Tag Archives: Cameras

Timecode Systems intros SyncBac Pro for GoPro Hero6

Not long after GoPro introduced its latest offering, Timecode Systems released a customized SyncBac Pro for GoPro Hero6 Black cameras, a timecode-sync solution for the newest generation of action cameras.

By allowing the Hero6 to generate its own frame-accurate timecode, the SyncBac Pro creates the capability to timecode-sync multiple GoPro cameras wirelessly over long-range RF. If GoPro cameras are being used as part of a wider multicamera shoot, SyncBac Pro also allows GoPro cameras to timecode-sync with pro cameras and audio devices. At the end of a shoot, the edit team receives SD cards with frame-accurate timecode embedded into the MP4 file. According to Timecode Systems, using SyncBac Pro for timecode saves around 85 percent in post.

“With the Hero6, GoPro has added features that advance camera performance and image quality, which increases the appeal of using GoPro cameras for professional filming for television and film,” says Ashok Savdharia, CTO at Timecode Systems. “SyncBac Pro further enhances the camera’s compatibility with professional production methods by adding the ability to integrate footage into a multicamera film and broadcast workflow in the same way as larger-scale professional cameras.”

The new SyncBac Pro for GoPro Hero6 Black will start shipping this winter, and it is now available for preorder.

Blackmagic’s new Ultimatte 12 keyer with one-touch keying

Building on the 40-year heritage of its Ultimatte keyer, Blackmagic Design has introduced the Ultimatte 12 realtime hardware compositing processor for broadcast-quality keying, adding augmented reality elements into shots, working with virtual sets and more. The Ultimatte 12 features new algorithms and color science, enhanced edge handling, greater color separation and color fidelity and better spill suppression.

The 12G-SDI design gives Ultimatte 12 users the flexibility to work in HD and switch to Ultra HD when they are ready. Sub-pixel processing is said to boost image quality and textures in both HD and Ultra HD. The Ultimatte 12 is also compatible with most SD, HD and Ultra HD equipment, so it can be used with existing cameras.

With Ultimatte 12, users can create lifelike composites and place talent into any scene, working with both fixed cameras and static backgrounds or automated virtual set systems. It also enables on-set previs in television and film production, letting actors and directors see the virtual sets they’re interacting with while shooting against a green screen.

Here are a few more Ultimatte 12 features:

  • For augmented reality, on-air talent typically interacts with glass-like computer-generated charts, graphs, displays and other objects with colored translucency. Adding tinted, translucent objects is very difficult with a traditional keyer, and the results don’t look realistic. Ultimatte 12 addresses this with a new “realistic” layer compositing mode that can add tinted objects on top of the foreground image and key them correctly.
  • One-touch keying technology analyzes a scene and automatically sets more than 100 parameters, simplifying keying as long as the scene is well-lit and the cameras are properly white-balanced. With one-touch keying, operators can pull a key accurately and with minimum effort, freeing them to focus on the program with fewer distractions.
  • Ultimatte 12’s new image processing algorithms, large internal color space, and automatic internal matte generation lets users work on different parts of the image separately with a single keyer.
  • For color handling, Ultimatte 12 has new flare, edge and transition processing to remove backgrounds without affecting other colors. The improved flare algorithms can remove green tinting and spill from any object — even dark shadow areas or through transparent objects.
  • Ultimatte 12 is controlled via Ultimatte Smart Remote 4, a touch-screen remote device that connects via Ethernet. Up to eight Ultimatte 12 units can be daisy-chained together and connected to the same Smart Remote, with physical buttons for switching and controlling any attached Ultimatte 12.

Ultimatte 12 is now available from Blackmagic Design resellers.

Review: Polaroid Cube+

By Brady Betzel

There are a lot of options out there for outdoor, extreme sports cameras — GoPro is the first that comes to mind with their Hero line, but even companies like Garmin have their own versions that are gaining traction in the niche action camera market. Polaroid has been trying their hand in lots of product markets lately, from camera sliders to monopods and even video cameras with the Polaroid Cube+.

I’m a big fan of GoPro cameras, but one thing that might keep people away is the price. So what if you want something that will record video and take still pictures at a lower cost? That’s where the Polaroid Cube+ fits in. It’s a cube-shaped HD camera that is not much larger than a few sugar cubes. It can film HD video (technically 720p at 30, 60 or 120 fps; 1080p at 30 or 60fps; or 1440p at 30fps), as well take still images at four megapixels interpolated into eight megapixels.

Right off the bat you’ll read “4MP interpolated into 8MP,” which really means it’s a 4MP camera sensor that uses some sort of algorithm, like bicubic interpolation, to blow up your image with a minimal amount of quality loss. Think of it this way — if you are viewing images on your smartphone, you probably won’t see a lot of problems except for your image being a little soft. Other than that tricky bit of word play (which is not uncommon among camera manufacturers), the Cube+ has a decent retail price at just $150.

