Tag Archives: Brady Betzel

Review: HP’s ZBook Studio G4 mobile workstation

By Brady Betzel

It seems like each year around this time, I offer my thoughts on an HP mobile workstation and how it serves multimedia professionals. This time I am putting the HP ZBook Studio G4 through its paces. The ZBook Studio line of HP’s mobile workstations seems to fit right in the middle between ease of mobility, durability and power. The ZBook 14u and 15u are the budget series mobile workstations that run Intel i5/i7 processors with AMD FirePro graphics and top out at around $1,600. The ZBook 15 and 17 are the more powerful mobile workstations in the line with the added ability to include Intel Xeon processors, ECC memory, higher-end Nvidia Quadro graphics cards and more. But in the this review we will take the best of all models and jam them into the light and polished ZBook Studio G4.

The HP ZBook Studio G4 I was sent to test out had the following components:
– Windows 10 64 bit
– Intel Xeon 1535M (7th gen) quad-core processor – 3.10GHz with 4.2 Turbo Boost
– 4K UHD DreamColor/15.6-inch IPS screen
– 32GB ECC (2x16GB)
– Nvidia Quadro M1200 (4GB)
– 512GB HP Z Turbo Drive PCIe (MLC)
– 92Whr fast charging battery
– Intel vPro WLAN
– Backlit keyboard
– Fingerprint reader

According to the info I was sent directly from HP, the retail price is $3,510 on hp.com (US webstore). I built a very similar workstation on http://store.hp.com and was able to get the price at $3,301.65 before shipping and taxes, and $3,541.02 with taxes and free shipping. So actually pretty close.

So, besides the natural processor, memory and hard drive upgrades from previous generations, the ZBook Studio G4 has a few interesting updates, including the higher-wattage batteries with fast charge and the HP Sure Start Gen3 technology. The new fast charge is similar to the feature that some products like the GoPro Hero 5/6 cameras and Samsung Galaxy phones have, where they charge quicker than “normal.” The ZBook Studio, as well as the rest of the ZBook line, will charge 50% of your battery in around 30 minutes when in standby mode. Even when using the computer, I was able to charge the first 50% in around 30 minutes, a feature I love. After the initial 50% charge is complete, the charging will be at a normal rate, which wasn’t half bad and only took a few hours to get it to about 100%.

The battery I was sent was the larger of the two options and provided me with an eight-hour day with decent usage. When pushed using an app like Resolve I would say it lasted more like four hours. Nonetheless it lasted a while and I was happy with the result. Keep in mind the batteries are not removable, but they do have a three-year warranty, just like the rest of the mobile workstation.

When HP first told me about its Sure Start Gen 3, I thought maybe it was just a marketing gimmick, but then I experienced its power — and it’s amazing. Essentially, it is a hardware function available on only 7th generation Intel processors that allows the BIOS to repair itself upon identification of malware or corruption. While using the ZBook Studio G4, I was installing some software and had a hard crash (blue screen). I noticed when it restarted the BIOS was running through the Sure Start protocol, and within minutes I was back up and running. It was reassuring and would really set my mind at ease if deciding between a workstation-level solution or retail store computing solution.

You might be asking yourself why you should buy an enterprise-level mobile workstation when you could go buy a laptop for cheaper and almost as powerful at Best Buy or on Amazon? Technically, what really sets apart workstation components is their ability to run 24/7 and 365 days a year without downtime. This is helped by Intel Xeon processors that allow for ECC (Error Correcting Code memory), essentially bits don’t get flipped as they can with non-ECC memory. Or for laymen, like me, ECC memory prevents crashing by fixing errors itself before we see any repercussions.

Another workstation-level benefit is the environmental testing that HP runs the ZBooks through to certify their equipment as military grade, also known as MIL-810G testing. Essentially, they run multiple extreme condition tests such as high and low temperatures, salt, fog and even high-vibration testing like gunfire. Check out a more in-depth description on Wikipedia. Finally, HP prides itself on its ISV (Independent Software Vendors) verification. ISV certification means that HP spends a lot of time working with software vendors like Adobe, Avid, Autodesk and others to ensure compatibility with their products and HP’s hardware so you don’t have to. They even release certified drivers that help to ensure compatibility regularly.

In terms of warranty, HP gives you a three-year limited warranty. This includes on-site service within the Americas, and as mentioned earlier it covers the battery, which is a nice bonus. Much like other warranties it covers problems arising from faulty manufacturing, but not intentional or accidental damage. Luckily for anyone who purchases a Zbook, these systems can take a beating. Physically, the computer weighs in around 4.6lbs and is 18mm thin. It is machined aluminum that isn’t sharp, but it can start to dig into your wrists when typing for long periods. Around the exterior you get two Thunderbolt 3 ports, an HDMI port, three USB 3.1 ports (one on left and two on the right), an Ethernet port and Kensington Lock port. On the right side, you also get a power port — I would love for HP to design some sort of break-away cable like the old Magsafe cables on the MacBook Pros — and there is also a headphone/mic input.

DreamColor Display
Alright, so now I’ll go through some of the post-nerd specs that you might be looking for. Up first is the HP DreamColor display, which is a color-critical viewing solution. With a couple clicks in the Windows toolbar on the lower right you will find a colored flower — click on that and you can immediately adjust the color space you want to view your work in: AdobeRGB, sRGB, BT.709, DCI-P3 or Native. You can even calibrate or backup your own calibration for later use. While most colorists or editors use an external calibrated monitoring solution and don’t strictly rely on your viewing monitor as the color-critical source, using the DreamColor display will get you close to a color critical display without purchasing additional hardware.

In addition, DreamColor displays can play back true 24fps without frame rate conversion. One of my favorite parts of DreamColor is that if you use an external DreamColor monitor through Thunderbolt 3 (not using an SDI card), you can load your color profile onto the second or third monitor and in theory they should match. The ZBook Studio G4 seems to have been built as a perfect DIT (digital imaging technician) solution for color critical work in any weather-challenged or demanding environment without you having to worry about failure.

Speed & Testing
Now let’s talk about speed and how the system did with speed tests. When running a 24TB (6TB-4TB drives) G-Speed ShuttleXL with Thunderbolt 3 from G-Technology, I was able to get write speeds of around 1450MB/s and read speeds of 960MB/s when running the AJA System Test using a 4GB test file running RAID-0. For comparison, I ran the same test on the internal 512GB HP Z Turbo Drive, which had a write speed of 1310MB/s and read speed 1524MB/s. Of course, you need to keep in mind that the internal drive is a PCIe SSD whereas the RAID is 7200RPM drives. Finally, I ran the standard benchmarking app Cinebench R15 that comes from the makers of Maxon Cinema 4D, a 3D modeling app. For those interested, the OpenGL test ran at 138.85fps with a Ref. Match of 99.6%, CPU 470cb and CPU (Single Core) 177cb with an MP Ratio of 2.65x.

I also wanted to run the ZBook through some practical and real-world tests, and I wanted to test the rendering and exporting speeds. I chose to use Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 14.2 software because it is widely used and an easily accessible app for many of today’s multimedia pros. For a non-scientific yet important benchmark, I needed to see how well the ZBook G4 played back R3D files (Red camera files), as well as QuickTimes with typical codecs you would find in a professional environment, such as ProRes and DNxHD. You can find a bunch of great sample R3D files on Red’s website. The R3D I chose was 16 seconds in length, shot on a Red Epic Dragon at 120fps and UHD resolution (3840×2160). To make sure I didn’t have anything skewing the results, I decided to clear all optimized media, if there was any, delete any render cache, uncheck “Use Optimized Media If Available” and uncheck “Performance Mode” just in case that did any voodoo I wasn’t aware of.

First was a playback test where I wanted to see at what decode quality I could playback in at realtime without dropping frames when I performed a slight color correction and added a power window. For this clip, I was able to get it to playback in a 23.98/1080p timeline in realtime when it was set to Half Resolution Good. At Half Resolution Premium I was dropping one or two frames. While playing back and at Full Resolution Premium, I was dropping five or six frames —playing back at around 17 or 18fps. Playing back at Half Resolution Good is actually great playback quality for such a high-quality R3D with all the head room you get when coloring a raw camera file and not a transcode. This is also when the fans inside the ZBook really kicked in. I then exported a ProRes4444 version of the same R3D clip from RedCine-X Pro with the LUT info from the camera baked in. I played the clip back in Resolve with a light color treatment and one power window with no frames dropped. When playing back the ProRes4444 file the fans stayed at a low pitch.

