Tag Archives: AR

Red’s Hydrogen One: new 3D-enabled smartphone

In their always subtle way, Red has stated that “the future of personal communication, information gathering, holographic multi-view, 2D, 3D, AR/VR/MR and image capture just changed forever” with the introduction of Hydrogen One, a pocket-sized, glasses-free “holographic media machine.”

Hydrogen One is a standalone, full-featured, unlocked multi-band smartphone, operating on Android OS, that promises “look around depth in the palm of your hand” without the need for separate glasses or headsets. The device features a 5.7-inch professional hydrogen holographic display that switches between traditional 2D content, holographic multi-view content, 3D content and interactive games, and it supports both landscape and portrait modes. Red has also embedded a proprietary H30 algorithm in the OS system that will convert stereo sound into multi-dimensional audio.

The Hydrogen system incorporates a high-speed data bus to enable a comprehensive and expandable modular component system, including future attachments for shooting high-quality motion, still and holographic images. It will also integrate into the professional Red camera program, working together with Scarlet, Epic and Weapon as a user interface and monitor.

Future-users are already talking about this “nifty smartphone with glasses-free 3D,” and one has gone so far as to describe the announcement as “the day 360-video became Betamax, and AR won the race.” Others are more tempered in their enthusiasm, viewing this as a really expensive smartphone with a holographic screen that may or might not kill 360 video. Time will tell.

Initially priced between $1,195 and $1,595, the Hydrogen One is targeted to ship in Q1 of 2018.

Lenovo’s ‘Transform’ event: IT subscriptions and AR

By Claudio Santos

Last week I had the opportunity to attend Lenovo’s “Transform” event, in which the company unveiled its newest releases as well as its plans for the near future. I must say they had quite the lineup ready.

The whole event was divided into two tracks “Datacenters” and “PC and Smart Devices.” Each focused on its own products and markets, but a single idea permeated all announcements in the day. It’s what Lenovo calls the “Fourth Revolution.” That’s what the company calls the next step in integration between devices and the cloud. Their vision is that soon 5G mobile Internet will be available, allowing for devices to seamlessly connect to the cloud on the go and more importantly, always stay connected.

While there were many interesting announcements throughout the day, I will focus on two that seem more closely relatable to most post facilities.

The first is what Lenovo is calling “PC as a service.” They want to sell the bulk of the IT hardware and support needs for companies as subscription-based deals, and that would be awesome! Why? Well, it’s simply a fact of life now that post production happens almost exclusively with the aid of computer software (sorry, if you’re still one of the few cutting film by hand, this article won’t be that interesting for you).

Having to choose, buy and maintain computers for our daily work takes a lot of research and, most notably, time. Between software updates, managing different licenses, subscriptions and hunting down weird quirks of the system, a lot of time is taken away from more important tasks such as editing or client relationship. When you throw a server and a local network in the mix it becomes a hefty job that takes a lot of maintenance.

That’s why bigger facilities employ IT specialists to deal with all that. But many post facilities aren’t big enough to employ a full-time IT person, nor are their needs complex enough to warrant the investment.

Lenovo sees this as an opportunity to simplify the role of the IT department by selling subscriptions that include the hardware, the software and all the necessary support (including a help desk) to keep the systems running without having to invest in a large IT department. More importantly, the subscription would be flexible. So, during periods in which you have need for more stations/support you can increase the scope of the subscription and then shrink it once again when the demands lower, freeing you from absorbing the cost of unused machines/software that would just sit around unused.

I see one big problem in this vision: Lenovo plans to start the service with a minimum of 1,000 seats for a deal. That is far, far more staff than most post facilities have, and at that point it would probably just be worth hiring a specialist that can also help you automate your workflow and develop customized tools for your projects. It is nonetheless an interesting approach, and I hope to see it trickle down to smaller clients as it solidifies as a feasible model.

AR
The other announcement that should interest post facilities is Lenovo’s interest in the AR market. As many of you might know, augmented reality is projected to be an even bigger market than it’s more popular cousin virtual reality, largely due to its more professional application possibilities.

Lenovo has been investing in AR and has partnered up with Metavision to experiment and start working towards real work-environment offerings of the technology. Besides the hand gestures that are always emphasized in AR promo videos, one very simple use-case seems to be in Lenovo’s sights, and that’s one I hope to see being marketable very soon: workspace expansion. Instead of needing three or four different monitors to accommodate our ever-growing number of windows and displays while working, with AR we will be able to place windows anywhere around us, essentially giving us a giant spherical display. A very simple problem with a very simple solution, but one that I believe would increase the productivity of editors by a considerable amount.

We should definitely keep an eye on Lenovo as they embark one this new quest for high-efficiency solutions for businesses, because that’s exactly what the post production industry finds itself in need of right now.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking hours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.

