Tag Archives: Avid Media Composer

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter editor Doobie White

By Brady Betzel

Editor Doobie White straddles two worlds. As co-founder of West Los Angeles-based Therapy Studios, he regularly works on commercials and music videos, but he also gets to step out of that role to edit movies. In fact, his most recent, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter for director Paul WS Anderson, is his ninth feature film.

Recently, we reached out to White to ask him about his workflow on this film, his editing techniques, his background and why regularly cutting more than one type of project makes him a better editor. Ok, let’s dig in.

Doobie White

What was it like coming onto a film that was an established franchise, and the last film in that franchise? Did that add any pressure?
The pressure was definitely on. The Final Chapter needed to be bigger, scarier and more exciting than the previous films. It’s also when the story comes full circle. We find out who Alice really is and what she has been fighting against throughout the franchise. There was a considerable amount of time and effort put into the edit to make it the best possible film it could be. That is what we aim for.

How early did you come on board? Were you on set? Near set? Keeping up with camera?
I was brought on a month or so before principal photography began. The film was shot in South Africa. I was there for four months cutting away like a madman. I was keeping up with camera so they could pick up any extra shots that would help tell the story. This was a life saver in the end. Scenes got better and we solved problems early on in the process. By the time we left South Africa we had a full rough cut. No re-shoots were necessary because they got it all before we left.

This is an action film with a lot of VFX. How did that affect your edit? Did they do pre and postvis on this one? Does that help you?
There was previs for some of the more complicated VFX in the movie, but that was mainly for production, to get a better understanding of what Paul was looking for and to make sure they captured every shot that was needed. I do think it really helps to get everyone on the same page. The scene usually evolves, but it’s a great way to start. I basically do the same thing but with the real footage when there is a lot of VFX involved.

When I’m working on a heavy VFX sequence, I really put everything into the scene that I possibly can to make sure it is working. There is a scene with a big flying creature at the beginning of the film that we called Dragon vs. Hummer. It’s basically exactly what it sounds like. I took still cut-outs of a temp creature and placed them into the shots, making the creature chase Alice around a destroyed Washington, DC. My goal was to make the edit look and sound like the finished film — albeit, with a silly cut-out of a scary monster. If I can create excitement with a still, I know the finished scene is going to be great.

Did the director shoot a lot of footage?
Paul does shoot a lot. He covers everything really well. I’m hardly ever painted into a corner. He always gives me a way out. Having tons of footage does make it more difficult when putting scenes together, but I love having the options to play.

What direction were you given from him in terms of the cut, if any?
We kinda had a motto for the film. Probably not a motto, but it’s something that Paul would say after showing him a cut, and I would always keep in mind. “There is a lot of great stuff in there… all you need to do now is move it all closer together.” Paul really wanted this film to be non-stop — for the story to always be propelled forward. I took that as a mission statement: to always make the audience feel like Alice, caught in this crazy post-apocalyptic world — with violence, chaos and monsters!

How did you work with Anderson? How often were you showing him cuts?
Paul is great to work with. We had an absolute blast cutting this film together. In the early stages I was just trying to tame the beast, so we would get together a couple of times a week to review. By the end, Paul was in everyday pushing me to take the edit into new territory. What’s incredible about Paul is that he never runs out of ideas. Anytime there was a problem he would always have a creative solution. It truly is a joy to work on a film like this with a director that isn’t afraid to push visual storytelling.

What system did you edit on?
Avid 8.3.1. It was the most stable at the time. Avid is still the best at having multiple people working on the same material at the same time. I might consider other software if they could match the sharing functionality that Avid has been doing for years. I also frequently use Adobe Photoshop and After Effects.

Do you have any special shortcuts/tricks you use often?
This really isn’t a shortcut or a trick, but it relates. If I find a performance that I like but there is something wrong with the image, I will usually figure out a way to fix it. I tend to do this on every job to some degree. For instance, if an actors eyes are shut when they are delivering a line, I will replace their eyes from a different take. Sometimes I’m replacing heads to have characters looking in the right direction. I will comp two different takes together. I use every tool I’ve got to get the best performance possible.

How do you organize your projects? Any special bins/folders of commonly used stuff like speed ramps, transitions, etc.?
I have a lot of bins that migrate from job to job. I place just as much importance on sound as I do on picture. Everything I do involves sound in a very specific way. So I have around 120 sound effects bins that I move over to every job that I do. Everything from footsteps to gunshots. I’m adding to this all the time, but it saves multiple days of work to keep a master set of sounds and then add specific sounds for each job.

On this one, we recorded a bunch of people in our office for zombie sounds, pitching their voices and adding effects to make them sound truly disturbing. I also have 60 bins or so of music that I keep on hand. I’m adding to this all the time as well.

What do you expect from an assistant editor, and how much knowledge should they already have? Are they essentially technical editors or do you mentor them?
I expect a lot from my assistants. They need to be technically savvy, but they also need to know how to edit. I do so many VFX and do a full sound design pass on every scene. My assistants have to be able to contribute on all fronts. One day they will be organizing. The next they will be adding sounds and lasers (temp VFX) to a scene. I have worked with the same assistant for a bunch of years. Her name is Amy K. Bostrom, and she is amazing. She does all the technical side, but she is a great editor in her own right. I have no doubt that she will have a great career.

How did you approach this project and was it any different than commercials/music videos?
It’s definitely different, but I start in a very similar way. I like to get a scene/commercial/music video cut together as fast as possible. I don’t watch a lot of the footage on the first pass. When I have a rough cut I go back to the dailies and watch everything. At that point I know what I’m looking for and my selects have a purpose.

If you could edit any genre and project what would you do?
That’s a tough question. I don’t think I really have a preference. I want the challenge and to be pushed creatively. Every project that I work on I’m really just trying to make myself feel something. I search for footage and sound that evokes emotion, and I cut it in a way that produces some sort of feeling in myself. Whether that be happiness, pain, excitement, fear, pleasure — if I can feel something when I’m working, then others will as well. I want to work on projects that connect with people in some way. The genre is secondary.

Are you ever satisfied with an edit, or does the edit just stop because of deadlines? Could you tinker forever or do know when something is at the right spot?
I think it is a little bit of both. You work really hard to get a project into a good place. Fix all the problems, fine-tune everything, but eventually you run out of time. A movie could be worked on forever. So it is like George Lucas said, “Movies are abandoned.” I believe a film can always be better. I go for that until I can’t.

Do you have any life/work balance tips or processes you do?
Unfortunately, no. I wish I did. I just have a lot of passion for what I do. I can’t really focus on anything else when I’m on a project. I try to disconnect from it, but I’m always thinking about it in some way. How can it be better? What is this scene/movie/commercial really about? How can I fix something that is not working? I’m half present when I’m on a project and I’m not in the cutting room. It takes over my life. It’s probably not the healthiest way to go, but it’s the only way I know. Honestly, I love it. I’m fine with getting a little obsessive. I’m going to work on meditating!

It must be fun to run an editorial house, but also step into the world of features films from time to time. Keeps things fresh for you?
Yes, it is nice to be able to jump from different types of projects. I love commercials and I love movies, but they are quite different and use different muscles. By the time I’m done with a movie I am so ready to cut commercials for a while, and vice versa. Films are extremely rewarding, but it’s an endurance race. Commercials are instant gratification. You cut for a week or two, and its on air the following week. It’s great! After a few months of commercials I’m ready for a new challenge.

Where/when did you get the first itch to work in video/film?
I had no plans of working in the film industry. I loved movies, music videos, and commercials, but I was so far removed from that world that I never saw a path. I was a ski bum studying art in Lake Tahoe, and one of the classes offered was digital media. This is the first time I realized you could edit clips together on a computer. It changed everything I was focused on. I started making silly short films and cutting them together. It wasn’t a film school and no one else was doing this so I had to do everything. From the writing, shooting and the music.

What I enjoyed the most was editing these little masterpieces. I decided I was going to figure out how to get someone to pay me to be an editor. I moved to LA and pretty much got laughed at. I couldn’t find a job, I was sleeping on couches. It was a bit desperate. The only opportunity that I eventually landed was an internship at a post house. After many coffee runs and taking out the trash, an editor asked me to work on a music video over the weekend. I jumped at the opportunity and didn’t go home until he came back on Monday. After he saw the cut I was hired the next day. This post house is where I met three of my best friends who would eventually become my partners at Therapy Studios.

Was your family supportive of you going into a creative job like editing?
To a degree, yes. It took a long time to find a path as an editor, and I think it was a bit confusing for them when I started working as an intern, especially being that I had zero cash and they were in no place to help. What I think is hard for a lot of people to understand that are not in the industry is that its very difficult to get a job in the film business. No matter what career you want to do, there are a thousand other kids that are trying to do the same thing. Perseverance is key. If you can outlast others you will probably find a way… ha!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Apple’s new MacBook Pro

By Brady Betzel

What do you need to know about the latest pro laptop from Apple? Well, the MacBook Pro is fast and light; the new Touch Bar is handy and sharp but not fully realized; the updated keys on the keyboard are surprisingly great; and working with ProRes QuickTime files in resolutions higher than 1920×1080 inside of FCP X, or any NLE for that matter, is blazing fast.

When I was tasked with reviewing the new MacBook Pro, I came into it with an open mind. After all, I did read a few other reviews that weren’t exactly glowing, but I love speed and innovation among professional workstation computers, so I was eager to test it myself.

I am pretty open-minded when it comes to operating systems and hardware. I love Apple products and I love Windows-based PCs. I think both have their place in our industry, and to be quite honest it’s really a bonus for me that I don’t rely heavily on one OS or get too tricked by the Command Key vs. Windows/Alt Key.

Let’s start with the call I had with the Apple folks as they gave me the lowdown on the new MacBook Pro. The Apple reps were nice, energetic, knowledgeable and extremely helpful. While I love Apple products, including this laptop, it’s not the be-all-end-all.

The Touch Bar is nice, but not a revolution. It feels like the first step in an evolution, a version 1 of an innovation that I am excited to see more of in later iterations. When I talked with the Apple folks they briefed me on what Tim Cook showed off in the reveal: emoji buttons, wide gamut display, new speakers and USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 connectivity.

NLEs
They had an FCPX expert on the call, which was nice considering I planned on reviewing the MacBook Pro with a focus on the use of nonlinear editing apps, such as Adobe Premiere Pro, Avid Media Composer and Blackmagic’s Resolve. Don’t get me wrong, FCPX is growing on me — it’s snappy jumping around the timeline with ProRes 5K footage; assigning roles are something I wish every other app would pick up on; and the timeline is more of a breeze to use with the latest update.