The second test was a simple DNxHD 10-bit export from the raw R3D. I used the DNxHD 175x codec — it took about 29 seconds, which was a little less than double realtime. I then added spatial noise reduction on my first node using the following settings: Mode: Better, Radius: Medium, Spatial Threshold (luma/chroma locked): 25. I was able to playback the timeline at around 5fps and exported the same DNxHD 175x file, but it took about 1 minute 27 seconds, about six times realtime. Doing the same DNxHD 175x export test with the ProRes4444 file, it took about 12 seconds without noise reduction and with the noise reduction about 1 minute and 16 seconds — about 4.5 times realtime. In both cases when using Noise Reduction, the fans kicked on.

Lastly, I wanted to see how Resolve would handle a simple one minute, 1080p, ProRes QuickTime in various tests. I don’t think it’s a big surprise but it played back without dropping any frames with one node of color correction, one power window and as a parallel node with a qualifier. When adding spatial noise reduction I started to get bogged down to about 6fps. The same DNxHD 175x export took about 27 seconds or a little less than half realtime. With the same spatial noise reduction as above it took about 4 minutes and 21 seconds, about 4.3 times realtime.

Summing Up
The HP ZBook Studio G4 is a lightweight and durable enterprise-level mobile workstation that packs the punch of a color-critical 4K (UHD — 3840×2160) DreamColor display, powered by an Nvidia Quadro M1200, and brought together by an Intel Xeon processor that will easily power many color, editing or other multimedia jobs. With HP’s MIL-810G certification, you have peace of mind that even with some bumps, bruises and extreme weather your workstation will work. At under 5lbs and 18mm thin with a battery that will charge 50% in 30 minutes, you can bring your professional apps like DaVinci Resolve, Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer anywhere and be working.

I was able to use the ZBook along with some of my Tangent Element color correction panels in a backpack and have an instant color critical DIT solution without the need for a huge cart — all capable of color correction and transcoding. The structural design of the ZBook is an incredibly sturdy, machined aluminum chassis that is lightweight enough to easily go anywhere quickly. The only criticisms are I would often miss the left click of the trackpad leaving me in a right-click scenario, the Bang & Olufsen speakers sound a little tin-like to me and, finally, it doesn’t have a touch bar… just kidding.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 14 for editing

By Brady Betzel

Resolve 14 has really stepped up Blackmagic’s NLE game with many great new updates over the past few months. While I typically refer to Resolve as a high-end color correction and finishing tools, this review will focus on the Editing tab.

Over the last two years, Resolve has grown from a high-end color correction and finishing app to include a fully-capable nonlinear editor, media organizer and audio editing tool. Fairlight is not currently at the same level as Avid Pro Tools, but it is still capable, and with a price of free or at most $299 you can’t lose. For this review, I am using the $299 version, which has a few perks — higher than UHD resolutions; higher than 60 frames per second timelines; the all-important spatial and/or temporal noise reduction; many plugins like the new face tracker; multi-user collaboration; and much more. The free version will work with resolutions up to UHD at up to 60fps and still gives you access to all of the powerful base tools like Fairlight and the mighty color correction tool set.

Disclaimer: While I really will try and focus on the Editing tab, I can’t make any promises I won’t wander.

Digging In
My favorite updates to Resolve 14’s Editing tab revolve around collaboration and conforming functions, but I even appreciate some smaller updates like responsiveness while trimming and video scopes on the edit page. And don’t forget the audio waveforms being visible on the source monitor!

With these new additions, among others, I really do think that Resolve is also becoming a workable nonlinear editor much like industry standards such as Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple Final Cut Pro X. You can work from ingest to output all within one app. When connected to a collaborative project there is now bin-locking, sharing bins and even a chat window.

Multicam works as expected with up to 16 cameras in one split view. I couldn’t figure out how to watch all of the angles in the source monitor while playing down the sequence in the record monitor, so I did a live switch (something I love to do in Media Composer). I also couldn’t figure out how to adjust the multi-cam after it had been created, because say, for instance, audio was one frame out of sync or I needed to add another angle later on. But the multicam worked and did its job by allowing me to sync by in point, out point, timecode, sound or marker. In addition, you can make the multicam a different frame rate than your timeline, which is handy.

[Editor’s Note: Blackmagic says: “There are a few ways to do that. You can right click on the multicam clip and select ‘open in timeline.’ Or you can pause over any segment of a multicam clip, click on a different angle and swap out the shots. Most importantly, you get into multicam edit mode by clicking on the drop down menu on the lower left hand corner of the source viewer and selecting Multicam mode.”]

Another addition is the Position Lock located in the middle right, above the timeline. The Position Lock keeps all of your clips locked in time in your timeline. What is really interesting about this is that it still allows you to trim and apply other effects to clips while locking the position of your clips in place. This is extremely handy when doing conforms and online passes of effects when you don’t want timing and position of clips to change. It’s a great safety net. There are some more fancy additions like re-time curves directly editable in the timeline. But what I would really love is a comprehensive overhaul of the Title Tool that would allow for direct manipulation of the text on top of the video. It would be nice to have a shortcut to use the title as a matte for other footage for some quick and fancy titling effects, but maybe that is what Fusion is for? The title tool works fine and will now give you nice crisp text even when blown up. The bezier curves really come in handy here to make animations ease in and out nicely.

If you start and finish within Resolve 14, your experience will most likely be pretty smooth. For anyone coming from another NLE — like Media Composer or Premiere — there are a few things you will have to get used to, but overall it feels like the interface designers of Resolve 14 kept the interface familiar for those “older” editors, yet also packed it with interesting features to keep the “YouTube” editors’ interest piqued. As someone who’s partial to Media Composer, I really like that you can choose between frame view in the timeline and clips-only view, leaving out thumbnails and waveform views in the timeline.

I noticed a little bit of a lag when editing with the thumbnail frames turned on. I also saw recently that Dave Dugdale on YouTube found an interesting solution to the possible bug. Essentially, one of the thumbnail views of the timeline was a little slower at re-drawing when zooming into a close view in a sequence Regardless, I like to work without thumbnails, and that view seemed to work fluidly for me.

After working for about 12 minutes I realized I hadn’t saved my work and Resolve didn’t auto-saved. This is when I remembered hearing about the new feature “Live Save.” It’s a little tricky to find, but the Live Save feature lives under the DaVinci Resolve Menu > User > Auto Save and is off by default — I really think this should be changed. Turn this fuction on and your Resolve project will continually save, which in turn saves you from unnecessary conniptions when your project crashes and you try to find the spot that was last saved.

Coming from another NLE, the hardest thing for me to get used to in a new app was the keyboard layouts and shortcuts. Typically, trimming works similar to other apps and overwriting; ripple edits, dissolves and other edit functions don’t change, but the placement of their shortcuts does. In Resolve 14, you can access the keyboard shortcut commands in the same spot as the Live Save, but under the Keyboard Mapping menu under User. From here you can get grounded quickly by choosing a preset that is similar to your NLE of choice — Premiere, FCP X, Media Composer — or Resolve’s default keyboard layout, which isn’t terrible. If this could be updated to how apps like Premiere and/or Avid have their keyboard layouts designed, it would be a lot easier to navigate. Meaning there is usually a physical representation of a keyboard that allows you to drag your shortcuts to and from it realtime.

Right now, Resolve’s keyboard mapper is text-based and a little cumbersome. Overall, Resolve’s keyboard shortcuts (when in the editing tab) are pretty standard, but it would do you well to read and go through basic moves like trimming, trimming the heads and tails of clips or even just trimming by plus or minus and the total frames you want to trim.

Something else I discovered when trimming was when you go into actual “trim mode,” it isn’t like other NLEs where you can immediately start trimming. I had to click on the trim point with my mouse or pen, then I could use keyboard shortcuts to trim. This is possibly a bug, but what I would really love to happen is when you enter “trim mode,” you would see trimming icons at the A and B sides of the nearest clips on the selected tracks. This would allow you to immediately trim using keyboard shortcuts without any mouse clicks. In my mind, the more mouse clicks I have to use to accomplish a task means time wasted. This leads to having less time to spend on “important” stuff like story, audio, color, etc. When time equals money, every mouse click means money out of my pocket. [Note from Blackmagic: “In our trim tools you can also enter trim mode by hitting T on the keyboard. We did not put in specific trim tool icons on purpose because we have an all-in-one content sensitive trim tool that changes based on where you place the cursor. And if you prefer trimming with realtime playback, hit W for dynamic trim mode, and then click on the cut you want to trim with before hitting JKL to play the trim.”]

I have always treated Resolve as another app in my post workflow — I wasn’t able to use it all the way from start to finish. So in homage to the old way of working, a.k.a. “a round trip workflow,” I wanted to send a Media Composer sequence to Resolve by way of a linked AAF, then conform the media clips and work from there. I had a few objectives, but the main one was to make sure my clips and titles came over. Next was to see if any third-party effects would translate into Resolve from Media Composer and, finally, I wanted to conform an “updated” AAF to the original sequence using Resolve’s new “Compare with Current Timeline” command.

