Tag Archives: Cory Choy

Dog in the Night director/DP Fletcher Wolfe

By Cory Choy

Silver Sound Showdown Music + Video Festival is unique in two ways. First, it is both a music video festival and battle of the bands at the same time. Second, every year we pair up the Grand Prize-winners, director and band, and produce a music video with them. The budget is determined by the festival’s ticket sales.

I conceived of the festival, which is held each year at Brooklyn Bowl, as a way to both celebrate and promote artistic collaboration between the film and music communities — two crowds that just don’t seem to intersect often enough. One of the most exciting things for me is then working with extremely talented filmmakers and musicians who have more often than not met for the first time at our festival.

Dog in the Night (song written by winning band Side Saddle) was one of our most ambitious videos to date — using a combination of practical and post effects. It was meticulously planned and executed by director/cinematographer Fletcher Wolfe, who was not only a pleasure to work with, but was gracious enough to sit down with me for a discussion about her process and the experience of collaborating.

What was your favorite part of making Dog in the Night?
As a music video director I consider it my first responsibility to get to know the song and its meaning very intimately. This was a great opportunity to stretch that muscle, as it was the first time I was collaborating with musicians who weren’t already close friends. In fact, I hadn’t even met them before the Showdown. I found it to be a very rewarding experience.

What is Dog in the Night about?
The song Dog in the Night is, quite simply, about a time when the singer Ian (a.k.a. Angler Boy) is enamored with a good friend, but that friend doesn’t share his romantic feelings. Of course, anyone who has been in that position (all of us?) knows that it’s never that simple. You can hear him holding out hope, choosing to float between friendship and possibly dating, and torturing himself in the process.

I decided to use dusk in the city to convey that liminal space between relationship labels. I also wanted to play on the nervous and lonely tenor of the track with images of Angler Boy surrounded by darkness, isolated in the pool of light coming from the lure on his head. I had the notion of an anglerfish roaming aimlessly in an abyss, hoping that another angler would find his light and end his loneliness. The ghastly head also shows that he doesn’t feel like he has anything in common with anybody around him except the girl he’s pining after, who he envisions having the same unusual head.

What did you shoot on?
I am a DP by trade, and always shoot the music videos I direct. It’s all one visual storytelling job to me. I shot on my Alexa Mini with a set of Zeiss Standard Speed lenses. We used the 16mm lens on the Snorricam in order to see the darkness around him and to distort him to accentuate his frantic wanderings. Every lens in the set weighed in at just 1.25lbs, which is amazing.

The camera and lenses were an ideal pairing, as I love the look of both, and their light weight allowed me to get the rig down to 11lbs in order to get the Snorricam shots. We didn’t have time to build our own custom Snorricam vest, so I found one that was ready to rent at Du-All Camera. The only caveats were that it could only handle up to 11lbs, and the vest was quite large, meaning we needed to find a way to hide the shoulders of the vest under Ian’s wardrobe. So, I took a cue from Requiem for a Dream and used winter clothing to hide the bulky vest. We chose a green and brown puffy vest that held its own shape over the rig-vest, and also suited the character.

I chose a non-standard 1.5:1 aspect ratio, because I felt it suited framing for the anglerfish head. To maximize resolution and minimize data, I shot 3.2K at a 1.78:1 aspect ratio and cropped the sides. It’s easy to build custom framelines in the Alexa Mini for accurate framing on set. On the Mini, you can also dial in any frame rate between 0.75-60fps (at 3.2K). Thanks to digital cinema cameras, it’s standard these days to over-crank and have the ability to ramp to slow motion in post. We did do some of that; each time Angler Boy sees Angler Girl, his world turns into slow motion.

In contrast, I wanted his walking around alone to be more frantic, so I did something much less common and undercranked to get a jittery effect. The opening shot was shot at 6fps with a 45-degree shutter, and Ian walked in slow motion to a recording of the track slowed down to quarter-time, so his steps are on the beat. There are some Snorricam shots that were shot at 6fps with a standard 180-degree shutter. I then had Ian spin around to get long motion blur trails of lights around him. I knew exactly what frame rate I wanted for each shot, and we wound up shooting at 6fps, 12fps, 24fps, 48fps and 60fps, each for a different emotion that Angler Boy is having.