The other side to this is that in my 13 years of working in television post I have never worked on a show that primarily used FCP or FCPX to edit or finish on. This doesn’t mean I don’t like the NLE, it simply means I haven’t relied on it in a professional working environment. Like I said, I really like the road it’s heading down, and if they work their way into mainstream broadcast or streaming platforms a little more I am sure I will see it more frequently.

Furthermore, with the ever-growing reduction in reliance on groups of editors and finishing artists apps like FCPX are poised to shine with their innovation. After all that blabbering, in this review I will touch on FCPX, but I really wanted to see how the MacBook Pro performed with the pro NLEs I encounter the most.

Specs
Let’s jump into the specs. I was sent a top-of-the-line 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, which costs $3,499 if configured online. It comes with a quad/-core Intel Core i7 2.9GHz (up to 3.8 GHz using Turbo Boost) processor, 16GB of 2133MHz memory, 1TB PCI-e SSD hard drive and Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB of memory. It’s loaded. I think the only thing that can actually be upgraded beyond this configuration would be to include a 2TB hard drive, which would add another $800 to the price tag.

Physically, the MacBook Pro is awesome — very sturdy, very thin and very light. It feels great when holding it and carrying it around. Apple even sent along a Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 adapter, which costs an extra $29 and a USB-C to Lightning Cable that costs an extra $29.

So yes, it feels great. Apple has made a great new MacBook Pro. Is it worth upgrading if you have a new-ish MacBook Pro at home already? Probably not, unless the Touch Bar really gets you going. The speed is not too far off from the previous version. However, if you have a lot of Thunderbolt 3/USB-C-connected peripherals, or plan on moving to them, then it is a good upgrade.

Testing
I ran some processor/graphics card intensive tests while I had the new MacBook Pro and came to the conclusion that FCPX is not that much faster than Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 when working with non-ProRes-based media. Yes, FCPX tears through ProRes QuickTimes if you already have your media in that format. What about if you shoot on a camera like the Red and don’t want to transcode to a more edit-friendly codec? Well, that is another story. To test out my NLEs, I grabbed a sample Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps clip from the Red sample footage page, strung out a 10-minute-long sequence in all the NLEs and exported both a color-graded version and a non-color-graded version as ProRes HQ QuickTimes files matching the source file’s specs.

In order to work with Red media in some of the NLEs, you must download a few patches: for FCPX you must install the Red Apple workflow installer and for Media Composer you must install the Red AMA plug-in. Premiere doesn’t need anything extra.

Test 1: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute sequence (no color grade or FX) exported as ProRes HQ matching the source file’s specs. Premiere > Media Encoder = 1 hour, 55 minutes. FCPX = 1 hour, 57 minutes. Media Composer = two hours, 42 minutes (Good news, Media Composer’s interface and fonts display correctly on the new display).

You’ll notice that Resolve is missing from this list and that is because I installed Resolve 12.5.4 Studio but then realized my USB dongle won’t fit into the USB-C port — and I am not buying an adapter for a laptop I do not get to keep. So, unfortunately, I didn’t test a true 6K ProRes HQ export from Resolve but in the last test you will see some Resolve results.

Overall, there was not much difference in speeds. In fact, I felt that Premiere Pro CC 2017 played the Red file a little smoother and at a higher frames-per-second count. FCPX struggled a little. Granted a 6K Red file is one of the harder files for a CPU to process with no debayer settings enabled, but Apple touts this as a MacPro semi-replacement for the time being and I am holding them to their word.

Test 2: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute color-graded sequence exported as ProRes HQ matching the source files specs. Premiere > Media Encoder = one hour, 55 minutes. FCPX = one hour, 58 minutes. Media Composer = two hours, 34 minutes.

It’s important to note that the GPU definitely helped out in both Adobe Premiere and FCPX. Little to no extra time was added on the ProRes HQ export. I was really excited to see this as sometimes without a good GPU — resizing, GPU-accelerated effects like color correction and other effects will slow your system to a snail’s pace if it doesn’t fully crash. Media Composer surprisingly speed up its export when I added the color grade as a new color layer in the timeline. By adding the color correction layer to another layer Avid might have forced the Radeon to kick in and help push the file out. Not really sure what that is about to be honest.

Test 3: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute color-graded sequence resized to 1920×1080 on export as ProRes HQ. Premiere > Media Encoder = one hour, 16 minutes. FCPX = one hour, 14 minutes. Media Composer = one hour, 48 minutes. Resolve = one hour, 16 minutes

So after these tests, it seems that exporting and transcoding are all about the same. It doesn’t really come as too big of a surprise that all the NLEs, except for Media Composer, processed the Red file in the same amount of time. Regardless of the NLE, you would need to knock the debayering down to a half or more to start playing these clips at realtime in a timeline. If you have the time to transcode to ProRes you will get much better playback and rendering speed results. Obviously, transcoding all of your files to a codec, like ProRes or Avid DNX, takes way more time up front but could be worth it if you crunched for time on the back end.

In addition to Red 6K files, I also tested ProRes HQ 4K files inside of Premiere and FCPX, and both played them extremely smoothly without hiccups, which is pretty amazing. Just a few years ago I was having trouble playing down 10:1 compressed files in Media Composer and now I can playback superb-quality 4K files without a problem, a tremendous tip of the hat to technology and, specifically, Apple for putting so much power in a thin and light package.

While I was in the mood to test speeds, I hooked up a Thunderbolt 2 SSD RAID (OWC Thunderbay 4 mini) configured in RAID-0 to see what kind of read/write bandwidth I would get running through the Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter. I used both AJA System Test as well as the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test. The AJA test reported a write speed of 929MB/sec. and read speed of 1120MB/sec. The Blackmagic test reported a write speed of 683.1MB/sec. and 704.7MB/sec. from different tests and a read speed of 1023.3MB/sec. I set the test file for both at 4GB. These speeds are faster than what I have previously found when testing this same Thunderbolt 2 SSD RAID on other systems.

For comparison, the AJA test reported a write speed of 1921MB/sec. and read speed of 2134MB/sec. when running on the system drive. The Blackmagic test doesn’t allow for testing on the system drive.

What Else You Need to Know
So what about the other upgrades and improvements? When exporting these R3D files I noticed the fan kicked on when resizing or adding color grading to the files. Seems like the GPU kicked on and heated up which is to be expected. The fan is not the loudest, but it is noticeable.

The battery life on the new MacBook Pro is great when just playing music, surfing the web or writing product reviews. I found that the battery lasted about two days without having to plug in the power adapter. However, when exporting QuickTimes from either Premiere or FCPX the battery life dropped — a lot. I was getting a battery life of one hour and six minutes, which is not good when your export will take two hours. Obviously, you need to plug in when doing heavy work; you don’t really have an option.

This leads me to the new USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports — and, yes, you still have a headphone jack (thank goodness they didn’t talk with the iPhone developers). First off, I thought the MagSafe power adapter should have won a Nobel Peace Prize. I love it. It must be responsible for saving millions of dollars in equipment when people trip over a power cord — gracefully disconnecting without breaking or pulling your laptop off the table. However, I am disappointed Apple didn’t create a new type of MagSafe cable with the USB-C port. I will miss it a lot. The good news is you can now plug in your power adapter to either side of the MacBook Pro.

Adapters and dongles will have to be purchased if you pick up a new MacBook Pro. Each time I used an external peripheral or memory card like an SD card, Tangent Ripple Color Correction panel or external hard drive, I was disappointed that I couldn’t plug them in. Nonetheless, a good Thunderbolt 3 dock is a necessity in my opinion. You could survive with dongles but my OCD starts flaring up when I have to dig around my backpack for adapters. I’m just not a fan. I love how Apple dedicated themselves to a fast I/O like USB-C/Thunderbolt 3, but I really wish they gave it another year. Just one old-school USB port would have been nice. I might have even gotten over no SD card reader.

The Touch Bar
I like it. I would even say that I love it — in the apps that are compatible. Right now there aren’t many. Adobe released an update to Adobe Photoshop that added compatibility with the Touch Bar, and it is really handy especially when you don’t have your Wacom tablet available (or a USB dongle to attach it). I love how it gives access to so many levels of functionality to your tools within your immediate reach.

It has super-fast feedback. When I adjusted the contrast on the Touch Bar I found that the MacBook Pro was responding immediately. This becomes even more evident in FCPX and the latest Resolve 12.5.4 update. It’s clear Apple did their homework and made their apps like Mail and Messages work with the Touch Bar (hence emojis on the Touch Bar). FCPX has a sweet ability to scrub the timeline, zoom in to the timeline, adjust text and more from just the Touch Bar — it’s very handy, and after a while I began missing it when using other computers.
In Blackmagic’s latest DaVinci Resolve release, 12.5.4, they have added Touch Bar compatibility. If you can’t plug in your color correction panels, the Touch Bar does a nice job of easing the pain. You can do anything from contrast work to saturation, even adjust the midtones and printer lights, all from the Touch Bar. If you use external input devices a lot, like Wacom tablets or color correction panels, the Touch Bar will be right up your alley.

One thing I found missing was a simple application launcher on the Touch Bar. If you do pick up the new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, you might want to download Touch Switcher, a free app I found via 9to5mac.com that allows you to have an app launcher on your Touch Bar. You can hide the dock, allowing you more screen real estate and the efficient use of the Touch Bar to launch apps. I am kind of surprised Apple didn’t make something like this standard.

The Display
From a purely superficial and non-scientific point of view, the newly updated P3-compatible wide-gamut display looks great… really great, actually. The colors are rich and vibrant. I did a little digging under the hood and noticed that it is an 8-bit display (data that you can find by locating the pixel depth in the System Information > Graphics/Display), which might limit the color gradations when working in a color space like P3 as opposed to a 10-bit display displaying in a P3 color space. Simply, you have a wider array of colors in P3 but a small amount of color shades to fill it up.

The MacBook Pro display is labeled as 32-bit color meaning the RGB and Alpha channels each have 8 bits, giving a total of 32 bits. Eight-bit color gives 256 shades per color channel while 10-bit gives 1,024 shades per channel, allowing for much smoother transitions between colors and luminance values (imagine a sky at dusk going smoothly from an orange to light blue to dark blue — the more colors per channel allows for a smoother gradient between lights and darks). A 10-bit display would have 30-bit color with each channel having 10 bits.

I tried to hook up a 10-bit display, but the supplied Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 dongle Apple sent me did not work with the mini display port. I did a little digging and it seems people are generally not happy that Apple doesn’t allow this to work, especially since Thunderbolt 2 and mini DisplayPort are the same connection. Some people have been able to get around this by hooking up their display through daisy chaining something like a Thunderbolt 2 RAID.