In my mind, this is a camera that can be used as an educational tool for young filmmakers or for a filmmaker that wants to get a really sneaky b-roll shot in a tight space without paying a high cost. The sound quality isn’t great, but it’s good for reference when syncing cameras together or in an emergency when there is no other audio recording.

Inside the box you get the Cube+ in black, red or teal; a microUSB cable to charge and connect the Cube + to your computer, a user guide, and an 8GB MicroSD. There is a WiFi button, a power/record button and a back cover. Your MicroSD lives under the back cover, and the connection for the microUSB cable can be found there as well.

The Cube+ has WiFi built in, so you can access the camera on your Android or iPhone, control your camera and settings, or even browse the content of your camera. You must have their app to be able to control the Cube+’s camera settings, otherwise it will default to what you had last. To start filming or taking pictures, you hold the power button for three seconds to turn it on. You click the button on the top twice to start recording video, then click once more to end video recording. You click just once to take a picture.

The Cube+ films with its 124-degree lens that has a fisheye look like many wide-angle action cams. According to Polaroid, the Cube+ has image stabilization built in, but I found the footage to still be shaky. It’s possible that the video could be shakier without it, but I found the footage to need some post production stabilization work.

In my opinion, what really sets this camera apart from other action cameras, besides the price point, is the magnet inside the camera that allows you to stick it to anything magnetic without buying additional accessories. Others should consider adding that to their lineup too.

I took the Cube+ to the Santa Barbara Zoo with one of my sons recently and wasn’t afraid to give it to him to film or take pictures with. Since it is splash proof, it can even get a little wet without ruining it. Again, I really love the ability to mount the Cube+ to almost anything with its magnet on the bottom, which is pretty strong. We were riding the train around the zoo, and I stuck it to the train rail without a worry of it falling off. But I did notice when using it that the magnet did get pretty warm, as in it would border on being too hot to touch. Just something to keep in mind if you let kids use it.

In the end, the Polaroid Cube+ is not on the quality level of the GoPro Hero 5 Session, but it might be good for someone filming for the first time that doesn’t want to spend a lot of money. And at $150, it might be a good b-roll camera when used in conjunction with your phone’s camera.

You can check out more about the Polaroid Cube+ in its user manual.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Chatting up IBC’s Michael Crimp about this year’s show

Every year, many from our industry head to Amsterdam for the International Broadcasting Convention. With IBC’s start date coming fast, what better time for the organization’s CEO, Michael Crimp, to answer questions about the show, which runs from September 15-19.

IBC is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. How will you celebrate?
In addition to producing a commemorative book, and our annual party, IBC is starting a new charitable venture, supporting an Amsterdam group that provides support through sport for disadvantaged and disabled children. If you want to play against former Ajax players in our Saturday night match, bid now to join the IBC All-Stars.

It’s also about keeping the conversation going. We are 50 years on and have a huge amount to talk about — from Ultra HD to 5G connectivity, from IP to cyber security.

How has IBC evolved over the past 10 years?
The simple answer is that IBC has evolved along with the industry, or rather IBC has strived to identify the key trends which will transform the industry and ensure that we are ahead of the curve.

Looking back 10 years, digital cinema was still a work in progress: the total transition we have now seen was just beginning. We had dedicated areas focused on mobile video and digital signage, things that we take for granted today. You can see the equivalents in IBC2017, like the IP Showcase and all the work done on interoperability.

Five years ago we started our Leaders’ Summit, the behind-closed-doors conference for CEOs from the top broadcasters and media organizations, and it has proved hugely successful. This year we are adding two more similar, invitation-only events, this time aimed at CTOs. We have a day focusing on cyber security and another looking at the potential for 5G.

We are also trying a new business matchmaking venue this year, the IBC Startup Forum. Working with Media Honeypot, we are aiming to bring startups and scale-ups together with the media companies that might want to use their talents and the investors who might back the deals.

Will IBC and annual trade shows still be relevant in another 50 years?
Yes, I firmly believe they will. Of course, you will be able to research basic information online — and you can do that now. We have added to the online resources available with our IBC365 year-round online presence. But it is much harder to exchange opinions and experiences that way. Human nature dictates that we learn best from direct contact, from friendly discussions, from chance conversations. You cannot do that online. It is why we regard the opportunity to meet old friends and new peers as one of the key parts of the IBC experience.

What are some of the most important decisions you face in your job on a daily basis?
IBC is an interesting business to head. In some ways, of course, my job as CEO is the same as the head of any other company: making sure the staff are all pulling in the same direction, the customers are happy and the finances are secure. But IBC is unlike any other business because our focus is on spreading and sharing knowledge, and because our shareholders are our customers. IBC is organized by the industry for the industry, and at the top of our organization is the Partnership Board, which contains representatives of the six leading professional and trade bodies in the industry: IABM, IEE, IET, RTS, SCTE and SMPTE.

