Tag Archives: Blackmagic Micro color panel

Blackmagic intros lower-cost color panels for Resolve, new camera

By Brady Betzel

Yesterday, Blackmagic held a press conference on YouTube introducing a new pro camera — the Ursa Mini Pro 4.6K, which combines high-end digital film quality with the ergonomics and features of a traditional broadcast camera — and two new portable hardware control panels for the DaVinci Resolve (yes, only the Resolve) designed to allow color correction workflows to be mixed in with editing workflows.

For this article, I’m going to focus on the panels.

The color correction hardware market is a small one, usually headed by the same companies who produce color correction software. Tangent is one of the few that produces its own color correction panels. There is also the Avid/Euphonix Artist color correction panel and a few others, but the price jumps incredibly when you step up to panels like the Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve Advanced panels (just under $30,000).

I’ve previously reviewed the Tangent Ripple and Element color correction panels, and I love them. However, besides Tangent there really hasn’t been any mid- to prosumer-level products… until now. Blackmagic is offering the new Micro and Mini color correction panels.

The Blackmagic’s Micro color correction panel (our main image) is well priced at $995, which can be somewhat compared to the Tangent Wave (over $1,500 on B&H‘s site), Tangent Element Tk (over $1,135), or more closely compared to the Avid Artist Color Control Surface ($1,299). You’ll notice all of those are priced way higher than the new Micro panel. You could also throw the Tangent Ripple up for comparison, but that has a much more limited functionality and is much lower in price at around $350. The Micro panel is essentially three trackballs, 12 knobs and 18 keys. It is a collection of the most highly used parts of a color correction panel without any GUI screens. It connects via USB-C, although a USB 3 to USB-C converter will be included.

The Blackmagic Mini color correction panel (pictured right) is priced higher at $2,995 and can be compared to a combo of the Tangent Element Tk with one or two more in the Element set, which retail for $3,320 on www.bhphotovideo.com. The Mini adds two 5-inch displays, eight soft buttons, and eight soft knobs, in addition to everything the Micro panel has. It also has pass-through Ethernet to power and connect the panel, USB-C, and 4-pin XLR 12V DC power connection.

I am really excited to try these color correction panels out for my own — and I will, as the panels are on their way to me as I type. I need to emphasize that these panels only work with Resolve, no other software apps, so these were built with one workflow in mind.

I do wonder if in the future Blackmagic will sell additional panels that add more buttons and knobs or something crazy like a Smartscope through the Ethernet ports so I don’t have to buy additional SDI output hardware. Will everyone be ok with transport controls being placed on the right?

“We are always looking to design new products and features to help with the creative process,” says Blackmagic’s Bob Caniglia. “These new panels were designed to enable our growing number of Resolve users to be able access the power of DaVinci Resolve and Resolve Studio beyond a mouse and keyboard. The Micro and Mini control panels provide the perfect complement to our existing Advanced control panels.”

Blackmagic is really coming for everyone in the production and post world with recent moves like the acquisition of audio company Fairlight and realtime bluescreen and greenscreen removal hardware Ultimatte, providing Avid with their Media Composer DNx IOs, and even releasing an updated version of the Ursa camera, the Ursa Mini Pro. Oh, yeah, and don’t forget they provide one of the top color correction and editing apps on the market in DaVinci Resolve, and the latest color correction hardware like the Micro and Mini panels are primed to bring the next set of colorists into the Resolve world.

Oh, and as not to forget about the camera, the Ursa Mini Pro 4.6K is now available for $5,995. Here are some specs:

•  Digital film camera with 15 stops of dynamic range.
• Super 35mm 4.6K sensor with third-generation Blackmagic color science processing of raw sensor data.
• Interchangeable lens mount with EF mount included as standard. Optional PL and B4 lens mount available separately.
• High-quality 2, 4 and 6 stop ND filters with IR compensation designed to specifically match the colorimetry and color science of Ursa Mini Pro.
• Fully redundant controls including ergonomically designed tactile controls that allow direct access to the most important camera settings such as external power switch, ND filter wheel, ISO, shutter, white balance, record button, audio gain controls, lens and transport control, high frame rate button and more.
• Built-in dual C-Fast 2.0 recorders and dual SD/UHS-II card recorders allow unlimited duration recording in high quality.
• LCD status display for quickly checking timecode, shutter and lens settings, battery, recording status and audio levels.
• Support for CinemaDNG 4.6K RAW files and ProRes 4444 XQ, ProRes 4444, ProRes 422 HQ, ProRes 422, ProRes 422 LT and ProRes 422 Proxy recording at Ultra HD and HD resolutions.
• Supports up to 60 fps 4.6K resolution capture in RAW.
• Features all standard connections, including dual XLR mic/line audio inputs with phantom power, 12G-SDI output for monitoring with camera status graphic overlay and separate XLR 4-pin power output for viewfinder power, headphone jack, LANC remote control and standard 4-pin 12V DC power connection.
• Built-in stereo microphones for recording sound.
• Four-inch foldout touchscreen for on-set monitoring and menu settings.