Tag Archives: Cine Gear

Canon targets HDR with EOS C200, C200B cinema cameras

Canon has grown its Cinema EOS line of pro cinema cameras with the EOS C200 and EOS C200B. These new offerings target filmmakers and TV productions. They offer two 4K video formats — Canon’s new Cinema RAW Light and MP4 — and are optimized for those interested in shooting HDR video.

Alongside a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system, Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF system and improved operability for pros, these new cameras are built for capturing 4K video across a variety of production applications.

Based on feedback from Cinema EOS users, these new offerings will be available in two configurations, while retaining the same core technologies within. The Canon EOS C200 is a production-ready solution that can be used right out of the box, accompanied by an LCD monitor, LCD attachment, camera grip and handle unit. The camera also features a 1.77 million-dot OLED electronic view finder (EVF). For users who need more versatility and the ability to craft custom setups tailored to their subject or environment, the C200B offers cinematographers the same camera without these accessories and the EVF to optimize shooting using a gimbal, drone or a variety of other configurations.

Canon’s Peter Marr was at Cine Gear demo-ing the new cameras.

New Features
Both cameras feature the same 8.85MP CMOS sensor that combines with a newly developed dual Digic DV6 image processing system to help process high-resolution image data and record video from full HD (1920×1080) and 2K (2048×1080) to 4K UHD (3840×2160) and 4K DCI (4096×2160). A core staple of the third-generation Cinema EOS system, this new processing platform offers wide-ranging expressive capabilities and improved operation when capturing high-quality HDR video.

The combination of the sensor and a newly developed processing system also allows for the support for two new 4K file formats designed to help optimize workflow and make 4K and HDR recording more accessible to filmmakers. Cinema RAW Light, available in 4K 60p/50p at 10-bit and 30p/25p/24p at 12-bit, allows users to record data internally to a CFast card by cutting data size to about one-third to one-fifth of a Cinema RAW file, without losing grading flexibility. Due to the reduced file size, users will appreciate rich dynamic range and easier post processing without sacrificing true 4K quality. Alongside recording to a CFast card, proxy data (MP4) can also be simultaneously recorded to an SD card for use in offline editing.

Additionally, filmmakers will also be able to export 4K in MP4 format on SD media cards at 60/50/30/25/24P at 8-bit. Support for UHD recording allows for use in cinema and broadcasting applications or scenarios where long recording times are needed while still maintaining top image quality. The digital cinema cameras also offer slow-motion full-HD recording support at up to 120fps.

The Canon EOS C200and Canon EOS C200B feature Innovative Focus Control that helps assist with 4K shooting that demands precise focusing, whether from single or remote operation. According to Canon, its Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology helps to expand the distance of the subject area to enable faster focus during 4K video recording. This also allows for highly accurate continuous AF and face detection AF when using EF lenses. For 4K video opportunities that call for precise focus accuracy that can’t be checked on an HD monitor, users can also take advantage of the LCD Monitor LM-V1 (supplied with the EOS C200 camera), which provides intuitive touch focusing support to help filmmakers achieve sophisticated focusing even as a single operator.

In addition to these features, the cameras offer:
• Oversampling HD processing: enhances sensitivity and helps minimize noise
• Wide DR Gamma: helps reduce overexposure by retaining continuity with a gamma curve
• ISO 100-102400 and 54db gain: high quality in both low sensitivity and low-light environments
• In-camera ND filter: internal ND unit allows cleaning of glass for easier maintenance
• ACESproxy support: delivers standardized color space in images, helping to improve efficiency
• Two SD card and one CFast card slots for internal recording
• Improved grip and Cinema-EOS-system-compatible attachment method
• Support for Canon Cine-Servo and EF cinema lenses

Editing and grading of the Cinema RAW Light video format will be supported in Blackmagic Resolve. Editing will also be possible in Avid Media Composer, using a Canon RAW plugin for Avid Media Access. This format can also be processed using the Canon application, Cinema RAW Development.

Also, Premiere Pro CC of Adobe will support this format until the end of 2017. Editing will also be possible in Final Cut Pro X from Apple, using the Canon RAW Plugin for Final Cut Pro X after the second half of this year.

The Canon EOS C200 and EOS C200B are scheduled to be available in August for estimated retail prices of $7,499 and $5,999, respectively. The EOS C200 comes equipped with additional accessories including the LM-V1 LCD monitor, LA-V1 LCD attachment, GR-V1 camera grip and HDU-2 handle unit. Available in September, these accessories will also be sold separately.

