome HR is a stand-alone multichannel chroma key processor based on the Carbonite Black processing engine. On Lost in Time, the Ultrachrome switcher accepts the Sony camera RGB 444 signal and uses high-resolution chroma keyers, each with full control of delay management, fill color temperature for scene matching, foreground key and fill, and internal storage for animated graphics.

Isolated feeds of all nine cameras are recorded, plus two quad-splits with the composited material and the program feed. Metus Ingest, a The Future Group proprietary hardware solution, was used for all video recording. Metus Ingest can simultaneously capture and record  up to six HD channels of video and audio from multiple devices on a single platform.

Post Production
While the system is capable of being broadcast live, they decided not to go live for the debut. Instead they are only doing a modest amount of post to retain the live feel. That said, the potential of the post workflow on Lost in Time arguably sets a whole new post paradigm. “Post allows us to continue to develop the virtual worlds for a longer amount of time,” says Kasin. “This gives us more flexibility in terms of storytelling. We’re always trying to push the boundaries with the creative content. How we tell the story of the different challenges.”

All camera metadata, including position, rotation, lens data, etc., and all game interaction, were recorded in the Unreal engine with a proprietary system. This allowed graphics playback as a recorded session later. This also let the editors change any part of the graphics non-destructively. They could choose to replace 3D models or textures or in post change the tracking or point-of-view of any of the virtual cameras as well as add cameras for more virtual “coverage.”

Lost in Time episodes were edited as a multicam project, based on the program feed, in Adobe Premiere CC. They have a multi-terabyte storage solution from Pixit Media running Tiger Technology’s workflow manager. “The EDL from the final edit is fed through a custom system, which then builds a timeline in Unreal to output EXR sequences for a final composite.”

That’s it for now, but be sure to visit this space again to see part two of our coverage on The Future Group’s Lost in Time. Our next story will include the real and virtual lighting systems, the SolidTrack IR tracking system, the backend component, and interview with Epic Games’ Kim Libreri about Unreal engine development/integration and a Lost in Time episode editor.


Daniel Restuccio, who traveled to Oslo for this piece, is a writer, producer and teacher. He is currently multimedia department chairperson at California Lutheran in Thousand Oaks.

Fantastic Beasts VFX workflow employs previs and postvis

By Daniel Restuccio

Warner Bros’ Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is considered by some a Harry Potter prequel and by others an entirely new J.K. Rowling franchise. Filled with nearly 1,500 VFX shots, this live-action, CG and character-driven movie put a huge emphasis on pre-pro and established the increased role of postvis in the film’s visual effects post pipeline.

For the film’s overall visual effects supervisors, Tim Burke and Christian Manz, it was a family reunion of sorts, reteaming with many of the companies and individuals that worked on the Harry Potter movies, including director David Yates and producers David Heyman, Steve Kloves, J.K. Rowling and Lionel Wigram.

According to Manz, one of the most significant aspects of this film was how visual effects were integrated into the story from the very beginning. The direction from Yates was very clear: “Make things fantastic, but not fantasy.” For every creature design presented, Yates would ask, “What would be the story behind that creature? What would that character do if the audience saw it from one moment to the next?” Says Manz, “It all had to work to support the story, but not be the story.”

Manz feels that this movie speaks to a new way of storytelling with VFX. “Visual effects is now a part of that filmmaking and storytelling team rather than being the guys who stick in everything afterwards.”

Starting in January 2015, while Burke was busy as VFX supervisor on The Legend of Tarzan, Manz worked with Framestore animation director Pablo Grillo, a Framestore art and animation team and a group of freelance concept and previs artists doing creature development and scene design. Over eight months of design sessions they created 18 main animal types based on hundreds of variations, and worked with the Framestore art department to conceive the turn-of-the-century New York City sets and set extensions.

“Of course, there were creatures we tested that didn’t make the film,” says Framestore animator Andras Ormos, “but it was about the process of whittling it down, and that was the real joy of working on this project. The creative input stretched beyond the post production stage, deciding what worked and what wouldn’t in the overall film.”