Why practical vs. CG for the head?
Even though the fish head is a metaphor for Angler Boy’s emotional state, and is not supposed to be real, I wanted it to absolutely feel real to both the actor and the audience. A practical, and slightly unwieldy, helmet/mask helped Ian find his character. His isolation needed to be tangible, and how much he is drawn to Angler Girl as a kindred spirit needed to be moving. It’s a very endearing and relatable song, and there’s something about homemade, practical effects that checks both those boxes. The lonely pool of light coming from the lure was also an important part of the visuals, and it needed to play naturally on their faces and the fish mask. I wired Lite Gear LEDs into the head, which was the easy part. Our incredibly talented fabricator, Lauren Genutis, had the tough job — fabricating the mask from scratch!

The remaining VFX hurdle then was duplicating the head. We only had the time and money to make one and fit it to both actors with foam inserts. I planned the shots so that you almost never see both actors in the same shot at the same time, which kept the number of composited shots to a minimum. It also served to maintain the emotional disconnect between his reality and hers. When you do see them in the same shot, it’s to punctuate when he almost tells her how he feels. To achieve this I did simple split screens, using the Pen Tool in Premiere to cut the mask around their actions, including when she touches his knee. To be safe, I shot takes where she doesn’t touch his knee, but none of them conveyed what she was trying to tell him. So, I did a little smooshing around of the two shots and some patching of the background to make it so the characters could connect.

Where did you do post?
We were on a very tight budget, so I edited at home, and I always use Adobe Premiere. I went to my usual colorist, Vladimir Kucherov, for the grade. He used Blackmagic Resolve, and I love working with him. He can always see how a frame could be strengthened by a little shaping with vignettes. I’ll finally figure out what nuance is missing, and when I tell him, he’s already started working on that exact thing. That kind of shaping was especially helpful on the day exteriors, since I had hoped for a strong sunset, but instead got two flat, overcast days.

The only place we didn’t see eye to eye on this project was saturation — I asked him to push saturation farther than he normally would advise. I wanted a cartoon-like heightening of Angler Boy’s world and emotions. He’s going through a period in which he’s feeling very deeply, but by the time of writing the song he is able to look back on it and see the humor in how dramatic he was being. I think we’ve all been there.

What did you use VFX for?
Besides having to composite shots of the two actors together, there were just a few other VFX shots, including dolly moves that I stabilized with the Warp Stabilizer plug-in within Premiere. We couldn’t afford a real dolly, so we put a two-foot riser on a Dana Dolly to achieve wide push-ins on Ian singing. We were rushing to catch dusk between rainstorms, and it was tough to level the track on grass.

The final shot is a cartoon night sky composited with a live shot. My very good friend, Julie Gratz of Kaleida Vision, made the sky and animated it. She worked in Adobe After Effects, which communicates seamlessly with Premiere. Julie and I share similar tastes for how unrealistic elements can coexist with a realistic world. She also helped me in prep, giving feedback on storyboards.

Do you like the post process?
I never used to like post. I’ve always loved being on set, in a new place every day, moving physical objects with my hands. But, with each video I direct and edit I get faster and improve my post working style. Now I can say that I really do enjoy spending time alone with my footage, finding all the ways it can convey my ideas. I have fun combining real people and practical effects with the powerful post tools we can access even at home these days. It’s wonderful when people connect with the story, and then ask where I got two anglerfish heads. That makes me feel like a wizard, and who doesn’t like that?! A love of movie magic is why we choose this medium to tell our tales.


Cory Choy, Silver Sound Showdown festival director and co-founder of Silver Sound Studios, produced the video.

Smile wins Grand Prize for best music video at Showdown 8

By Randi Altman

Silver Sound’s Showdown 8 Music Video Festival took place this week at the Brooklyn Bowl, highlighting bands, showcasing music videos and naming the winner of their Best Music Video contest.