This was a standard 1080p, 23.98 sequence (transcoded to one mezzanine DNx175x codec with 12 frame handles) with plenty of slates, titles, clips, speed ramps, Boris Continuum Complete and Sapphire Effect. Right off the bat all of the clip-based media came over fine and in its correct time and place in the timeline. Unfortunately, the titles did not come over and were offline — none of them were recognized as titles so they couldn’t be edited. Dissolves came over correctly, however none of the third-party BCC or Sapphire effects came across. I didn’t really expect the third-party effects to come over, but at some point, in order to be a proper conforming application, Resolve will need to figure out a way to translate those when sending sequences from an NLE to Resolve. This is more of a grand wish, but in order to be a force in the all-in-one app for the post finishing circle, this is a puzzle that will need to be solved.

Otherwise, for those who want to use alternative nonlinear editing systems, they will have to continue using their NLE as the editor, Resolve as a color-only solution, and the NLE as their finisher. And from what I can tell Blackmagic wants Resolve to be your last stop in the post pipeline. Obviously, if you start your edit in Resolve and use third-party OpenFX (OFX) like BCC or Sapphire, you shouldn’t have any problems.

Last on my list was to test the new Compare with Current Timeline command. In order for this option to pop up when you right click, you must be in the Media tab with the sequence you want to compare to the one loaded. You then need to find the sequence you want to compare from, right click on it and click Compare with Current Timeline. Once you click the sequences you want to compare, a new window will pop up with the option to view the Diff Index. The Diff Index is a text-based list of each new edit next to the timeline that visually compares your edits between the two sequences. This visual representation of the edits between the sequences is where you will apply those changes. There are marks identifying what has changed, and if you want to apply those changes you must right click and hit Apply Changes. My suggestion is to duplicate your sequence before you apply changes (actually you should be constantly duplicating your sequence as a backup as a general rule). The Compare with Current Timeline function is pretty incredible. I tested it using an AAF I had created in Media Composer and compared it against an AAF made from the same sequence but with some “creative” changes and trimmed clips — essentially a locked sequence that suddenly became unlocked while in Online/Color and needed to reflect the latest changes from the offline edit.

I wasn’t able to test Resolve 14 in a shared-project environment, so I couldn’t test a simultaneous update coming from another editor. But this can come in really handy for anyone who has to describe any changes made to a particular sequence or for that pesky online editor that needs to conform a new edit while not losing all their work.

I can’t wait to see the potential of this update, especially if we can get Resolve to recognize third-party effects from other NLEs. Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not oblivious to the fact that asking Resolve engineers to figure out how to recognize third-party effects in an AAF workflow is a pie-in-the-sky scenario. If it was easy it probably would have already been done. But it is a vital feature if Blackmagic wants Resolve to be looked at like a Flame or Media Composer but with a high-end coloring solution and audio finishing solution. While I’m at it, I can’t help but think that Resolve may eventually include Fusion as another tab maybe as a paid add-on, which would help to close that circle to being an all-in-one post production solution.

Summing Up
In the end, Resolve 14 has all the makings of becoming someone’s choice as a sole post workflow solution. Blackmagic has really stepped up to the plate and made a workable and fully functional NLE. And, oh yeah not to mention it is one of the top color correction tools being used in the world.

I did this review of the editing tab using Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve 14.2. Find the latest version here. And check out our other Resolve review — this one from a color and finishing perspective.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: G-Tech’s G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters, Thunderbolt 3

By Brady Betzel

As video recording file sizes continue to creep up, so do our hard drive storage size, RAID and bandwidth needs. These days we are seeing a huge amount of recorded media needing to be offloaded, edited and color graded in the field. G-Technology has stepped up to bat with its 24TB G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series adapters, Thunderbolt 3 edition — a portable, durable, adaptable and hardware-RAID powered storage solution.

In terms of physical appearance, the G-Speed Shuttle XL is just shy of 10x7x16-inches and weighs in at around 25 pounds. It’s not exactly lightweight, but with spinning hard drives it’s what I would expect. To get a lighter RAID you would need SSD drives, but those would most likely triple the price. The case itself is actually pretty rugged; it seems like it could withstand a minimal amount of production abuse, but again without being an SSD RAID you have some risks since spinning disk drives are more volatile.

The exterior is made out of a hard plastic, and it would have been nice to have the rubberized feel on at least the handle of the Shuttle XL — similar to G-Tech’s Rugged line of drives — but it still feels solid. To open the Shuttle XL, there is an easy-to-access switch on the front. There is a lock switch that took me a few wiggles to work correctly, but I would loved to have seen a key lock that would to add a little more security since this RAID will most likely house important data. When closing the front door, the slide lock wouldn’t fully close unless I pushed hard a second time. If I didn’t do that the door would open by itself. On the back are the two Thunderbolt 3 ports, a power cable plug and a Kensington Lock slot. On the inside of this particular Shuttle XL are six 4TB 7200 RPM Enterprise Class HGST (Western Digital) drives configured to a RAID-5 by default and two EV Series Bay adapters.

Since I was on a Windows-based PC I had to download and format the drives since it comes formatted for Mac OS by default. The EV adapters allow for quick connection of memory products like Atomos Master Caddy drives, CFast 2.0 or even Red Mini Mags. This gives you fast connection on set for transferring and backing up your media without extra card readers. The HGST hard drives are enterprise class, which very simply means that the drives are rated to be run 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year more reliably than standard hard drives. This should do as it says, but if it doesn’t there is a five-year limited warranty that will back up this product. Basically, if the RAID or its drives fail due to craftsmanship errors, they will replace or repair it. Keep in mind, you are responsible for shipping the item back to them, and with the heavy weight of the RAID it may be costly if it goes bad. They will not cover accidental damage or misuse. Another caveat to G-Technology’s limited warranty is that they will not cover commercial use, so if you plan to use the G-Speed on a commercial shoot, you might not be covered. You should contact G-Technology’s support to check if your use will be covered: 1.888.426.5214 if you are in North or South America, including Canada.

The Shuttle XL comes pre-RAID formatted in a RAID-5 configuration for the Mac OS, but it can also be formatted as RAID-0,-1, -6, -10 and 50 using the G-Speed Studio Utility. Here is a quick RAID primer in case you forget the differences:

– RAID-0: All drives are used as one large drive. This gives you the fastest RAID performance.
– RAID-1: Total amount of drive space is halved, so if one drive goes out you will not lose your data and it will be rebuilt over time once the bad drive is replaced. The speed is slower than RAID 0. Essentially each drive is mirrored to an identical drive in the RAID.
– RAID-5: Needs at least three drives and uses each drive to create a safety net if a drive fails. The plus side is that it is faster than RAID-1 and includes a safety net. This is why G-Technology ships this drive with this configuration. You will have about 80% of usable disk space. The downside is that if a drive goes out you, will have degraded speed until the RAID fully repopulates itself once the bad drive is replaced.
– RAID-6: Works similar to RAID-5 but has two safety nets (a.k.a. parita blocks). One drawback of RAID-5 is that if a second drive goes out while the RAID database is rebuilding, all data can be lost permanently. RAID-6 adds another safety net so that if two drives go out you can still rebuild your RAID. The downside is that you have only 60% of your storage usable.
RAID-10: RAID-10 requires at least four drives and cuts your usable drive count in half. The upside is that if a drive goes out, you will not have degraded speed during the RAID rebuilding process, which depending on the data involved can be multiple days or longer. RAID-10 essentially mirrors a striped RAID.
– RAID-50: RAID-50 can be thought of as a RAID-5 + 0 and needs a minimum of six drives. It’s two RAID arrays running RAID-5. In each of those RAID arrays you will lose one drive’s worth of usable space. The good news is that if you can have a drive in each RAID array go out while minimizing total RAID loss unlink RAID-5 alone.

Those RAID formatting options are a lot to think about, and frankly I have to look them up about every year or so. If you didn’t read all about RAID formatting, then you may want to stick with RAID-5, which gives you a nice combo of safety vs. speed. If you are a risk taker, backup your data regularly, or if you can survive a total RAID failure, RAID-0 might be more your style. But in the end, keep in mind no matter how good your equipment is or how high a level of RAID protection you have, you can always suffer a total RAID failure and backups are always important.

