Tag Archives: ASC

Sony adds 36×24 full-frame camera to CineAlta line

Sony has introduced Venice, the company’s first full-frame digital motion picture camera system and the newest of its CineAlta camera lineup, which is designed to expand the filmmaker’s creative freedom through immersive, large-format, full-frame capture of filmic imagery that enables production of natural skin tones, elegant highlight handling and wide dynamic range.

Venice was officially unveiled on September 6 to American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) members and a range of other industry pros. Sony also screened the first footage shot with Venice, a short film, The Dig, that was produced in anamorphic, written and directed by Joseph Kosinski, and shot by Academy Award-winning cinematographer Claudio Miranda, ASC.

The new sensor.

“We really went back to the drawing board for this one,” says Peter Crithary, marketing manager, Sony Electronics. “It is our next-generation camera system, a ground-up development initiative encompassing a completely new image sensor. We carefully considered key aspects such as form factor, ergonomics, build quality, ease of use, a refined picture and painterly look — with a simple, established workflow. We worked in close collaboration with film industry professionals. We also considered the longer-term strategy by designing a user-interchangeable sensor that is as quick and simple to swap as removing four screws, and can accommodate different shooting scenarios as the need arises.”

Venice features a newly developed 36x24mm full-frame sensor to meet the demands of feature filmmaking. Full frame offers the advantages of compatibility with a wide range of lenses, including anamorphic, Super 35mm, spherical and full-frame PL mount lenses for a greater range of expressive freedom with shallow depth of field. The lens mount can also be changed to support E-mount lenses for shooting situations that require smaller, lighter and wider lenses. User-selectable areas of the image sensor allow shooting in Super 35mm 4-perf. Future firmware upgrades are planned to allow the camera to handle 36mm-wide 6K resolution. Fast image scan technology minimizes “Jello” effects.

A new color management system with an ultra-wide color gamut gives users more control and greater flexibility in working with images during grading and post production. Venice also has more than 15 stops of latitude to handle challenging lighting situations from low light to harsh sunlight with a gentle roll-off handling of highlights.

Venice uses Sony’s 16-bit RAW/X-OCN via the AXS-R7 recorder, and 10-bit XAVC workflows. The new camera is also compatible with current and upcoming CineAlta camera hardware accessories, including the DVF-EL200 full-HD OLED viewfinder, AXS-R7 recorder, AXS-CR1 and high-speed Thunderbolt-enabled AXS-AR1 card reader, using established AXS and SxS memory card formats.

Venice has a fully modular and intuitive design with functionality refined to support simple and efficient on-location operation. It is the film industry’s first camera with a built-in stage glass ND filter system, making the shooting process efficient and streamlining camera setup. The camera is designed for easy operation with an intuitive control panel placed on the assistant and operator sides of the camera. A 24-V power supply input/output and LEMO connector allow use of many standard camera accessories designed for use in harsh environments.

Users can customize Venice by enabling the features needed, matched to their individual production requirements. Optional licenses will be available in permanent, monthly and weekly durations to expand the camera’s capabilities, with new features including 4K anamorphic and full frame sold separately.

The Venice CineAlta digital motion picture camera system is scheduled to be available in February 2018.

Sight, Sound & Story takes on cinematography

By Daniel Rodriguez

Manhattan Edit Workshop’s recent Sight, Sound & Story: Art of Cinematography in New York City featured two one-hour panels: “Thinking In Pictures — Perspectives, Compositions, Lighting and Mood” and “Life Behind the Lens: DPs Talk Careers and Creativity in Film and Television.” The first focused on documentary work and the second on narrative-based storytelling. Both sparked questions and ideas in the head of this DP, including what roles and responsibilities cinematographers play in the storytelling process.

Docs
“Thinking In Pictures — Perspectives, Compositions, Lighting and Mood,” moderated by DP David Leitner, featured fellow cinematographers Wolfgang Held and Kirsten Johnson. Johnson’s documentary Cameraperson has made the Academy Awards Documentary shortlist.

The role of a cameraperson is essential to any film, narrative or documentary, but especially in the documentary world where much of the action is unplanned or out of one’s control. Johnson remarked how “we all live in a new way of filming and being filmed.” So, while much of their talk reflected on their own careers, they also looked toward the future. Her statement made me think about the current state of filming and seeing how stories are becoming much easier to tell thanks to technology that ranges from high-end digital cinema cameras to the ever-improving video quality of cellphones.