“J.K. Rowling’s wonderful script was filled with characters and creatures,” explains Grillo. “Having seen how animation is such a big part of the process in a film like this, we decided that it was important to be involved from the concept stage onwards.” The character development and scene work sessions were so impressive they actually influenced subsequent drafts of the script.

Burke came on full-time in June 2015, and they split the movie in half. Manz took the lead developing the world inside Newt’s magical case, and Burke did the “Obscurus” and the third act. Principal photography took place from August 2015 to January 2016, and they took turns on set supervising their own and each other’s VFX sequences.

With Framestore and Double Negative taking the lead, the shots were spread out among nine main VFX and three previs/postvis companies including: Cinesite, Image Engine, Method Studios, Milk Visual Effects, Moving Picture Company, Nvizible, Proof, Rodeo FX, Secret Lab, The Third Floor and others. Burke says they divided the work by “the strengths of the companies and without overlapping them too much.”

Framestore
Framestore took on the majority of the complex character animation: the Niffler, Gnarlack, the Erumpent and Picket Bowtruckle, as well as many goblins and elves. Grillo first tackled Niffler, described by Rowling as “a long-snouted, burrowing creature native to Britain with a penchant for anything shiny.” The creature design was a mash-up of a spiny anteater, platypus and mole and went through hundreds of iterations and many animated prototypes. Framestore used the skin and muscle rigging toolkit Flesh and Flex developed for Tarzan on Niffler’s magic “loot stuffing” pouch.

Framestore

Framestore

The reason the audience is so delighted when this character first appears, explains Ormos, is that “this scene is driven by the relationship between Newt and the Niffler. There was a history we had to get across — the fact that the Niffler was notorious for escaping and pick-pocketing, and that Newt was going through the motions in trying to catch him. They understood each other and there were little looks, a language in their movement.”

Gnarlack, an American, cigar-chewing, snarky goblin, voiced and facial mocaped by actor Ron Perlman, “is one of the best digital humanoids yet,” reports Grillo. Perlman donned a Vicon Cara 3D facial motion capture headset, surrounded by four high-resolution, high-speed witness cameras. According to Framestore VFX supervisor Andy Kind, Perlman also sat in front of 98 cameras for a facial action coding shape (FACS) session so the team could sculpt the face directly in 3D.

“We created CG characters for the giants, elves and band ensemble,” says Kind. “Then we gave them crazy instruments, including a sousaphone/trumpet concoction.”

A 17-foot carbon fiber puppet, built by Handspring Puppet, substituted for the amorous rhinoceros Erumpent during the Central Park chase scene. It was switched out with the CG version later and dynamic simulations of shattering ice, explosive snow and water effects were added to the concluding shots. There’s this liquid, light-filled sack on the Erumpent’s forehead that Manz says, “made her slightly more unusual than a normal creature.”

“There was an awful lot of digital environment as well as the beast itself,” continues Manz. “David Yates fell in love with the postvis for this scene. It was great to be able to play with shots and offer up suggestions for the edit. It was a very organic way of filmmaking.”

Newt’s pocket-hiding creature sidekick, Picket Bowtruckle, took two months and 200 versions to get right. “We were told that Picket moved too slowly at first and that he appeared too old. We played with the speed but kept his movements graceful,” explains Manz. “He didn’t really have any facial animation, but he does blow a raspberry at one point. In the end, we added more shots to get Pickett’s story to go through, as everyone just loved him.”

MPC
The Moving Picture Company (MPC) completed more than 220 shots and created the Demiguise, Occamy and Billiwig, as well as 3D set extensions of period Manhattan.

For Demiguise’s long, flowing hair and invisibility effect, MPC used their Furtility groom technology. According to MPC VFX supervisor Ferran Domenech, using Furtility “allows for the hair to move naturally and interact with the creature’s arms, legs and the environment around it.” Demiguise was animated using enhanced mocap with keyframed facial expressions.

