Tag Archives: creative director

Nylon Studios ups composer Zac Colwell to CD

Music and sound boutique Nylon Studios has promoted composer Zac Colwell to creative director of music at their NYC studio. Colwell joined Nylon in 2015 and will become the studio’s first creative director to meet the increased scope of creative projects out of the music and sound shop in the US market.

Colwell is a multi-instrumentalist who has toured the world with numerous groups, including Big Data, Sondre Lerche, Kishi Bashi and others. He has composed original tracks for such top brands as Aetna, M.A.C, Zac Posen, Honey Nut Cheerios and Unicef. As creative director, Colwell will oversee all creative output from the NYC studio, encompassing original compositions, sound design, spatial audio, mix and music licensing. Nylon also has a studio in Sydney.

“Not only is [Zac] an incredibly talented musician, but he also has a deep understanding of how music can enhance pictures to communicate to their most effective and engaging degree,” notes global executive producer Hamish Macdonald.

Colwell, an Austin native, grew up in a musical family, playing drums, piano, guitar, saxophone and flute. A classically-trained jazz composer, he continues to perform and compose outside of Nylon. In addition to his commercial compositions, he is the drummer and producer of Chappo, sings his own songs with Fancy Colors, produces artists of all different genres, and most recently toured with Bleachers.

Behind the Title: Edit 1 creative director/editor Ken Kresge

NAME: Ken Kresge

COMPANY: New York City’s Edit 1

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a production company with a unique talent for previs and content work.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
VP creative director/editor

Edit 1

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
At heart, I’m an editor. I have been so for the past 20 years. Editing led to a natural progression into being a CD. I manage the creative expectation of our clients and make sure our team of pros executes it in the manner that I feel represents the client’s needs.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In today’s business environment, being an editor means more than editing video, offline color correct and light After Effects work. Now the job includes all that plus a myriad other things, ranging from collaborating concept and script to audio, online color correct, graphic design, 3D animation and even helping with PR and social media. Fortunately, I love doing all those things, so for me now is a great time to be a creative editor.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with my new colleagues. It’s been 17 years since I was the new guy, and for me its very exciting getting to know them and seeing their talent for the first time. Oh yeah, the pizza on Friday is pretty awesome.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Give me some time and I am sure I will find something.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the mornings, when its just one or two of us. I put on some music and get ready for whatever is coming up.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a scientist or a host for a comedic documentary TV show. Yes, that is pretty specific for me.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I used editing as a way of expressing myself. I started my first editing gig at McCann Erickson.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Is it ok if that hasn’t happened yet?

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I just joined Edit 1 so much of it is still going on, but I can say I was able to re-connect with some of my previous clients and friends on a few projects from McCann, Evoke, DDB, One World Trade and Grey. They have kept me quite busy over the past four weeks.

Edit 1’s rooftop.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
One World is project I am proud of for a few reasons. I helped on the agency pitch and then helped create this interactive AR project for iPad, which involved editing almost 50 different videos about places in New York City. Moreover, I am a New Yorker, and having lived here through 9/11, this project gave me an overwhelming sense of pride. For me it’s like patriotism, in a New York-er way. I’m also proud of a personal project called “Road Trip Earth.”

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A powerful laptop, Adobe’s Creative Cloud and a decent camera/phone.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Honestly, I don’t follow anything.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I listen to KEXP almost every day. I love John in the Morning. Other than that, lately, it’s a lot of ALT-J, Modest Mouse and the new Slowdive.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just don’t sweat it anymore. Life can be pretty hard but I have a good one, with an amazing wife and kids to share it with. I try not to mess with those things and everything else seems to fall into place.

Designer Mitch Monson joins mOcean as creative director

Mitch Monson has joined LA-based mOcean as creative director/client partner. An Emmy-winning designer, Monson has collaborated with the likes of ABC, Al Jazeera, Canal+, Comedy Central, Fox, HBO, Showtime, Canon, IBM and Nike. He was also instrumental in creating the iconic Love Symbol for The Artist Formerly Known as Prince.

Prior to joining mOcean, Monson was creative director at Trollbäck + Company in New York, where he led the rebrand of the BBC master brand; brand identities for the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics and the upcoming 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics for NBC Sports; and the original Mr. Robot show packaging for USA Network.

“I’m excited about my new role at mOcean and the opportunity to combine more filmmaking and in-camera work with motion design and animation,” says Monson. “It’s been amazing to jump right in with so many clients that represent the top entertainment brands in film and television. Plus, it is great to have the strength of mOcean’s directing, editorial, design and key art capabilities all in one team. There is just so much creative and executional depth to their narrative process and it’s inspiring to be a part of it!”