While I couldn’t directly test an external display when I had the MacBook Pro, I’ve read that people have been able to push 10-bit color out of the USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports to an external monitor. So as long as you are at a desk with a monitor you can most likely have 10-bit color output from this system.

I reached out to Apple on the types of adapters they recommend for an external display and they suggest a USB-C to DisplayPort adapter made by Aukey. It retails for $9.99. They also recommend the USB-C to DisplayPort cable from StarTech, which retails for $39.99. Make sure you read the reviews on Amazon because the experience people have with this varies wildly. I was not able to test either of these so I cannot give my personal opinion.

Summing Up
In the end, the new MacBook Pro is awesome. If you own a recent release of the MacBook Pro and don’t have $3,500 to spare, I don’t know if this is the update you will be looking for. If you are trying to find your way around going to a Windows-based PC because of the lack of Mac Pro updates, this may ease the pain slightly. Without more than 16GB of memory and an Intel Xeon or two, however, it might actually slow you down.

The battery life is great when doing light work, one of the longest batteries I’ve used on a laptop. But when doing the heavy work, you need to be near an outlet. When plugged into that outlet be careful no one yanks out your USB-C power adapter as it might throw your MacBook Pro to the ground or break off inside.

I really do love Apple products. They typically just work. I didn’t even touch on the new Touch ID Sensor that can immediately switch you to a different profile or log you in after waking up the MacBook Pro from sleep. I love that you can turn the new MacBook Pro on and it simply works, and works fast.

The latest iteration of FCPX is awesome as well, and just because I don’t see it being used a lot professionally doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be. It’s a well-built NLE that should be given a fairer shake than it has been given. If you are itching for an update to an old MacBook Pro, don’t mind having a dock or carrying around a bunch of dongles, then the 2016 MacBook Pro with the Touch Bar is for you.

The new MacBook Pro chews through ProRes-based media from 1920×1080 to 4K, 6K and higher will play but might slow down. If you are a Red footage user this new MacBook Pro works great, but you still might have to knock the debayering down a couple notches.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Lenovo ThinkStation P410

By Brady Betzel

With the lukewarm reaction of the professional community to the new Apple MacBook Pro, there are many creative professionals who are seriously — for the first time in their careers — considering whether or not to jump into a Windows-based world.

I grew up using an Apple II GS from 1986 (I was born in 1983, if you’re wondering), but I always worked on both Windows and Apple computers. I guess my father really instilled the idea of being independent and not relying on one thing or one way of doing something — he wanted me to rely on my own knowledge and not on others.

Not to get too philosophical, but when he purchased all the parts I needed to build my own Windows system, it was incredibly gratifying. I would have loved to have built my own Apple system, but obviously never could. That is why I am so open to computer systems of any operating system software.

If you are deciding whether or not to upgrade your workstation and have never considered solutions other than HP, Dell or Apple, you will want to read what I have to say about Lenovo‘s latest workstation, the P410.

When I set out on this review, I didn’t have any Display Port-compatible monitors and Lenovo was nice enough to send their beautiful Think Vision Pro 2840m — another great piece of hardware.

Digging In
I want to jump right into the specs of the ThinkStation P410. Under the hood is an Intel Xeon E5-1650 v4, which in plain terms is a 6-core 3.6GHz 15MB CPU that can reach all the way up to 4.0GHz if needed using Intel’s Turbo Boost technology. The graphics card is a medium-sized monster — the Nvidia Quadro M4000 with 8GB of GDDR5 memory and 1664 CUDA cores. It has 4 DisplayPort 1.2 ports to power those four 30-bit 4096×2160 @60Hz displays you will run when editing and color correcting.

If you need more CUDA power you could step up to the Nvidia M5000, which runs 2048 CUDA cores or the M6000, which runs 3072 CUDA cores, but that power isn’t cheap (and as of this review they are not even an option from Lenovo in the P410 customization — you will probably have to step up to a higher model number).

There is 16GB of DD4-2400 ECC memory, 1TB 2.5-inch SATA 6Gb/s SSD (made by Macron), plus a few things like a DVD writer, media card reader, keyboard and mouse. At the time I was writing this review, you could configure this system for a grand total of $2,794, but if you purchase it online at shop.lenovo.com it will cost a little under $2,515 with some online discounts. As I priced this system out over a few weeks I noticed the prices changed, so keep in mind it could be higher. I configured a similar style HP z440 workstation for around $3,600 and a Dell Precision Tower 5000 for around $3,780, so Lenovo’s prices are on the low end for major-brand workstations.

For expansion (which Windows-based PCs seem to lead the pack in), you have a total of four DIMM slots for memory (two are taken up already by two 8GB sticks), four PCIe slots and four hard drive bays. Two of the hard drive bays are considered Flex Bays, which can be used for hard drives, hard drive + slim optical drive or something like front USB 3.0 ports.

On the back there are your favorite PS/2 keyboard port and mouse port, two USB 2.0 ports, four USB 3.0 ports, audio in/out/mic and four DisplayPorts.

Testing
I first wanted to test the P410’s encoding speed when using Adobe Media Encoder. I took a eight-minute, 30 second 1920×1080 23.98fps ProRes HQ QuickTime that I had filmed using a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, did a quick color balance in Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 using the Lumetri Color Correction tools and exported a Single Pass, variable bit rate 25Mb/s H.264 using Media Encoder. Typically, CUDA cores kick in when you use GPU-accelerated tools like transitions, scaling in Premiere and when you export files with GPU effects such as Lumetri Color tools. Typically, when exporting from tools, like Adobe Premiere Pro CC or Adobe Media Encoder, the GPU acceleration kicks in only if you’ve applied GPU-accelerated effects, color correction with something like Lumetri (which is GPU accelerated) or a resize effect. Otherwise if you are just transcoding from one codec to another the CPU will handle the task.

In this test, it took Media Encoder about six minutes to encode the H.264 when Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration (CUDA) was enabled. Without the GPU acceleration enabled it took 14 minutes. So by using the GPU, I got about a 40 percent speed increase thanks to the power of the Nvidia Quadro M4000 with 8GB of GDDR5 RAM.

For comparison, I did the same test on a newly released MacBook Pro with Touch Bar i7 2.9Ghz Quad Core, 16GB of 2133 MHz LPDDR3 memory and AMD Radeon Pro 460 4GB of RAM (uses OpenCL as opposed to CUDA); it took Media Encoder about nine minutes using the GPU.

Another test I love to run uses Maxon’s Cinebench, which simply runs real-world scenarios like photorealistic rendering and a 3D car chase. This taxes your system with almost one million polygons and textures. Basically, it makes your system do a bunch of math, which helps in separating immature workstations from the professional ones. This system came in around 165 frames per second. In comparison to other systems, with similar configurations to the P410, it placed first or second. So it’s fast.

Lenovo Performance Tuner
While the low price is what really sets the P410 apart from the rest of the pack, Lenovo has recently released a hardware tuning software program called Lenovo Performance Tuner. Performance Tuner is a free app that helps to focus your Lenovo workstation on the app you are using. For instance, I use Adobe CC a lot at home, so when I am working in Premiere I want all of my power focused there with minimal power focused on background apps that I may not have turned off — sometimes I let Chrome run in the background or I want to jump between Premiere, Resolve and Photoshop. You can simply launch Performance Tuner and click the app you want to launch in Lenovo’s “optimized” state. You can go further by jumping into the Settings tab and customize things like Power Management Mode to always be on Max Performance. It’s a pretty handy tool when you want to quickly funnel all of your computing resources to one app.

The Think Vision Pro Monitor
Lastly, I wanted to quickly touch on the Think Vision Pro 2840m LED backlit LCD monitor Lenovo let me borrow for this review. The color fidelity is awesome and can work at a resolution up to 3840×2160 (UHD, not full 4K). It will tilt and rotate almost any way you need it to, and it will even go full vertical at 90 degrees.

When working with P410 I had some problems with DisplayPort not always kicking in with the monitor, or any monitor for that matter. Sometimes I would have to unplug and plug the DisplayPort cable back in while the system was on for the monitor to recognize and turn on. Nonetheless, the monitor is awesome at 28 inches. Keep in mind it has a glossy finish so it might not be for you if you are near a lot of light or windows — while the color and brightness punch through, there is a some glare with other light sources in the room.

Summing Up
In the end, the Lenovo ThinkStation P410 workstation is a workhorse. Even though it’s at the entry level of Lenovo’s workstations, it has a lot of power and a great price. When I priced out a similar system using PC Partpicker, it ran about $2,600 — you can check out the DIY build I put together on PCPartpicker.com: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/r9H4Ps.

A drawback of DIY custom builds though is that they don’t include powerful support, a complete warranty from a single company or ISV certifications (ISV = Independent Software Vendors). Simply, ISVs are the way major workstation builders like HP, Dell and Lenovo test their workstations against commonly used software like Premiere Pro or Avid Media Composer in workstation-focused industries like editing or motion graphics.

One of the most misunderstood benefits of a workstation is that it’s meant to run day and night. So not only do you get enterprise-level components like Nvidia Quadro graphics cards and Intel Xeon CPUs, the components are made for durability as well as performance. This way there is little downtime, especially in mission-critical environments. I didn’t get to run this system for months constantly, but I didn’t see any sign of problems in my testing.

When you buy a Lenovo workstation it comes with a three-year on-site warranty, which covers anything that goes wrong with the hardware itself, including faulty workmanship. But it won’t cover things like spills, drops or electrical surges.

I liked the Lenovo ThinkStation P410. It’s fast, does the job and has quality components. I felt that it lacked a few of today’s necessary I/O ports like USB-C/Thunderbolt 3.

The biggest pro for this workstation is the overwhelmingly low price point for a major brand workstation like the ThinkStation P410. Check out the Lenovo website for the P410 and maybe even wander into the P910 aisle, which showcases some of the most powerful workstations they make.

Check out this video I made that gives you a closer look at (and inside) the workstation.

Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Team Player: Rules Don’t Apply editor Brian Scofield

By Randi Altman

In the scheme of things, we work in a very small industry where relationships, work ethic and talent matter. Brian Scofield is living proof of that. He is one of a team of editors who worked on Warren Beatty’s recent Rules Don’t Apply.

That team included lead editor Billy Weber, Leslie Jones and Robin Gonsalves. It was the veteran editor Weber (Beatty’s Bulworth 1998) who brought Scofield on board as a second editor.

Weber was Scofield’s mentor while he was in the MFA program at USC. “Not long after I completed graduate school, Billy helped me reconnect with the Malick camp, who I met while working in the camera crew on Tree of Life,” he explains. “I then became an apprentice on To the Wonder, and then an editor on Knight of Cups. When Billy came in as an advisor at the end of Knight of Cups, we reconnected in LA. He had just begun working on Rules Don’t Apply with Warren, and when I finished my work on Knight of Cups, he brought me aboard.”