MPC

MPC built the large feathered dragon-snake Occamy in sections to fill the real and CG extended attic. They used Furtility once more, this time to add feathers, and they augmented the code so that in the climatic fight scene they could scale the giant version of the creature down to mouse-size. MPC’s effects team then used its in-house Kali destruction technology to wreck the attic.

Finally, MPC worked on the Billiwig, a magical bug that can change its flight mode from dragonfly to propeller plane. “This little creature has lots of character and was great fun to bring to life,” reports Domenech.

Previs and Postvis
A major technical advance for Fantastic Beasts can be found in the workflow. It’s been 15 years since the first Harry Potter movie and five years since Deathly Hallows. Over that time Burke had designed a very efficient, streamlined, mostly film-based VFX workflow.

“In the past, we were always stuck at the point where when we shot the film, it was put into editorial, they cut it and then gave it back to us — quite often with big holes where creatures would exist or environments needed to be placed,” describes Burke. “Then we would have to involve the facilities to use their real power to push things through and start blocking out all of the characters. This took quite a bit of time and would always slow the process down, and time is really the key difference with everything we do these days.”

In the past, says Burke, he might wait two months to see an early block of an animated character, “which always then restricts what you can do at the back end or restricts the director’s ability to make creative changes.”

Thankfully this wasn’t the case with Fantastic Beasts. “In the middle of the shoot, Christian and I started supervising the postvis of the scenes we’d already shot,” he explains. They assembled a 50-artist in-house postvis team comprised of members of The Third Floor, Proof and Framestore. While some of the movie was prevised, all of the movie was postvised.

“The path from previs to postvis varied from sequence to sequence,” explains Peter McDonald, previs/postvis supervisor for The Third Floor, London. “At one end of the scale, we had sequences that never really survived through shooting, while at the other end we had sequences that were followed shot-for-shot during the shoot and subsequent editorial process.”

Third Floor

Third Floor postvis

“As an example,” he continues, “the Demiguise and Occamy scene in the department store attic was heavily prevised. The final previs was a pretty polished and spectacular piece in its own right with some relatively sophisticated animation and a highly refined edit. This previs edit was taken onto the stage, with printouts of the shots being referenced as the shoot day progressed. What later came back our way for postvis was very similar to what had been designed in the previs, which was very satisfying from our point of view. It’s nice to know that previs can help drive a production at this level of fidelity!”

One of the benefits of this process was having a movie during editorial that had no “holes” where VFX shots were to later appear. The “postvis” was so good that it was used during audience screenings before the VFX shots were actually built and rendered.

“There were a couple of factors that elevated the postvis,” says McDonald. “Probably the primary one was integration between Framestore’s team with our team at The Third Floor London. Having them present and being supervised by Pablo Grillo guaranteed that the work we were putting together was being judged from almost a “finals” point of view, as Pablo and his artists would also be the ones finishing the job in post. It meant that our postvis wasn’t a throw away — it was the first step in the post production pipeline. This philosophy was present beyond the personnel involved. We also had creature rigs that could be translated with their animation down the line.”

Subway rampage previs

Third Floor’s previs of subway rampage.

One example of a scene that followed through from previs to postvis were parts of the Obscurus rampage in the subway. “Pablo and I worked very closely with artists at both Framestore and The Third Floor on this ‘sequence within a sequence,” says McDonald. “We started with bifrost fluid simulations created in Maya by our own senior asset builder Chris Dawson. We then had our animators distort these simulations into the virtual subway set. Through iteration, we developed the choreography of the piece and further refined the overall rhythm and shape of the piece with our previs editor. This previs then became the template for what was shot on the actual set with Eddie Redmayne and Colin Farrell in the roles of Newt and Graves. When the plate edit returned to us for postvis, we were pretty much able to drop the same distorted simulations onto the plates. The camera angles and cutting pattern in the previs edit had been followed very closely by the live-action unit. We then animated a layer of environment destruction and comped it into the shots to help tie it all together.”