Can you talk a bit about the conference?
One significant development from that first IBC 50 years ago is the nature of the conference. The founders were insistent that an exhibition needed a technical conference, and in 1967 it was based solely on papers outlining the latest research.

Today, the technical papers program still forms the center piece of the conference. But today our conference is much broader, speaking to the creative and commercial people in our community as well as the engineering and operational.

This year’s conference is subtitled “Truth, Trust and Transformation,” and has five tracks running over five days. Session topics range from the deeply technical, like new codec design, to fake news and alternative facts. Speakers range from Alberto Duenas, the principal video architect at chipmaker ARM to Dan Danker, the product director at Facebook.

How are the attendees and companies participating in IBC changing?
The industry is so much broader than it once was. Consumers used to watch television, because that was all that the technology could achieve. Today, they expect to choose what they want to watch, when and where they want to watch it, and on the device and platform which happen to be convenient at the time.

As the industry expands, so does the IBC community. This year, for example, we have the biggest temporary structure we have ever built for an IBC, to house Hall 14, dedicated to content everywhere.

Given that international travel can be painful, what should those outside the EU consider?
Amsterdam is, in truth, a very easy place for visitors in any part of the world to reach. Its airport is a global hub. The EU maintains an open attitude and a practical approach to visas when required, so there should be no barriers to anyone wanting to visit IBC.

The IBC Innovation Awards are always a draw. Can you comment on the calibre of entries this year?
When we decided to add the IBC Innovation Awards to our program, our aim was to reflect the real nature of the industry. We wanted to reward the real-world projects, where users and technology partners got together to tackle a real challenge and come up with a solution that was much more than the sum of its parts.

Our finalists range from a small French-language service based in Canada to Google Earth; from a new approach to transmitters in the USA to an online service in India; and from Asia’s biggest broadcaster to the Spanish national railway company.

The Awards Ceremony on Sunday night is always one of my highlights. This year there is a special guest presenter: the academic and broadcaster Dr. Helen Czerski. The show lasts about an hour and is free to all IBC visitors.

What are the latest developments in adding capacity at IBC?
There is always talk of the need to move to another venue, and of course as a responsible business we keep this continually under review. But where would we move to? There is nowhere that offers the same combination of exhibition space, conference facilities and catering and networking under one roof. There is nowhere that can provide the range of hotels at all prices that Amsterdam offers, nor its friendly and welcoming atmosphere.

Talking of hotels, visitors this year may notice a large building site between hall 12 and the station. This will be a large on-site hotel, scheduled to be open in time for IBC in 2019.

And regulars who have resigned themselves to walking around the hoardings covering up the now not-so-new underground station will be pleased to hear that the North-South metro line is due to open in July 2018. Test trains are already running, and visitors to IBC next year will be able to speed from the centre of the city in under 10 minutes.

As you mentioned earlier, the theme for IBC2017 is “Truth, Trust and Transformation.” What is the rationale behind this?
Everyone has noticed that the terms “fake news” and “alternative facts” are ubiquitous these days. Broadcasters have traditionally been the trusted brand for news: is the era of social media and universal Internet access changing that?

It is a critical topic to debate at IBC, because the industry’s response to it is central to its future, commercially, as well as technically. Providing true, accurate and honest access to news (and related genres like sport) is expensive and demanding. How do we address this key issue? Also, one of the challenges of the transition to IP connectivity is the risk that the media industry will become a major target for malware and hackers. As the transport platform becomes more open, the more we need to focus on cyber security and the intrinsic design of safe, secure systems.

OTT and social media delivery is sometimes seen as “disruptive,” but I think that “transformative” is the better word. It brings new challenges for creativity and business, and it is right that IBC looks at them.

Will VR and AR be addressed at this year’s conference?
Yes, in the Future Zone, and no doubt on the show floor. Technologies in this area are tumbling out, but the business and creative case seems to be lagging behind. We know what VR can do, but how can we tell stories with it? How can we monetize it? IBC can bring all the sides of the industry together to dig into all the issues. And not just in debate, but by seeing and experiencing the state of the art.

Cyber security and security breaches are becoming more frequent. How will IBC address these challenges?
Cyber security is such a critical issue that we have devoted a day to it in our new C-Tech Forum. Beyond that, we have an important session on cyber security on Friday in the main conference with experts from around the world and around the industry debating what can and should be done to protect content and operations.

Incidentally, we are also looking at artificial intelligence and machine learning, with conference sessions in both the technology and business transformation strands.

What is the Platform Futures — Sport conference aiming to address?
Platform Futures is one of the strands running through the conference. It looks at how the latest delivery and engagement technologies are opening new opportunities for the presentation of content.