I tested the 24TB Shuttle XL in each of the available RAID configurations on an HP ZBook Studio G4 with a Thunderbolt 3 interface using the AJA System Test Utility. Each test used the 4GB testing size, 3840×2160 resolution and DNxHR 444 codec since I typically use RAIDS when editing video or motion based projects, which tend to be higher file size. As a caveat, when I lowered the file size to 1GB the speeds increased tremendously. For instance, in RAID-0 the Read/Write speeds were 953MB/s/2274MB/s compare to those below. Here are my results, including the total size of the RAID:

RAID-0: 21.83TB – Read: 960 MB/s – Write: 1451 MB/s
RAID-1: 10.91TB – Read: 439 MB/s – Write: 639 MB/s
RAID-5: 18.19TB – Read: 950 MB/s – Write: 1171 MB/s ***
RAID-6: 14.55TB – Read: 683 MB/s – Write: 750 MB/s
RAID-10: 10.91TB – Read: 506 MB/s – Write: 667 MB/s
RAID-50: 14.55TB – Read: 614 MB/s – Write: 933 MB/s

***I pulled a drive while working live in RAID-5 and while the read/write speed degraded to Read: 326MB/s and Write: 858MB/s it continued to function while the RAID rebuilt itself.

For some reference I also ran the AJA System Test on my local hard drive and got Read 1606MB/s — Write 1108MB/s, which is pretty fast, so the Shuttle XL is doing well. I also wanted to test real-world copy speed and using 50GB of Cinema DNG files here are the results:

RAID-0: 2 mins. 7 seconds (~403 MB/s)
RAID-1: 3 mins. 35 seconds (~238 MB/s)
RAID-5: 2 mins. 49 seconds (~303 MB/s)
RAID-6: 3 mins. 6 seconds(~275 MB/s)
RAID-10: 3 mins. 17 seconds (~260 MB/s)
RAID-50: 2 mins. 45 seconds (~310 MB/s)

While these results are pretty self explanatory, when configured in RAID-5 they are pretty impressive. If you ran the tests continuously for a day you would probably see some variation on the average, maybe a little higher than what you see here. The speeds are pretty impressive, especially when considering a drive can give out and you can still be running at a pretty high bandwidth. Technically, G-Technology states that the Shuttle XL can reach a maximum transfer rate up to 1500MB/s — which I was close to hitting. This is very surprising since typically these specs are a little like miles-per-gallon on new cars but not in this case. I really appreciate that accuracy and think it will go a long way with consumers. In terms of other apps, I wasn’t running anything other than the AJA System Test, but I also did not shut down anything in the background so it is possible some background apps affected these transfer numbers, but I wouldn’t say they had a lot of influence, you should see similar results.

Summing Up
In the end, the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle XL with EV Series Adapters Thunderbolt 3 Edition is a great choice for a RAID that might need to stand up to a little abuse in the field. The 24TB version of the Shuttle XL that connects using Thunderbolt 3 has a retail price of $2,799.95 with EV adapters being sold separately for between $99.95 and $199.95. The Shuttle XL is available from 24TB all the way up to 72TB, which will cost you $7,699.95.

If you like the idea of multiple RAID options, including ones that require more than four drives, the Shuttle XL has a decent price, a great build quality that should last you for years thanks to its Enterprise Class hard drives, and high bandwidth — the only thing better would be to load it with some SSD drives, but that could cost another $10,000 and would call for another review. Check out the Shuttle XL at G-Technologies website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Red Giant Trapcode Suite 14

By Brady Betzel

Every year we get multiple updates to Red Giant’s Adobe After Effects plug-in behemoth, Trapcode Suite. The 14th update to the Trapcode suite is small but powerful and brings significant updates to Version 3 of Trapcode as well as Form (Trapcode Form 3 is a particle system generator much like Particular, but instead of the particles living and dying they stay alive forever as grids, 3D objects and other organic shapes). If you have the Trapcode Suite from a previous purchase the update will cost $199, and if you are new the suite costs $999, or $499 with an academic discount.

Particular 3 UI

There are three updates to the Suite that warrant the $199 upgrade fee: Trapcode 3, Form 3 and Tao 1.2 update. However, you still get the rest of the products with the Trapcode Suite 14: Mir 2.1, Shine 2.0, Lux 1.4, 3D Stroke 2.6, Echospace 1.1, Starglow 1.7, Sound Keys 1.1 and Horizon 1.1

First up is the Tao 1.2 update. Trapcode Tao allows you to create 3D geometric patterns along a path in After Effects. If you do a quick YouTube search of Tao you will find some amazing examples of what it can do. In the Tao 1.2 update Red Giant has added a Depth-of-Field tool to create realistic bokeh effects on your Tao objects. It’s a simple but insanely powerful update that really gives your Tao creations a sense of realism and beauty. To enable the new Depth-of-Field, wander over to the Rendering twirl-down menu under Tao and either select “off” or “Camera Settings.” It’s pretty simple. From there it is up to your After Effects camera skills and Tao artistry.

Trapcode Particular 3
Trapcode Particular is one of Red Giant’s flagship plugins and it’s easy to see why. Particular allows you to create complex particle animations within After Effects. From fire to smoke to star trails, it can pretty much do whatever your mind can come up with, and Version 3 has some powerful updates, including the overhauled Trapcode Particular Designer.

The updated designer window is very reminiscent of the Magic Bullet Designer window, easy and natural to use. Here you design your particle system, including the look, speed and overall lifespan of your system. While you can also adjust all of these parameters in the Effects Window dialog, the Designer gives an immediate visual representation of your particle systems that you can drag around and see how it interacts with movement. In addition you can see any presets that you want to use or create.

Particular 3

In Particular 3, you can now use OBJ objects as emitters. An OBJ is essentially a 3D object. You can use the OBJ’s faces, vertices, edges, and the volume inside the object to create your particle system.

The largest and most important update to the entire Trapcode Suite 14 is found within Particular 3, and it is the ability to add up to eight particle systems per instance of Particular. What does that mean? Well, your particle systems will now interact in a way that you can add details such as dust or a bright core that can carry over properties from other particle systems in the same same instance, adding the ability to create way more intricate systems than before.

Personally, the newly updated Designer is what allows me to dial in these details easily without trying to twirl down tons of menus in the Effect Editor window. A specific use of this is that you want to duplicate your system and inherit the properties, but change the blend mode and/or colors, simply you click the drop down arrow under system and click “duplicate.” Another great update within the multiple particle system update is the ability to create and load “multi-system” presets quickly and easily.

Now, with all of these particle systems mashed together you probably are wondering, “How in the world will my system be able to handle all of these when it’s hard to even playback a system in the older Trapcode Suite?” Well, lucky for us Trapcode Particular 3 is now OpenGL — GPU-accelerated and allowing for sometimes 4x speed increases. To access these options in the Designer window, click the cogwheel on the lower edge of the window towards the middle. You will find the option to render using the CPU or the GPU. There are some limitations to the GPU acceleration. For instance, when using mixed blend modes you might not be able to use certain GPU acceleration types — it will not reflect the proper blend mode that you selected. Another limitation can be with Sprites that are QuickTime movies; you may have to use the CPU mode.

Last but not least, Particular 3’s AUX system (a particle system within the main particle system) has been re-designed. You can now choose custom Sprites as well as keyframe many parameters that could not be keyframed before.

Form 3 UI

Trapcode Form 3
For clarification, Trapcode Particular can create particle emitters that emit particles that have a life, so basically they are born and they die. Trapcode Form is a particle system that does not have a life — it is not born and it does not die. Some practical examples can be a ribbon like background or a starfield. These particle systems can be made from 3D models and even be dynamically driven by an audio track. And much like Particular’s updated Designer, Form 3 has an updated designer that will help you build you particle array quickly and easily. Once done inside the Designer you can hop out and adjust parameters in the Effects Panel. If you want to use pre-built objects or images as your particles you can load those as Sprites or Textured Polygons and animate their movement.

Another really handy update in Trapcode Form 3 is the addition of the Graphing System. This allows you to animate controls like color, size, opacity and dispersion over time.

Just like Particular, Form reacts to After Effect’s cameras and lights, completely immersing them into any scene that you’ve built. For someone like me, who loves After Effects and the beauty of creations from Form and Particular but who doesn’t necessarily have the time to create from scratch, there is a library of over 70 pre-built elements. Finally, Form has added a new rendering option called Shadowlet rendering which adds light falloff to your particle grid or array.

Form 3

Summing Up
In the end, the Trapcode Suite 14 has significantly updated Trapcode Particular 3 with multiple particle systems, Trapcode Form 3 with a beautiful new Designer, and Trapcode Tao with Depth-of-Field, all for an upgrade price of $199. Some Trapcode Particular users have been asking for the ability to build and manipulate multiple particle systems together, and Red Giant has answered their wishes.

If you’ve never used the Trapcode Suite you should also check out the rest of the mega-bundle which includes apps like Shine, 3D Stroke, Starglow, MIr, Lux, Sound Keys, Horizon and Echospace here. And if you want to get more in-depth rundowns of each of these programs check out Harry Frank’s (@graymachine) and Chad Perkin’s tutorials on the Red Giant News website. Then immediately follow @trapcode_lab and @RedGiantNews on Twitter.