It brought to mind the saying, “the best camera is the one you have with you,” as some of the most stunning documentation of the human condition in the past decade have been on phones and lower-end cameras. Today’s ability to capture images is a far cry from a time when Super 8 and 16mm were the few feasible formats for documentary work — even then, the technology limited the possibilities due to technical skill or the unfortunate reality of a film magazine running out and the precious few minutes one might lose while reloading.

Working off older terms like “reloading,” all three on the stage expressed their distaste with the term “shooter.” They emphasized how they weren’t shooting any firearms and, if anything, the real shooters were the ones pointing guns at them — this had them reflecting on the death of Leonardo Henrichsen, a cameraperson who filmed his death while staring down a rifle’s barrel as a soldier fired at him during Salvador Allende’s rule in Chile.

Oftentimes camerapersons have to live in the moment, whether in narrative or documentary to judge the conditions they’re in and make decisions that’ll maximize their coverage and approach. To paraphrase Johnson, she made the brilliant observation that “directors work by anticipating what happens next, while a cameraperson nourishes in the present.” Regardless of filming background, whether documentary or narrative, this statement rings true because time is usually the most pressing factor in the field or on set.

While I do believe that a cameraperson must be somewhat aware of what they are striving to tell or cover, this feeling of nourishing in the present permits one to be flexible with how the given moment affects mood and emotion. I’m going to paraphrase once more — Cartel Land director Matthew Heineman has said, “If the documentary you were looking to shoot is the same one you get at the end then you weren’t paying attention.” The statement that Johnson made only enforces this idea because you must be able to fully immerse yourself in that moment in order to truly understand how to capture it.

Possibly the most simple and effective statement hat really summarized the role of a cameraperson was from moderator Leitner. He said, “Every shot matters.” While that is a very general statement, it does raise many questions regarding the cameraperson’s role in today’s world. Since we are now living in a predominantly digital age where truly cinematic images can be captured easily and on cheaper prosumer cameras, our artistic roles as cinematographers and camerapersons come down to the intuition we have as artists to make every shot matter.

With the advent of digital cinematography, excessive coverage and the ability to shoot longer has now become part of the norm; oftentimes this is a sacrifice of quality for the sake of having more to work with. Coming from analog film backgrounds, each person on the panel, specifically Leitner, emphasized how this finite length of film made the utmost care and attention go into every shot.

Wolfgang Held most effortlessly showed this approach as he screened bits from the latest film he worked on as cinematographer, Sophie and the Rising Sun was largely shot handheld, but unlike this feeling of over-coverage, each shot feels thought out and effective in adding to the story. The role of a cameraperson is an ever-changing one, especially in our current age, and as technology becomes more accessible to many the emphasis will always be on the artist and their approach.

Narrative
“Life Behind The Lens: DPs Talk Careers and Creativity in Films and Television” was moderated by cinematographer Marcin Kapron and featured Eric Lin, Eric Alan Edwards and Vanja Černjul, ASC. All four cinematographers come from a narrative-based background and they reflected on the moments that inspired their career choices and projects they’ve worked on.

I loved hearing how each panelist began in the industry. They all came from different walks of life and have built their careers in different fields, ranging from television to indie films to major blockbusters. As a young DP, it was very exciting to hear that they each shared a persistent and infinitely curious approach to creating images from early on, mostly originating through stills photography and related techniques.

Each pro screened clips from projects and discussed their approach on set and the technical challenges they each faced. The talk eventually looked toward the future and newer storytelling formats, such as high frame rate, HDR, and 4K projection. All agreed that there has yet to be a common standard set for newer methods of displaying these new formats. Despite this, each panelist agreed that there is definitely potential in these formats, especially in HDR which Vanja has direct experience with, shooting episodes of Marco Polo for Netflix, which requesedt an HDR version for delivery.

Speaking with Vanja directly after the event and having spoken with the colorist who collaborated with him on the SDR and HDR versions, Dado Valentic, the biggest challenge with HDR is having ways of displaying and monitoring on set in a cost-effective way. Ultimately, each panelist agreed that these are simply tools to aid and provide new methods of storytelling and, as cinematographers, they’re excited for the future.