Sport has always been a major driver – perhaps the major driver – of innovation in television and media. For many years now we have had a sport day as part of the conference. This year, we are dedicating the Platform Futures strand to sport on Sunday.

The stream looks at how new technology is pushing boundaries for live sports coverage; the increasing importance of fan engagement; and the phenomenon of “alternative sports formats” like Twenty20 cricket and Rugby 7s, which provide lucrative alternatives to traditional competitions. It will also examine the unprecedented growth of eSports, and the exponential opportunities for broadcasters in a market that is now pushing towards the half-billion-dollar size.

 

Keslow Camera acquires Clairmont Camera — Denny Clairmont Retires

Signaling the end of an era, Denny Clairmont, one of the industry’s most respected talents in front of and behind the camera, is retiring. Keslow Camera is buying his company, Clairmont Camera, including its Vancouver and Toronto operations. The acquisition is expected to be complete on or before August 4.

Keslow Camera says it will retain the teams at Clairmont’s Vancouver and Toronto facilities, which have been offering professional digital and film cameras, lenses and accessories to the area since the 1980s. All operations within California are slated to eventually be consolidated into Keslow Camera’s headquarters in Culver City. The move will more than quadruple Keslow Camera’s anamorphic and vintage lens inventory and add a substantial range of custom camera equipment to the company’s portfolio.

Denny Clairmont, along with his brother, Terry, established the movie equipment and camera rental company that would become Clairmont Camera in 1976. In 2011, Clairmont received the John A. Bonner Medal of Commendation from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), awarded by the Academy Board of Governors upon the recommendation of the Scientific and Technical Awards Committee. Clairmont and Ken Robings won a Technical Achievement Award from the Society of Camera Operators (SOC) for the lens perspective system, and Clairmont has won two Emmys from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his role in the development of special lens systems.

“Clairmont Camera is my life’s work, and I never stopped searching for innovative ways to serve our clients,” says Clairmont. “I have long respected Robert Keslow and the team at Keslow Camera for their integrity, quality of management, best-in-class customer service and successful performance. I am confident they are the right company to honor my heritage and founding vision going forward.”

Digging Deep: Sony intros the PXW-FS7 II camera

By Daniel Rodriguez

At a press event in New York City a couple of weeks ago, Sony unveiled the long-rumored follow-up to its extremely successful Sony PXW FS7 — the Sony PXW-FS7 II. With the new FS7 II, Sony dives deeper in the mid-level cinematographer/ videographer market that it firmly established with the FS100, FS700, FS7 and the more recent Sony FS5.

Knowing they are competing with cameras of other similarly priced brands, Sony has built upon a line that fulfills most technical and ergonomic needs. Sony prides itself on listening to videographers and cinematographers who make requests and suggestions from first-hand field experience, and it’s clear that they’ve continued to listen.

New Features
The Sony FS7 II might be the first camera where you can feel the deep care and consideration from Sony for those who have used the FS7 extensively, in regards to improvements. Although the body and overall design might seem nearly identical to the original FS7, the FS7 II has made subtle but important ergonomic improvements to the camera’s design.

Improving on their E-mount design, Sony has introduced a lever locking mechanism much how a PL mount functions. Unlike the PL mount, the new lever lock rotates counter-clockwise but provides a massive amount of support, especially since there is a secondary latch that prevents you from accidentally turning the lever back. The mount has been tested to support the same weight as traditional PL mounts, and larger cinema zooms can be easily mounted without the need of a lens support. Due to its short flange distance, Sony’s E-mount has become very popular with users for adapting almost all stills and cinema lenses to Sony cameras, and with this added support there is reduced risk and concern when adding lens adapters.

The camera body’s corners and edges have all been rounded out, allowing users to have a much more comfortable control of the camera. This is especially helpful for handheld use when the camera might be pressed up against someone’s body or under their arm. Considering things like operating below the underarm and at the waist, Sony has redesigned the arm grip, and most of the body, to be tool-less. The arm grip no longer requires tools to be adjusted and now uses two knobs to allow easy adjustments. This saves much needed time and maximizes comfort.

The viewfinder can now be extended further in either direction with a longer rod, which benefits left-eye dominant operators. The microphone holder is no longer permanently attached to the other side of the rod so it can either be adapted to the left side of camera to allow viewing the monitor to the right of the camera or it could be removed altogether. Sony has also made the viewfinder collapsible for those who’d rather just view the monitor. The viewfinder rod is now square shaped to allow uniform horizontal aligning in the framing in relation to the cameras balancing. This stemmed from operators confusing their framing by believing framing was crooked due to how the viewfinder was aligned, even if the camera was perfectly balanced.