If you want to find out more about the other tools in the Trapcode Suite check out my previous two-part review of Suite 13 here on postPerspective: http://postperspective.com/review-red-giants-trapcode-suite-13-part-1 and http://postperspective.com/review-red-giant-trapcode-suite-13-part-2.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Boxx’s Apexx 4 7404 workstation

By Brady Betzel

The professional workstation market has been blown open recently with companies like HP, Apple, Dell, Lenovo and others building systems containing i3/i5/i7/i9 and Xeon processors, and  AMD’s recent re-inauguration into the professional workstation market with their Ryzen line of processors.

There are more options than ever, and that’s a great thing for working pros, but for this review, I’m going to take a look at Boxx Technologies Apexx 4 7404, which the company sent me to run through its paces over a few months, and it blew me away.

The tech specs of the Apexx 4 7404 are:
– Processor: Intel i7-6950X CPU (10 cores/20 threads)
– One core is overclocked to 4.3GHz while the remaining nine cores can run at 4.1GHz
– Memory: 64GB DDR4 2400MHz
– GPUs: Nvidia Quadro P5000 (2560 CUDA cores, 16GB GDDR5X)
– Storage drive: NVMe Samsung SSD 960 (960GB)
– Operating system drive: NVMe Intel SSDPEDMW400 (375GB)
– Motherboard: ASUS X99-E WS/USB3.1

On the front of the workstation, you get two USB 3.0, two USB 2.0, audio out/mic in, and on the rear of the 7404 there are eight USB 3.0, two USB 3.1, two Gigabit Ethernet, audio out/mic in, line in, one S/PDIF out and two eSATA. Depending on the video card(s) you choose, you will have some more fun options.

This system came with a DVD-RW drive, which is a little funny these days but I suppose still necessary for some people. If you need more parts or drives there is plenty of room for all that you could ever want, both inside and out. While these are just a few of the specs, they really are the most important, in my opinion. If you purchase from Boxx all of these can be customized. Check out all of the different Boxx Apexx 4 flavors here.

Specs
Right off the bat you will notice the Intel i7-6950X CPU, which is a monster of a processor and retails for around $1,500, just by itself. With its hefty price tag, this Intel i7 lends itself to niche use cases like multimedia processing. Luckily for me (and you), that is exactly what I do. One of the key differences between a system like the Boxx workstation and ones from companies like HP is that Boxx takes advantage of the X or K series Intel processors and overclocks them, getting the most from your processors all while still being backed by Boxx’s three-year warranty. The 7404 has one core overclocked to 4.3GHz which can sometimes provide a speed increase for apps that don’t use multiple cores. While this isn’t a lot of cases it doesn’t hurt to have that extra boost.

The Apexx 4 case is slender (at 6.85-inches wide) and quiet. Boxx embraces liquid cooling systems to keep your enterprise-class components made by companies like Samsung, Intel, etc. running smoothly. Boxx systems are built and fabricated in Texas from aircraft grade aluminum parts and steel strengthening components.

When building your own system you might pick a case because the price is right or it is all that is available for your components (or that is what pcpartpicker.com tells you that is what fits). This can mean giving up build quality and potentially bad airflow. Boxx knows this and has gone beyond just purchasing other companies cases — they forge their own workstation case masterpieces.

Boxx’s support is based in Austin – no outsourcing — and their staff knows the apps we use such as Autodesk, Adobe and others.

Through Its Paces
I tested the Apexx 4 7404 using Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Media Encoder since they are really the Swiss Army knives of the multimedia content creation world. I edited together a 10-minute UHD (3840×2160) sequence using an XAVC MP4 I shot using a Sony a6300. I did a little color correction with the Lumetri Color tools, scaled the image up to 110% and exported the file through Media Encoder. I exported it as a 10-bit DNxHQX, UHD, QuickTime MOV.

It took seven minutes and 40 seconds to export to the OS drive (Intel) and about six minutes and 50 seconds to go to the internal storage drive (Samsung). Once I hit export I finally got the engines to rev up inside of the Boxx, the GPU fans seemed to kick on a little; they weren’t loud but you could hear a light breeze start up. On my way out of Premiere I exported an XML to give me a headstart in Resolve for my next test.

My next test was to import my Premiere XML into Blackmagic’s Resolve 14 Studio and export with essentially the same edits, reproduce the color correction, and apply the same scaling. It took a few minutes to get Resolve 14 up and running, but after doing a few uninstalls, installing Resolve 12.5.6 and updating my Nvidia drivers, Resolve 14 was up and running. While this isn’t a Boxx problem, I did encounter this during my testing so I figured someone might run into the same issue, so I wanted to mention it.

I then imported my XML, applied a little color correction, and double checked that my 110% scaling came over in the XML (which it did), and exported using the same DNxHQX settings that I used in Premiere. Exporting from Resolve 14 to the OS drive took about six minutes and 15 seconds, running at about 41 frames per second. When exporting to the internal storage drive it took about six minutes and 11 seconds, running between 40-42 frames per second. For those keeping track of testing details, I did not cache any of the QuickTimes and turned Performance Mode off for these tests (in case Blackmagic had any sneaky things going on in that setting).

After this, I went a little further and exported the same sequence with some Spatial Noise Reduction set across the entire 10-minute timeline using these settings: Mode: Better; Radius: Medium; Spatial Threshold: 15 on both Luma and Chroma; and Blend: 0. It ran at about nine frames per second and took about 25 minutes and 25 seconds to export.

Testing
Finally, I ran a few tests to get some geeky nerd specs that you can compare to other users’ experiences to see where this Boxx Apexx 4 7404 stands. Up first was the AJA System Test, which tests read and write speeds to designated disks. In addition, you can specify different codecs and file sizes to base this test off of. I told the AJA System Test to run its test using the 10-bit Avid DNxHQX codec, 16GB file size and UHD frame size (3860×2140). I ran it a few times, but the average was around 2100/2680 MB/sec write and read to the OS drive and 1000/1890 MB/sec write and read to the storage drive.

To get a sense of how this system would hold up to a 3D modeling test, I ran the classic Cinebench R15 app. OpenGL was 215.34 frames per second with 99.6% ref. match, CPU scored 2121cb and CPU (single core) cored 181cb with MP Ratio of 11.73x. What the test really showed me when I Googled Cinebench scores to compare mine to was that the Boxx Apexx 4 7404 was in the top of the heap for all categories. Specifically, within the top 20 for overall render speed being beaten only by systems with more cores and placed in the top 15 for single core speed — the OpenGL fps is pretty incredible at over 215fps.

Summing Up
In the end, the Boxx Apexx 4 7404 custom-built workstation is an incredible powerhouse for any multimedia workflow. From rendering to exporting to transcoding, the Boxx Apexx 4 7404 with dual Nvidia Quadro P5000s will chew through anything you throw at it.

But with this power comes a big price: the 7404 series starts at $7,246! The price of the one I tested lands much higher north though, more like just under $14,000 — those pesky Quadros bump the price up quite a bit. But if rendering, color correcting, editing and/or transcoding is your business, Boxx will make sure you are up and running and chewing through every gigabyte of video and 3D modeling you can run through it.

If you have any problems and are not up and running, their support will get you going as fast as possible. If you need parts replaced they will get that to you fast. Boxx’s three-year warranty, which is included with your purchase, includes getting next day on-site repair for the first year but this is a paid upgrade if you want it to continue for years two and three of your warranty. But don’t worry. If you don’t upgrade your warranty you still have two years of great support.

In my opinion, you should really plan for the extended on-site repair upgrade for all three years of your warranty — you will save time, which will make you more money. If you can afford a custom-built Boxx system, you will get a powerhouse workstation that makes working in apps like Premiere and Resolve 14 snappy and fluid.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: OWC’s USB-C dock

By Brady Betzel

Whether you have a MacBook Pro with only one USB 3.1 Gen 1 port (a.k.a. USB-C) or a desktop PC and aren’t fond of reaching around the back of your tower to plug in peripherals, you’ll need a dock. At first you might think a dock isn’t necessary, but it is. With the popularity of the USB-C connection you can use one single cable to plug in your dock and connect with many different devices, including HDMI, Mini DisplayPort, SD cards and multiple other USB connected devices.

OWC has a reputation for having high-quality, Mac-focused products like external RAID storage solutions. OWC branded SSD drives, memory upgrades and even refurbished Mac OS-based systems. One of the company’s latest products is the USB-C dock that is compatible with both Mac OS- and Windows-based computer systems. The OWC USB-C dock comes in two versions: Mini DisplayPort and HDMI. Otherwise, the rest of the ports are identical.