At Cine Gear, Panasonic shows 5.7K Super 35mm cinema camera

During Cine Gear this past weekend, Panasonic previewed the AU-EVA1, a new 5.7K cinema camera positioned between the Panasonic Lumix GH5 4K mirrorless camera and the VariCam LT 4K cinema camera. Compact and lightweight, the AU-EVA1 is made for handheld shooting, but is also suited for documentaries, commercials and music videos.

“For cinema-style acquisition, we realized there was a space between the GH5 and the VariCam LT,” said Panasonic cinema product manager Mitch Gross. “With its compact size and new 5.7K sensor, the EVA1 fills that gap for a variety of filmmaking applications.”

The EVA1 contains a newly designed 5.7K Super 35mm-sized sensor for capturing true cinematic images. By starting at a higher native resolution, the 5.7K sensor yields a higher resolving image when down sampled to 4K, UHD, 2K and even 720p. The increased color information results in a finer, more accurate finished image.

One of the key features of the VariCam 35, VariCam LT and VariCam Pure is dual native ISO. Using a process that allows the sensor to be read in a fundamentally different way, Dual Native ISO extracts more information from the sensor without degrading the image. This results in a camera that can switch from a standard sensitivity to a high sensitivity without an increase in noise or other artifacts.

On the VariCams, dual native ISO has allowed cinematographers to use less light on set, saving time and money, as well as allowing for a great variety of artistic choices. The EVA1 will include dual native ISO, but the camera is currently being tested to determine final ISO specifications.

The ability to capture accurate colors and rich skin tones is a must for any filmmaker. Like the VariCam lineup of cinema cameras, the EVA1 contains V-Log/V-Gamut capture to deliver high dynamic range and broad colors. V-Log has log curve characteristics that are reminiscent of negative film and V-Gamut delivers a color space even larger than film. The EVA1 will also import the colorimetry of the VariCam line.

Weighing only 2.65 pounds (body only) with a compact form factor (6.69” x 5.31” x 5.23”) and a removable hand-grip, the EVA1 can be used for efficient handheld shooting and can also be mounted on a drone, gimbal rig or jib arm for complex yet smooth camera moves. There will also be numerous mounting points and Panasonic is currently working with top accessory makers to allow further customization with the EVA1.

Also suited for indie filmmakers, the EVA1 records to lower-cost SD cards. The camera can record in several formats and compression rates and offers up to 10-bit 4:2:2, even in 4K. For high-speed capture, the EVA1 offers 2K up to 240fps. In terms of bitrates, you can record up to 400Mbps for robust recording. A complete breakdown of recording formats will be available at the time of the EVA1’s release this fall.

In terms of lenses, the camera uses a native EF-mount, allowing shooters access to the broad EF lens ecosystem, including dozens of cinema-style prime and zoom lenses from numerous manufacturers. Electronic Image Stabilization (EIS) is employed to compensate for camera shake and blurring, which will help smooth out handheld or shoulder-mount shots on documentary or run-and-gun projects. Behind the lens mount, an integrated ND filter wheel in 2, 4 and 6 stops allows for precise exposure control. The EVA1 also allows the IR Cut filter to be swung out of the path to the sensor at the push of a button. Photographic effects and night vision imagery are possible with this control over infrared.

The EVA1 offers dual balanced XLR audio inputs and 4K-capable video outputs in both HDMI and SDI. In a future firmware upgrade, the EVA1 will offer 5.7K RAW output to third-party recorders.

The EVA1 will ship for just under $8,000 (body only).

 

Cine Gear Expo showcases production, post solutions

By Mel Lambert

With its focus on sound and image acquisition, the annual Cine Gear Expo — now in its 20th year — offers attendees the opportunity to examine a wide cross section of systems targeted at the production and post communities, including capture, storage and delivery configurations that accommodate 4K and HDR workflows. Held last Friday and Saturday at the Paramount Studios complex in central Hollywood, a large number of companies showed off new innovations within Stages 31 and 32, in addition to outdoor booths located throughout the New York Street area. This year’s event reportedly attracted in excess of 12,000 attendees.

One highlight was a rare 70mm screening by Band Pro Film & Digital of Baraka, followed by a Q&A with producer Mark Magidson. Shot in 25 countries on six continents, the film includes a number of scenes that director Ron Fricke defines as “a guided meditation on humanity.” Originally released in 1992, Baraka was the first film in over 20 years to be photographed in the 70mm Todd-AO format, and reportedly the first film ever to be restored and scanned at 8K resolution. “Last year we screened Samsara in 4K at Cine Gear,” reports Band Pro president/CEO Amnon Band. “The response was huge, and we wanted this year to be just as amazing. Baraka is a film that deserves to be projected and appreciated on the big screen.” (As critic Roger Ebert once commented: “If man sends another Voyager to the distant stars and it can carry only one film on board, that film might be Baraka.”)