 

Shipping + Handling adds Luca Giannettoni as CD of motion design/animation

Luca Giannettoni has recently joined Venice, California-based visual effects house Shipping + Handling as creative director. He has been tasked with growing its motion design and animation business.

Shipping + Handling is a creative content studio — working in broadcast, TV, Web and mobile —that offers creative finishing services such as VFX, design, motion graphics and animation. S+H has offices in LA and New York.

“S+H is expanding and we are stoked to have Giannettoni join our team here in Venice,” says executive producer Scott Friske.

While at companies such as Elastic, Oishii Creative and Yu+Co, among others, Giannettoni worked on commercials, broadcast and main titles for brands such as T-Mobile, Toyota, Coke, Hyundai, Goodyear, McDonald’s and ESPN. Giannettoni is a native from Verona, Italy, where he worked in design and fashion prior to coming to Los Angeles.

Behind the Title: Nutmeg creative director Dave Rogan

NAME: Dave Rogan

COMPANY: New York City’s Nutmeg Creative

CAN YOU DESCRIBE NUTMEG?
We are a single-resource creative partner that brings targeted communications to life for brands, networks and ad agencies. A post resource for nearly 40 years, Nutmeg also provides audio, editing, color and graphics, in addition to interactive, identity and social.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It depends on the day, on the project and on the client. In some cases, I am acting in the traditional role of agency creative director, coming up with original ideas that meet stated goals for the project. In many other cases, I am guiding a project from genesis to completion, adding a creative perspective or ensuring that our clients’ expectations are met or surpassed.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Almost anything can fall under that title — from original concepting and scripting, to “MacGyvering” a makeshift tracking marker out of a stick on set for an effects-heavy spot.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I was an ad agency CD, it was almost impossible getting the creative, production and post talent on the same page at the same time, to my satisfaction. Half of my job was making sure everyone was current on any rolling changes, adaptations to, or special challenges presented by the creative. But because Nutmeg has creative, interactive, production and post all under one roof, we’re able to think through every stage of the project together from the get-go. Instances of something unexpected popping up are almost non-existent because so many heads are in the game at the same time.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I seem to always be flying the day before or after a holiday. Last year, I flew home from a shoot on Thanksgiving morning. Wasn’t in love with that, I must admit.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning person — I love waking up before the sun and watching it rise.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be trying to convince Dream Theater they need a second keyboard player.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew I wanted to be in a creative professional environment from a very early age — before college. I’ve been lucky enough to ride industry trends and continual reinvention to a place where I am still able to continue to shape creative communications in any number of ways on a day-to-day basis.

ParagardCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
My current projects range from working on a critically celebrated pharma campaign for a disease called nontuberculous mycobacteria — NTM, for short —to a series of hilarious spots for a female contraceptive to an animated PSA aimed at wiping out polio in the Third World. There is also the forthcoming launch of a famous Broadway reboot. It varies every day with no rhyme or reason, and I love it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Scale-wise, it certainly pales in comparison to most of the projects I’m involved in here, but I take a special amount of pride in Nutmeg’s semi-finalist submission to the Doritos’ Crash the Super Bowl (image below) contest a year ago. It was a spot I wrote, directed and co-produced with our internal production team with almost no budget. To know that people really enjoyed it was thrilling and very satisfying for all of us.

Doritos Crash the Superbowl-Dave RoganNAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My iPhone, laptop and my ancient, but beloved, Korg Trinity.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, mostly.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Only with headphones! Lately, I’ve been listening to Dream Theater’s prog metal opera, “The Astonishing.” I think my coworkers would tear their earballs out if I played it at any kind of audible volume.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I wish I had a more interesting answer than this, but I find my clients enjoyable, not stress inducing. When I worked at agencies, the dynamic was different and I definitely felt under the gun on a daily basis. At Nutmeg, it’s different. The clients really want our perspective and guidance, and, in most cases, we’re very much partners with the same goals.

Behind the Title: Northern Lights CD/editor Pat Carpenter

NAME: Pat Carpenter

COMPANY: New York-based Northern Lights.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE NORTHERN LIGHTS?
We are a creative agency that handles all aspects of content creation from ideation through completion, and everything in between.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director/Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The majority of my career has been editorial for commercials, networks and digital content in both long and short form. I have been extremely fortunate to have a diverse background. In the past couple of years the post industry has gone through a bit of a change, which affects how I work with my clients.