During postvis, says Manz, “A character could go into a shot within a day or two. You would track the shot plate, put the character in, light it and stick it back into editorial. That sort of turn around, that in-house work that we did was the big, big difference with how the film worked. It allowed us to feed all that stuff to David Yates.”

Yates showed his director’s cut to the studio with every single shot of the film blocked out. There were no empty spaces. “We even got the environments in so he had a representation of every street,” says Manz. They completed a three-hour assembly of the film in about five months.

Creatively, it was very liberating, which enabled them to do additional shoots just to enhance the movie. Burke says they were designing and changing shots right up to the end. The final reveal of Jonny Depp as dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald came together all at the last minute.

Fantastic Beasts is like a Harry Potter movie because it exists in the J.K. Rowling story universe and is part of the Harry Potter lore. “Where it’s similar to Potter in terms of the filmmaking,” says Manz, “ is in making it feel very real and not fantasy. What I always enjoyed about the Potter films was they really felt like they were set in a real version of the UK; you could almost believe that magical sort of school existed.”

Third Floor previs

How Fantastic Beasts is different, says Burke, is that it is set in turn-of-the-century New York City, a real city, and not the magical school environment of Hogwarts. “We were dealing with adults,” continues Burke, “we’re not talking about a child growing and running everything through a child’s life. We’re talking about a series of adults. In that sense, it felt when we were making it like were making a film for adults, which obviously has great appeal to children as well. But I do feel it’s more of a film for grown-ups in terms of its storyline, and the issues it’s challenging and discussing.”

Someone told Manz that somebody “felt like Fantastic Beasts was made for the audience that read the books and watched those films and has now grown up.”

IMDB lists four new Fantastic Beasts movies in development. Burke and Manz are already in pre-production on the second, penciled in for a November 16, 2018 release date. “I think it’s fair to say,” says Burke, “that we’ll obviously be trying to expand on the universe that we’ve started to create. Newt will be there with his animals and various other characters, which are going to bring a lot more interest as the story evolves.”

Manz predicts, “It’s just trying to push the believability of the interactions and that world even further. The first film was all about creating that new world, and now it’s out there. It will be a new city (Paris) so we’ll have that challenge again, but we’ll build on what we’ve learned. You don’t often get an opportunity to work with the same team of people, so that’s going to be the great for the second one.”

 

 

Blending Ursa Mini and Red footage for Aston Martin spec spot

By Daniel Restuccio

When producer/director Jacob Steagall set out to make a spec commercial for Aston Martin, he chose to lens it on the Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4.6k and the Scarlet Red. He says the camera combo worked so seamlessly he dares anyone to tell which shots are Blackmagic and which are Red.

L-R Blackmagic’s Moritz Fortmann and Shawn Carlson with Jacob Steagall and Scott Stevens.

“I had the idea of filming a spec commercial to generate new business,” says Steagall. He convinced the high-end car maker to lend him an Aston Martin 2016 V12 Vanquish for a weekend. “The intent was to make a nice product that could be on their website and also be a good-looking piece on the demo reel for my production company.”

Steagall immediately pulled together his production team, which consisted of co-director Jonathan Swecker and cinematographers Scott Stevens and Adam Pacheco. “The team and I collaborated together about the vision for the spot which was to be quick, clean and to the point, but we would also accentuate the luxury and sexiness of the car.”

“We had access to the new Blackmagic Ursa Mini 4.6k and an older Red Scarlet with the MX chip,” says Stevens. “I was really interested in seeing how both cameras performed.”

He set up the Ursa Mini to shoot ProRes HQ at Ultra HD (3840×2160) and the Scarlet at 8:1 compression at 4K (4096×2160). He used both Canon still camera primes and a 24-105mm zoom, switching them from camera to camera depending on the shot. “For some wide shots we set them up side by side,” explains Stevens. “We also would have one camera shooting the back of the car and the other camera shooting a close-up on the side.”