Sony really kept the smaller suggestions in mind by making the memory card slots protrude more than on the original FS7. This allows for loaders to more easily access the memory card should they be wearing something that inhibits their grip, like gloves. Compatibility with the newer G-series XQD cards, which boast an impressive 440MBps write and 400MBps read speed, allowing FS7 II users to quickly dump their footage on the field without the worry of running out of useable memory cards.

Coming straight out the box is the FS7 II’s ability to do internal 4K DCI (4096×2160) without the need for upgrades or HDMI output. This 4K can be captured in nearly every codec, whether in XAVC, ProRes 422HQ, or RAW, with the option of HyperGammas, Slog-3 or basic 709. RAW output will be available to the camera, but like its siblings, an external recorder will still be required to do so. The FS7 II will also be capable of recording Sony’s version of compressed RAW, XOCN, which allows 16-bit 3:1 recording to an external recorder. Custom 3D LUTs will still be available to be uploaded into the camera. This allows more of a cinematographer’s touch when using a custom LUT, rather than factory presets.

Electronic Internal Variable ND
The most exciting feature of the Sony FS7 II — and the one that really separates this camera from the FS7 — is the introduction of an Electronic Internal Variable ND. Introduced originally in the FS5, the new options that the FS7 II has over the FS5 with this new Electronic Variable ND makes this a very promising camera and an improvement over its older sibling.

Oftentimes with similarly priced cameras, or ones that offer the same options, there is either a lack of internal NDs or a limited amount of internal ND control, which is either too much or not enough when it comes to exposure control. The term Variable ND is also approached with caution from videographers/cinematographers with concerns of color shifts and infrared pollution, but Sony has taken care of these precautions by having an IR cut filter over the sensor. This way, no level of ND will introduce any color shifts or infrared pollution. It’s also often easy to break the bank buying IR NDs to prevent infrared pollution, and the constant swapping of ND filters might prove a disadvantage when it comes to being time-efficient, which could also lead you to open or close your F-stop to compensate.

Compromising your F-stop is often an unfortunate reality when shooting — indoors or outdoors — and it’s extremely exciting to have a feature that allows you to adjust your exposure flawlessly without worrying about having the right ND level or adjusting your F-stop to compensate. It’s also exciting to know that you can adjust the ND filter without having to see a literal filter rotate in front of your image. The Electronic Variable ND can be adjusted from the grip as well, so you can essentially ride the iris without having to touch your F-stop and risk your depth of field being inconsistent.

closeup-settingsAs with most modern-day lenses that lack manual exposure, riding the iris is simply out of the question due to mechanical “clicked” irises and the very obvious exposure shift when changing the F-stop on one of these lenses. This is eliminated by letting the Variable ND do all the work and allowing you to leave your F-stop untouched. The Electronic Variable ND on manual mode allows you to smoothly transition between 0.6ND to 2.1ND in one-third increments.

Recording in BT
Another exciting new addition to the FS7 II is the ability to record in BT. 2020 (more commonly known as Rec. 2020) internally in UHD. While this might seem excessive to some, considering this camera is still a step below its siblings the F55 and F65 as far as use in productions where HDR deliverables are required, providing the option to shoot Rec. 2020 futureproofs this camera for years to come especially when Rec. 2020 monitoring and projection becomes the norm. Companies like Netflix usually request an HDR deliverable for their original programs so despite the FS7 II not being on the same level as the F55/F65, it shows it can deliver the same level of quality.

While the camera can’t boast a global shutter like its bigger sibling, the F55, the FS7 does show very capable rolling shutter with little to no skewing effects. In the FS7 II’s case it is preferable to retain rolling shutter over global because as a camera that leans slightly toward the commercial/videography spectrum of cinematography, it is preferable to retain a native ISO of 2000 and the full 14 stops over global shutter, which is easy to overlook and use cost much-needed dynamic range.

This exclusion of global shutter retains the native ISO of the FS7II at 2000 ISO, which is the same as the previous FS7. Retaining this native ISO puts the FS7 II above many similar priced video cameras whose native ISOs usually sit at 800. While the FS7 II may not be a low-light beast like the Sony a7s/a7sii, the ability to do internal 4K DCI, higher frame rates and record 10-bit 422HQ (and even RAW) greatly outweigh this loss in exposure.

The SELP18110G 18-110 F4.0 Servo Zoom
Alongside the Sony FS7 II, Sony has announced a new zoom lens to be released alongside the camera. Building off what they have introduced before with the Sony FE PZ 28-135 F4 G, the 18-110 F4 is a very powerful lens optically and the perfect companion to the FS7 II. The lens is sharp to the edges; doesn’t drop focus while zooming in and out; has no breathing whatsoever; has a quiet internal zoom, iris, and focus control; internal stabilization; and a 90-second zoom crawl from end to end. The lens covers Super 35mm and APSC-sized sensors and retains a constant f4 throughout each focal length.

