Tag Archives: commercials

Behind the Title: Composer Michael Carey

NAME: Michael Carey (@MichaelCarey007)

COMPANY: Resonation Music

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative director/composer (film/commercials/TV) and songwriter/producer/mixer (album work).

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
For commercials, film and TV projects, I work closely with the director, producer and agency to come up with something that meets their needs and the needs of the project. I develop an understanding of their overall vision, and then I conceptualize, compose and produce original music to capture the essence of this vision, in a complimentary way.

i-want-to-say-composer-main-title-opening-scenes

Michael Carey was composer of the main title theme and the opening scenes for ‘I Want to Say.’

This includes themes, underscore, source, main titles, end titles, etc. When it comes to album projects and soundtrack songs, I often write for (or with) the featured artist or band and produce the track from end to end. This means that I am also the engineer, programmer, session player and often mixer for a project.

On large projects that require fast turnaround, I wear the “creative director” hat, and I assemble and manage a specific team of colleagues to collaborate with me — those I know can get the job done at the highest level. I keep things focused and cohesive, and strive to maintain a consistent musical voice.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Whichever medium I’m working in, be it music-for-picture or album work, the underlying fundamentals are surprisingly similar. In both instances, it’s ultimately about storytelling – conveying maximum emotional impact in a compelling way. Using dynamics, melody, tension, release, density and space to create memorable moments and exciting transitions to keep the viewer or listener engaged.

I’m always striving to support the “main event.” In film, it’s visuals and dialog. In album work it’s the singer’s performance. I see my job as building a metaphorical “frame” around the picture. Enhance, reinforce, compliment, but never distract.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Two parts, really. First, the satisfaction of achieving a collective goal. Helping a filmmaker/artist realize their vision, while finding a way to authentically express my own musical vision and make a deeper connection with the audience experiencing the work.

There are moments in the course of a project when you hit on something that’s undeniable. Everyone involved immediately feels it. Human connections are made. Those are great moments, and ultimately you want the whole piece to feel like that.

The second part is the inspiration that comes from working collaboratively (usually with people at the top of their game) with those talented peers who challenge and push you in directions you might not have taken otherwise.

WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS FOR SCORING? HOW DO YOU BEGIN?
1) Watch film/read script. 2) Discuss with director, get a sense of their vision. 3) Create musical sketches and build a sonic palette. If there’s already some picture available to work with, then I’ll tackle a scene that feels representative of the rest of the project and refine it with input from the director. My goal is to create a musical/sonic “voice” or “sound” for the film that becomes an inextricable part of its personality.

CAN YOU WALK US THROUGH YOUR WORKFLOW?
Once overall direction has been established and scenes have been spotted, my first step with a scene is to map things out tempo/timing-wise, making note of any significant cuts, events or moments that need to be hit (or avoided) musically.

By defining this structure first, it frees me up to explore musically and texturally with a clear understanding of where “ins” and “outs” are. By then, I usually have a pretty clear sense of what I want to hear as it pertains to realizing the vision of the director, and from that point it is about execution —programming, recording live instrumentation, processing/manipulation and mixing — whatever is required to make the scene “feel” the way it does in my head.

DOES YOUR PROCESS CHANGE DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PROJECT? FILM VS. SPOT, ETC?
There are certain nuances that have to be considered when approaching these different types of projects. Nailing the details in short form (commercials) is often more crucial because you have an entire world of information to convey in 30 seconds or less. There can be no missed moment or opportunity. It needs to feel cohesive with a cinematic story arc, and a compelling payoff at the end, all in an incredibly compressed window of time.

This is less evident in long-form projects. With feature films or TV, you often have the luxury to build musical movements more naturally as a scene progresses.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
That’s a tough one. As a kid I wanted to be an anthropologist. At 21, I went to a cooking school in Paris for a month thinking that that might be cool. More recently, I’ve been dabbling with building websites for friends using template-based platforms like Squarespace.