Scofield recognizes that relationships open doors, but says you have to walk through them and prove you belong in the room all by yourself. “I think people often make the mistake of thinking that networking trumps talent and work ethic, or the other way around, and that just isn’t true.  All three are required to have a career as a film editor — the ability to form lasting relationships, the diligence to work really hard, and having natural instincts that you’re always striving to improve upon.”

Scofield says he will always be grateful to Weber and the example he’s set. “I’m only one of over a dozen people whose careers Billy has helped launch over the years. It’s in large part his generosity and mentorship that inspires me to pay it forward any chance I get.”

Let’s find out more from Scofield about his editing process, what he’s learned over the years, and the importance of collaboration.

You have worked with two Hollywood icons in Terrence Malick and Warren Beatty. I’m assuming you’re not easily intimidated.
It’s been a transformative experience in every way. These two guys, who have been making films for over 40 years, are constantly challenging themselves to try new things… to experiment, to learn. They’re always re-evaluating pretty much everything from the story to the style, and yet these are two guys with such distinct voices that really shine through their work. You know a Malick or Beatty film when you see it. The Inexhaustibility of the cinematic art form, I guess, is what I really took away from both of them.

Photo Credit: Francois Duhamel.They are both very different kinds of filmmakers.
You would never think that working on a Terrence Malick film would prepare you to work on a Warren Beatty film. Knight of Cups is a stream-of-consciousness, meditative tome about the meaning of life. Warren’s film is a romantic comedy with a historical drama slant. Aesthetically, they’re very different films, but the process of constantly finding ways to break open the movie all over again, and the mindset that requires, is very similar.

Both Terry and Warren are uncompromising and passionate about making movies the way they want and not bending to conventions, yet at the same time looking for ways to reach people on a very deep level. In this case, both films were also deeply personal for the director. When you work on something like that, it adds another layer of pressure because you want to honor how much of themselves they’re willing to put into their work. But that’s also where I believe the most exciting films come from. That pressure just becomes inspiration.

How early did you get involved on Rules Don’t Apply?
Right after production wrapped. I was finishing up with Terry on the mix stage for Knight of Cups when Billy called. They had an assembly of the film when I joined — everything was in there — and that version was probably about four hours long. Interestingly, some things have changed dramatically since that version and some are remarkably similar.

I was on Rules Don’t Apply for just over a year, but I’ve been back several times since officially finishing. I took a good amount of time off and went back, and since then I’ve popped in and out whenever Warren has needed me. Robin became a true caretaker of the film, staying with Warren through that additional time leading up to the release.

Is that typically how you’ve worked? Coming in after there’s an assembly?
I’ve come in as an additional set eyes on some, and I’ve been on films during production, sending cuts to the director while they’re in the middle of shooting. This includes giving feedback on pick-ups they need to grab or things to be wary of performance-wise, those types of things.

Both are thrilling experiences. It’s fun to come in when there has been one specific approach and they’re open to new ideas. You kind of get to shake people out of the one way they’ve been going about the film. When I’m the editor that’s been working on the film since the beginning, that initial discovery period when you see the film take shape for the first time is always thrilling. The relationship you form with both the film and the director is hard to beat. But then, I’m always excited for someone to come in and shake things up, to help me think differently. That’s why you do feedback screenings. That’s why you bring other editors into the room to take a look and to make you think about things from a different angle.

How was it on Rules Don’t Apply?
When I came on, so much of it was working really well from the first assembly, but I did want to strengthen the love story between Frank and Marla and make their attraction more evident early in the film so that it paid off later. I started by going through all of the scenes and looking for little moments where we could build up glances between them or find little raindrops before the storm of that budding relationship.

Photo Credit: Francois Duhamel.There were a few storylines going on at the same time as well?
The story takes place over a long period of time — you’ve got Warren Beatty playing Howard Hughes, you’re dealing with a young love story, you’re dealing with an incredible supporting cast, all of whom could be bigger characters or smaller characters. When you come in a little bit later, it’s often your job to help figure out which storylines or themes are going to become the main thrust of the movie.

So there are different definitions of co-editor?
Well, it varies every day. Some days Warren would want to work on a couple of different scenes, so one editor would take one and I would take the other. Sometimes you would have worked on a scene for a long time and somebody else would say, “Let me have a stab at that. I’ve got a different idea.” Sometimes we were all together in one room with one of us driving the Avid and the others offering a different set of eyes — eyes that aren’t staring at the timeline — and they’re looking at it side-by-side with the director, almost as a viewer instead of within the nitty-gritty of making the cut. We would take turns doing that.

You’ve got to check your ego at the door, I suppose? Everybody’s on the same team these days.
There’s no pecking order, and I think Billy Weber is really the one who sets that tone because he’s such a generous and experienced editor and man. There are people out in the industry that might be protective of their work versus letting anybody else touch it, but there’s none of that in any of the editing rooms that I’ve been fortunate enough to work in. Everybody’s respectful of each other.

On this film we had Billy, myself, Leslie Jones and Robin all working at the same time. You’ve got almost three generations of editors in that room, and to be treated as an equal really opens up your mind and your creativity. You feel the freedom to really present big ideas.

How is it collaborating with Warren?
He is such a unique guy. His favorite thing to do is to have a fight — he doesn’t want people who are just going to accept what he says. He wants a fiery debate, which can make people uncomfortable, but I’m okay with it. I actually really enjoyed that, especially when you realize he’s not taking it personally and neither should I. This is about making a movie the best that it can be. He wants people that are going to challenge him and push back.

Photo Credit: Francois Duhamel.So it’s part of his creative process?
Yes, it’s all about the discourse. If he has a strong point of view, he wants to argue it to make sure that he really believes it. And if you have a strong point of view, he wants you to be able to tell him why. I would say the fiercest fights led to him being most happy afterwards. At the end of the screaming, he would always say, “That was such a productive conversation. I’m so glad we did that!” He surrounds himself with people he knows he trusts. He knows that’s what he needs to make him as productive and as creative as he can be.

It’s been a long time since Warren directed a film, how did he react to the new technology?
He was thrilled with all of the new abilities of technology. This movie was shot on the Alexa, for the most part, and we did do a good amount of combining it will archival footage. This is a very modern movie in many ways, but it also has a distinctive throwback vibe. We had to try to marry those things without going overboard.

We resized frames, added a few push-ins, speed ramps, and so on. Ultimately, all of these tools just allowed him to explore the footage even more than he’s used to doing. He really loved taking advantage of new editorial opportunities that couldn’t have been done even 15 years ago, at least not as easily.

How do you organize things within the Avid Media Composer?
Any time I start a new job, I send a Google Doc to the assistant that specifies exactly how I want the project set up. It’s an evolution of things I’ve learned in different editing rooms over time.

For every scene, I have a bin with a frame view. If the bin is the size of my monitor, I should be able to see all clips in that one view without scrolling. Each set-up is separated from each other, so I can see very quickly, “Oh there are four takes of that shot, there are four takes of that shot, there are three takes of that one.” I have the assistant prepare three sequences: one that’s just a pure string-out of all of the clips, so I can, in one sequence, scrub through everything that’s there. I do a string-out “clean,” which is when you take out all the slates and you take out all the director’s talking, so I can be impartial and just look at the footage. Then I usually have one more sequence that’s just circle takes that the director chose on set. Then I go through and I make a select reel based off of everything that I watch. That’s the basic bin set-up.

For films that have multiple editors, organization is really important because somebody else has to be able to understand how your work is organized. You have to be able to find things that you did a year ago.

Any special tricks, like speed ramps, sound effects, transitions? I’m imagining that changes per project?
Yeah, it’s pretty unique to the project. There are a lot of editors who have specific effects that they go back to over and over again in their own bin. I’ve got a few of those, but I almost always end up tailoring them and sometimes just starting from scratch.  I go on the hunt for the right effect when I need it.

Photo Credit: Francois Duhamel.I’ve gotten pretty adept at tailoring the built-in effects to my needs as they come up, but people who use those effects all the time are working on more crazy action or stylized films because they’ve got a lot more demand for those than when you’re working on character-driven content.

Do you typically work with a template from a colorist, or do you do any temp color corrections yourself?
Most of the films have a look that the DP has already applied, and I do tweaking as needed. If we come up with a creative reason for color correction, I’ll do a sketch. I do a lot of work with sound, but with color, it just depends. If it needs to be changed in order to understand what the idea is or if we’re screening it for somebody that we don’t trust to be able to see what it is without color correction, then of course we’re going to go in and we’re going to tweak it. I’ve worked on a film where all the exteriors were really magenta, so we came up with our kind of default fix to be applied to all of those shots.

Can you elaborate on the sound part?
I cut as much for sound as I do for picture. I think people grossly underestimate the influence that sound has on how you watch a movie. I’m not a sound designer, but I try my best to provide a sketch for when we go into that next phase so the sound designer has a pretty clear idea of what we’re going for. Then, of course, they use their creativity to expand and do their own thing.

How do you work with your assistant editors? Do you encourage them to edit, or are they strictly technical?
It depends on the project and on the timeframe of the project. In the beginning, the priority is on getting everything set up. Then the priority is on helping me build a first sound pass after we’ve gotten an assembly. They help bring in effects and to smooth over things I’ve sketched out. Sometimes they’re just gathering effects for me and sometimes they’re cutting them themselves. Sometimes we’re kind of tossing them back and forth. I do a rough pass and I ask them to mix it, clean up the levels, add in a couple accents here and there. Once we’re through with that we kind of have at least a ground floor for sound to cut with.

When given the opportunity, I love to let my assistants get creative. I let them take a stab at scenes, or at least have them be present in the room to give feedback. When the director isn’t present, I rely a lot on my assistant just to check in and say, “Hey, is this crazy?” or try to engage them as much as I can in that creative process. It all just depends on the demands of the project and the experience level of the assistant.

Is there anything you would like to add?
Film is a collaborative art form, and in order to help a director do their best work, you need to be their friend, their antagonist, their therapist, their partner. Whatever it takes is what your job is. I was so fortunate to learn an enormous amount from Warren, but also from my fellow editors. I hope everybody has as much fun watching this crazy little movie as we did making it.

Finally, I’d just love to say that working with Warren will undoubtedly be one of the most cherished experiences of my life. Reputations be damned, he’s a kind, brilliant and uncompromising artist who it was endlessly inspiring to spend so much time with.  I’ll forever be grateful I had the opportunity to both work for him and to call him a friend.

Main Image: Robin Gonsalves, Warren Beatty and Brian Scofield.