It’s multi-coating allows for high contrast and low flaring with circular bokeh to give truly cinematic images. Despite its size, the lens only weighs 2.4 pounds, a weight easily supported by the FS7 II’s lever-locking E mount. Though it isn’t an extremely fast lens, paired with a camera like the FS7 II, which has a native ISO of 2000, the 18-110 F4 should prove to be a very useable lens on the field and as well in narrative work.

Final Impressions
This camera is very specifically designed for camerapersons who either have a very small camera team or shoot as individuals. Many of the new features, big and small, are great additions for making any project go down smoothly and nearly effortlessly. While its bigger siblings the F55 and F65 will still dominate major motion picture production and commercial work, this camera has all its corners covered to fill the freelance videographer/cinematographer’s needs.

Indie films, short films, smaller commercial and videography work will no doubt find this camera to be hugely beneficial and give as few headaches as possible. Speed and efficiency are often the biggest advantage on smaller productions and this camera easily handles and facilitates the most overlooked aspects of video production.

The specs are hard to pass up when discussing the Sony FS7 II. Hearing of a camera that does internal 4K DCI with the option of high frame rates at 10-bit 422HQ with 14 stops of dynamic range and the option to shoot in Slog3 or one of the many HyperGammas for faster deliverables should immediately excite any videographer/cinematographer. Many cinematographers making feature or short films have grown accustomed to shooting RAW, and unless they rent the external recorder, or buy it, they will be unable to do so with this camera. But with the high write speeds of the internal codecs, it’s difficult to argue that, despite a few minor features being lost, the internal video will retain a massive amount of information.

This camera truly delivers on providing nearly any ergonomic and technical need, and by anticipating future display formats with Rec.2020, this shows that Sony is very conscious of future-proofing this camera. The physical improvements on the camera have shown that Sony is very open and eager to hear suggestions and first-hand experiences from FS7 users, and no doubt any suggestions on the FS7 II will be taken into mind.

The Electronic Variable ND is easily the best feature of the camera since so much time in the field will be saved by not having to swap NDs, and the ability to shift through increments between the standard ND levels will be hugely beneficial to get your exposure right. Being able to adjust exposure mid shot without having filters come between the image will be a great feature to those shooting outdoors or working events where the lighting is uneven. Speed cannot be emphasized enough, and by having such a massively advantageous feature you are just cutting more and more time from whatever production you’re working.

Pairing up the camera with the new 18-110 F4 will make a great camera package for location shooting since you will be covered for nearly every focal length and have a sharp lens that has servo zooming, internal stabilization and low flaring. The lens might be off-putting to some narrative filmmakers, since it only opens to a F4.0 and isn’t fast by other lens standards, but with the quality and attention to optic performance the lens should be considered seriously alongside other lenses that aren’t quite cinema lenses but have been used heavily so far in the narrative world. With the native ISO of 2000, one should be able to shoot comfortably wide open or closed down with proper lighting and for films done mostly in natural light this lens should be highly considered.

Oftentimes when choosing a camera, the biggest question isn’t what the camera has but what it will cost. Since Sony isn’t discontinuing the original FS7, the FS7 II will be more expensive, and when considering BP-U60 batteries and XQD cards the price will only climb. I think despite these shortcomings, one must always consider the price of storage and power when upgrading your camera system. More powerful cameras will no doubt require faster cards and bigger power supplies, so these costs must be seen as investments.

While XQD cards might be considered pricey to some, especially those who are more familiar with buying and using SD cards, I consider jumping into the XQD card world a necessary step to develop your video capabilities. CFast cards are becoming the norm in higher-end digital cinema, especially when the FS7 II is being heavily considered.

Compromise is often expected in any level of production, be it technically, logistically or artistically. After getting an impression of what the FS7 II can provide and facilitate in any production scenario I feel this is one of the few cameras that will take away feelings of compromise from what you as a user can provide.

The FS7 II will be available in January 2017 for an estimated street price of $10,000 (body only) and $13,000 for the camcorder with 18-110mm power zoom lens kit.


Daniel Rodriguez is cinematographer and photographer living in New York City. Check out his work here. Dan took many of the pictures featured in this article.

Canon intros C700 camera and two new UHD/4K monitors

Canon has introduced a line of new cinema cameras — the EOS C700, EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL. Featuring a completely new, customizable, modular design, Canon says the EOS C700 is suited for all types of pro workflows, from feature films to documentaries to episodic dramas. They also have two new reference displays, but more on that later.

The Canon EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL cameras feature a Super 35mm 4.5K sensor with wide dynamic range and can be used for productions requiring 4K UHD TV or 4K DCI cinema deliverables. The EOS C700 GS PL features a Super 35mm 4K sensor with a global shutter to enable the distortion-free capture of subjects moving at high speeds. In addition to supporting the earlier XF-AVC recording format, the cameras also support Apple ProRes.