I’m often asked to creatively oversee entire projects from start to finish, which might require concepting, writing, producing, supervising several editors, overseeing music composition or designing a graphic approach to a campaign or spot. All of this is, in addition to my traditional editing responsibilities, is where the title of creative director comes in. It’s a continuation of the editorial process on projects where clients are looking for creative solutions beyond strictly editorial.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
How involved I am in all aspects of a project from designing the overall look and feel of a spot to tweaking copy, auditioning VO talent and suggesting music tracks.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Making something that elicits some sort of emotion from the viewer. In the world of mass consumption and disposable media, where people are inundated with content, if at the end of the day somebody watches something that I had a part in making them feel something that was intended, that’s still the biggest thrill.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Accelerated deadlines. You want to give it your all, and that becomes difficult when it’s due yesterday.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Morning… there’s still hope in the morning!!!

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Playing drums.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
After college I knew liked both production and post, and then it all clicked while playing in bands on NYC’s Lower East Side. Editing always came easiest for me, and I was fortunate enough to have some incredible mentors, so the progression from assistant to editor was natural. If you asked 20-year-old Pat, he’d say I’d be playing drums professionally for a career. The Pat of today is pretty happy to be an editor.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
A WWE campaign called For the Hero in All of Us, which aired on NBC’s two broadcast networks, 17 cable channels and more than 50 digital properties; ID designs for Nickelodeon; and NCAA Confidential, a 60-minute show for CBS Sports that aired before the NCAA Basketball championship.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Most recently, Adult Rappers. It’s an independent documentary that pulls back the curtain on the world of “working class” rappers. The film spotlights independent artists struggling to find a balance between making a living and pursuing their art alongside the never-ending saga of age and relevance. It was a total passion project that seemed to strike a chord with a lot of folks. I’m proud to have edited it.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Phone. PowerBook. Drumsticks.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Twitter and Instagram

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I really try to bounce around as much as possible. As for artists, I’ve been listening to Todd Snider as of late, but I still find myself hitting sites: http://www.syffal.com, http://www.birp.fm or http://www.musictrajectory.com to see what they have going on.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Play drums and Crossfit for sure, but mostly a little time with my two girls will put it all back in perspective.

Behind the Title: Mr. Wonderful CD Gary Keenan

NAME: Gary Keenan

COMPANY: New York City’s Mr. Wonderful (@mrwdesign)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Mr. Wonderful is a NYC based creative-production studio specializing in concept-driven motion design, branding and effects for television, film, interactive and environmental media.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?

It involves having a clear creative vision and being able to provide constructive, specific and intelligible feedback to my team so they can create their best work. Building strong client relationships, developing briefs and making presentations are also essential. The creative director is a manager, salesman, therapist and sometimes a creative.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Having the right mix of talent and interpersonal skills is a very difficult task, which is why good creative directors are hard to find – there are so few people who can both be creative and manage creative.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Persuasion, it’s the most useful tool of all. Failing that, some Irish charm.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The variety of projects that come across my desk is what keeps the job interesting.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Miller Time. Sorry, working in advertising is bound to have its effects.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Oshiya. In Japan, oshiya are professionals that are hired to push people onto trains. I live in Manhattan and do it here everyday for free.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
When I came to the realization that I was absolutely useless at everything else.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The season launch promo and digital package for Keeping up With the Kardashians for E! and the identity for the new late night show Full Frontal With Samantha Bee.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Easy, Robert (13), Zach (10) and Marcus (4). It’s a work in progress but ultimately the most satisfying one.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Electricity, the Internet and a pair of glasses.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes. I like listening to different genres of music, and the genre I’m currently listening to is Stomp and Whittle. It’s like stomp and flutter, but with a more traditionalist bent. Those stomp and flutter guys just took it too far. My guess is you are now doing a Google search for Stomp and Whittle. Don’t. It’s absolute rubbish.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Turn off my phone.

Behind the Title: Roger’s Dane Macbeth

NAME: Dane Macbeth

COMPANY: LA-based Roger (@RogerTVLA)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Roger is a multimedia company that brings a unique and creative vision to a wide landscape of projects. We offer design, animation, original content, branding ID, live-action and post services.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The best part of being a creative director at Roger is the wide range of work that entails. For every project that comes through our doors, we aim to give a unique and personal feel, from concept through delivery. As a creative director, I am in charge of all creative decisions from pre- through post. Depending on the size and scope of the project, my specific role can change drastically.

On smaller projects, I may do the design and storyboards myself alongside other artists. On larger projects, I will oversee a large design team and make creative decisions along the way. It also depends on how many projects I am overseeing at one time. I can be overseeing up to 15 or more projects at once, which makes it virtually impossible to make any time to get behind the box. The job also requires a lot of time on sets working as a live-action director. It’s the constant blend of working with different mediums and wearing multiple hats that makes the creative direction position so appealing to me.

