Tag Archives: audio mixer

Behind the Title: 3008 Editorial’s Matt Cimino and Greg Carlson

NAMES: Matt Cimino and Greg Carlson

COMPANY: 3008 Editorial in Dallas

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Cimino: We are sound designers/mixers.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Cimino: Audio is a storytelling tool. Our job is to enhance the story directly or indirectly and create the illusion of depth, space and a sense of motion with creative sound design and then mix that live in the environment of the visuals.

Carlson: And whenever someone asks, I always tend to prioritize sound design before mixing. Although I love every aspect of what we do, when a spot hits my room as a blank slate, it’s really the sound design that can take it down a hundred different paths. And for me, it doesn’t get better than that.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Carlson: I’m not sure a brief job title can encompass what anyone really does. I am a composer as well as a sound designer/mixer, so I bring that aspect into my work. I love musical elements that help stitch a unified sound into a project.

Cimino: That there really isn’t “a button” for that!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Carlson: The freedom. Having the opportunity to take a project where I think it should go and along the way, pushing it to the edge and back. Experimenting and adapting makes every spot a completely new trip.

Matt Cimino

Cimino: I agree. It’s the challenge of creating an expressive and aesthetically pleasing experience by taking the soundtrack to a whole new level.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Cimino: Not Much. However, being an imperfect perfectionist, I get pretty bummed when I do not have enough time to perfect the job.

Carlson: People always say, “It’s so peaceful and quiet in the studio, as if the world is tuned out.” The downside of that is producer-induced near heart attacks. See, when you’re rocking out at max volume and facing away from the door, well, people tend to come in and accidentally scare you to death.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Cimino: I’m a morning person!

Carlson: Time is an abstract notion in a dark room with no windows, so no time in particular. However, the funniest time of day is when you notice you’re listening about 15 dB louder than the start of the day. Loud is better.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Cimino: Carny. Or Evel Knievel.

Carlson: Construction/carpentry. Before audio, I had lots of gritty “hands-on” jobs. My dad taught me about work ethic, to get my hands dirty and to take pride in everything. I take that same approach with every spot I touch. Now I just sit in a nice chair while doing it.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION? HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Cimino: I’ve had a love for music since high school. I used to read all the liner notes on my vinyl. One day I remember going through my father’s records and thinking at that moment, I want to be that “sound engineer” listed in the notes. This led me to study audio at Columbia College in Chicago. I quickly gravitated towards post production audio classes and training. When I wasn’t recording and mixing music, I was doing creative sound design.

Carlson: I was always good with numbers and went to Michigan State to be an accountant. But two years in, I was unhappy. All I wanted was to work on music and compose, so I switched to audio engineering and never looked back. I knew the second I walked into my first studio, I had found my calling. People always say there isn’t a dream job; I disagree.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Cimino: A fun, stress-free environment full of artistry and technology.

Carlson: It is a place I look forward to every day. It’s like a family, solely focused on great creative.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT SPOTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Cimino: Snapple, RAM, Jeep, Universal Orlando, Cricket Wireless, Maserati.

Carlson: AT&T, Lay’s, McDonald’s, Bridgestone Golf.

Greg Carlson

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Carlson: It’s nearly impossible to pick one, but there is a project I see as pivotal in my time here in Dallas. It was shortly after I arrived six years ago. I think it was a boost to my confidence and in turn, enhanced my style. The client was The Home Depot and the campaign was Lets Do This. A creative I admire greatly here in town gave me the chance to spearhead the sonic approach for the work. There are many moments, milestones and memories, but this was a special project to me.

Cimino: There are so many. One of the most fun campaigns I worked on was for Snapple, where each spot opened with the “pop!” of the Snapple cap. I recorded several pops (close-miced) and selected one that I manipulated to sound larger than life but also retain the sound of the brands signature cap pop being opened. After the cap pops, the spot transforms into an exploding fruit infusion. The sound was created by smashing Snapple bottles for the glass break, crushing, smashing and squishing fruit with my hands, and using a hydrophone to record splashing and underwater sounds to create the slow-motion effect of the fruit morphing. So much fun.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Cimino: During a mix, my go-tos are iZotope, Sound Toys and Slate Digital. Outside the studio I can’t live without my Apple!

Carlson: ProTools, all things iZotope, Native Instruments.

THIS IS A HIGH-STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS. WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Cimino: Family and friends. I love watching my kiddos play select soccer. Relaxing pool or beachside with a craft cider. Or on a single path/trail with my mountain bike.

Carlson: I work on my home, build things, like to be outside. When I need to detach for a bit, I prefer dangerous power tools or being on a body of water.