Digging deeper with Jackie editor Sebastián Sepúlveda

By Mel Lambert

Cutting Jackie together was a major challenge, according to picture editor Sebastián Sepúlveda. “Cinematographer Stéphane Fontaine’s intricate handheld camera work — often secured in a single take — the use of the extreme close-ups and the unconventional narrative framework meant that my creative sensibilities were stretched to the maximum. I was won over by the personality of Jackie Kennedy, and saw the film and its component parts as a creative opportunity on several levels. I approached the edit as several small emotional moments that, as a whole, offered a peek into her inner life.”

sebastian_sepulveda

Sebastián Sepúlveda

Director Pablo Larraín’s new offering, which opens in the US on December 2, chronicles the tragic events following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, as the late Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy fights through grief and trauma to regain her faith, console her children and maintain her husband’s historic legacy, as well as the world of Camelot that they created. Jackie stars Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard, Billy Crudup and Greta Gerwig.

The script, by Noah Oppenheim, is nonlinear. It opens with an interview between Jackie and an unnamed journalist from Life magazine just a few days after the assassination and transitions to earlier events as the narrative unfolds. The 100-minute film was shot in France and Washington, DC, on Kodak Vision3 Super 16mm film with an Arriflex 416 Plus camera. It had a 2K DI in an aspect ratio of is 1.66:1, which more convincingly matches the 4×3 archive footage than a wide-screen format.

The film is already getting award attention. Portman (Jackie) was nominated for a Gotham Independent Film Award for best actress, Larraín won the Platform Prize at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival, and Oppenheim’s screenplay received the Golden Osella at the 2016 Venice Film Festival. The director was also nominated for the Golden Lion for best film at the latter festival.

The Edit
Sepúlveda (who has been nominated for a Spirit Award for his work on Jackie) previously edited Larraín’s Spanish-language film The Club and has collaborated with his friend on previous films. “I shaped Jackie’s unconventional narrative into a seamless story and dove into Larraín’s exploration of her internal reality — the emotional, enigmatic core of the most unknown woman in the world,” he explains. “I found emotional bridges to stitch the piece together in a format that’s bold, innovative and not taught in film school — it is organic to the movie and very much in sync with Larraín’s creative process.”

Sepúlveda identified four key layers to the narrative: ongoing interview sequences at Hyannis Port that provide an insight into the lead character’s frail emotional state; a reconstruction of the landmark White House tour that the First Lady hosted for CBS Television in 1961; sequences with an Irish catholic priest (John Hurt) that explore the lead character’s inevitable crisis of faith; and the assassination and harrowing high-speed exit from Dealey Plaza in Dallas on November 22, 1963.

“I navigated the edit by staying true to Jacqueline Kennedy’s emotional core, which was the primary through-line of the director’s approach to the movie. We had to bring to life a structure that went back and forth across many layers of time,” he says. “The film starts with a more classical interview of Mrs. Kennedy by a magazine journalist just after the tragedy. Then we have the White House tour in flashback, and then the day in Dallas where JFK was murdered. So that was tricky. We also had extreme close-ups of Natalie [Portman] in almost every scene, which we used not only to see the story from her point of view, but also to observe every detail of her expression following the nightmare the former First Lady had to go through.”

Sepúlveda, who works most often in Apple Final Cut Pro, was given an Avid Media Composer for this film. He says his biggest challenge in the editing suite was honoring the four identified layers throughout the complex cut. “It was very hard to balance all the facts, but also to give life to the film. I did a very quick edit in a week by keeping the structure very simple. I then went back and refined the edit while still honoring the basic shape. The use of extreme close-ups and medium shots let me keep [the First Lady] at the center of attention, and to make sure that the editing was not obtrusive to that vision of a sad, melancholic feel.

Photo by William Gray“And we had the gorgeous, incredible Natalie Portman, who plays with her eyes in a way that you cannot read so easily. It puts the character into a more mysterious perspective. You think in one scene that you understand the character, then comes the next scene and… boom! Natalie shows you another part of this complex character. Finally, you cannot pick which one is Jacqueline Kennedy, since all those different aspects of the character are the First Lady. We had to build the structure — the bridges between the scenes — only guided by this emotional path.”

Eye Contact
Both Larraín and Sepúlveda subscribe to the Shakespearean adage that our eyes are the windows to our soul, and arranged their cut around that conviction. “When we started the edit, after studying the rushes, Pablo and I had a conversation — maybe the most important/interesting part of the process for me — about the eyes,” says Sepúlveda. “For us, they built the entire emotional path of the storytelling process, because the viewer is always trying to read what’s behind the eyes. You can try to bluff with a facial expression, but our eyes are there to show things that you don’t want to say.

“As an audience member you are trying to go deeper into the character,” the editor continues, “but always find the unexpected. You become emotionally involved with this figure while wanting to know more about her. Your imagination is engaged, playing with the film. For me, that’s pure cinema.”

Sepúlveda considers the process as harkening back to the New Wave or La Nouvelle Vague film period of the late 1950s and 1960s. Although never a formally organized movement, New Wave filmmakers rejected literary-period pieces being made in France and written by novelists, and instead elected to shoot current social issues on location. They intended to experiment with a film form that chronicled social and political upheavals with their radical experiments in editing, visual style and narrative elements in more of a documentary style, with fragmented, discontinuous editing and long takes.

Photo by Pablo LarraínAnd not all scenes in Jackie involve complex cross editing. An example is the scene in the White House when Jacqueline Kennedy strips off her blood-stained clothing, to the ironical accompaniment of the title song from the Broadway musical Camelot sung by Richard Burton. “It was the first time she had been alone, and we had a number of long shots to emphasize that isolation; she was walking like a ghost, dropping clothes as she went from room to room — almost as if she was changing her skin — with several two- to three-minute takes,” describes Sepúlveda. “The music also recedes as if it was coming from an adjacent room, to add to the sense of separation, and the haunting loss of the sense of [JFK’s] Camelot — the dream was broken. This was not the same Jacqueline Kennedy known by the public.”

Because he has young girls, editing a film about this powerful, vulnerable, creative First Lady was important to this Chilean-born editor. “Given our current political situation here in the States – and which obviously has ripple effects beyond our borders — I think we need a little Jackie love and magic right now,” he says.

“As the father of two little girls I know that they don’t have the same opportunities as the boys, and that scares me. To participate in a film in which the main character is a woman who had to make important decisions for her country in a moment of political and personal crisis, is ethically important to me. Because, obviously, it was an extremely traumatic time for Jacqueline Kennedy, the idea was to create a seamless edit that could evoke how human memory works under trauma. In this case, we approached it like small glimpses of that period of the First Lady’s life. For me, it was very important to keep the audience emotionally involved with the main character, to almost participate in her experience and, ultimately, to empathize with her. It’s a portrait of grief but we also appreciate, ultimately, how she persevered and overcame it.”

An Editor’s Background
An experienced cinematographer, writer and director, Sepúlveda has enjoyed an eclectic career, whose vocations inform each other and also reflect a sometimes-stressful home life. “My family was exiled from Chile because of Pinochet’s coup d’état in 1973. My mother was a university professor and supported the Allende government. We lived in five countries — France, Venezuela, Argentina, Switzerland and Spain — but it was a very beautiful childhood. To live in Venezuela, discovering the Amazon rainforest, living in Argentina when the democracy returned in the eighties, attending public school in France and getting my dose of republican values. I studied history in a Chilean university, editing in Cuba and scriptwriting in Paris. I really like to work on different aspects of a film.”

In 2007, he worked in France as a film editor, and returned to Chile for vacations. “Pablo was editing Tony Manero, and invited me to give them feedback. It was a first cut, but astonishing. I was shocked in a positive way. We had a pleasant conversation about possible ways to build the film. Then I moved back to Chile and Pablo’s brother Juan invited me to work with them. I started as a script doctor for films and TV series they produced, edited some feature films, and also wrote some script treatments for Pablo. His company, Fabula, produced my first feature film as a director, Las Niñas Quispe (2013), which premiered at Venice Critics Week,” he concludes. “It’s been an amazing journey.”

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Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA

Review: Tangent Ripple color correction panel

By Brady Betzel

Lately, it feels like a lot of the specializations in post production are becoming generalized and given to the “editor.” One of the hats that the editor now wears is that of color corrector — I’m not saying we are tasked with color grading an entire film, but we are asked to make things warmer or cooler or to add saturation.

With the standard Wacom tablet, keyboard and/or mouse combo, it can get a little tedious when color correcting — in Adobe Premiere, Blackmagic Resolve or Avid Media Composer/Symphony — without specialized color correction panels like the Baselight Blackboard, Resolve Advanced, Nucoda Precision, Avid Artist Color or even Tangent’s Element. In addition, those specialized panels run between $1,000 per piece to upwards of $30,000, leaving many people to fend for themselves using a mouse.

While color correcting with a mouse isn’t always horrible, once you use a proper color correction panel, you will always feel like you are missing a vital tool. But don’t worry! Tangent has released a new color correction panel that is not only affordable and compatible with many of today’s popular coloring and nonlinear editing apps, but is also extremely portable: the Tangent Ripple.

For this review I am covering how the Tangent Ripple works inside of Premiere Pro CC 2015.3, Filmlight’s Baselight Media Composer/Symphony plug-in and Resolve 12.5.

One thing I always found intimidating about color correction and grading apps like Resolve was the abundance of options to correct or grade an image. The Tangent Ripple represents the very basic first steps in the color correction pipeline: color balancing using lift, gamma, gain (or shadows, midtones and highlights) and exposure/contrast correction. I am way over-simplifying these first few steps but these are what the Ripple specializes in.

You’ve probably heard of the Tangent Element Panels, which go way beyond the basics — if you start to love grading with the Tangent Ripple or the Element-VS app, the Element set should be your next step. It retails for around $3,500, or a little below as a set (you can purchase the Element panels individually for cheaper, but the set is worth it). The Tangent Ripple retails for only $350.

Basic Color Correction
If you are an offline editor who wants to add life to your footage quickly, basic color correction is where you will be concentrating, and the Ripple is a tool you need to purchase. Whether you color correct your footage for cuts that go to a network executive, or you are the editor and finisher on a project and want to give your footage the finishing touch, you should check out what a little contrast, saturation and exposure correction can do.

panelYou can find some great basic color correcting tutorials on YouTube, Lynda.com and color correction-focused sites like MixingLight.com. On YouTube, Casey Faris has some quick and succinct color correction tutorials, check him out here. Ripple Training also has some quick Resolve-focused tips posted somewhat weekly by Alexis Van Hurkman.