What was new at GTC 2017

By Mike McCarthy

I, once again, had the opportunity to attend Nvidia’s GPU Technology Conference (GTC) in San Jose last week. The event has become much more focused on AI supercomputing and deep learning as those industries mature, but there was also a concentration on VR for those of us from the visual world.

The big news was that Nvidia released the details of its next-generation GPU architecture, code named Volta. The flagship chip will be the Tesla V100 with 5,120 CUDA cores and 15 Teraflops of computing power. It is a huge 815mm chip, created with a 12nm manufacturing process for better energy efficiency. Most of its unique architectural improvements are focused on AI and deep learning with specialized execution units for Tensor calculations, which are foundational to those processes.

Tesla V100

Similar to last year’s GP100, the new Volta chip will initially be available in Nvidia’s SXM2 form factor for dedicated GPU servers like their DGX1, which uses the NVLink bus, now running at 300GB/s. The new GPUs will be a direct swap-in replacement for the current Pascal based GP100 chips. There will also be a 150W version of the chip on a PCIe card similar to their existing Tesla lineup, but only requiring a single half-length slot.

Assuming that Nvidia puts similar processing cores into their next generation of graphics cards, we should be looking at a 33% increase in maximum performance at the top end. The intermediate stages are more difficult to predict, since that depends on how they choose to tier their cards. But the increased efficiency should allow more significant increases in performance for laptops, within existing thermal limitations.

Nvidia is continuing its pursuit of GPU-enabled autonomous cars with its DrivePX2 and Xavier systems for vehicles. The newest version will have a 512 Core Volta GPU and a dedicated deep learning accelerator chip that they are going to open source for other devices. They are targeting larger vehicles now, specifically in the trucking industry this year, with an AI-enabled semi-truck in their booth.

They also had a tractor showing off Blue River’s AI-enabled spraying rig, targeting individual plants for fertilizer or herbicide. It seems like farm equipment would be an optimal place to implement autonomous driving, allowing perfectly straight rows and smooth grades, all in a flat controlled environment with few pedestrians or other dynamic obstructions to be concerned about (think Interstellar). But I didn’t see any reference to them looking in that direction, even with a giant tractor in their AI booth.

On the software and application front, software company SAP showed an interesting implementation of deep learning that analyzes broadcast footage and other content looking to identify logos and branding, in order to provide quantifiable measurements of the effectiveness of various forms of brand advertising. I expect we will continue to see more machine learning implementations of video analysis, for things like automated captioning and descriptive video tracks, as AI becomes more mature.

Nvidia also released an “AI-enabled” version of I-Ray to use image prediction to increase the speed of interactive ray tracing renders. I am hopeful that similar technology could be used to effectively increase the resolution of video footage as well. Basically, a computer sees a low-res image of a car and says, “I know what that car should look like,” and fills in the rest of the visual data. The possibilities are pretty incredible, especially in regard to VFX.

Iray AI

On the VR front, Nvidia announced a new SDK that allows live GPU-accelerated image stitching for stereoscopic VR processing and streaming. It scales from HD to 5K output, splitting the workload across one to four GPUs. The stereoscopic version is doing much more than basic stitching, processing for depth information and using that to filter the output to remove visual anomalies and improve the perception of depth. The output was much cleaner than any other live solution I have seen.

I also got to try my first VR experience recorded with a Light Field camera. This not only gives the user a 360 stereo look around capability, but also the ability to move their head around to shift their perspective within a limited range (based on the size the recording array). The project they were using to demo the technology didn’t highlight the amazing results until the very end of the piece, but when it did that was the most impressive VR implementation I have had the opportunity to experience yet.
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Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been working on new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

SMPTE’s ETCA conference takes on OTT, cloud, AR/VR, more

SMPTE has shared program details for its Entertainment Technology in the Connected Age (ETCA) conference, taking place in Mountain View, California, May 8-9 at the Microsoft Silicon Valley Campus.

Called “Redefining the Entertainment Experience,” this year’s conference will explore emerging technologies’ impact on current and future delivery of compelling connected entertainment experiences.

Bob DeHaven, GM of worldwide communications & media at Microsoft Azure, will present the first conference keynote, titled “At the Edge: The Future of Entertainment Carriage.” The growth of on-demand programming and mobile applications, the proliferation of the cloud and the advent of the “Internet of things” demands that video content is available closer to the end user to improve both availability and the quality of the experience.

DeHaven will discuss the relationships taking shape to embrace these new requirements and will explore the roles network providers, content delivery networks (CDNs), network optimization technologies and cloud platforms will play in achieving the industry’s evolving needs.