Summing Up
We currently live in an industry where the tools that were once exclusive to camerapersons and cinematographers are now affordable, compact and available to anyone. Listening to these panelists talk about their experiences and opinions on the future was exhilarating and encouraging. Regardless of whether you work on narrative or documentary fare, ultimately comes down to the role of the artist to bring their unique approach and creative work ethic to make every shot matter.


Daniel Rodriguez is cinematographer and photographer living in New York City. Check out his work here. Dan took many of the pictures featured in this article. He is credited with the photos in this piece.

Rotolight Anova Pro LEDs shipping with updated feature set

The Anova Pro, from British LED lighting company Rotolight, is now shipping with an enhanced feature set for use in studios and on location. Featuring five patented effects, the Anova Pro includes CineSFX, which provides customizable cinematic lighting, including common effects like fire, lightning, TV, film, neon and spark simulation, and more novel effects, such as police, paparazzi and gunshot visual effects. CineSFX can now be used with a wired remote trigger for wireless as well.

The light also includes FX Slave, enabling CineSFX effects to be slaved to up to 512 third-party light sources in realtime with zero latency; True Aperture Dimming, which calculates and displays F-stop for a subject at a given distance; Designer Fade, which provides custom fade up/down production effects; and High Speed Sync Flash, providing a powerful HSS flash with zero recycle time at 150 percent of the maximum continuous light output for traditional photographic workflows.

DP Roy H. Wagner, ASC, on set, with the Rotolight, and his dog!

Recently, DP Roy H. Wagner, ASC, (Ray Donovan, Elementary, House) met a long-term goal using a Rotolight system. “I’ve often spoken of simplicity of image creation and had wished to do a feature with just one light and one lens. Of course, this seldom happens, but I was given the encouragement to do just that on an independent feature, Trouble Sleeping. I chose the Rotolight system to pursue this goal for it had proven to me that it could accurately reproduce the color and power that I needed.

“It survived the rough handling of the everyday professional production crews who have very little time to ‘baby’ any equipment, and it was easily controllable from the back of the unit or from my iPhone,” he continues. “LED lighting is also very tough on actors’ eyes, but Rotolight has found a way of filtering that notch of blue wavelength that is harsh and difficult on the eyes. My crew was also pleased with how easily controlled and mounted the units are.”

Quick Chat with new ASC president Kees Van Oostrum

The Board of Governors of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has elected Kees Van Oostrum as its president. This is Oostrum’s first term, which will run for one year, beginning immediately. The ASC Board also selected its slate of officers, which includes Bill Bennett, Dean Cundey and Lowell Peterson as VPs; Levi Isaacs as treasurer; Fred Goodich as secretary; and Roberto Schaefer as sergeant-at-arms.

“It is our task as an organization to educate the industry on the value of the cinematographer as the author of the images, to be involved in advancing imaging technology, and most importantly, to promote our artistry,” said Amsterdam native Van Oostrum.

Van Oostrum previously served as VP and has fulfilled other ASC board roles over the years. He is also the chairman and originator of the ASC Master Class, which takes place five times a year. The Master Class is one of several educational initiatives of the ASC. Inaugurated in 2013, the five-day course is taught by award-winning cinematographers and is designed for cinematographers with an intermediate-to-advanced skill set. It incorporates practical, hands-on demonstrations of lighting and camera techniques with essential instruction in current workflow practices.

In addition to the Master Class, other efforts of the organization include its Student Heritage Awards, Breakfast Club seminars, panel discussions by the Education and Outreach committee, the Friends of the ASC membership, and the ongoing committee collaborations with other industry participants vital to the image-making process. Possibly the most notable is the ASC Technology Committee, which has proven unique in its ability to shape the standards and practices of cinematography for digital workflows

Van Oostrum has earned two Primetime Emmy nominations for his work on the telefilms Miss Rose White and Return to Lonesome Dove. His peers chose the latter for a 1994 ASC Outstanding Achievement Award. Additional ASC Award nominations for his television credits came for The Burden of Proof, Medusa’s Child and Spartacus. He also shot the Emmy-winning documentary The Last Chance. Currently, he serves as director of photography on The Fosters which airs on Freeform.

Van Oostrum studied at the Dutch Film Academy with an emphasis on both cinematography and directing, and went on to earn a scholarship sponsored by the Dutch government which enabled him to enroll in the American Film Institute (AFI). Van Oostrum broke into the industry shooting television documentaries for several years. He has subsequently compiled a wide range of some 80-plus credits, including movies for television and the cinema, such as Gettysburg and Gods and Generals, and occasional documentaries.