When you open the Tangent Ripple box you get an instruction manual, the Ripple, three track balls and some carrying pouches to keep it all protected. The Ripple has a five-foot USB cable hardwired into it, but the track balls are separate and do not lock into place. If you were to ask a Ripple user to tell you the serial number on the bottom of the Ripple, most likely they will turn it over, dropping all the trackballs. Obviously, this could wreck the trackballs and/or injure someone, so don’t do it, but you get my point.

The Ripple itself is very simple in layout: three trackballs, three dials above the trackballs, “A” and “B” buttons and revert buttons next to the dials. That is it! If you are looking for more than that, you should take a look at the Element panels.

After you plug in the Ripple to an open USB port, you probably should download the Tangent Hub software. This will also install the Tangent Mapper, which allows you to customize your buttons in apps like Premiere Pro. Unfortunately, Resolve and the Media Composer Baselight plug-in do not allow for customization, but when you install the software you get a nice HUD that signals what service each Ripple button and knob does in the software you are using.

If you are like me and your first intro into the wonderful world of color correction in an NLE was Avid Symphony, you might have also encountered the Avid Artist Color panel, which is very similar in functionality: three balls and a couple of knobs. Unfortunately, I found that the Artist Color never really worked like it should within Symphony. Here is a bit of interesting news: while you can’t use the Ripple in the native Symphony color corrector, you can use external panels in the Baselight Avid plug-in! Finally a solution! It is really, really responsive to the Tangent Ripple too! The Ripple really does work great inside of a Media Composer plug-in.

The Ripple was very responsive, much more than what I’ve experienced with the Avid Artist Color panel. As I mentioned earlier, the Ripple will accomplish the basics of color correcting — you can fix color balance issues and adjust exposure. It does a few things well, and that is it. To my surprise, when I added a shape (a mask used in color correction) in Baselight, I was able to adjust the size, points and position of the shape using the Ripple. In the curves dialogue I was able to add, move and adjust points. Not only does Baselight change the game for powerful, in-Avid color correction, but it is a tool like the Ripple that puts color correction within any editor’s grasp. I was really shocked at how well it worked.

When using the Ripple in Resolve you get what Resolve wants to give you. The Ripple is great for basic corrections inside of Resolve, but if you want to dive further into the awesomeness of color correction, you are going to want to invest in the Tangent Element panels.

With the Ripple inside of Resolve, you get the basic lift, gamma and gain controls along with the color wheels, a bypass button and reset buttons for each control. The “A” button doesn’t do anything, which is kind of funny to me. Unlike the Baselight Avid plug-in, you cannot adjust shapes, or do much else with the Ripple panel other than the basics.

Element-Vs
Another option that took me by surprise was Tangent iOS and the Android app Element-Vs. I expected this app to really underwhelm me but I was wrong. Element-Vs acts as an extension of your Ripple — based off the Tangent Element panels. But keep in mind, it’s still an app and there is nothing comparable to the tactile feeling and response you get from a panel like the Ripple or Elements. Nonetheless, I did use the Element-Vs app on an iPad Mini and it was surprisingly great.

It is a bit high priced for an app, coming in at around $100, but I was able to get a really great response when cycling through the different Element “panels,” leading me to think that the Ripple and Element-Vs app combo is a real contender for the prosumer colorist. At a total of $450 ($350 for the Ripple and $100 for the Element-Vs app), you are in the same ballpark as a colorist who has a $3,000-plus set of panels.

As I said earlier, the Element panels have a great tactile feel and feedback that, at the moment, is hard to compare to an app, but this combo isn’t as shabby as I thought it would be. A welcome surprise was that the installation and connection were pretty simple too.

Premiere Pro
The last app I wanted to test was Premiere Pro CC. Recently, Adobe added external color panel support in version 2015.3 or above. In fact, Premiere has the most functionality and map-ability out of all the apps I tested — it was an eye-opening experience for me. When I first started using the Lumetri color correction tools inside of Premiere I was a little bewildered and lost as the set-up was different from what I was used to in other color correction apps.

I stuck to basic color corrections inside of Premiere, and would export an XML or flat QuickTime file to do more work inside of Resolve. Using the Ripple with Premiere changed how I felt about the Lumetri color correction features. When you open Premiere Pro CC 2015.3 along with the Tangent Mapper, the top row of tabs opens up. You can customize not only the standard functions of the Ripple within each Lumetri panel, like Basic, Creative, Curves, Color Wheels, HSL Secondaries and Vignette, but you can also create an alternate set of functions when you press the “A” button.

In my opinion, the best button press for the Ripple is the “B” button, which cycles you through the Lumetri panels. In the panel Vignette, the Ripple gives you options like Vignette Amount, Vignette Midpoint, feather and Vignette Roundness.

As a side note, one complaint I have about the Ripple is that there isn’t a dedicated “bypass” button. I know that each app has different button designations and that Tangent wants to keep the Ripple as simple as possible, but many people constantly toggle the bypass function.

Not all hope is lost, however. Inside of Premiere, if you hold the “A” button for alternate mapping and hit the “B” button, you will toggle the bypass off and on. While editing in Premiere, I used the Ripple to do color adjustments even when the Lumetri panel wasn’t on screen. I could cycle through the different Lumetri tabs, make adjustments and continue to edit using keyboard functions fast — an awesome feature both Tangent and Adobe should be promoting more, in my opinion.

It seems Tangent worked very closely with Adobe when creating the Ripple. Maybe it is just a coincidence, but it really feels like this is the Adobe Premiere Pro CC Tangent Ripple. Of course, you can also use the Element-Vs app in conjunction with the Ripple, but in Premiere I would say you don’t need it. The Ripple takes care of almost everything for you.

One drawback I noticed when using the Ripple and Element-Vs inside of Premiere Pro was a small delay when compared to using these inside of Resolve and Baselight’s Media Composer plug-in. Not a huge delay, but a slight hesitation — nothing that would make me not buy the Ripple, but something you should know.

Summing Up
Overall, I really love the Ripple color correction panel from Tangent. At $350, there is nothing better. The Ripple feels like it was created for editors looking to dive deep into Premiere’s Lumetri color controls and allows you to be more creative because of it.

Physically, the Ripple has a lighter and more plastic-type of feel than its Element Tk panel brother, but it still works great. If you need something light and compact, the Ripple is a great addition to your Starbuck’s-based color correction set-up.

I do wish there was a little more space between the trackballs and the rotary dials. When using the dials, I kept nudging the trackballs and sometimes I didn’t even realize what had happened. However, since the Ripple is made to be compact, lightweight, mobile and priced to beat every other panel on the market, I can forgive this.

It feels like Tangent worked really hard to make the Ripple feel like a natural extension of your keyboard. I know I sound like a broken record, but saving time makes me money, and the Tangent Ripple color correction panel saves me time. If you are an editor that has to color correct and grade dailies, an assistant editor looking to up their color correction game or just an all-around post production ninja who dabbles in different areas of expertise, the Tangent Ripple is the next tool you need to buy.


Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.

The Colonie provides editing, VFX for Toyota Corolla spot

Chicago’s The Colonie has teamed with Burrell Communications to provide editorial, visual effects and design services for I Do, a broadcast spot introducing the 2017 Toyota Corolla.

Creative editor Bob Ackerman edited with the carmaker’s tagline, “Let’s Go Places,” in mind. Fast-paced cuts and editing effects helped create an upbeat message that celebrates the new Corolla, as well as its target audience — what Toyota refers to as today’s “on-the-go” generation of young adults.

Lewis Williams, Burrell’s EVP/CCO, brought The Colonie onboard early in the process to collaborate with the production company The Cavalry, ensuring the seamless integration of a variety of visual effects that were central to the style of this spot.

The commercial integrates three distinct vignettes. The spot opens with a young woman behind the wheel of her Toyota. She arrives at a city park and her friends help her yarn bomb the surroundings — from hand-knitted tree trunk covers to a slipcover for a love seat and a garbage pail cozy in the likeness of whimsical characters.

barbarFrom the get-go art director Winston Cheung was very focused on keeping the tone of the spot fresh and young. When selecting footage during the edit session, Ackerman and Cheung made sure to use some of the more playful set-ups from the yarn vignette to providing the bold color palette for final transfer.

The second scenario finds an enterprising man parking his Corolla and unloading his “Pop-Up Barbershop” in front of a tall wall featuring artful graffiti. A well-placed painting of a young man’s face extends over the top of the wall completes the picture. As soon as the barber sets up his chair, his first customer arrives.

The third vignette features a young filmmaker shooting footage of the 2017 Toyota as her crew adds some illuminating effects. Taking her cues from this scene, The Colonie senior designer, Jen Moody, crafted a series of shots that use a “light painting” technique to create a trail of light effect. One of the characters writes the spot’s title, I Do with a light, which Moody layered to create a more tangible quality that really sells the effect. VFX supervisor Tom Dernulc took a classic Toyota Corolla from a previous segment and seamlessly integrated it into the background of the scene.

The Colonie’s team explored several methods for creating the various VFX in the spot before deciding upon a combination of Autodesk Flame Premium and Adobe After Effects. Then it was a matter of picking the right moments. Ackerman grabbed some of their top choices, roughed in the effect on the Avid Media Composer, and presented the client with a nearly finished look right from the very first rough cuts.

“Early on, creative director Lisa McConnell had expressed a desire to explore using a series of stills flashing (á la TV’s Scandal) to advance the spot’s story,” says Ackerman. “We loved the idea. Condensing short sequences of footage into rapid progressions of imagery provided us with an innovative way to convey the full scope of these three scenarios in a very limited 30-second time frame — while also adding an interesting visual element to the final spot.”

Fred Keller of Chicago’s Filmworkers provided the color grade, CRC’s Ian Scott performed the audio mix and sound design, and composers Mike Dragovic, Michael Yessian and Brian Yessian provided the score.

Review: Avid Media Composer 8.5 and 8.6

By Brady Betzel

It seems that nonlinear editing systems, like Adobe Premiere, Apple FCP X, Lightworks, Vegas and Blackmagic Resolve are being updated almost weekly. At first, I was overjoyed with the frequent updates. It got to the point where I would see a new codec released on a Monday and by Friday you could edit with it (maybe a slight exaggeration, but pretty close to the truth). Unfortunately, this didn’t always mean the updates would work.

One thing that I have learned over the last decade is that reliable software is worth its weight in gold, and one NLE that has always been reliable in my work is Avid Media Composer. While Media Composer isn’t updated weekly, it has been picking up steam and has really given its competitors a run for their money.

With Avid Media Composer’s latest updates, including 8.5 and all the way through 8.6.1, we are seeing the true progression of THE gold standard in nonlinear editing software. From the changes that editors have been requesting for years, like the ability to add a new track to the timeline by simply dragging a clip, all the way to selecting all clips with the same source clip color in the timeline (an online editor’s dream — or maybe just mine), Media Composer is definitely heading in the right direction. Once they fix options, such as the Title Tool, I am sure many others will be in the same boat I am. Even with Adobe’s latest update news of Team Projects, I think Avid’s project sharing will remain on top, but don’t get me wrong, I love the competition and believe it’s healthy for the industry in general.