I’m proud to say that this was my fourth year as a judge of the contest and happy to report that my number one pick took home the top prize. Joe Staehly’s Smile, for artist Jay Pray, features an older woman revisiting places from her past, bringing with her a film projector that plays images of herself and friends — including one special boy — when they were young. Finally, in present day, she visits an older man in a medical facility. He clearly doesn’t recognize her and is visibly uncomfortable. The woman then turns off the lights and turns on projectors that fill the room with images of their past.

For this effort, Staehly took home the Grand Prize for the video he shot on Red Epic Dragon and Super 8 film. Smile brought the audience, and this judge, to tears. That’s right, a music video did that.

Twenty-three-year-old Staehly is a Philadelphia-based cinematographer and director at Set in Motion. Staehly, who also edited the piece, is the youngest grand prize winner in Showdown history.

Each year 21 music videos and four bands compete for the Grand Prize — Silver Sound will produce a music video with them — worth over $10,000. Staehly will be collaborating on this music video with artist Gabrielle Sterbenz.

Created eight years ago by the talents behind NYC audio post house Silver Sound, Showdown shows no sign of slowing down. “Music videos are an oft-overlooked medium that I personally find very exciting,” reports Silver Sound partner/festival director Cory Choy. “Music video directors take risks, both narratively and technically, that other filmmakers, who have to worry about dialogue, aren’t willing to take. It’s a challenge, but it’s also incredibly freeing and exciting to experience two stories simultaneously — the story that the music is telling, and the story that the movie is telling. The way these stories interact and resonate with each other… that’s what music videos are about.”

Ergonomics from a post perspective (see what I did there?)

By Cory Choy

Austin’s SXSW is quite a conference, with pretty much something for everyone. I attended this year for three reasons: I’m co-producer and re-recording mixer on director Musa Syeed’s narrative feature film in competition, A Stray; I’m a member of the New York Post Alliance and was helping out at our trade show booth; and I’m a blogger and correspondent for this here online publication.

Given that my studio, Silver Sound in New York, has been doing a lot of sound for virtual reality recently, and with the mad scramble that every production company, agency and corporation has been in to make virtual reality content, I was pretty darn sure that my first post was going to be about VR (and don’t fear, I will be following up with one soon), but while I was checking out the new 360-degree video camera and rig offerings from Theta360 and 360Heros, and taking a good look at the new Micro Cinema Camera from Blackmagic, I noticed a pretty enthused and sizable crowd at one of the booths. The free Stella Artois beer samples were behind me, so I was pretty excited to go check out what I was sure must be the hip, new virtual reality demonstration, The Martian VR Experience.

To my surprise, the hot demo wasn’t for a new camera rig or stitching software. It was for a chair… sort of. Folks were gathered around a tall table playing with Legos while resting on the Mogo, the latest “leaning seat” offering from inventor Martin Keen’s company, Focal Upright. It’s kind of a mix between a monopod, a swivel stool and an exercise ball chair, and it comes in a neat little portable bag — have chair, will travel! Leaning chairs allow people to comfortably maintain good posture while at their workstations. They also encourage you to work in a position that, unlike most traditional chairs, allows for good blood flow through the legs.

They were raffling off one of those suckers, hence all the people around. I didn’t win, but I did have the opportunity to talk to Keen about his products — a full line of leaning chairs, standing desks and workstations. Keen’s a really nice fellow, and I’m going to follow-up with a more in-depth interview in the future. For now, though, the basics are that Keen’s company, Focal Upright, is one of several companies that have emerged to help folks who spend the majority of their days sitting (i.e. all of us post professionals) figure out a way to bring better posture and health back into their daily routines.

As a sound engineer, and therefore as someone who spends a whole lot of time every day at a console or mixing board, ergonomics is something I’ve had to pay a lot of attention to. So I thought I might share some of my, and my colleagues’, ergonomics experiences, thoughts and solutions.