In the front of the dock is an SD card reader, 3.5 headphone/microphone combo port and high-powered USB 3.1 Gen 1 USB port. On the back are three USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports (one of those is another high-powered charging port), one USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C, Gigabit Ethernet, a USB 3.1 Gen 1 connection for your system, HDMI or MiniDP port, and the DC power connection. The docks come in four different colors that match Apple’s MacBook Pros, including space gray, silver, gold and rose gold. The Mini DisplayPort version costs $148.75, and the HDMI version costs anywhere from $127.99 to $148.75.

What I really love about the USB-C dock from OWC, aside from the abundance of ports, is the addition of high-powered charging ports. I have a Samsung Galaxy S8+ phone, which can charge at a high speed with ports like these, so having them on the dock is extra handy. Besides the S8+, other electronics like the GoPro Hero 5 Black Edition can benefit from these ports.

Where the USB-C dock will really shine is in an environment where you don’t want to carry around all your peripherals and you use a newer MacBook Pro that features USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C connections. Keep in mind that the dock will supply up to 60W of power for your computer in addition to the 20W for other peripherals, so if your computer needs more than 60W to charge it may charge slowly or not at all.

For us desktop users, the USB-C dock expands our connections by adding multiple USB ports, an HDMI connection, and even add a Gigabit network adapter all at close range instead of having to reach around the back of your workstation.

The HDMI port supports connection via HDMI 1.4b-enabled displays or televisions: and a high-speed HDMI cable is required for display resolutions of 1080p or higher. Most HDMI cables these days are high-speed, you can even find the AmazonBasics high-speed HDMI cables for $7.99.

As mentioned earlier, the OWC USB-C dock is compatible with both Windows and Mac OS systems, but a driver is required if using the Gigabit Ethernet port on Mac OS X system 10.10 and 10.11. You can find that driver here.

In a Windows-based environment you will not have to update the Ethernet driver, but in both Mac OS and Windows environments if you have the HDMI version, you will need to install the following firmware update.

Summing Up
Out of selfishness, I wish there was one more USB port on the back of the USB-C dock to host my four Tangent Element color correction panels, each of which has its own USB connections. Instead, I have one poking out of the front. In addition, it would be nice to have a Thunderbolt 1/2 port on the dock for my legacy Thunderbolt-connected RAIDs; instead, I will have to buy an additional adapter. Other than those two suggestions, the dock is awesome and works great. It measures just over an inch tall, 3.5 inches wide, and just under 8 inches long. It weighs .9 lbs and comes with a power supply that is actually heavier than the dock, and what I think is a way-too-short Type-C cable measuring at about 20 inches. Obviously, for those using the dock with a laptop this is sufficient, but for those using this dock with a tower something triple that length is needed.

The USB-C dock comes with a two-year limited warranty which in simple terms means that if anything goes wrong with the product because of bad manufacturing they will fix or replace it. They will not cover your data or shipping, so keep that in mind.

The dock’s manual features tips, like the Type-C USB 3.1 port between the traditional USB ports and the Ethernet port is for data and power only; it will not support video signals or video adapters. In addition, this dock is not compatible with Apple’s USB-C Digital AV multiport adapter or USB-C VGA multiport adapter. There are plenty of other usage notes you will want to read, so make sure that you check the manual out before you use the dock.

If you not only want a dock. but also want to update an older MacBook Pro, OWC has some great SSD and memory bundles.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Røde Mic’s Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote

By Brady Betzel

There are a ton of microphone types out there, and when it comes to adding an external mic to a camera you need to know what kind of mic works best in different situations. For interviews, you most likely want a microphone that picks up the audio that is placed directly in front of the microphone. If you are recording a music performance or ambience, you may want something that records in multiple directions without concentrating in any one specific location. I wanted to talk about Røde Microphones, which makes many of the on camera mics you see used YouTube content creators, Podcasters and filmmakers.

The way a microphone picks up audio is typically described as a polar pattern. The most common polar patterns in microphones are Cardioid, Super Cardioid and Omnidirectional. A Cardioid microphone will record mostly audio directly in front of it; a Super Cardioid will record mostly audio in the front, but also some directly in the rear; and an Omnidirectional will pick up audio equally from all directions. To further complicate the matter, if you record in stereo you can have a pickup pattern like X-Y Cardioid.

So after all that description of microphone polar patterns (you are welcome), here I’m going to focus on the Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote, which has an X-Y Cardioid polar pattern. You may be familiar with Rode’s famous VideoMic Pro, which is a great Super Cardioid, dual-mono microphone. The VideoMic Pro would be a great mic for recording a discussion outdoors, focusing on the conversation, but also picking up a little of the ambience. The Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote uses its X-Y Cardioid to record a stereo scene without a focus on a smaller specific area. In plain language, the Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote is great for recording ambience or performances. It is not the mic you want to use for an interview; that would be a job for the VideoMic Pro or better yet a directional mic like the Rode NTG series, which will give an intense focus on the area it is pointed at.

Capturing Ambience Outdoors
So why would someone want the Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote? If you record scenes outdoors, like at a baseball or soccer game, where you want to generally focus your audio on an area but also catch the surrounding ambience of the crowd… or at an outdoor group performance. Something I see missing a lot in videography is ambience in timelapses or b-roll, the Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote is exactly the on-camera mic you need to grab some great stereo ambience and add life to any b-roll shot, instantly. If you record traffic b-roll with cars crossing the camera from left to right or right to left, the stereo recording will convey traffic movement in a much more natural way engaging the viewer more than a mono recording of traffic that will not convey movement.

For all of the technical nerds out there, the Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote features a frequency range of 40Hz ~ 20,000Hz but can be limited with the built-in High Pass Filter that clips anything below 75Hz, matched pair ½” condenser capsules in X-Y stereo configuration, three position level control -10dB, 0 and +20dB. It uses a single 9V battery, measures 4.5” x 3.1” x 5.3”. It connects using a 3.5mm stereo mini-jack and weighs only .26 lbs.

The Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote is an updated version from the original Stereo VideoMic Pro, which includes the nearly indestructible Rycote Lyre shock mount, new condenser capsule setup, new Kevlar reinforced braided cable and improved foam windscreen. Best of all it comes with a 10-year warranty (one-year warranty plus nine additional years when you register your microphone). If you read any online comments about Røde microphones, you will notice one common theme: great customer service. More often than not you will see someone talk about how they needed an addition piece or how their warranty ran out but Rode still helped them out free of charge.

Putting it to the Test
To test the Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro I tried a few different scenarios including some outdoor scenes where I showcased stereo and mono recording. You can check out my YouTube video. I recorded everything on a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, which is notorious for having low audio recording levels. Luckily, the Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote has the three position level control and I was able to boost the recording by +20dB with very little noise. Otherwise my levels would have to be boosted when editing and that would definitely introduce more noise than I would have liked. While I did pick up a little bit of handling noise when recording, the Rycote Lyre shock-mount limited the little movements that other mics without this shock mount would have picked up. In terms of noise recorded on the mic, you can hear a little bit but nothing you couldn’t easily take out if it bothered you.

In the end the, Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro is a high-level external microphone that will add production value to any camera recording. It is priced between $279 and $300, although I found differing prices. Visit here to find a retailer near you, and one that will make sure you can take advantage of the tremendous warranty and customer service they offer. I also noticed that many retailers are including the Dead Kitten wind muff for free with purchase for when you are recording in a windy area.

When you listen to the difference between recording stereo with the Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote vs. recording mono on a mic like the Røde VideoMic Go, you can really feel your b-roll opening up. It adds a great level of depth to what would ordinarily be straight up the middle audio with no sense of left or right panning.

The Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote has an incredible recording and product build quality that will add depth to any footage you film. If you record outdoor b-roll, performances, or any other non-interview type footage. The Røde Stereo VideoMic Pro Rycote is going to be a vital piece of equipment you need to have in your bag.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Fangs Film Gear’s Wolf Packs and Panther lens bags

By Brady Betzel

Summertime is the perfect time to make sure you have the right gear bags to throw your cameras, memory cards and lenses in. Fangs Film Gear is a brand from the company Release the Hounds Studios. They also have other products, like Ground Control color correction LUTs, Wave Brigade royalty-free sound effects and ambience, and a podcast called Video Dogpound.

I found out about them when I was watching some music videos for inspiration and slowly fell down a rabbit hole that led me to a great organization called Heart Support. It’s basically a group that lends a helping hand to people having a hard time. I found co-owner Casey Faris’ YouTube page, where he has some awesome and easily digestible video editing and color correction tutorials — mainly on Blackmagic Design Resolve. You can find his co-owner Dan Bernard’s YouTube page here. They were promoting some of their LUTs from Ground Control and also some gear bags, which I’m now reviewing.

