Tag Archives: Assistant Editor

Assistant Editor’s Bootcamp coming to Burbank in June

The new Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp, founded by assistant/lead editors Noah Chamow (The Voice) and Conor Burke (America’s Got Talent), is a place for a assistant editors and aspiring assistants to learn and collaborate with one another in a low-stakes environment. The next Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp classes will be held on June 10-11, along with a Lead Assistant Editors’ class geared toward understanding troubleshooting and system performance on June 24-25. All classes, sponsored by AlphaDogs’ Editor’s Lounge, will be held at Skye Rentals in Burbank.

The classes will cover such topics as The Fundamentals of Video, Media Management, Understanding I/O and Drive Speed, Prepping Footage for Edit, What’s New in Media Composer, Understanding System Performance Bottlenecks and more. Cost is $199 for two days for the Assistant Editor class, and $299 for two days for the Lead Assistant Editor class. Space is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 25 participants per course. You can register here.

A system with Media Composer 8.6 or later and an external hard drive is required to take the class (30-day Avid trial available) 8GB of system memory and Windows 7/OS X 10.9 or later are needed to run Media Composer 8.6. Computer rentals are available for as little as $54 a week from Hi-Tech Computer Rental in Burbank.

Chamow and Burke came up with the idea for Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp when they realized how challenging it is to gain any real on-the-job experience in today’s workplace. With today’s focus being primarily on doing things faster and more efficiently, it’s almost impossible to find the time to figure out why one method of doing something is faster than another. Having worked extensively in reality television and creating the “The Super Grouper,” a multi-grouping macro for Avid that is now widely used in reality post workflows, Chamow understands first-hand the landscape of the assistant editor’s world. “One of the most difficult things about working in the entertainment industry, especially in a technical position, is that there is never time to learn,” he says. “I’m very passionate about education and hope by hosting these classes, I can help other assistants hone their skills as well as helping those who are new to the business get the experience they need.”

Having worked as both an assistant editor and lead assistant editor, Burke has created workflows and overseen post for up to 10 projects at a time, before moving into his current position at NBC’s America’s Got Talent. “In my years of experience and working on grueling deadlines, I completely understand how difficult the job of an assistant editor can be, having little or no time to learn anything other than what’s right in front of you,” he says. “In teaching this class, I hope to make peers feel more confident and have a better understanding in their work, taking them to the next level in their careers.”

Main Image (L-R): Noah Chamow and Conor Burke.

My Top 5 Avid Media Composer shortcuts

By Brady Betzel

During my four years as an assistant editor and my two as a full-time editor, almost all of my work has been on the Avid Media Composer or Symphony.

Over the years I have collected a few shortcuts that I love to use and wanted to share. I hope you find them helpful.

Replacing the default “A” + “S” Go to Next/Previous Edit with Fast Forward and Rewind
When you open the default keyboard settings in Avid Media Composer, “A” and “S” are used as Go to Next and Go to Previous edit. While this serves its purpose of going to the next edit in the timeline and going into Trim Mode, I prefer it to be used to just jump to the next edit Continue reading

Top five assistant editor life skills

By Brady Betzel

This piece is going to be a bit different for me. It’s the first time I’ve ever written something to be published that wasn’t a review. I was asked to share some tips and experiences from when I was an assistant editor. I thought, “Why not?”

During college I started as an intern on a Fox talk show called On Air with Ryan Seacrest, where I was able to make some very important contacts — some of whom I’m still in contact with 10 years later. Once we were told the show wasn’t renewed people started to flee and find work elsewhere (which happens a lot). It was the perfect time for me to swoop in and get at least a few months of real work under my belt before the show went officially dark.

I was lucky. They asked me to be a tape coordinator, and thus my post-production career was born. Truth be told I didn’t do much more than make sure tapes went to set for a news Continue reading