Digging In
So how great are the latest updates in Media Composer? Well, I am going to touch on a few that really make our lives as editors easier and more efficient, including the new Source Browser; custom-sized project creation Preset Manager; Audio Channel Grouping; grouping clips by audio waveform; and many more.

For simplicity’s sake I won’t be pointing out which update contained exactly what, so let’s just assume that you and I are both talking about 8.6.1. Even though 8.6.2 was released, it was subsequently pulled down because of a bad installer and replaced by 8.6.3. Long story short, I did this review right before 8.6.3 was released so I am sticking to 8.6.1. You can find the read me file for any 8.6.3 related bug fixes and feature updates, including Realtime EQ and Audio Suite Effects.

Source Browser
Let’s take a look at the new Source Browser first. If you have worked in Premiere Pro before then you are basically familiar with what the Source Browser does. Simply put, it’s a live access point from within Media Composer where you can either link to media (think AMA) or import media (the traditional way). The Source Browser is great because you can always leave it open if you want, or close it and reopen it whenever you want. One thing I found funny is that there was not a default shortcut to open the Source Browser — you have to manually map it.

Nonetheless, it’s a fast way to load media into your Source Monitor without bringing the media into a bin. It even has a Favorites tab to keep all of the media you access on a regular basis in the same place — a good spot for transition effects, graphics, sound effects and even music cues that you find yourself using a lot. The Source Browser can be found under the Tools menu. While I’ve seen some complaints about the menu reorganization and the new Source Browser, I like what Avid has done. The updated layout and optimized menu items seem to be a good fit for me, it will just take a little time to get used to.

Up next is my favorite update to Media Composer since I discovered the Select Right and Select Left commands without Filler and how to properly use the extend edit function: selecting clips in the timeline based on source color. If you’ve ever had to separate clips onto different video and audio tracks, you will understand the monotony and pain that a lot of assistant editors and conforming editors have to go through. Let’s say you have stock footage mixed in with over two hours of shot footage and you want to quickly raise all of the clips onto their own video layer. Previously, you would have to move each clip individually using the segment tool (or shift + click a bunch of clips), but now you can select every clip with the same source color at once.

Color Spaces

First, you should (or at least I recommend that you should) enable Source Color in your timeline, but you don’t have to for this to work. Second, you use either the red or yellow segment tools or alt (option) + click from left to right over the clip with the color that you want to select throughout the timeline. Once the clip is selected you will right click on the clip. Under the Select menu, click on Clips with the Same Source Color. Every clip with that same color will be selected and you can Shift + CTRL drag the clips to a new track. Make this a shortcut and holy cow — imagine the time you will save!

Immediately, I think of trouble shots that might need a specific color correction or image restoration applied to them like a dead pixel that appears throughout a sequence. In the bin, color the trouble clips one color, select them all in the timeline and bam you are ready to go, quickly and easily. This update is a game changer for me. Under the Select menu you will see a few other options like Offline Clips, Select Clips with No Source Color, Select Clips with Same Local Color, and even Reverse Selection.

Audio
Now let’s jump into the audio updates. First off is the nesting of audio effects. I mean come on! How many times have I wanted to apply a Vari-Fi effect at the end of a music cue and add D-Verb on top of it?! Now I can create all sorts of slow down promo/sizzle reel madness that a mixer will hate me for without locking myself into a decision!

I tried this a few times expecting my Media Composer to crash, but it worked like a champ. Previously, as a workaround, I had to mixdown the Vari-Fi audio (locking me into that audio with no easy way of going back) and apply the D-Verb to the audio mixdown. This isn’t the cleanest workflow but it guaranteed my Vari-Fi would make it into the mix. Now I guess I will have to trust the mixer to not strip my audio effects off of the AAF we send them.

Digging a bit further into the audio updates for Media Composer 8.5 and 8.6, I found the ability to add up to 64 tracks of audio and, more specifically, 64 voices. Sixty-four voices can be laid out in these possible combinations: 64 mono tracks, 32 stereo tracks, 10-5.1 tracks plus four mono tracks or even eight 7.1 tracks.

Nested Audio

Let’s be honest — from one editor to another — do we really need to use all 64 tracks of audio? I urge you to use this sparingly, and only if you have to. No one wants to be scrolling through 64 tracks of audio. I am hesitant to totally embrace this, because while it is an incredible update to Media Composer, it allows for editors to be sloppy, and nobody has time for that. Also, older versions of Media Composer won’t be able to open your sequence as they are not backwards compatible with this.

My second favorite update in Media Composer is Audio Groups. I am a pretty organized (a.k.a. obsessive-compulsive editor), and with my audio I typically lay out voiceover and ADR on tracks 1-2, dialogue on 3-6, sound effects on 7-12 and music on 13-16.

These have to be fluid, and I find that these fit my screen real estate well. They keep my audio edit as tidy as possible, although now with 64 tracks I can obviously expand. But one thing that always sucked was having to mute each track individually or all at once. Now, in the Audio Mixer you can easily create groups of audio tracks that can be enabled and disabled with one click instead of individually selecting each audio track. For instance, I can group all of my music tracks together to toggle them off and on with one check box. In the Audio Mixer there is a small arrow on the upper left that you will twirl down, select the audio tracks that you want to group, such as tracks 13-16 for music, right click, click Create New Group, name it and there you go — audio track selection glory.

Audio Ducking

Last in the audio updates is Audio Ducking. When I think of Audio Ducking I think of having a track of voiceover or ADR over the top of a music bed. Typically, I would go through and either add audio keyframes where I need to lower the music bed or create add edits, lower the audio in the mixer, apply a dissolve between edits and repeat throughout the segment.

Avid has really stepped its game up with Audio Ducking because now I can specify which of my dialogue tracks I want Avid to calculate for when my music bed is playing. You can even twirl down the advanced settings, adjust threshold and hold time for the dialogue tracks, as well as attenuation and ramp time for the music bed tracks. I tried it and it worked. I won’t go as far as to say that you should just use that instead of doing your own music edits, but it is an interesting feature that may help a few people.

Wait, There’s More
There were a few straggling updates I didn’t touch on you will want to check out. Avid has added support for HDR color spaces, such as RGB DCI-P3, RGB 2020 and many more. Once I get my hands on some sweet HDR footage (and equipment to monitor it) I will dabble in that space.

Also, you can now group footage by audio waveform. While grouping by audio waveform is an awesome addition, especially if you have previously used Red Giant’s PluralEyes and feel left out because they discontinued AAF support, it lacks a few adjustments that I find absolutely necessary when working with hours upon hours of footage. For instance, I would love to be able to manually sync clips that don’t have audio loud enough for Avid to discern properly and create a group. Even more so, for all grouping I would really love to be able to adjust the group after it has been created. If after the group was created I could alter it inside of a sequence that would immediately reflect my changes in the group itself, I —along with about one million other editors and assistant editors — would jump for joy.

Lastly, the Effects Tab has been improved with its Quick Find search-ability. Type in the effect you are looking for and it will pop up. This is another game-changing feature to me.

Summing Up
For a while there I thought Avid was satisfied to stay the course in 1080p land, but luckily that isn’t the case. They have added resolution independence, custom project resolutions, and while they have added features to Media Composer — like Source Browser and the ever-improving Frame Flex — they kept their project sharing and rock solid media management at the top level.

Even after all of these updates I mentioned, there are still some features that I would love to see. Those include built-in composite modes in the Effects Pallette; editable groups; an improved Title Tool that will work in 4K and higher resolutions without going to a third-party for support; updated Symphony Color Correction tools; smart mix-downs that can inherit alpha channels; the ability to disable video layers but still see all the layers above and below; and many more.

If I had to use just one word to describe Media Composer, I would say reliable. I love reliability more than fancy features. And now that you heard my Media Composer review, you can commence trolling on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.

Editor Josh Beal on Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’

By Randi Altman

Looks are deceiving, and that familiar saying is at the heart of Netflix’s dramatic series Bloodline. The show focuses on the Rayburns, a respected family that runs a popular and long-standing beachfront hotel in the Florida Keys.

On the surface, they are pillars of the community and a perfect family, but when you dig below the surface they are a mess — long-standing family secrets, a black sheep with a criminal record, drug use, alcoholism. It’s all there.

Josh

Josh Beal at his stand-up desk.

So, if you are into intrigue, drug cartels, paranoia, gorgeous scenery and damn-good acting (Kyle Chandler was just nominated for a Lead Actor Emmy for his role as John, and Ben Mendelsohn got a nod for Supporting Actor for his role as Danny), the show’s first two seasons are available now for streaming.

Josh Beal joined the editing team of Bloodline around Episode 7 of Season 1 as the show’s only LA-based editor. The other three were in New York — Aaron Kuhn, Deborah Moran and Naomi Geraghty — working with East Coast-based show producers Daniel Zelman and Todd Kessler. Beal, at the time based at the Sony lot in Culver City, worked closely with producer Glenn Kessler, who was headquartered in Los Angeles.

Coming into Season 2, Glenn Kessler was the one who was going to be driving the episodes through editorial, so they moved the whole thing to LA. While Beal hesitates to be called the show’s main editor, he was the first one on and did cut the majority of episodes for Season 2, which is shot on a Sony F55 camera in 4K by DP Jaime Reynoso.

I reached out to editing veteran Beal, who uses the Avid Media Composer, to find out more about his process and the show’s workflow.

How many episodes would you say you cut for the second season?
I’m credited with four, but Bloodline is a unique show in that all of the editors — Lynne Willingham, Louise Innes, Sue Blainey and Michelle Tesoro — may end up working to some extent on episodes where they don’t get final credit. I’m credited as the primary editor on the second season’s last episode, but the other editors helped me out with it. That’s usually due to issues surrounding scheduling and the workload.

When did you start getting footage?
We received footage as soon as they started shooting. If they were shooting today I would be getting footage tomorrow morning, and it would just go like that through the production.

Camera files were uploaded to Sony’s 24p Dailies Lab from the shoot in Florida. The Avid media was then copied to a portable hard drive and delivered to our assistant editors each morning by our post assistant. Our assistant editors would then load the media onto our Avid ISIS and prep scenes for the editors.

Can you talk us through your workflow?
It followed a pretty typical workflow for episodic television. I would try to stay close to camera with the dailies and cut scenes as they were shot. Then I had a couple of days to put together my cut of the episode, which I would present to the director. The director would then get four days for the director’s cut, which would then be shown to producers. The producers then shared their cut with Sony and Netflix.