I think the common themes with these other interests are curiosity, experimentation, creativity and storytelling. Bringing an idea to life, making the abstract tangible. At the end of the day, music still allows me to do these things with a greater degree of satisfaction.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew music would be my path by age 14. I was playing guitar in local bands at the time, and then moved into steady club gigs. By the time I was 18, I was in a signed band, recording and touring. I couldn’t have imagined doing anything else. When I hit my 20s, I knew that writing and composing was the path ahead (vs. being a “gun for hire” guitarist).

I still played in bands and did lots of session work, but I focused more on songwriting and learning about recording and production. During that time, I had the opportunity to work with some legendary British engineer producers. At one point, a well-known video director who had shot some videos with one of my bands had started doing commercials, and he was unhappy with the music that an ad agency had put in one of his spots. So he recruited me to take a shot a composing a new score. It all clicked, and that opened the door to a couple of decades of high-profile commercial spots, as well as consistent work from major ad agencies and brands.

Eventually, this journey led me down the road of TV and film. All the while, I kept a foot in the album world, writing for and producing artists in the US and internationally.

andy-vargas-the-beat-2016-hmma-winner-producer-songwriterCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I Want To Say— Composer: Main Title and opening scenes (Healdsburg International Film Festival – Best Documentary).
LBS– Songwriter/Producer: End Title Track feat. J.R. Richards of Dishwalla (Sundance Official Selection, Independent Spirit Awards nominee)
• Andy Vargas/The Beat (Producer/Songwriter – Winner 2016 Hollywood Music in Media Awards “R&B/Soul”)
• Escape The Fate/Alive (Songwriter — hit single, #26 Active Rock, album #2 Billboard Hard Rock charts)

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s hard to pick one. Some of the projects listed above are contenders. There’s a young band I’m developing and producing right now called Bentley. I will be very proud when that is released. They’re fantastic.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Pro Tools. It’s my “instrument” as much as any guitar or keyboard. It’s allowed me to be incredibly productive and make anything I hear in my head a reality. Steven Slate, Sound Toys and PSP plug-ins. Vibe, warmth, color, saturation, detail. My extensive collection of vintage gear (amps, mics, mic pres, compressors, guitars, boutique pedals, etc.). Not sure if these qualify as “technology,” but they all have buttons and knobs and make great noises!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (to a lesser extent lately).

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have an amazing family who helps keep me centered with my eyes on the big picture. Running and exercise (not enough, but feels great when I do) and, increasingly, I try to meditate each morning. A friend and colleague whose studio demeanor I’ve always admired turned me onto it. He’s consistently calm and focused even in the midst of total drama and chaos. I’d like to think I’m getting there.

Main Image: Patricia Maureen Photography-P.M.P

TwoPoint0 adds editors Debbie McMurtrey and David Cornman

TwoPoint0 has added two veteran editors to its New York-based studio: David Cornman and Debbie McMurtrey.

Cornman is a commercial editor who has cut comedy, effects-driven, dramatic and documentary-style spots for clients such as AIG, GE, Accenture, Bank of America, Staples, Verizon and Computer Associates. He has won awards from the AICE, AICP, Clio and Addys, and he has an Emmy nom in the Best Commercial category.

Cornman’s recent projects include a package of Crayola spots for McGarry-Bowen and P&G work out of Havas, as well as a several digital projects for Facebook’s Creative Shop. A recent passion project included shooting and editing a piece for Atria Senior Living in Rye Brook, New York, which gave residents the chance to try rowing for the first time. Rowers ranged in age from 85-97. “That was fun to be part of,” he says.

McMurtrey started her career at Crew Cuts in 1999. In 2007, she was hired as the first editor at Nomad’s East Coast office. From there she worked at Cutting Room, Red Car and Alkemy X. In addition to spots and branded web content, she has also cut short films that have screened in over 30 festivals, a sitcom pilot for VH1, and parody commercials for Saturday Night Live. She recently collaborated with director/producer Greg Kohs on his feature documentary, The Great Alone, which chronicles the comeback journey of four-time Iditarod champion Lance Mackey. McMurtrey considers her specialty to be docu-style. She excels at taking raw footage and finding the narrative in order to shape the story. She also enjoys editing dialogue and comedy.