Shortly after this news, we reached out to Van Oostrum with a couple of questions:

As a cinematographer yourself, what does it mean to you to now be president of the organization?
As ASC president I need to listen to and guide the membership in making decisions on key issues that impact all cinematographers in our international industry. In researching and addressing those issues, I plan to lead the process in a civilized and transparent way. Hopefully, those efforts will result in a greater understanding of what cinematographers do, why our work is so important to every production, and how we can help all of our collaborators excel — ideally, while helping the entire industry move forward, both technically and artistically.

You are already a big believer in educational initiatives, such as the ASC Master Class. What’s next?
Education is the strength of our future, and it’s the foundation for keeping cinematography both relevant and progressive as a creative craft. I consider us first and foremost to be visual artists and managers of a team. We need to stay up to date on imaging technologies and techniques. No one knows everything, but the ASC is supportive in providing an endless stream of knowledge to our members, to peers and to students.

What do you hope to accomplish in this role over the next year?
I would like cinematographers to feel like “Rembrandt” again. Our profession, like others in the filmmaking industry, has been democratized by technology. Cinematographers do much more than just “seeing”— we tell stories and we can create memorable images that evoke emotion.

In the end, every artist is edited. Rembrandt’s “Nightwatch” had the sides chopped off because it did not fit between two doors, but when you enter the exhibition room to see it, you become momentarily breathless — the world around you disappears, and you leave the room a different person. That’s the “Rembrandt” business, and that’s what we do as cinematographers.

Quick Chat: DP Dejan Georgevich, ASC

By Randi Altman

Long-time cinematographer Dejan Georgevich, ASC, has been working in television, feature film production and commercials for over 35 years. In addition to being on set, Georgevich regularly shares his experience and wisdom as a professor of advanced cinematography at New York’s School of Visual Arts.

Georgevich’s TV credits include the series Mercy, Cupid, Hope & Faith, The Book of Daniel and The Education of Max Bickford. In the world of documentaries, he has worked on HBO’s Arthur Ashe: Citizen of the World, PBS’ A Wayfarer’s Journey: Listening to Mahler and The Perfumed Road.

One of his most recent projects was as DP on Once in a Lifetime, a 30-minute television pilot about two New Jersey rockers trying to make it in the music business. The show’s musical roots are real — Once in a Lifetime was written by Iron Maiden’s bass player and songwriter, Stephen Harris.

Georgevich, who was in Australia on a job, was kind enough to use some of his down time to answer our questions about shooting, lighting, inspiration and more. Enjoy…

How did you decide TV production and cinematography, in particular, would be your path?
Perhaps it all started when I hauled around a Bell & Howell projector half my size in elementary school, showing films to an assembly of kids transfixed to a giant screen. Working on the stage crew in middle school revealed to me that I was “a fish to water” when it came to lighting.

You work on a variety of projects. How does your process change, if at all, going from a TV spot to a TV series to a documentary, etc.?
Each genre informs the other and has made me a better storyteller. For example, my work in documentaries demands being sensitive to anticipating and capturing the moment. The same skills translate perfectly when shooting dramas, which require making the best choices that visually express the idea, mood and emotion of a scene.

How do you decide what is the right camera for each job? Or do you have a favorite that you use again and again?
I choose a camera that offers the widest dynamic range, renders lovely skin tones, a natural color palette, and is user-friendly and ergonomic in handling. My camera choice will also be influenced by whether the end result will be projected theatrically on a big or small screen.

Once in a Lifetime

You used the Panasonic Varicam 35 on the TV pilot Once in a Lifetime. Why was this the right camera for this project, and was most of the shooting outdoors?
Once in a Lifetime was an independently financed TV pilot, on a tight schedule and budget, requiring a considerable amount of shooting in low-light conditions. This production demanded speed and a limited lighting package because we were shooting on-location night interiors/exteriors, including nightclubs, rooftops, narrow tenement apartments and dimly-lit city streets. Panasonic Varicam 35’s dual ISO of 800 and 5000 provided unbelievable image capture in low-light conditions, rendering rich blacks with no noise!