Fangs Film Gear Panther Lens Bags
These are black weather-resistant drawstring lens bags lined with lens-quality micro fiber cloth. They come in three sizes: small for $19.99, medium for $22.99 and large for $24.99. You can also buy one of each for $64.99. Once you touch them you will immediately feel the durability on the outside but the softness a lens demands on the inside. When using these bags you will always have a great lens cloth nearby.

Not only have I been toting around my lenses in these bags, but they’ve made great GoPro carrying bags since the GoPro’s lens is constantly exposed. The small bag works with a compact DSLR lens and is perfect for something like the Nifty Fifty Canon 50mm lens; it’s about the size of an iPhone 7 Plus or my Samsung Galaxy S8 +. Even the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera fits well — it measures 5×7 inches when lying flat. The medium bag measures 6×8 inches and is good for multiple GoPros or a medium-sized lens like my micro four-thirds Lumix 14-140. The large measures 6.5×9.25 inches and is obviously great for a longer lens, but in a rush I keep my Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera with 14-140 lens attached sometimes. All the bags are weather resistant, meaning you can splash some water on them and it won’t get through. However, as they are drawstring so water can still get in through the top.

If you are looking for a GoPro-specific gear bag they also carry something called The Viper, a GoPro-focused sling bag. And if you are a DJI Mavic owner, they sell a two-pack of Panther bags that will fit the remote and Mavic — it looks essentially like the small and large Panther bags.

Fangs Film Gear Tactical Production Organizers
These are called Wolf Packs but I like to call them sweet dad bags. Not only do they have a practical production purpose, but they are great for dads who have to carry baby stuff around but want a little more stylish look.

So first the production purpose of the Wolf Packs. It’s really genius and simple: one side is green for your charged batteries or unused memory cards, and the red side is for depleted batteries and used memory cards. No more worrying about which cards have been used, or having to try and label a bunch of MicroSD cards with some gaffers tape. Now for the dad use of the Wolf Packs — green for the clean diapers and red for the used diapers! If you’ve ever used cloth diapers you may be a little more familiar with this technique.

The Wolf Packs are ultra durable and haven’t shed a stitch since I’ve used them in production scenarios, and even Disneyland dad scenarios. The zippers are extremely sturdy, but what impressed me the most were the included carabiner and carabiner grommet on the Wolf Packs themselves. The grommet is very high quality and won’t rip. The carabiner itself isn’t of rock climbing grade but will do for almost any situation you will need it for. The clip makes these bags easy to attach anywhere but specifically my backpack.

Inside the Wolf Pack is a durable fabric that isn’t the same as the Panther Lens bags, so do not clean your lenses with these! The pockets are made to stand up to the abuses of throwing batteries in and out all day long. I would love to see one of these with the microfiber lining like the Panther bags, but I also see the benefit of using both of them separate. The Wolf Packs break down like this: the small is 6.5×5.5 inches for $29.99, the medium is 8.25×7 inches for $34.99 and the large is 9×9 inches for $39.99. You can also purchase all three for $99.99.

Summing Up
I’ve definitely put these bags through the wringer over an extended period of time to make sure they will hold up. I am particularly concerned about things like zippers, stitching and cinches, so just a month or so of testing won’t give you a great sample. So over multiple months I’ve put the Panther Lens Bags and Wolf Packs through the wringer, hiking in the Simi Valley mountains and running into rattle snakes with GoPros, batteries, memory cards, lenses, Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Cameras and much more.

Even lightly dropping some of the bags with GoPros and BMPCC’s in them into the water and found no damage. I’ve really come to love the lens bags, especially when I need a quick lens cleaning and I know that I always have that with me. The Wolf Packs are something I constantly keep with me, great for shoots where I need to change out batteries and memory cards but also great for kid snacks, chapstick and sunscreen. Without hesitation I would order these again; the fabric and stitching is top notch. I had my wife, who really likes to sew and make clothing, take a look at them and she was really impressed with the Wolf Packs… so much so there is now one missing.

Check them out at their website www.fangsfilmgear.com, Twitter @FangsFilmGear and their main company site. Finally, if you are interested in some positivity you should check out www.heartsupport.com.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Sony’s a6300 E-mount camera

By Brady Betzel

It’s fair to say that the still and motion camera market isn’t boring. Canon and Nikon have been the huge players in the market, more so a few years ago when Canon introduced the landscape-changing 7D and full-frame 5D cameras. The 5D was the magic camera for the filmmaking community. Over the years, other companies have been breaking the 5D mold with cameras like Blackmagic with its Pocket Cinema Camera, but once the filmmaking community started lusting for higher frame rates that filmed at higher than 1920×1080 resolution, along with a Log or Log-like color space, the field began to really open up.

It seems that’s when Sony started taking the prosumer camera market seriously and doubled down on the Sony a6000 mirrorless E-mount camera, which eventually led to the 4K (technically UHD) recording-capable a6300 and a6500.

Once people started seeing the images and video that the APS-C-based a6300 produced, mixed with the awesome low-light capabilities and wide dynamic range using picture profiles like SLog2/3 — Sony had a bonafide hit on their hands. And if you still wanted more sensor size than the a6300 can provide with its crop sensor, you have the full-frame A7SII and A7RII (and, hopefully, soon the A7R/S III).

In this review, I am going to cover the Sony a6300 and explain why it’s a good value for anyone looking to make some great content, or even just have top-notch 4K home videos. The image fidelity that comes from the Sony a6300 is truly incredible. It’s a little hard to quantify for me, but I think that the Sony a6300 has a look from the sensor that is superbly unique to a handheld camera. The Sony a6300 delivers a top-notch product for around $949.99 (not including lenses) or $1049.99, which includes a 16-50mm lens… but more on pricing later.

Technically, the Sony a6300 is a handheld camera camera with an interchangeable E-mount lens system. Since this is an APS-C crop sensor camera, it is not full frame. The sensor will record images at 24.2 megapixels and up to UHD (3840×2160) resolution when recording video, and since I work in video I am focusing on that aspect of the a6300. It records in the Sony created xvYCC color space — essentially an extended gamut color space that allows for more saturation but is compatible with existing YCC color space. Short answer: more saturation. It accepts Sony Memory Stick Duo or SD memory cards to record on, but do some research on your memory card as not all will allow for UHD recording at the full 100Mb/s. In movie mode you have an ISO range of 100-25600, which really shines in the high ISO range when filming in low light.

In terms of video recording formats, the Sony a6300 stays in the family with its XAVC S, AVCHD and MP4 all of which are 8-bit out of the camera. Keep in mind that if you edit a lot of footage in XAVC- or AVCHD-based codecs, your computer will need to be on the higher end and/or you will want to create proxy media to edit before finishing and color correcting. The XAVC and AVCHD codecs allow for pretty good quality video to be recorded, but this really stresses editing systems because of the way interframe codecs work. If you notice your system can’t play down your clips, it might be time to think about transcoding them to a more edit-friendly codec like ProRes, Cineform or DNxHR.

When recording in XAVC S 4K/UHD (3840×2160) you can shoot in multiple framerates and bitrates — 24p @ 100/60Mbps; 30p @ 100/60Mbps; XAVC S HD (1920×1080) 60p/30p/24p @ 50Mbps and 120p @ 100/50Mbps as well as many other options — but for this review those are the ones that really matter. The real beauty in the Sony a6300 is the ability to shoot in Log color space, which in very basic terms is a video with a grayish-flat color that allows for advanced color correction in post production because there is more information to pull out of the shadows and highlights aka dynamic range.

S-Log 2 split screen.

To enable the Log color spaces, find the Picture Profile menu under menu five and select PP7, PP8 or PP9. This is where you will find the Gamma menu and S-Log 2- or 3-enabled by default. There are more options but the next one that concerns a lot of people is the Color Mode, which can be changed to S-Gamut, S-Gamut3.Cine, S-Gamut3 and more. These are a little tricky, and my best piece of advice is to try each combination in different lighting environments like sunset, a bright blue sky with gradations and low light to see which works best for each situation. I noticed I got a good amount of noise in S-Log3 S-Gamut3.Cine, but I really tried to push the low light in that mode. I fixed excessive shadow noise when I was color correcting by using Red Giant’s Magic Bullet Suite Denoiser — read my review.

I noticed S-Log2 left me a little more detail in the highlights, while S-Log 3 gave a little more detail in the shadows; that may have just been my experience, but that is what I noticed. In addition, when shooting in S-Log 2/3 I noticed some macro-blocking/banding in shots that had color gradations, like a blue sky turning into white or even very bright lights — this will look like square digital artifacts or bands arcing across the gradient. I even saw a dead pixel flash when shooting some really low-light footage. The real test is to watch this footage on a huge TV or output monitor above 32-inches because you will really start to see the noise and banding that is present. I did some testing with noise removal, and with a little bit of noise removal elbow grease you can get a great picture. Overall, I am very impressed with the Log type images I was able to pull out of the a6300 and how well they held up in color correction. Typically, a camera that can pull this type of image would be at least over $5,000-6,000 or more plus lenses, so the a6300 is a steal.