The EOS C700 allows users to convert between EF mount and PL mounts, and between a standard CMOS image sensor and a global shutter CMOS image sensor at Canon service facilities. The EF lens mount provides compatibility with Canon’s lineup of over 70 interchangeable EF lenses as well as enabling use of Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology. The EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL allow use of industry-standard PL lenses and compatibility with Cooke /i metadata communication technology.

For those wanting to shoot and deliver High Dynamic Range (HDR) content, the EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL provide 15 stops of latitude, Canon’s proprietary Log Gammas (Canon Log3, Canon Log2 and Canon Log) and color science. Additionally, these cameras seamlessly integrate with Canon’s pro 4K displays (DP-V2420, DP-V2410 or DP-V1770) for on-set color management and review that conforms to SMPTE ST 2084 standards of HDR display.

Canon has called on Codex to provide a fully-integrated (no cables) recording and workflow option. The combination of the EOS C700 camera with the optional Codex CDX-36150 recorder allows for high-speed 4.5K RAW recording at up to 100fps, 4K RAW at up to 120fps, 4K ProRes at up to 60fps, 2K ProRes at up to 240fps and XF-AVC at up to 60fps.

The EOS C700, EOS C700 PL and EOS C700 GS PL are the company’s first Cinema EOS cameras to support anamorphic shooting by using a “de-squeeze” function for monitoring, making possible it possible to create images with the 2.39:1 aspect ratio typical of cinema productions. Furthermore, enabling full HD HFR recording at a maximum of 240fps (crop), the camera enables smooth playback, even when slowed down.

Along with the announcement of these cameras, there are new optional accessories: OLED 1920×1080 Electronic View Finder EVF-V70, Remote Operation Unit OU-700, Shoulder Support Unit SU-15, Shoulder Style Grip Unit SG-1 and B4 mount adapters MO-4E/MO-4P.

The EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL are currently expected to go on sale in December 2016, while the EOS C700 GS PL is expected to go on sale in January 2017. The EOS C700 and EOS C700 PL will have a list price of $35K and the EOS C700 GS PL will have a list price of $38K.

New On-Set Monitors
Also from Canon are two new pro 4K/UHD displays targeting content creators — the DP-V2420, a 24-inch high-luminance model targeting HDR footage, and the DP-V1710 4K, a 17-inch, 3840×2160 display suited for use on set, in broadcasting vans and in studios. Both displays feature a Canon-developed image-processing engine, proprietary backlight system and an IPS LCD panel that when combined deliver excellent color reproduction and high-resolution, high-contrast imaging performance.

The Canon DP-V2420 supports HDR standards and display methods increasingly used for next-gen video production, and provides high luminance and black luminance performance essential for screening HDR content. The DP-V2420 display qualifies as a Dolby Vision mastering monitor and complies with the ITU-R BT.2100-0 HDR standard, which specifies a peak luminance 1000 cd/m2 and a minimum luminance 0.005 cd/m2. Allowing for the review and confirmation of high-quality 4K images, the display’s expanded dynamic range increases color expression and the contrast between the light and dark areas of an image to achieve luminance expression close to that of the naked eye while also supporting the expression of natural colors and a sense of three-dimensionality.

The DP-V1710 4K/UHD is a 17-inch 3840×2160 resolution display, which can be used with the 19-inch rack mounts that are commonplace in broadcast studio sub control rooms and broadcasting vans. In addition to providing high-image-quality UHD resolution, the display features a compact body size that makes it useful for on set, carrying during on-location shooting or for use in broadcasting vans with limited space.

The DP-V2420 and DP-V1710 displays are scheduled to be available in November 2016 and February 2017 for list prices of $32,900 and $13,500, respectively.

Quick Chat: GoPro EP/showrunner Bill McCullough

By Randi Altman

The first time I met Bill McCullough was on a small set in Port Washington, New York, about 20 years ago. He was directing NewSport Talk With Chet Coppock, who was a popular sports radio guy from Chicago.

When our paths crossed again, Bill — who had made some other stops along the way — was owner of the multiple Emmy Award-winning Wonderland Productions in New York City. He remained there for 11 years before heading over to HBO Sports as VP of creative and operations. Bill’s drive didn’t stop there. Recently, he completed a move to the West Coast, joining GoPro as executive producer of team sports and motor sports.

Let’s find out more:

You were most recently at HBO Sports in New York. Why the jump to GoPro, and why was this the right time?
I was fortunate enough to have a great and long career with HBO, a company that has set the standard for quality storytelling, but when I had the opportunity to join the GoPro team I could not pass it up.