McMurtrey has recently worked with director Zack Resnicoff of Impressionista Films on three campaigns for Fisher Price, including 20 individual spots.They have previously worked together on projects for Macy’s, Blue Cross and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Other recent projects completed by McMurtrey include the “We the Voters” campaign and a series of films for Stephens Bank, including a bio of Alexander Hamilton. She has also edited projects this fall for Facebook, Hewlett Packard and Nintendo.

To view Cornman’s and McMurtrey’s reels on the studio’s site.

Behind the Title: Sound mixer/sound designer Rob DiFondi

Name: Rob DiFondi

Company: New York City’s Sound Lounge

Can you describe your company?
Sound Lounge is an audio post company that provides creative services for TV and radio commercials, feature films, television series, digital campaigns, gaming and other emerging media. Artist-owned and operated, we’re made up of an incredibly diverse, talented and caring group of people who all love the advertising and film worlds.

We recently celebrated Sound Lounge’s 18th birthday. I’m proud to say I’ve been a part of the SL family for over 13 years now, and I couldn’t ask for a better group of friends to hang out with every day.

What’s your job title?
Senior Mixer/Sound Designer

What does that entail?
I have actors in my booth all day recording VO (voiceover) for different commercials. My clients (usually brands, ad agencies, production companies, or editorials) hang in my room, and together we get the best possible read from the actor while they’re in the booth. I then craft sound design for the spot by either pulling sound effects from my library or recreating the necessary sounds myself (a.k.a. “Foley”). Once that’s set, I’ll take the lines the actor recorded, the sound effects I created, and any music, and then mix them all together so the spot sounds perfect (and is legal for TV broadcast)!

Being a mixer in the advertising post world isn’t easy. I also have to be able to provide a solid lunch recommendation — I always need to make sure I know where my clients can get the best sushi in the Flatiron district!

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
That most of us are musicians who wanted to be rock stars but thought better of it. Maybe that isn’t so surprising though.

Sound Lounge

What’s your favorite part of the job?
The people, and the social part of the advertising industry. This business is filled with so many kind, funny and talented people, and it’s so nice to have them be a part of your life. And how can you beat partying every year at the MOMA for the AICP Gala?

What’s your least favorite?
Probably the lack of travel. I love our office, but it would be fun to do my job in different cities once in a while.

What is your favorite time of the day?
Walking in my front door and seeing my wife and kids.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Something that involves beaches and nice weather.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I totally fell into this profession. I went to school to become a music engineer/producer. I had no idea there was a whole industry for mixing TV spots. Once I got into it though, I knew immediately that I loved it.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I worked on some really nice pieces for Maybelline, Google, Lincoln and TD Ameritrade.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
Miracle Stain, a Super Bowl commercial that I mixed for Tide a few years back. I finished the mix at 10pm on Thursday and got a call at 2am that there had been some changes, so I had to come back to work in the middle of the night. I tweaked the mix until the sun came up and had it ready to ship by 9am. It was one of those very epic projects that had all the classic markings of a Super Bowl spot.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my DSLR camera and iZotope RX.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’m a big Instagram guy. I love seeing people’s lives told through photos. Facebook is so 2015.

Do you listen to music while you work? Care to share your favorite music to work to?
Since I work in audio I can’t listen to music while I work, but when I’m not working I listen to a lot of modern country music, Dave Matthews Band (not afraid to say it!), prog metal and pretty much everything in between.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I just leased a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. There’s nothing like putting the top down and taking a drive to the beach!

Napoleon Audio launched, Gregg Singer named EP

Veteran agency and audio producer Gregg Singer has joined The Napoleon Group in New York City as executive producer of its newly-launched Napoleon Audio.