Often, in my case, the distinction between what was director cut and producer cut would start to break down because the majority of the episodes that I worked on for Season 2 were directed by one of the producers, with the exception of one. The typical division between those phases of the edit ceased to really apply and it all sort of became a long director’s cut, which was actually really great creatively to have that continuity.

The direction and feel of the show was established during season one. Can you talk about that?
One of the defining characteristics of the mood in Bloodline is a voyeuristic feel to the way a scene might be covered, and therefore the way a scene would be put together.

Sometimes there are behind-the-bushes kind of a shots that might pop up of in the middle of the scene in a way that is a little atypical. It gives the viewer a sense that they are always being watched, which is especially applicable thematically for Season 2. It heightens the sense of paranoia and unease. So editing-wise, it’s about finding a way to use that material and maximize that feeling while at the same time keeping the audience in the character’s perspective, keeping them in the scene.

As Season 2 progresses, John Rayburn’s world starts falling apart — you could feel his desperation. How did you handle that from an editing perspective?
At that stage, it’s trying to stay rooted in a character’s perspective and leaning into it and finding performance. Any decisions that you are making in terms of shot selection begin and end in large part with performance.

For example, with Kyle Chandler (John), I thought he was doing incredible work. Sometimes it was just about getting out of his way; it’s about watching the performance and trying to make that work first. It’s not so much a visual thing.

You edited the show on Media Composer. Do you use the script tool to help pick different takes?
I did for the first season, but I’ve never felt 100% comfortable with that tool. I did something else to help me with me with the sorts of problems that ScriptSync is intended to solve.

Can you talk about that a bit?
One of the challenges with it is you’ll have exceptionally long dialogue scenes. For example, two people sitting in an interrogation room speaking to one another. That kind of scene offers very few visual cues as to where you are within the text of the scene, and this is often what an editor might be going off of when looking for a specific line. If you want to audition line readings, especially when you are working with the producer in the room, you are frequently going off of these visual cues, but you don’t have many when it’s just people at a table.

My solution was every time someone spoke in the script, I’d put a number next to that chunk of dialogue. If a character’s name was mentioned for dialogue within the script it got a number. Then I would put a locator in my clip at that point — “L01, L02, L03 — all the way through the script. Then I would throw all the clips into a KEM roll in the Avid and sort that by the marker name in the marker window. I can also make notes as to whether or not I like a given reading over another. I can just see it listed in my description of it.

In fact, KZK (producers Glenn, Daniel and Todd) do something that I don’t often run into on other shows. They will write alternative lines into the script, and they’ll shoot it both ways. Then the decision gets made later as to which way it’s going to go in editorial.

Season 2 has a ton of flashback sequences. Did you have to tackle that in a different way?
One of the things that I appreciate about the way that flashbacks are handled on Bloodline is that they don’t talk down to the audience. We aren’t throwing some sepia tone effect on the flashbacks. There aren’t any flashy visual transitions in and out of the flashbacks. We are assuming that the audience will know pretty quickly where they are at within the timeline based on context.

In watching Bloodline, it almost seems sweat and alcohol play characters on the show.
Yes, it’s deeply threaded throughout the world created for the show. The sweat, I suspect, is simply unavoidable when it comes to shooting in the Keys. It is an element, however, that really helps sell the sense of place. It feels real because it is. It’s part of the atmosphere and is also something that perfectly dovetails into John and his siblings’ growing feelings of stress and dread.

The drinking was something that came up in conversation with producers and directors when we were chatting in the cutting room. All reports I heard are that indeed there’s a real drinking culture down there.  It’s just another detail I think that adds to the strong sense of place the show excels at presenting.

Is there a particular scene that stands out to you as more challenging than others?
In Season 2, there is an episode where (Rayburn siblings) Kevin and Meg were being interrogated again by (police officer) Marco. They are very long scenes, just back and forth between Kevin and Marco and then between Meg and Marco.

The audience thinks that Kevin is going to blow it and that Meg has her shit together, but she is the one that steps in it and puts everything at risk. I really liked those sequences, but they are hard to cut because it’s just two people in a room talking and yet the scenes had to have a shape. They had to twist and turn based on subtleties of performance. I often find those to be among the more challenging scenes because they can begin in a very unruly state and it’ll take time to carve them out just right.

When Glenn first saw those scenes he wanted to put a slightly different emphasis and rhythm to some of the performance — a slightly different intent to come across in the interaction between the characters. These were scenes that we worked on and modified quite a bit for the better as we went along.

Do you have a general philosophy about editing?
I guess my philosophy is not to get lost in the weeds, and try to keep perspective on the story. Try to always keep the big picture in mind, because there is all the minutia of editing. How can I get this cut to match? Or, how can I cut out this section that I’m being asked to remove without making the whole thing seem clunky? That type of thing is important but it can’t be the only way you look at the cut.

What’s next for you?
I’m working on a new show starring Pierce Brosnan based on a novel called The Son. It’ll air on AMC next year. It’s like a great American history lesson that follows a South Texas family over the course of multiple generations. It begins with the story of the family patriarch who builds a financial empire first in the cattle industry and later in oil. The storyline goes all the way up to the present.

Is there anything you would like to add?
I would like to emphasize how collaborative Bloodline was. Lynne and Louise and the other editors on the show are phenomenally talented. I was honored to be among them. I learned a lot working with them. That collaboration, for me, is one of the high points of working on the series. I’ve worked on shows where I hardly ever talked to the other editors, but we got to talk shop and bounce ideas off each other a bit. That was a really fun part of the show for me.

Quick Chat: Lost Planet editor Federico Brusilovsky

By Randi Altman

Buenos Aires native Federico Brusilovsky works as an editor at Lost Planet’s Los Angeles office, leading efforts on campaigns for Cadillac, Dodge, Heineken and HP. He joined Lost Planet’s New York studio four years ago as an intern, with production and assistant editorial experience already under his belt. From there, he worked his way up, learning from experienced editors, including the company’s Oscar-nominated editor and owner Hank Corwin (The Big Short).

Cadillac

We reached out to Brusilovsky, who studied film at New York’s City College after coming to the US, to talk about his path, the way he likes to work and tips for those just starting out.

How long have you been editing?
That’s a tough question. I guess my first experiences editing were all in-camera when I was shooting movies on VHS as a kid. Working in that linear format taught me a lot, especially how to recognize happy accidents: those coincidences and subconscious decisions that end up being some of the cooler parts of a film.

Once I was in college, I was working with Super 8 and 16mm and cutting with a guillotine. Working with your hands with such delicate materials teaches you a lot, too. There’s a craftsmanship to physically altering and moving around film that requires really sophisticated organization and patience. Those experiences are important to me now that I edit using digital, nonlinear systems. So, the short answer is probably “as long as I can remember.”

How did you get started in this business?
I was lucky to know editor Julie Monroe (Lolita, The Patriot), who offered me the chance to intern on the film she was working on, Mud. From there, Julie introduced me to Saar Klein (The Bourne Identity, Almost Famous), who introduced me to the studio that he’s on roster with, Hank Corwin’s Lost Planet.

After joining Lost Planet as an intern, it was easy stay focused on my goal of becoming an editor. I knew an internship wouldn’t naturally evolve into a lucrative editing career. I did lots of technical training on my own, so that the moment they needed me to step into a more challenging role, I would already have the skills.

Heineken

Heineken

How early did you know this would be your path?
I didn’t recognize it as a path early on, even though it was in front of me for a while, and I was always editing one way or another. It wasn’t until after meeting and talking to a bunch of feature editors that I was able to see it.

Was it much of a transition in terms of editing moving from Argentina to the US?
Speaking strictly in the commercial world, the biggest difference between the US and Argentina (and I guess most other countries as well) is the role of the editor and the director. For some reason, directors in the US are not as involved from start to finish as they are abroad. They tend to shoot and walk away, not always because they want to but because they have to.

Although we work with them at the beginning of the process, a lot of decisions that may be directorial end up in the hands of the editor. Which is great for me from a creative standpoint.

Overseas, directors are a good deal more involved in post production, and editors in production, which can be an advantage for strong collaborations but a disadvantage for editing objectively. It’s fun to get a feel for each shot while it’s happening on set, then work closely with the director in post, but that experience can make you married to footage that you would otherwise toss out in the edit room.

What system do you use?
Mostly Avid Media Composer. It’s the least user-friendly piece of software, probably because it pre-dates functions like drag-and-drop being available in every single app. But, with patience and the right training, it’s the most robust and attractive piece of non-linear software out there.

What’s your favorite shortcut?
CMD+Z (or CTRL+Z for the Windows crowd). Not only is “undo” possibly the most useful hotkey on a technical level, it has huge symbolic importance. Undo is a digital safety net. Knowing that I’m never more than two keys away from reverting to a previous version gives me the freedom and efficiency to take risks and experiment with different styles.

Cadillac

Cadillac

Do you use plug-ins?
With Avid I try not to, unless a specific project calls for it. If I’m using plug-ins, that means I’ve probably moved to After Effects.

What are some recent projects you have worked on?
Heineken’s “Soccer is Here” and Cadillac’s “CT6 Forward” are my two most recent campaigns. Cadillac was fantastic to be a part of. The material I had to work with was so rich and delicate. Each individual shot was successful on so many levels — color, light, movement, composition and so on. Some projects require a bit of strategy in the edit so high quality shots don’t call attention to less successful ones, but not with this project. It was like playing chess with a board full of queens and no pawns.

Do you have a favorite genre? If so, why?
Comedy. I know it’s a cliché to say that it’s my favorite because it’s the hardest genre to work in, but that’s probably why. One unique challenge to comedy is that the margin for error is so wide compared to other genres. The impact of a not-so-exciting fight scene is much less than the impact of a not-so-funny joke. Getting an audience to laugh is one of the biggest challenges in the industry, and so satisfying when you’re successful.

It’s also easy to get caught in an echo chamber of bad comedy in a writers’ room or on set. When you’re working with comedic premises and characters, trying out concepts and laughing with your coworkers, you can easily lose objectivity and convince yourself something is funny when it definitely isn’t.

I read somewhere that on the set of Sydney Pollack’s Tootsie, there was a real sense of seriousness and tension, despite it being one of Dustin Hoffman and Bill Murray’s funniest movies. Maybe that’s a secret to great comedy… approach it seriously.

Any tips for new editors just starting out?
Listen! Not listening is a classic rookie mistake. Also, it’s more important to be in the right place than to be doing the most glamorous or rewarding tasks. Better to be low on the totem pole for a good film with good people than at the top directing for a bad film. Try to be around companies and projects you admire, then work hard to grow in those communities.