Quick Chat: Ian Stynes on mixing two Sundance films

By Kristine Pregot

A few years back, I had the pleasure of working with talented sound mixer Ian Stynes on a TV sketch comedy. It’s always nice working with someone you have collaborated with before. There is a comfort level and unspoken language that is hard to achieve any other way. This year we collaborated once again for So Yong Kim’s 2016 film Lovesong, which made its premiere at this year’s Sundance and had its grade at New York’s Nice Shoes via colorist Sal Malfitano.

Ian has been busy. In fact, another film he mixed recently had its premiere at Sundance as well — Other People, from director Chris Kelly.

Ian Stynes

Ian Stynes

Since we were both at the festival, I thought what better time to ask him how he approached mixing these two very different films.

Congrats on your two films at Sundance, Lovesong (which is our main image) and Other People. How did the screenings go?
Both screenings were great; it’s a different experience to see the movie in front of an excited audience. After working on a film for a few months it’s easy to slip into only watching it from a technical standpoint — wondering, if a certain section is loud enough, or if a particular sound effect works — but seeing it with an engaged crowd (especially as a world premiere at a place like Sundance) is like seeing it with fresh eyes again. You can’t help but get caught up.

What was the process like to work with each director for the film?
I’ve been lucky enough to work with some wonderful directors, and these movies were no exception. Chris Kelly, the director for Other People, who is a writer on a bunch of TV shows including SNL and Broad City is so down to earth and funny. The movie was based on the true story of his mother, who died from cancer. So he was emotionally attached to the film in a unique way. He was very focused about what he wanted but also knew when to sit back and let me do my thing. This was Chris’s first movie, but you wouldn’t know it.

For Lovesong, I worked with director So Yong Kim once again. She makes all her films with her husband Bradley Rust Gray. They switch off with directorial duties but are both extremely involved in each other’s movies. This is my third time working on a film with the two of them — the other two were For Ellen with Paul Dano and Jon Heder, and Exploding Girl with Zoe Kazan. So is an amazing director to work with; it feels like a real collaboration mixing with her. She is creative and extremely focused with her vision, but always inclusive and kind to everyone involved in the crew.

With both films a lot of work was done ahead of time. I try and get it to a very presentable place before the directors come in. This way we can focus on the creative tasks together. One of the fun parts of my job is that I get to sit in a room for a good while and work closely with creative and fun people on something that is very meaningful to them. It’s usually a bit of a bonding experience by the end of it.

How long did each film take you to mix?
I am also extremely lucky to work with some great people at Great City Post. I was the mixer, supervising sound editor and sound designer on both films, but I have an amazing team of people working with me.

Matt Schoenfeld did a huge amount of sound designing on both movies, as well as some of the mixing on Lovesong. Jay Culliton was the dialogue editor on Other People. Renne Bautista recorded Foley and dealt with various sound editing tasks. Shaun Brennan was the Foley artist, and additional editing was done by Daniel Heffernan and Houston Snyder. We are a small team but very efficient. We spent about eight to 10 weeks on each film.

Lovesong

How is it different to mix comedy than it is to mix a drama?
When you add sound to a film it’s important to think about how it is helping the story — how it augments or moves the story along. The first level of post sound work involves cleaning and removing anything that might take the viewer out of the world of the story (hearing mics, audio distortion, change in tone etc.).

Beyond that, different films need different things. Narrative features usually call for the sound to give energy to a film but not get in the way. Of course, there are always specific moments where the sound needs to stand out and take center stage. Most people usually aren’t aware of it or know what post sound specifically entails, but they certainly notice when it is missing or a bad sound job was done. Dramas usually have more intensity to the story and comedy’s can be a bit lighter. This often informs the sound design, edit and mix. That said, every movie is still different.

What is your favorite sound design on a film of all time?
I love Ben Burtt, who did all the Star Wars movies. He also did Wall-E, which is such a great sound design movie. The first 40 or so minutes have no direct dialogue — all the audio is sound design. You might not realize it, but it is very effective. On the DVD extra Ben Burtt did a doc about the sound for that movie. The documentary ends up being about the history of sound design itself. It’s so inspiring, even for non-sound people. Here is the link.

I urge anyone reading this to watch it. I guarantee it will get you thinking about sound for film in a way you never have before.

Kristine Pregot is a senior producer at New York City-based Nice Shoes.


Behind the Title: Sonic Union’s Steve Rosen

NAME: Steve Rosen

COMPANY: Sonic Union (@sonicunion)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Sonic Union is deeply experienced in audio post and we are proud of our extremely good-looking team of 20 in New York City.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE? Partner/Mixer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The mixer part of my title is what made the partner part of my title a possibility. I’ve been involved in the New York advertising audio post business for 30 years, and consider myself very lucky to be doing something that I really enjoy every day.

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