Singer intends to integrate Napoleon’s audio capabilities with the group’s soup-to-nuts offerings, which span previz through live action production and post. “We’re creating a true full-service audio production company within The Napoleon Group,” he explains. “This will encompass everything from audio recording and mixing to in-studio direction and supervision, creative writing, sound design, original and stock music, music supervision and licensing, voice-over work and on-camera casting.”

gregg_singerNapoleon Audio’s rooms have mirrored gear and shared ISDN capabilities, a common network and separate isolation booths that can be linked or paired with either control room for simultaneous recording. Alongside the suites is an acoustically-treated stage that connects to the control rooms and enables the capture of live performances. In addition to audio post, the new division will offer trafficking, talent services, location recording and foreign language services, he adds.

Singer himself has an eclectic background, spanning everything from TV and radio production, marketing, advertising and creative development to sales, management, budgeting and strategic planning.  A film and television graduate of the Newhouse School at Syracuse, he got his start working on commercial shoots in New York. He then transitioned to the agency side and worked his way up through the production department, working as a producer, senior producer and head of production at such shops as JWT, BBDO, Bozell/Eskew, Cline Davis Mann and Kirshenbaum & Bond.

Singer left the agency world and joined audio post facility Sound Lounge in 2002 to launch a full-service audio production company. He left Sound Lounge in 2011 and was most recently partner and EP at Propeller Music Group.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Alex Hagon

Name: Alex Hagon

Company: PS260 in New York

Can you describe your company?
We are a media company offering editorial, post production, visual effects and graphic solutions across all viewable platforms.

PS260 is a lovely place to work as we have some of the most creative, talented and friendly people and, in my opinion, also some of the nicest offices in our industry. We started in New York and recently opened our second location in Venice, California. So we now have two amazing spaces.

Job Title?
Film Editor

What does that entail?
Being a film editor, you have to wear many hats — you’re responsible for creating a narrative from a director’s or agency’s vision. Sometimes you start with a treatment and a storyboard. Sometimes you have been on set and had plenty of time to discuss the project with the director and team. And other times, you get many hours of footage for an unscripted spot and are given the brief to make it “great, enthralling, engaging.”

army

Hagon edited this spot for the Army Reserve.

Once you have footage cut together, you are adding music, sound design and visual effects, all of which add layers to the story. Having the knowledge to do these well ultimately helps sell the vision to the brand.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Once you are presenting an edit to the director and agency, you have to have good negotiating skills and be able to “sell” your point of view. You also need to interpret what may be very different points of view in the room, and then work out how to best achieve those goals.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Being able to bring something to a project that no one was expecting, whether that’s finding a different perspective on a story or even coming up with an interesting music track.

What’s your least favorite?
Not being able to do a great job when schedules clash.

What is your favorite time of day?
I like the early evening, when the sun is setting, especially since I have a nice view of Manhattan from my office!

Not a bad view!

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be a vet.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I thought I was going to be a drummer for a living, but when that didn’t pan out, editing was a natural fit. I started as a runner and worked my way up, working under three very different editors, all of whom were generous enough to share their skills. I also learned a lot from how they would interact with clients, adopting what I thought were their best characteristics, and I continue to learn from the people around me, even to this day.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I recently did a project for Prudential with Droga5, directed by Matt Bieler at Reset. There was also an AT&T project via BBDO and directed by Brian Billow at O Positive. Another one was a project for the Army Reserve for McCann, directed by Brett Froomer at Radical Media.

What is the project you are most proud of?
I loved working with Marcus Svanberg at Blink on the Blackberry campaign featuring Alicia Keys, Neil Gaiman and Robert Rodriguez for BBDO. It was beautiful footage to edit and it was a lot of fun creating the narrative from the fascinating interviews that Marcus managed to coax out of each of the characters.

Blackberry with Alicia Keys.

What social media channels do you follow?
Most of them, but Instagram is my favorite.

What kind of music do you listen to while you work?
I listen to a large variety of music, usually via Spotify, and I tend to play certain albums to death. This week it’s been Beck’s Morning Phase, Dr. John’s Swamp Blues, The Budos Band’s self-titled album, Wise Up Ghost from Elvis Costello and the Roots, Bob Marley and the Wailers Live! and Grimes’ Art Angels.