Hanno Basse, chief technical officer at Twentieth Century Fox Film, will present “Next-Generation Entertainment: A View From the Fox.” Fox distributes content via multiple outlets ranging — from cinema to Blu-ray, over-the-top (OTT), and even VR. Basse will share his views on the technical challenges of enabling next-generation entertainment in a connected age and how Fox plans to address them.

The first conference session, “Rethinking Content Creation and Monetization in a Connected Age,” will focus on multiplatform production and monetization using the latest creation, analytics and search technologies. The session “Is There a JND in It for Me?” will take a second angle, exploring what new content creation, delivery and display technology innovations will mean for the viewer. Panelists will discuss the parameters required to achieve original artistic intent while maintaining a just noticeable difference (JND) quality level for the consumer viewing experience.

“Video Compression: What’s Beyond HEVC?” will explore emerging techniques and innovations, outlining evolving video coding techniques and their ability to handle new types of source material, including HDR and wide color gamut content, as well as video for VR/AR.

Moving from content creation and compression into delivery, “Linear Playout: From Cable to the Cloud” will discuss the current distribution landscape, looking at the consumer apps, smart TV apps, and content aggregators/curators that are enabling cord-cutters to watch linear television, as well as the new business models and opportunities shaping services and the consumer experience. The session will explore tools for digital ad insertion, audience measurement and monetization while considering the future of cloud workflows.

“Would the Internet Crash If Everyone Watched the Super Bowl Online?” will shift the discussion to live streaming, examining the technologies that enable today’s services as well as how technologies such as transparent caching, multicast streaming, peer-assisted delivery and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) streaming might enable live streaming at a traditional broadcast scale and beyond.

“Adaptive Streaming Technology: Entertainment Plumbing for the Web” will focus specifically on innovative technologies and standards that will enable the industry to overcome inconsistencies of the bitrate quality of the Internet.

“IP and Thee: What’s New in 2017?” will delve into the upgrade to Internet Protocol infrastructure and the impact of next-generation systems such as the ATSC 3.0 digital television broadcast system, the Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) suite of internationally accepted open standards for digital television, and fifth-generation mobile networks (5G wireless) on Internet-delivered entertainment services.

Moving into the cloud, “Weather Forecast: Clouds and Partly Scattered Fog in Your Future” examines how local networking topologies, dubbed “the fog,” are complementing the cloud by enabling content delivery and streaming via less traditional — and often wireless — communication channels such as 5G.

“Giving Voice to Video Discovery” will highlight the ways in which voice is being added to pay television and OTT platforms to simplify searches.

In a session that explores new consumption models, “VR From Fiction to Fact” will examine current experimentation with VR technology, emerging use cases across mobile devices and high-end headsets, and strategies for addressing the technical demands of this immersive format.

You can resister for the conference here.

HPA Tech Retreat takes on VR/AR at Tech Retreat Extra

The long-standing HPA Tech Retreat is always a popular destination for tech-focused post pros, and while they have touched on virtual reality and augmented reality in the past, this year they are dedicating an entire day to the topic — February 20, the day before the official Retreat begins. TR-X (Tech Retreat Extra) will feature VR experts and storytellers sharing their knowledge and experiences. The traditional HPA Tech Retreat runs from February 21-24 in Indian Wells, California.

TR-X VR/AR is co-chaired by Lucas Wilson (Founder/Executive Producer at SuperSphereVR) and Marcie Jastrow (Senior VP, Immersive Media & Head of Technicolor Experience Center), who will lead a discussion focused on the changing VR/AR landscape in the context of rapidly growing integration into entertainment and applications.

Marcie Jastrow

Experts and creative panelists will tackle questions such as: What do you need to understand to enable VR in your environment? How do you adapt? What are the workflows? Storytellers, technologists and industry leaders will provide an overview of the technology and discuss how to harness emerging technologies in the service of the artistic vision. A series of diverse case studies and creative explorations — from NASA to the NFL — will examine how to engage the audience.

The TR-X program, along with the complete HPA Tech Retreat program, is available here. Additional sessions and speakers will be announced.

TR-X VR/AR Speakers and Panel Overview
Monday, February 20

Opening and Introductions
Seth Hallen, HPA President

Technical Introduction: 360/VR/AR/MR
Lucas Wilson

Panel Discussion: The VR/AR Market
Marcie Jastrow
David Moretti, Director of Corporate Development, Jaunt
Catherine Day, Head of VR/AR, Missing Pieces
Phil Lelyveld, VR/AR Initiative Program Lead, Entertainment Technology Center at USC

Acquisition Technology
Koji Gardiner, VP, Hardware, Jaunt

Live 360 Production Case Study
Andrew McGovern, VP of VR/AR Productions, Digital Domain