What were some of the challenges of this project? Since it was a pilot, you were setting a tone for the entire series. How did you go about doing that?
The biggest challenge for me was to “re-educate my eye” working with the Panasonic Varicam 35, which sees more than what my eye sees, especially in darkness. To my eye, a scene would look considerably under-lit at times, but surpringly the picture on the monitor looked organic and well motivated. I was able to light predominately with LEDs and low-wattage lights augmenting the practicals or, in the case of the rooftop, the Manhattan night skyline. House power and/or portable put-put generators were all that was necessary to power the lights.

The pilot’s tone, or look, was achieved using the combination of wide-angle lenses and high-contrast lighting, not only with light and shadow but with evocative primary and secondary colors. This is a comedic story about two young rockers wanting to make it in the music business and their chance meeting with a rock ’n’ roll legend offering that real possibility of fulfilling their dreams.

How did you work with the DIT on this project, and on projects in general?
I always prefer and request a DIT on my projects. I see my role as the “guardian of the image,” and having a DIT helps preserve my original intent in creating the look of the show. In other words, with the help of my DIT, I like to control the look as much as possible in-camera during production. I was very fortunate to have Dave Satin as my DIT on the pilot — we have worked together for many years — and it’s very much like a visual  pitcher/catcher-type of creative relationship. What’s more, he’s my second set of eyes and technical insurance against any potential digital disaster.

Can you talk about lighting? If you could share one bit of wisdom about lighting, what would it be?
As with anything to do with the arts, I believe that lighting should be seamless. Don’t wear it on your sleeve. Keep it simple… less is best! Direction of light is important as it best describes a story’s soul and character.

What about working with colorists after the shoot. Do you do much of that?
As a DP, I believe it’s critically important that we are active participants in post color correction. I enjoy outstanding collaborations with some of the top colorists in the business. In order to preserve the original intent of our image we, as directors of photography, must be the guiding hand through all phases of the workflow. Today, with the advent of digital image capture, the cinematographer must battle against too many entities that threaten to change our images into something other than what was originally intended.

What inspires you? Fine art? Photography?
I make it a point to get my “creative fix” by visiting art museums as often as possible. I’m inspired by the works of the Grand Master painters and photographers — the works of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Caravaggio, Georges de la Tour, Edward Hooper, Henri Cartier Bresson, William Eggelston — too many to name!  Recreating the world through light and perspective is magical and a necessary reminder of what makes us alive!

What haven’t I asked that you feel is important to talk about?
We’re currently experiencing a digital revolution that is being matched by an emerging revolution in lighting (i.e. LED technology). The tools will always change, but it’s our craft reflecting the heart and mind that remains constant and so important.

‘Beasts of No Nation’, ‘Macbeth,’ ‘Son of Saul’ nominated for ASC Spotlight

The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has nominated three cinematographers for the 2016 Spotlight Award, which recognizes outstanding cinematography in feature-length projects that are screened at festivals, internationally or in limited theatrical release. The winner will be announced at the 30th ASC Awards on February 14.

The 2016 nominees are Adam Arkapaw for Macbeth, Mátyás Erdély, HSC, for Son of Saul and Cary Joji Fukunaga (our main image) for Beasts of No Nation.

Adam Arkapaw on Macbeth

“Our panel had a wealth of material to choose from and worked very hard to determine the best in visual artistry and craftsmanship in this category,” said ASC President Richard Crudo.

For the Spotlight Award, ASC members submit entries for consideration that go before a Blue Ribbon panel that choose the nominees. All active members may vote to select the winner.
“Each nominated film evokes intense emotions through its cinematography,” said Daryn Okada, chairman of the ASC Awards. “Their commitment to the visual narrative of their stories and characters are an integral part of the cinematic experience.”

Macbeth, directed by Justin Kurzel, premiered at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival. It’s been recognized by critics, festivals and industry organizations worldwide.

son of saul

Mátyás Erdély, HSC, was nominated for Son of Saul.

Son of Saul from director László Nemes won the Grand Prize of the Jury Award at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, and went on to win the Bronze Frog at Camerimage, the international film festival of cinematography. It also won a Golden Globe and has been recognized by several critics and organizations

Beasts of No Nation, also directed by Fukunaga, premiered at the 2015 Venice Film Festival. It was the first feature film produced by Netflix, which received a limited theatrical release in addition to streaming on Netflix simultaneously. Beasts of No Nation has received Golden Globe, BAFTA and Spirit Award nominations, among other accolades.