Standing, Sitting and Posture
We’ve all been hearing about it for a while — sitting for extended periods of time can be bad for you. Sitting with bad posture can be even worse. My buddy and co-worker Luke Allen has been doing design and editing at a standing desk for the last couple of years, and he swears that it’s one of the best work decisions he’s ever made. After the first couple of months though, I noticed that he was complaining that his feet were getting tired and his knees hurt. In the same pickle? Luke solved his problem with a chef’s mat, like this one. Want to move around a little more at the standing desk? Check out the Level from FluidStance, another exhibitor at this year’s SXSW show. Not ready for a standing desk? Maybe try exploring a ball chair or fluid disc from physical therapy equipment manufacturer Isokinetics Inc.

Feel a little silly with that stuff? Instead, try getting up and walking around, or stretching every 20 minutes or so — 30 seconds to a minute should do. When I was getting started in this business, I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to apprentice under sound master craftsman Bernie Hajdenberg. I first got to observe him working in the mix, and then after some time, I had the privilege of operating sessions with him. One of the things that struck me was that Bernie usually stood up for the majority of the mixing sessions, and he would pace while discussing changes. When I was operating for him, he had me sit in a seat with no arms that could be raised pretty high. He told me this was very important, and it’s something that I’ve continued throughout my career. And lo and behold, I now realize that part of what Bernie had me do was to make sure that I wasn’t cutting off the circulation in my legs by keeping them extended and a little in front of me. And the chair with no arms helped keep my back straight.

Repetitive Stress
People who use their fingers a lot, whether typing or using a mouse, run the risk of developing a repetitive stress injury. Personally, I had a lot of wrist pain after my first year or so. What to do? First, make sure that your set-up isn’t forcing you to put your hands or wrists in an uncomfortable position. One of the things I did was elevate my mouse pad and keyboard. My buddy Tarcisio, and many others, use a trackball mouse. Try to break up your typing or mouse movements every couple of minutes with frequent, short bursts of finger stretches. After a few weeks of introducing stretching into my routine, my wrist and finger pain was alleviated greatly.

Cory Choy is an audio engineer and co-founder of Silver Sound Studios in New York City. He was recently nominated for an Emmy for “Outstanding Sound Mixing for Live Action” for Born To Explore.

Slamdance, Sundance: Why it’s 
important to audio post pros

By Cory Choy

Why are we, audio post professionals, in Park City right now? The most immediate reason is Silver Sound has some skin in the game this year: we are both executive producers and the post sound team for Driftwood, a feature narrative in competition at Slamdance that was shot completely MOS. We also provided production and audio post on content Resonance and World Tour for Google’s featured VR Google Cardboard demos at Sundance’s New Frontier.

Sundance’s footprint is everywhere here. During the festival, the entirety of Park City is transformed — schools, libraries, cafes, restaurants, hotels and office buildings are now venues for screenings, panel discussions and workshops. A complex and comprehensive network of shuttle busses allows festival goers to get around without having to rely on their own vehicles.

Tech companies, such as Samsung and Canon, set up public areas for people to rest, talk, demo their wares and mingle. You can’t take three steps in any direction without bumping into a director, producer or someone who provides services to filmmakers. In addition to being chock full of industry folk — and this is a very important ingredient —Park City is charming, beautiful and very different than the American film hubs, New York and Los Angeles. So people are in a relaxed and friendly mood.

Films in competition at Sundance often feature big-name actors, receive critical acclaim and more and more often are receiving distribution. In short, this is the place to make personal connections with “indie” filmmaking professionals who are either directly, or through friends, connected to the studio system.

As a partner and engineer at a boutique sound studio in Manhattan, I see this as a fantastic opportunity to cut through the noise and hopefully put myself, and my company, on the radar of folks with whom I might not otherwise get a chance to meet or collaborate. It’s a chance for me, a post professional in the indie world, to elevate my game.