What Do You Do To De-Stress From It All?
I tend not to get too stressed out as I love what I do, but I do the Alexander Technique and meditate.

Director Zach Math joins Caviar

Production company Cavier, which has offices in Los Angeles, London, Brussels and Paris, has added director Zach Math to its directorial roster. Math’s series of spots for K-Mart (“Ship My Pants”) got over 50 million views on YouTube and won a Webby Award, and two of his branded shorts are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

His documentary feature, The Final Member, premiered at the Toronto Hot Docs International Film Festival and played festivals all over the world. The distribution rights were purchased by Drafthouse Films and it was released on Netflix. Since then, he’s worked with brands such as Fox Sports, Nissan, AT&T, Comcast and the NFL.

While Math is excited to continue working in the advertising and commercial world, he is also looking forward to taking advantage of Caviar’s film and television capabilities to develop his own long format projects.

“Zach has proven his directorial expertise throughout the branded content world,” says Caviar Los Angeles executive producer Jasper Thomlinson. “His sophisticated visual style, skills as a writer and comedic sensibility fit in here perfectly.”

Behind the Title: Nutmeg creative director Dave Rogan

NAME: Dave Rogan

COMPANY: New York City’s Nutmeg Creative

CAN YOU DESCRIBE NUTMEG?
We are a single-resource creative partner that brings targeted communications to life for brands, networks and ad agencies. A post resource for nearly 40 years, Nutmeg also provides audio, editing, color and graphics, in addition to interactive, identity and social.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It depends on the day, on the project and on the client. In some cases, I am acting in the traditional role of agency creative director, coming up with original ideas that meet stated goals for the project. In many other cases, I am guiding a project from genesis to completion, adding a creative perspective or ensuring that our clients’ expectations are met or surpassed.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Almost anything can fall under that title — from original concepting and scripting, to “MacGyvering” a makeshift tracking marker out of a stick on set for an effects-heavy spot.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I was an ad agency CD, it was almost impossible getting the creative, production and post talent on the same page at the same time, to my satisfaction. Half of my job was making sure everyone was current on any rolling changes, adaptations to, or special challenges presented by the creative. But because Nutmeg has creative, interactive, production and post all under one roof, we’re able to think through every stage of the project together from the get-go. Instances of something unexpected popping up are almost non-existent because so many heads are in the game at the same time.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I seem to always be flying the day before or after a holiday. Last year, I flew home from a shoot on Thanksgiving morning. Wasn’t in love with that, I must admit.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning person — I love waking up before the sun and watching it rise.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be trying to convince Dream Theater they need a second keyboard player.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew I wanted to be in a creative professional environment from a very early age — before college. I’ve been lucky enough to ride industry trends and continual reinvention to a place where I am still able to continue to shape creative communications in any number of ways on a day-to-day basis.

ParagardCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
My current projects range from working on a critically celebrated pharma campaign for a disease called nontuberculous mycobacteria — NTM, for short —to a series of hilarious spots for a female contraceptive to an animated PSA aimed at wiping out polio in the Third World. There is also the forthcoming launch of a famous Broadway reboot. It varies every day with no rhyme or reason, and I love it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Scale-wise, it certainly pales in comparison to most of the projects I’m involved in here, but I take a special amount of pride in Nutmeg’s semi-finalist submission to the Doritos’ Crash the Super Bowl (image below) contest a year ago. It was a spot I wrote, directed and co-produced with our internal production team with almost no budget. To know that people really enjoyed it was thrilling and very satisfying for all of us.

Doritos Crash the Superbowl-Dave RoganNAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My iPhone, laptop and my ancient, but beloved, Korg Trinity.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, mostly.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Only with headphones! Lately, I’ve been listening to Dream Theater’s prog metal opera, “The Astonishing.” I think my coworkers would tear their earballs out if I played it at any kind of audible volume.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I wish I had a more interesting answer than this, but I find my clients enjoyable, not stress inducing. When I worked at agencies, the dynamic was different and I definitely felt under the gun on a daily basis. At Nutmeg, it’s different. The clients really want our perspective and guidance, and, in most cases, we’re very much partners with the same goals.