Panavision Primo 70 lenses and the Red Weapon 8K.

Panavision Primo 70 lenses and the Red Weapon 8K.

Panavision/Light Iron showed test footage from director Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight, which was shot by Robert Richardson, ASC, in Ultra Panavision 70 and projected from 70mm anamorphic film at the Paramount Theater. The first production since Khartoum (1966) to be shot in Ultra Panavision 70, the anamorphic format is captured on 65mm negative stock to deliver an approximately 2.7:1 image that is described as “sharp but not clinical, with painterly bokeh and immersive depth.” Also shown in the Panavision/Light Iron booth was a demo of 8K footage shot on the RED Weapon 8K with Panavision Primo 70 lenses, PanaNet, a high-speed fiber network between Panavision locations for transferring media at up to 10GB per second; LightScan, a low-cost telecine solution that transfers ProRes UHD quality targeted at independent films, commercials and TV shows that prefer film optics; and Live Play 3, an iPad dailies app for Mac OS X.

Canon’s EOS C300 Mark II digital cinema camera.

Canon took the opportunity to showcase the new EOS C300 Mark II digital cinema camera. According to Joseph Bogacz, a Canon advisor on professional engineering and solutions, the Mk II is a completely new camera, and not derived from the original C300. “The Mk II offers more than 15 stops of dynamic range, with ISO from 160 to 102,400. We have also included 10-bit recording for 4K shoots, in addition to 10- or 12-bit HD/2K resolutions. The Mk II also offers internal 4K recording, for less complexity on a film or TV set.” The camera’s power system has also been beefed up to 14.4 volts, with Lemo connectors.

Also shown was the new portable DP-V2410 24-inch 4K reference monitor, which is designed for on-set use during 4K cinema and 4K/UHD TV/commercial productions. The monitor “delivers a consistent look throughout the entire workflow,” according to Jon Sagud, a professional marketing manager with Canon Imaging Technologies and Communications Group. “It connects via a single cable to the C300 MkII and also accepts HDMI sources.”

Gale Tattersall

The RGB LED backlight panel is rated at 400 NIT light levels with several built-in waveform displays, and can be powered from 24V supplies. It can also de-Bayer live 4K RAW video from EOS C500 and C300 Mark II cameras, and supports 4K ACES proxy (ACES 1.0) to maintain a desired “look” throughout a production-to-post workflow.

The company also hosted a panel discussion, “A First Look at the EOS C300 Mark II with Gale Tattersall,” during which the acclaimed director of photography presented his first impressions of the new camera, together with reactions from first AC Tony Gutierrez, second AC Zoe Van Brunt and Steadicam operator Ari Robbins, while shooting Trick Shot, the first short to be shot entirely with the new system. “I was immediately impressed by the C300 Mk II’s wide dynamic range and output quality,” Tattersall confided. “I could avoid white-level clipping and hold shadow detail; you can go beyond the 15-stop range if you want to. We were working with a 50-1,000 T5 Canon lens, which is a perfect all-round zoom. With Netflix and other studios specifying 4K resolution, the MkII’s on-board recording will definitely streamline our workflows.”

Probably best known for his work as DP on Fox’s House television series, Tattersall currently is working on Netflix’s Grace and Frankie series, using a competitive 4K camera. “When you have [series principals] Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin – ‘ladies in their seventies’ – wearing black against black backgrounds, dynamic range become a key factor! The Mk II offers outstanding performance down in the critical 15 IRE low-level range.”

During a panel discussion organized by Sony, cinematographer Rob Hardy, BSC, shared details of his work on director Alex Garland’s Ex Machina, using a F65 CineAlta digital camera. Because of his prior experience shooting 35mm film for commercials, “I wanted to retain the same operator workflow,” Hardy concedes. “During pre-production 4K tests [in the UK at Pinewood Studios] we compared the look of Red Dragon, Arri Alexa and Sony F65 cameras, with new and old glass [lenses]. I needed to capture in the camera what I was seeing on the set; skin tones became a key parameter across a range of interior and exterior lighting levels.

DP Rob Hardy during a panel discussion on using Sony CineAlta F65 camera to shoot Ex Machina.