Slamdance
Slamdance sets up shop in one very specific location, the Treasure Mountain Inn on Main Street in Park City. It happens at the same time as Sundance — and is located right in eye of the storm — but has built a reputation for celebrating the most indie of the indies. Films in competition at Slamdance must have budgets under one million dollars (and many often have budgets far below that.) Where Sundance is a sprawling behemoth — long lines, hard-to-get tickets, dozens of venues, the inability to see all that is offered — Slamdance sort of feels like a friend’s very nice living room.

Slamdance logo

Many folks see most of or even the entire line-up of films. There’s no rushing about to different locations. Slamdance embraces the DIY, and is about empowering people outside of the industry establishment. Tech companies such as Blackmagic and Digital Bolex hold workshops geared towards enabling filmmakers with smaller budgets to be able to make films unencumbered by technical limits. This is a place where daring and often new or first-time filmmakers showcase their work. Often this is one of the first times or perhaps even the first time they’ve gone through the post and finishing process. It is the perfect place for an audio professional to shine.

In my experience, the films that screen best at Slamdance — the ones that are the most immersive and get the most attention — are the ones with a solid sound mix and a creative sound design. This is because some of the films in competition have had minimal or no post sound. They are enjoyable, but the audience finds itself sporadically taken out of the story for technical reasons. The directors and producers of these films are going to keep creating, and after being exposed to and competing against films with very good sound, are probably going to be looking to forge a creative partnership — one that could quite possibly grow and last the entirety or majority of their future careers — with a post sound person or team. Like Silver Sound!

Cory Choy is an audio engineer and co-founder of Silver Sound Studios in New York City.

VFX bring wheatpaste poster to life in ‘Paper Heart’ music video

Each January, The Silver Sound Showdown music video festival and battle of the bands takes place at Brooklyn Bowl. It pairs the winning director and winning band together to make a music video with Silver Sound Studios in New York City. It was here that Paper Heart, the music video directed by Nick Snyder, produced by Silver Sound and featuring the band Blood and Glass, was born.

Paper Heart, is one of the most ambitious Showdown collaborations to date,” according to festival director and producer Cory Choy, features Blood and Glass lead singer Lisa Moore as a wheatpaste poster on walls across Brooklyn. It was shot on a Red Scarlet camera and features effects created in Adobe’s After Effects and Photoshop. It was edited on Adobe Premiere Pro.

Why the wheatpaste poster look? LA-based Snyder (@nickwsnyder) works in the arts district of downtown, where he sees inspiration in everything. He also liked the idea that the nature and lifespan of the wheatpaste poster seemed to play nicely into the “themes of isolation and fragility found in the song.”

Director Nick Snyder, right.

Director Nick Snyder, right, in front of monitor.

Snyder’s Showdown-winning video Lost Boy Found also combined the techniques of live performance, compositing and animation — silhouettes of actors were composited into a fantasy shadow puppet world — so this was a realm he was comfortable in.

The Production
After several months of prep, Snyder and the band made their way to New York City for the two-day shoot. The first day was dedicated to shooting plates. Locations around Brooklyn had been scouted by Silver Sound, Google street-viewed by Snyder prior to arrival and then scouted in person. So by the time production began, specific moments had been planned to take place in a handful of selected locations. The remaining moments were narrowed down to areas where the filmmakers anticipated chance discoveries. Snyder, DP J. Andrés Cardona and a skeleton crew set out onto the streets of New York to shoot with their Red Scarlet.

Going Green
The second day was shot at Parlay Studios in Jersey City and dedicated exclusively to greenscreen shots. During a brief break in between days, Snyder analyzed the plates. While he shot listed and storyboarded, he also left room for improvisation and collaboration.

greenscreen RED Scarlet

To aid lead singer Lisa Moore in her characterization, extra attention was given to wardrobe, makeup and props. “For example, it was decided beforehand that her prop cane would become a matchstick and that after using it, the matchstick would shrivel and blacken,” explains Snyder. “The art director constructed a practical burnt matchstick prop, but rather than swapping it out during Lisa’s performance, the prop was shot suspended in front of the greenscreen. Then, using an LED light on Lisa’s un-burnt cane, I tracked the movement of the matchstick in After Effects. I then replaced it with the burnt matchstick seen at the end of the video.”