In addition to his shooting duties, Stevens also edited the spot, using Adobe Premiere, and exported the XML into Blackmagic Resolve Studio 12. Stevens notes that, in addition to loving cinematography, he’s also “really into” color correction. “Jacob (Steagall) and I liked the way the Red footage looked straight out of the camera in the RedGamma4 color space. I matched the Blackmagic footage to the Red footage to get a basic look.”

Blackmagic colorist Moritz Fortmann took Stevens’ basis color correction and finessed the grade even more. “The first step was to talk to Jacob and Scott and find out what they were envisioning, what feel and look they were going for. They had already established a look so we saved a few stills as reference images to work off. The spot was shot on two different types of cameras, and in different formats. Step two was to analyze the characteristics of each camera and establish a color correction to match the two.  Step three was to tweak and refine the look. We did what I would describe as a simple color grade, only relying on primaries, without using any Power Windows or keys.”

If you’re planning to shoot mixed footage, Fortmann suggests you use cameras with similar characteristics, matching resolution, dynamic range and format. “Shooting RAW and/or Log provides for the highest dynamic range,” he says. “The more ‘room’ a colorist has to make adjustments, the easier it will be to match mixed footage. When color correcting, the key is to make mixed footage look consistent. One camera may perform well in low light while another one does not. You’ll need to find that sweet spot that works for all of your footage, not just one camera.”

Daniel Restuccio is a writer and chair of the multimedia department at California Lutheran University.

Notes from Adobe Max 2015

By Daniel Restuccio

Creativity, community, collaboration and the cloud were the dominant themes of Adobe Max 2015, which attracted over 7,000 creative types to the Los Angeles Convention Center earlier this week.

Adobe’s Creative Cloud, with 5.3 million subscribers, wants to be the antidote to the phenomenon of “content velocity” — the increasing demand for more content to be delivered faster, better and less expensively. They highlighted the following solutions for managing the emerging, worldwide, 24/7 work schedule.

Here are some highlights:
– Mobile apps: projects on mobile devices with apps like Adobe Comp or Adobe Clip and then get sent to desktop apps In-Design or Premiere for finishing. Newly announced app Adobe Capture aggregates Adobe Shape, Color, Hue and Brush into one app.
– Creative Sync: all assets are in the Creative Cloud and can be instantly updated by anyone on any desktop or mobile device.
– All Adobe apps are now touch enabled on Microsoft Windows.
– Adobe Stock — the company’s royalty-free collection of high-quality photos, illustrations and graphics, which offers 40 million images, will soon expand to video.
– Video editing: Premiere is already UHD-, 4K- and 8K-enabled with Dolby Vision HDR extended dynamic range exhibition on the horizon.

Director Tim Miller (R) with Deadpool movie with Adobe’s senior VP, Bryan Lamkin,

Director Tim Miller (R) with Deadpool movie with Adobe’s senior VP, Bryan Lamkin,

Movies and Premiere Pro
Deadpool director Tim Miller addressed the crowd and spoke with Adobe’s Senior VP/GM, Bryan Lamkin. Miller shared that David Fincher persuaded him to make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro for this film. In fact, Premiere editor Vashi Nedomansky set up the Premiere Pro systems on Deadpool, which was shot on Arri Raw.

Nedomansky trained the editors and assistant editors on the system, which is pretty much a clone of the one he set up for David Fincher — including using Jeff Brue’s solid state drives via OpenDrive — on Gone Girl.

The Coen brothers next film, Hail Caesar!, is also being cut on Premiere, so I think we’ve hit the tipping point with Premiere and feature work. I don’t suspect anyone’s going to throw out their Media Composers anytime soon, but Premiere is now the little engine that could, like Final Cut was back in the day.

Photos: Elizabeth Lippman