DP Rob Hardy during a panel discussion on using Sony F65 CineAlta camera to shoot Ex Machina.

“We opted for Xtal Express anamorphic glass on the F65, a combination that offered everything I was looking for. The resultant images had the depth that I needed for the film; the F65 ‘read’ the glass perfectly for me at T2.8 or T2.3 apertures.” UK-based Joe Dunton Cameras supplied the Cooke Xtal (Crystal) Express anamorphic lenses, which are derived from vintage Cooke spherical lenses that, in the eighties, were rehoused and modified with anamorphic elements.

Turning to other booth displays at Cine Gear, Amimon demonstrated the Connex series of 5GHz wireless transmission units that are said to deliver full HD video quality with zero-latency transmission over distances up to 3,300 feet, which are targeted at feature films, documentaries, music videos and other production applications that need realtime control of a camera and drone. A built-in OSD provides telemetry information; commands can also be sent via Futaba S-Bus protocol to a drone’s gimbal; the unit supports simultaneous multicasting to four screens.

Audio Intervisual Design (AID) showed examples of recent post-production design and installation projects, including a multi-function dub stage and DI/color grading suite for Blumhouse Productions, which has enjoyed recent success with the Paranormal Activity, The Purge, Insidious and Sinister franchises, in addition to Oscar success with Whiplash and Emmy success with HBO’s The Normal Heart. Also shown at the AID booth was an Avid S6 Console surface for Pro Tools and examples of IHSEusa’s extensive range of KVM switches and extenders, plus DVI splitters and converters.

GoPro demonstrated application of its free-of-charge GoPro Studio software that imports, trims and playbacks videos and timelapse photo sequences; edit templates offer music, edit points and slow-motion effects. Video playback speeds can also be changed for ultra-slow and fast motion using the built-in Flux app.

G-Tech's Aimee Davos with G-Drive ev ATC drives.

G-Tech’s Aimee Davos with G-Drive ev ATC drives.

G-Tech showed the new G-Drive ev ATC with either Thunderbolt or USB3 interfaces, designed to withstand life while on hostile locations. The ruggedized, watertight housing with tethered cable holds a removable hard drive and is available in various capacities. The ATC’s all-terrain case is compatible with the firm’s Evolution Series, with a durable 7,200 RPM drive that is said to leverage the speed of Thunderbolt while providing the flexibility of USB. A 1TB USB drive sells for $179 and $229 for a 1TB Thunderbolt model. Also shown was the RAID 8-Bay Thunderbolt 2 storage solution designed to support multi-stream compressed 4K workflows at transfer rates up to 1,350MB/s

London-based iDailies offers 35/16mm processing and 35 mm printing, together with telecine transfer and color grading; only two such film-processing facilities currently exist in the UK. “We are handling all of the processing for [Walt Disney Pictures’] new Star Wars: Episode 7–The Force Awakens, which is being shot entirely on film by director J. J. Abrams,” explains the firm’s senior colorist Dan Russell. Reportedly, the facility has processed every studio film shot in the UK since March 2013, including Spectre, Mission Impossible 5, Cinderella and Fury, together with The Imitation Game and Far From The Madding Crowd. It also supports the majority of film schools, to help “encourage and enable the next generation of filmmakers to discover the unique attributes of film origination.”

L-R: SNS's Steve McKenna with the John Diel.

L-R: SNS’s Steve McKenna with  John Diel.

Sound Devices showcased the PIX-E Series on-camera video monitors, which includes 1,920-by-1,080 five-inch and or 1,920-by-1,200 seven-inch LCDs, with integral monitoring tools, SDI and HDMI I/O, plus the ability to record 4K and Apple ProRes 4444 to mSATA-based SpeedDrives. PIX-E monitors feature compact, die-cast metal housings and Gorilla Glass 2. Also shown was the 12-input Model 688 production mixer with 16-track recorder, offering eight outputs plus digital mixing and routing and the MixAssist automatically drops the volume of inactive inputs and maintains consistent background levels.

Studio Network Solutions (SNS) showcased practical applications for ShareBrowser, a file/project/asset management interface for OS X and Windows, and which is included with every EVO shared-storage system. “ShareBrowser lets post users search, index, share, preview and verify all assets,” explained sales manager Steve McKenna. “More than a file manager, the app enables automatic project locking for Apple Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premier, Avid Pro Tools and other editors, as well as Avid project and bin sharing, and allows search across all EVO storage as well as local, offline and other network disks.”

Cine Gear photos by Mel Lambert