After all that S-Log talk you might be asking, “What if I just want to shoot great video and not worry about Logs and Gamuts?” Well, you can set the Picture Profile to 1-6 and get a great image with little to no color correction needed. Specifically, Picture Profile 1 is really the automatic setting to use; it is described by Sony as being the “Movie Gamma,” which basically means your video will look good.

For more descriptions on the Picture Profiles of the Sony a6300, check out their help guide. You will need to test out all of the Picture Profiles though as they all have different characteristics, such as more detail in the shadows but less accurate color in the highlights. Just something to take a few hours and test out.

More Cool Stuff
The internal microphone on the a6300 is ok, but probably shouldn’t be used to use as your primary audio recording. I would suggest something like the Røde VideoMic Pro. Unfortunately without being able to monitor your audio by headphones you will definitely need to test your external microphone to check whether you need a pre-amp, or if something like the VideoMic Pro +20dB boost will be enough or too loud.

One thing that really stuck out to me was how fast the automatic focus was on the Sony a6300. I am used to using a Canon EOS Rebel t2i camera, and the Sony a6300 is lightning fast, almost instantaneous. It really impressed me. I was visiting Disneyland when I had the a6300 and was taking some stills and video around the park, I took a picture of my son, but the Sony a6300 had accidentally caught a bubble in the autofocus and very clearly took a picture of that bubble. It was accidentally incredible.

In addition to the camera, Sony let me borrow a few lenses when I tested out the a6300, including the 50mm f1.8 ($249.99), E 35mm f1.8 ($449.99) and E PZ 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 ($349.99). While the 35mm and 50mm are great , I felt that the 16-50mm zoom lens did the job for me overall. In low-light situations it definitely helped to have the f1.8 prime lenses in my bag, but during daylight, and even dusk, the zoom lens was great. However, when taking portraits or footage where I wanted a nice bokeh background, the prime lenses were what I had to use.

If I was going to buy this camera for myself I would weigh the idea of spending a little more money and grabbing a really nice lens, whether it be a prime or zoom. The only problem with that is most of the upgraded lenses are for full-frame cameras, which brings me to my next point: Would I just go all the way to a full-frame Sony A7rII or A7sII camera? In my mind, if I have enough money to get a full-frame camera I do it. The quality, in my eyes, is far superior. However, you are going to be paying an extra $1,000 to $2,500, depending on the lenses, whether you buy new or used. So a middle ground might be to buy the full-frame lenses like the G Master series for the a6300. This way when you find the right Sony body you don’t have to upgrade lenses as the full-frame lenses will work on the a6300. Keep in mind you will have a crop factor of 1.5, which means a full-frame 50mm lens will actually be a 75mm lens. That might be more confusing than helpful, but it is a constant fight for Sony a6300 owners after they see what the Sony cameras can do. Another option is to take a look at Craigslist or Ebay and see if anyone is selling a used a6300 or A7srII. I did a cursory search when writing this article and found a Sony a6300 with four lenses and extra accessories for $1,300, and another a6300 for sale with one lens for $700, so there are options for used cameras at a great price.

So what didn’t I like about the Sony a6300? There is no headphone jack to monitor your audio. That’s a big one, but one possible solution is using the micro-HDMI port. If you use an external monitoring solution, like an Atomos or a SmallHD monitor, you will be able to use their audio monitoring. Also, I just can’t get used to Sony’s menu and button setup. Maybe because I’ve been used to Canon’s menu, button and wheel setup for a while, but Sony’s setup for some reason throws me off. I feel like I have to go in to one or two extra menus before I get to the settings I want.

Summing Up
The bottom line is that the Sony a6300 is an incredible UHD-capable camera that can be purchased with a lens for around $1,000. It lacks things like proper audio monitoring but gives you great control over your color correction when filming in SLog 2 or 3, and with a little noise reduction you will have clean low-light footage in the palm of your hand.

There is a newer version of this camera in the a6500, which has the following upgrades over the a6300 — 5-axis image stabilization, touchscreen LCD (can swipe to change focus on an object or touch to set focus) and improved menu system. The a6500 costs $1,399.99 for the body only. The image stabilization is what really sells the a6500 since you can now use any lens (with adapters) that you want while still benefitting from image stabilization. Either way, the a6300 is the best bet to get a great UHD-capable camera at a great price, especially if you can find someone selling a used one with a bunch of lenses and batteries. The video that comes from the Sony line of cameras is unmistakable, and will add a level of professionalism to anyone’s videography arsenal.

You can see my Sony a6300 Slow Motion SLog 2/SLog 3 test as well as my UHD tests on YouTube.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

My top workstation accessories

By Brady Betzel

As a working video editor, I’m at my desk and on my computer all day. So when I get home I want my personal workstation to feel as powerful as possible and having the right tools to support that experience are paramount.

I’m talking workstation accessories. I’ve put together a short list based on my personal experience. Some are well known, while some are slightly under the radar. Either way, they all make my editing life easier and more productive.

They make my home-based workstation feel like a full-fledged professional edit suite.

Wacom Intuos Pro Medium
In my work as an offline editor, I started to have some wrist pain when I used a mouse in conjunction with my keyboard. That is when I decided to jump head first into using a Wacom tablet. Within two weeks, all of my pain went away and I felt that I had way more control over drawing objects and shapes. I specifically noticed more precision when working inside of apps like Adobe’s After Effects and Photoshop when drawing accurate lines and shapes with bezier handles.

In addition, you can program minimal macros on the express keys on the side of the tablet. While the newest Wacom Intuos Pro Medium tablet costs a cool $349.95, it will pay for itself with increased efficiency and, in my experience, less wrist pain.

Genelec 8010A Studio Monitors
One workstation accessory that will blow you away is a great set of studio monitors. Genelec is known for making some great studio monitors and the 8010A are a set I wish I could get. These monitors are small —  around 8-inches tall by 4-inches deep and 4-inches wide — but they put out some serious power at 96dBs.

Don’t be fooled by their small appearance; they are a great complement to any serious video and audio power user. They connect via XLR, so you may need to get some converters if you are going straight out of your station, without runing through a mixer. These speakers are priced at $295 each; they aren’t cheap, but they are another important accessory that will further turn your bay into a professional suite.

Tangent Element & Blackmagic Resolve Color Correction Panels
If you work in color correction, or aspire to color correct, color correction panels are a must. They not only make it easier for you to work in apps like Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve, but they free your mind from worrying about where certain things are and let your fingers do the talking. It is incredibly liberating to use color correction panels when doing a color grade — it feels like you have another arm you can use to work.

The entire set of Tangent Element Panels costs over $3,300, but if you are just getting started, the Tangent Element Tk (just the trackballs) can be had for a little over $1,100. What’s nice about the Tangent panels is that they work with multiple apps, including Adobe Premiere, FilmLight Baselight, etc. But if you know you are only going to be using Resolve, the Resolve Micro or Mini panels are a great deal at under $1,000 and $3,000, respectively.

Logitech G13 Advanced Gameboard
This one might sound a bit odd at first, but once you do some research you will see that many professional editors use these types of pads to program macros of multiple button pushes or common tasks. Essentially, this is a macro pad that has 25 programmable keys as well as a thumb controlled joystick. It’s a really intriguing piece of hardware that might be able to take place of your mouse in conjunction with your keyboard. It is competitively priced at only $79.99 and, with a little Internet research on liftgammagain.com, you can even find forums of user’s custom mappings.

Logickeyboard Backlit Keyboard
Obviously, the keyboard is one of the most used workstation accessories. One difficulty is trying to work with one in a dark room. Well, Logickeyboard has a dimmable backlit keyboard series for apps like Resolve and Avid Media Composer.

In addition to being backlit, they also have two powered USB 2.0 ports that really come in handy. These retail for around $140, so they are a little pricey for a keyboard but, take it from me, they will really polish that edit suite.

OWC USB-C Dock
With ports on Mac-based systems being stripped away, a good USB-C dock is a great extension to have in your edit suite. OWC offers a Mini-DisplayPort or HDMI-equipped version in the colors that match your MacBook Pro, if you have one.

In addition, you get five USB 3.1-compatible ports — including two of those being a high-powered charging port and a USB type C port — a Gig-E port, front facing SD card reader, combo audio in/out port and Mini-DisplayPort or HDMI port. These retail for under $150.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.