The set for

The set for the KPMG project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think because the word creative is in the job title itself an outsider may think it’s only creative decisions that are made. While making creative decisions makes up the bulk of my position, there is a lot of management that comes along with the title. Putting together teams of artists that are the perfect fit for an individual project can go a long way. Working with producers to oversee schedules, calendars and budgets also plays a major role in my position.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of my job is getting a new project in. I love starting from little to nothing and thinking about all the amazing possible directions that it can be taken. Writing treatments is the best way to show off and sell an idea, and I love the creative and competitive edge it brings out.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of my job is making creative sacrifices. It’s very rare that a project comes along and your total and complete vision comes to be. At the end of the day, as a creative director, it’s your aim to create something interesting, compelling and unique that pleases both your internal team and the client. Often, a great concept and idea can be watered down through the process. Over time, you learn to pick and choose your battles — what is worth sacrificing versus what you feel is important to fight for. On the flip side, I’ve been surprised by what seemed like a sacrifice at first that turned out to make a project better in the long run.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
It’s hard to pinpoint my favorite time of day — creative breakthroughs and inspiration can come at any point in time from anywhere. When I solve or help solve a problem with a creative solution, that’s my favorite time of day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I have several other areas of interest that I could see myself doing professionally if I were not in this position. I am an avid scuba diver and could see myself travelling the world as a dive master and underwater photographer. I also love creating original comedic content and writing.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I tend to think that I didn’t choose this position it chose me. I always knew I would be working in some form of a creative position, I just didn’t know what field. Growing up, I was always creating something. From drawing, writing, filming, and playing sports, I was always looking from one creative outlet to another.

I was very drawn to the video game industry at a young age. I surprised myself when I pivoted more towards production as I began my professional career. Working in the game industry you can work on one project for years. If you’re not in love with the creative direction of that project, it can become very tiresome very fast. I was drawn to the fast-paced and diverse work that goes along with motion-graphics and production. It was a great fit and a decision I am very happy I made.

15_fung_logo USE
Stills from FYI’s What the Fung?!

WHAT ARE SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
My most recent delivery was a television commercial for a financial firm KPMG. The work came through the agency JWT. It was KPMG’s first television commercial and a fun and exciting project from start to finish. We’ve done several projects for Disney, which includes Disney Junior, Disney XD and Disney. We recently worked on the marketing campaign for the launch of “Miles from Tomorrowland” on Disney Junior. This was a fun project that had us filming scientists and astronauts. I was also CD on promos for the show What the Fung?! on FYI  network.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I had a lot of fun on a recent project that came in from TBS. It was completely open with no direction from the client. We had very little time to execute but always want to create compelling content. The only restriction was to use the new TBS logo. Our idea was to 3D print the new logo and stuff it with explosives, confetti and paint. We used a Phantom camera to capture the explosion and were very happy with the results.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
That’s a tough question, as I often ask myself if I have an unhealthy addiction to tech. From when I first wake up to when I go to bed, I’m interacting with tech on all levels. If I had to name three it would have to be my phone, laptop and camera.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m an avid user of Instagram and Facebook. I never got into the Twitter craze. I also use LinkedIn on a regular basis when looking for new talent.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Depending on my workload and what type of project I’m working on, listening to music while working can be very difficult. We always have music playing in the background at work, which is a must for me. I spend a lot of day talking to clients and artists, so it’s hard to completely zone out with headphones and music.

Later in the day and when working from home, I will put on some headphones and music to help inspire creativity. I have a very wide range and eclectic taste of music. I pretty much listen to everything. I enjoy working to a wide range of music and often find myself shuffling through genres to find inspiration.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I love playing sports. I think it’s my greatest stress relief. I can fully focus on the sport I’m playing and not think about any stress that work may have. Basketball, football and scuba diving truly take me away from the real world and its stress.

Behind the Title: Executive Creative Director Vincenzo LoRusso

NAME: Vincenzo LoRusso

COMPANY: New York- and Santa Monica-based Elias Arts (@eliasarts)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY? 
We are a full-service music and sound production company and music library that specializes in advertising.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Interfacing with clients and our creative team to find the best solution for their Continue reading

Meet Basetwo Media’s Creative Director Lilian Salloum

NAME: Lilian Salloum

COMPANY: Vancouver’s Basetwo Media (@BasetwoMedia)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Basetwo Media offers complete “prep-to-post” video agency services for corporate clients, including scriptwriting, filming, editing, motion graphics and 3D animation. Our services extend beyond concept to completion of individual projects. Our approach involves partnering with our clients in a strategic planning process to help them develop and execute a long-term video strategy.

Many of our larger clients have in-house video production capabilities but still find they need help from time to time. Our work continues upon delivery of a project. Often videos need to be Continue reading