GoPro has literally changed the way we capture and share content. With its unique perspective and immersive style, the capture device has given filmmakers the ability to tell stories and capture visuals that have never existed before. The size of the device makes it virtually invisible to the subject and creates an atmosphere that is much more organic and authentic. GoPro is also a leader in VR capture and we’re excited for 2016.”

What will you be doing in your new role? What will it entail?
I am an executive producer in the entertainment division. I will be responsible for creating, developing and producing content for all platforms.

What do you hope to accomplish in this new role?
I am excited for my new role because I have the opportunity to make films from a completely new perspective. GoPro has done an amazing job capturing and telling stories. My goal is to raise the bar and grow the brand even more.

You have a background in post and production. Will this new job incorporate both?
Yes. I will oversee the creative and production process from concept to completion for my projects.

JVC upgrades 4KCAM line of camcorders

JVC Pro has made upgrades to its 4KCAM camera line, which targets filmmaking and digital production applications. The JVC 4KCAM family of camcorders encompasses the GY-LS300, GY-HM200 and GY-HM170.

Variable scan mapping technology in the GY-LS300 adapts the camera’s Super 35 CMOS sensor to provide native support of MFT, PL and EF mount lenses, among others. The technology also drives the new “prime zoom” feature, which allows shooters using fixed-focal (prime) lenses to zoom in and out — without losing resolution or depth of field — using the camera’s hand grip zoom rocker. Prime zoom can also be used as a lens extender for zoom lenses.

The GY-LS300’s new “JVC log” gamma setting expands dynamic range by 800 percent for increased flexibility during the color grading process and greatly enhanced image details. Other new recording modes include cinema 4K (4096×2180) and cinema 2K (2048×1080), which offer a 17:9 aspect ratio for digital cinema presentations.

All 4KCAM camcorders feature a new 70Mbps recording mode for recordinGY-HM200-LCDg 4K footage on economical class 10 SDHC/SDXC memory cards. Plus, every model includes dual XLR audio inputs, integrated handle with hot shoe and dedicated microphone mount, and LCD display and color viewfinder.

In addition to the upgrades that are available now, a new slow-motion 120 fps HD recording mode will be added to the GY-HM200 and GY-HM170 models via a free firmware upgrade in December.

Both the GY-LS300 and GY-HM200 include a built-in HD streaming engine with Wi-Fi and 4G LTE connectivity. With support for various streaming protocols, the cameras can stream directly from various content delivery networks and websites. The GY-HM170 features a built-in 12x zoom lens (24x dynamic zoom in HD mode) with optical image stabilizer, as well as comprehensive video profile settings and wired remote control capability.

‘Crocodile Gennadiy’ filmmakers tell story with C300, 5D cameras

Director Steve Hoover, producer Danny Yourd and DP John Pope used highly mobile cameras and lenses from Canon to document the struggle of pastor Gennadiy Mokhnenko to operate a children’s rehabilitation center amidst civil unrest in eastern Ukraine.

For the documentary Crocodile Gennadiy, the team used two Canon EOS C300 Digital Cinema cameras, one Canon EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR camera and multiple EF series lenses to capture cinematic, creative images while maintaining a low profile in dangerous areas.

The Pilgrim Home rehabilitation center run by Mokhnenko is dedicated to drug-addicted orphans rescued from the streets of the city of Mariupol. To capture the dark, confusing world inhabited by the film’s characters, the team did a lot of shooting at night, relying largely on available light — sometimes just moonlight — and the low-light sensitivity of the EOS C300 cameras. The lightweight and ergonomic camera also allowed the team to shoot for long hours and move quickly when necessary. With two XLR inputs for recording, the EOS C300 allowed the team to capture inputs from both a shotgun mic mounted on the camera and the recordist’s wireless transmitter. The recordist also captured audio on a separate CT card recorder. This combination allowed the team to cut time spent logging, loading and organizing in post by a month or more.

The team used the EOS 5D Mark III to pick up additional footage. Its physical similarity to conventional still cameras made it less conspicuous than the EOS C300 cameras, allowing the filmmakers to capture imagery even in places requiring a very low profile.

The EOS C300 and EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR can be used with any of the more than 103 interchangeable Canon EF series photographic lenses, and Hoover, Yourd and Pope used EF series lenses strategically to tell the story. The tilt-shift lenses enabled creative representation of certain people and locations; primes were used both for interviews and for following Mokhnenko around on his nightly rescue missions, and zooms were used for undercover work, shooting from a distance and landscape-type shots.

In post, the preparation and editing of footage was simplified by the EOS C300 camera’s use of the MXF file format, which in turn facilitated editing with Adobe Premiere without the need for transcoding. The filmmakers shot in Canon Log mode, which captures the full exposure latitude that the camera’s Super 35mm CMOS sensor is capable of. This capability enabled the team to achieve cinematic subtleties in color grading.