Last year, Peter Flickenberg won the Spotlight Award for director Pirjo Honkasalo’s Concrete Night (Betoniyö).

 

ASC TV nominees and their reactions

The American Society of Cinematographers has named its nominees for the 29th Annual Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography Awards. The winners will be given their statuettes on February 15, during a ceremony in Los Angeles.

“Our members had a very difficult time choosing these nominees from such an incredible field of submissions,” said ASC president Richard Crudo. “They have done superlative work in a very challenging medium, and we salute them.”

The nominees for Episode of a Regular Series are: P.J. Dillon for Vikings, “Blood Eagle” (History); Jonathan Freeman, ASC, for Boardwalk Empire, “Golden Days for Boys and Girls” (HBO); Anette Haellmigk for Game of Thrones, “The Children” (HBO); Christopher Norr for Gotham, “Spirit of the Goat” (Fox); Richard Rutkowski for Manhattan, “Perestroika” (WGN Continue reading

‘Gravity’ earns top film honor from American Society of Cinematographers

Hollywood— At this past weekend’s ASC Awards show, Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC; Jeremy Benning, CSC; Jonathan Freeman, ASC and Blake McClure earned top honors in the four competitive categories at the 28th Annual American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Awards for Outstanding Achievement.

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American Society of Cinematographers names television nominees

LOS ANGELES — The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) has selected its television nominees for the organization’s 28th Annual Outstanding Achievement Awards.

The winners will be announced at the ASC Awards Show (www.theasc.com) on February 1  in Hollywood.

The nominees in each of the three categories are:
One-Hour Episodic Television Series
• Steven Bernstein, ASC for Starz Network’s Magic City (“The Sins of the Father”)
• David Franco for HBO’s Boardwalk Empire (“Erlkönig”)
• Jonathan Freeman, ASC for HBO’s Game of Thrones (“Valar Dohaeris”)
• Pierre Gill, CSC for Showtime’s The Borgias (“The Purge”)
• David Greene, CSC for The CW’s Beauty and the Beast (“Tough Love”)
• Anette Haellmigk for HBO’s Game of Thrones (“Kissed by Fire”)
• Kramer Morgenthau, ASC for Fox’s Sleepy Hollow (“Pilot”)
• Ousama Rawi, BSC, CSC for NBC’s Dracula (“The Blood is the Life”)

dracula-Dracula_ST_1920x1080_rgb

Ousama Rawi was nominated for NBC’s Dracula.

Half-hour Episodic Series
• Peter Levy, ACS, ASC for Showtime’s House of Lies (“The Runner Stumbles”)
• Matthew J. Lloyd, CSC for Amazon’s Alpha House (“Pilot”)
• Blake McClure for Comedy Central’s Drunk History (“Detroit”)

Television Movie/Miniseries:
• Jeremy Benning, CSC for National Geographic Channel’s Killing Lincoln
• David Luther for Starz Network’s The White Queen (“War at First Hand”)
• Ashley Rowe, BSC for Starz Network’s Dancing on the Edge (Episode 1.1)
Franco has been previously nominated for Boardwalk Empire (2012), Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (2008), Intensity (1998), Falling for You (1996) and Million Dollar Babies (1995).

Freeman has collected three ASC Awards. His wins were for Boardwalk Empire (2012, 2011) and Homeland Security in (2005). He has also earned additional nominations for Taken (2003), Strange Justice (2000) and Prince Street (1998).

Gill and Morgenthau have each previously earned an ASC Outstanding Achievement Award.

Gill took home an Award for Hitler: The Rise of Evil (2004), and was nominated for Joan of Arc (2000).

Morgenthau earned his first ASC Award last year for Game of Thrones, and has nominations for Boardwalk Empire (2011), Life on Mars (2009) and The Five People You Meet in Heaven (2005).

This is Levy’s fourth nomination, having been nominated for House of Lies (2013), The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2005) and 24 (2002).

Rowe and Rawi have both previously been nominated for The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (2004) and The Tudors (2009), respectively.

Benning, Bernstein, Greene, Haellmigk, Lloyd, Luther and McClure are all first-time nominees.
HBO and Starz led the pack with three nominations each, followed by Showtime with two noms. Amazon, Comedy Central, The CW, Fox, NBC and National Geographic Channel are also represented.