Adam Schwartz and Jim Ulbrich join Nomad Editing

Nomad Editing has expanded its New York staff with the addition of editors/partners Jim Ulbrich and Adam Schwartz. Their hiring comes on the heels of EP/partner Jennifer Lederman and editor/partner Jai Shukla joining the studio earlier this year.

Jim Ulbrich comes to Nomad  — an Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere house — after working at a variety of New York-based editorial shops. Since joining Nomad, Ulbrich has worked on projects for Saatchi & Saatchi NY and Toyota with Droga5. He is now finishing a campaign with Grey. He collaborates on many projects with director Matt Smukler from Community Films.

Ulbrich began his career at Berlin Cameron and then moved to 89 Edit. He then moved to Mad River and then Beast where he became a partner in the company. He has edited campaigns for AT&T, Cheerios, Hanes and Coke.

Schwartz has followed a similar career trajectory to Ulbrich. His client list includes big brands such as Google, HP, Verizon, Reebok and Nike. Schwartz has worked with high-profile directors, including Janusz Kaminski, Errol Morris, Jared Hess and Wes Anderson. He’s worked on several projects since joining Nomad, and is now editing with BBDO NY. Schwartz began editing at Lost Planet before he became a founding partner at Beast.

 

Commercial and film director Jessica Sanders joins Sanctuary

Sanctuary in Culver City has added director Jessica Sanders to its roster. Sanders, who has a background in documentaries and character-driven storytelling, got her big break in advertising with a Sony “make.believe” short film, for which she won a Cannes Young Director Award. The film also got the attention of Steve Jobs, who personally handpicked her to direct the launch ad for the Apple iPad.

During her career, the filmmaker has earned an Oscar nomination for Sing, a short doc on aspiring young vocalists. She also got a Sundance Special Jury Prize for After Innocence, her documentary about wrongfully convicted men cleared by DNA that serves as the basis for her upcoming feature film, Picking Cotton.

Sanders, whose resume also includes campaigns for Amazon, Samsung, Procter & Gamble, Honda and Toyota, is currently working on a three-film campaign for Land Rover out of agency Spark44’s London office. She will be also be directing a short film for Refinery29’s SmashBox Anthology Series, produced by Sanctuary and Sanders.

Main Photo: Elisabeth Caren

ArsenalCreative beefs up with head of 2D Chris Noellert

LA-based ArsenalCreative has brought on Chris Noellert as head of 2D. He brings with him over 20 years of experience in VFX, Flame and post. During Noellert’s two-decade career, he’s been a Flame artist and served as VFX supervisor at shops including Chimney, Syndicate, Mirada Studios. Most recently, he spent nearly four years at Carbon VFX, where he held the title of creative director/lead Flame.

At ArsenalCreative, Noellert had already worked on the “Not Just New, Better” campaign for Hyundai, continuing his longtime collaboration with agency partner Innocean. “I had done a fair amount of work for Innocean at my previous shop, including leading two of their three Hyundai Super Bowl ads, First Date and Ryan Town, and over the years we really hit a nice stride,” he says. “It’s fantastic when you have the opportunity to consistently work with creative directors and teams where you have developed a creative shorthand. You can anticipate and fulfill their needs successfully thru the project — from concepting and participating on-set, to sitting in the bay and pulling it all together. So when Innocean called with ‘Not Just New, Better,’ I was super excited to get them introduced to my new cohorts at Arsenal.”

In addition to the Hyundai and Principal Financial campaigns — Noellert led the revamped logo rollout and brand campaign — ArsenalCreative is also releasing 17 web films for Toyota in partnership with Saatchi & Saatchi LA and Superlounge’s Jordan Brady.

“From the outset, I was looking for an established boutique-style shop positioned to expand into the latest media trends and technologies” he explains. “I also knew I was looking for a shop that fosters open relations with clientele – allowing me to take a collaborative leading role in the creative process, not being the guy in the Flame suite in the corner at a two-man shop, or a cog in a wheel of hundreds.”