The same technique was used for the origami birds that interact with Moore throughout the video. Practical birds were made, shot against the greenscreen and keyed out in post. The intention was that they could be keyframed in After Effects, but their natural movement would allow for a slightly more organic feel. It was a good time saver. “Green apple boxes, chroma key gloves and even crew members wrapped in green blankets were used to achieve the effect of tactile contact within the video,” explains Snyder. “The performance moments were shot from start to finish in various sizes, and shooting in 4K allowed for any Lisa/plate size relationship miscalculations,” explains Snyder.

The Post
The next step was assembly. This involved mapping Moore to the building surface plates. Premiere Pro was used to assemble performance shots in raw R3D and narrow down her best takes. For performance takes, a six-panel export was made to quickly compare her gestures from the narrowed down shots. From there, a preliminary pass was made on pairing Moore with the plates by adding the chroma key effect in Premiere. “This simplified version of After Effects Keylight allowed us to see what was working without having to check all the shots in the much more sluggish After Effects video playback,” says Snyder. “Additionally, once the assembled shots were ready for AE, the greenscreen clips with this chroma key effect would stay in the metadata of the shot.” Another time saver, he says, was that once the Moore/plate relationships were locked and a cut was close to locked, the compositing could begin.

bird person birds

To save space and make for faster save times, Snyder chose to create separate After Effects files for each shot. The first step was to finalize the look for “Wheatpaste Lisa.” After some trial and error, a look was established and a master file was created that could be imported into each After Effects file, but the process for creating the look wasn’t as easy as copying and pasting a LUT. In some cases, upwards of 20 pre-comps were used.

According to Snyder, the basic process went like this. “The greenscreen shot was keyed out using Keylight, adjusting for spill and greenscreen inconsistencies. Luckily, the DP did an excellent job at lighting Lisa, so this was a breeze. If there was an issue, a simple matte choker was used. Then, this was precomped and a minimal texture was brought in to dirty it up a bit. The overlay blending mode was often used as well as an image mask. It was precomped again; an off-white stroke was added using a layer style stroke. This effect was used to create the white-edge poster look. The stroke size and precomp level varied from shot to shot, depending on the size of shot Lisa was in and also the texture of the plate onto which she was to be composited. At this point the look started to emerge a bit, but a few steps remained in order to completely bring Wheatpaste Lisa to life.”

For Paper Heart, a combination of Adobe CC’s Glass and Texturize were used to give Moore a convincing paper texture as well as authentic surface imperfections, explains Snyder. Most often, two bump maps were used — one for generic surface texture and lighting and a second to pick up the surface of the wall behind her. For the second, a high contrast grayscale image was created in Photoshop to bring out the important parts. Using Dynamic Link, Snyder was able to paint over parts of the bump map that were less important, save and view the results in After Effects.

one two

Lastly, two layers needed to be created to mimic ink on paper and human error. This would also come into play later in the video as the iterations of Wheatpaste Lisa start to erode away. “For this effect, the comp had to be duplicated. Unfortunately, After Effects comp duplication only duplicates the top comp,” explains Snyder. “So in order to duplicate all of the nested comps, a purchased script called True Comp Duplicator had to be used. The newly duplicated comp was then brought into the original comp and placed below. Using the Fill effect, this comp was colored off-white. Then, to add the finishing touches, some final grungifying had to be done to the top layer. Using Photoshop, 5K resolution brush strokes and alpha channel grunge effects were created on multiple layers. Once imported into AE, these could be used in the top Lisa comp. Using the Silhouette Alpha blending mode, the grungy paintbrush strokes subtracted bits of Wheatpaste Lisa, creating imperfections and rough edges that exposed the off-white layer beneath it.

“Finally, back in the master comp with the two Lisa layers, those were precomped once more. At this point, the look was more or less complete,” he continues. “But from shot to shot, additional work was sometimes required to successfully composite Lisa onto the plates.” Some additional tools used were Roughen Edges, another Matte Choker and occasionally another round of Silhouette Alpha grungy paintbrush strokes.

For lighting, Snyder used either the 4-Color Gradient or Gradient Ramp on an Adjustment Layer or on a Solid set to the Hard Light Blending Mode. Opacity was usually in the 10-20 percent range.

umbrella 5 flame

During the process, Snyder and Silver Sound discovered that Wheatpaste Lisa’s movement looked best at 12fps. “We wanted to underscore the fact that Wheatpaste Lisa was an actual wheatpaste entity existing in her own little universe, not just a video projection,” explains Silver Sound’s Choy. “So the choppier feel of 12fps was used to make Lisa’s motions a little less fluid, a little more animation-y and other worldly feeling.” For this effect, the Posterize Time effect was used.

Throughout the compositing process, Snyder created H.264 proxy files from the transcoded R3D footage. This was especially helpful with the origami birds. To save space, the birds were rendered out on their own at a much smaller file size and then re-imported.

The Death of Wheatpaste Lisa
Finally, Wheatpaste Lisa had to die. To achieve the effect of wheatpaste poster weathering, both layers of Wheatpaste Lisa had to erode. “Back inside the top layer — the double layer Lisa comp — individual brush strokes and grunge effects were animated with Silhouette Alpha as their blending mode,” describes Snyder. “Once the weathering looked satisfactory, these animated layers were copied, pasted into the bottom layer Lisa comp and adjusted in movement and timing. This allowed for the top layer to erode just before the bottom layer, pushing the compositing one step closer toward realism. Occasionally, one final matte choker and/or an animated mask was used on the final precomp to eliminate any stray particles or to insure that she dissolved away completely.

The crew

The crew.

Once complete, the shots were rendered at 4K ProRes 4444. The final shots were delivered to Silver Sound colorist Vlad Kucherov with Moore separated from the building surface plates. Using DaVinci Resolve, Kucherov worked with Snyder to achieve a satisfactory look that worked well for the video concept while also helping sell the compositing realism. Having the layers separated gave Silver Sound more control during this process by being able to adjust the levels independently. The goal was to find a look that played to the feel of the song, but also gave the video a confident personalized look of its own.

“In the end, Paper Heart is the result of careful planning, post experimentation, lots of hair pulling and creating a concept that exists within a strict set of limitations,” concludes Snyder.

Blog: HP’s latest laptops, displays, virtual workstations

By Cory Choy

I started my career as a sound designer and re-recording mixer, but as independent film imploded in the early 2000s and was beginning to be replaced by Internet video, I found myself adding more and more “work hats” to my collection. In order to succeed in this business I needed to adapt to the ever-changing NYC film and TV landscape, and that meant adding more disciplines to my professional offerings.

So now, in addition to post sound, I find myself also post producing — mostly color correction, but I do a bunch of other things as well.

While I have access to state-of-the art sound workstations at Silver Sound, a New York City- Continue reading

Review: Krotos Limited’s Dehumaniser

By Robin Shore

Dehumaniser’s aim is to make the usually time consuming and esoteric process of designing creature vocals into something as simple as twiddling a few knobs and flicking some switches. If you’ve ever found yourself struggling to create the voice of dinosaur, alien or troll then this software is for you.

I first used Dehumaniser about a year ago when it was available as a free-by-request beta version from creator Orfeas Boteas’ personal website. Even with this early version I was impressed by how easy it was to transform a fairly dopey sounding recording of myself groaning into a massive King Kong-sized growl.

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Subtle Sounds: The Diary of a Sound Designer

By Cory Choy

I often find people asking: “So what does sound design and mix actually DO for a movie? You know, other than adding cool explosions and alien noises…”

It’s true that we sound folks really get a chance to shine during ninja fights and robot wars, Continue reading

Cool Tool: The AATranslator

We recently reached out to sound engineer/head of production Cory Choy, who helps run Silver Sound Studios (www.silversound.us) in NYC, and asked him about gear he uses as part of his day-to-day workflow. He was happy to share his experience with a lesser-known tool by an Australian-based company, called AATranslator.

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