Live 360 Production Case Study
Michael Mansouri, Founder, Radiant Images

Interactive VR Production Case Study
Tim Dillon, Head of VR & Immersive Content, MPC Advertising USA

Immersive Audio Production Case Study
Kyle Schember, CEO, Subtractive

Panel Discussion: The Future
Alan Lasky, Director of Studio Product Development, 8i
Ben Grossmann, CEO, Magnopus
Scott Squires, CTO, Creative Director, Pixvana
Moderator: Lucas Wilson
Jen Dennis, EP of Branded Content, RSA

Panel Discussion: New Voices: Young Professionals in VR
Anne Jimkes, Sound Designer and Composer, Ecco VR
Jyotsna Kadimi, USC Graduate
Sho Schrock, Chapman University Student
Brian Handy, USC Student

TR-X also includes an ATSC 3.0 seminar, focusing on the next-generation television broadcast standard, which is nearing completion and offers a wide range of new content delivery options to the TV production community. This session will explore the expanding possibilities that the new standard provides in video, audio, interactivity and more. Presenters and panelists will also discuss the complex next-gen television distribution ecosystem that content must traverse, and the technologies that will bring the content to life in consumers’ homes.

Early registration is highly recommended for TR-X and the HPA Tech Retreat, which is a perennially sold-out event. Attendees can sign up for TR-X VR/AR, TR-X ATSC or the HPA Tech Retreat.

Main Image: Lucas Wilson.

Missing Pieces hires head of VR/AR/360, adds VR director

Production company Missing Pieces has been investing in VR recently by way of additional talent. Catherine Day has joined the studio as head of VR/AR/360. She was most recently at Jaunt VR where she was executive producer/head of unscripted. VR director Sam Smith has also joined the company as part of its VR directing team.

This bi-coastal studio has a nice body of VR under its belt. They are responsible for Dos Equis’ VR Masquerade and for bringing a president into VR with Bill Clinton’s Inside Impact series. They also created Follow My Lead: The Story of the NBA 2016 Finals, a VR sports documentary for the NBA and Oculus.

In her new role, Day (pictured) will drive VR/AR/360 efforts from the studio’s Los Angeles office and oversee several original VR series that will be announced jointly with WME and partners in the coming months. In her previous role at Jaunt VR, Day led projects for ABC News, RYOT/Huffington Post, Camp 4 Collective, XRez, Tastemade, Outside TV, Civic Nation and Conservation International.

VR director Smith is a CD and VR director who previously worked with MediaMonks on projects for Expedia, Delta, Converse and YT. Smith also has an extensive background in commercial visual effects. His has a deep understanding of post and VFX, which is helpful when developing VR/360 projects. He will also act as technical advisor.

Margarita Mix’s Pat Stoltz gives us the low-down on VR audio

By Randi Altman

Margarita Mix, one of Los Angeles’ long-standing audio and video post facilities, has taken on virtual reality with the addition of 360-degree sound rooms at their facilities in Santa Monica and Hollywood. This Fotokem company now offers sound design, mix and final print masters for VR video and remixing current spots for a full-surround environment.

Workflows for VR are new and developing every day — there is no real standard. So creatives are figuring it out as they go, but they can also learn from those who were early to the party, like Margarita Mix. They recently worked on a full-length VR concert film with the band Eagles of Death Metal and director/producer Art Haynie of Big Monkey Films. The band’s 2015 tour came to an abrupt end after playing the Bataclan concert hall during last year’s terrorist attacks in Paris. The film is expected to be available online and via apps shortly.

Eagles of Death Metal film.

We reached out to Margarita Mix’s senior technical engineer, Pat Stoltz, to talk about his experience and see how the studio is tackling this growing segment of the industry.

Why was now the right time to open VR-dedicated suites?
VR/AR is an exciting emerging market and online streaming is a perfect delivery format, but VR pre-production, production and post is in its infancy. We are bringing sound design, editorial and mixing expertise to the next level based on our long history of industry-recognized work, and elevating audio for VR from a gaming platform to one suitable for the cinematic and advertising realms where VR content production is exploding.

What is the biggest difference between traditional audio post and audio post for VR?
Traditional cinematic audio has always played a very important part in support of the visuals. Sound effects, Foley, background ambiance, dialog and music clarity to set the mood have aided in pulling the viewer into the story. With VR and AR you are not just pulled into the story, you are in the story! Having the ability to accurately recreate the audio of the filmed environment through higher order ambisonics, or object-based mixing, is crucial. Audio does not only play an important part in support of the visuals, but is now a director’s tool to help draw the viewer’s gaze to what he or she wants the audience to experience. Audio for VR is a critical component of storytelling that needs to be considered early in the production process.

What is the question you asked the most from clients in terms of sound for VR?
Surprisingly none! VR/AR is so new that directors and producers are just figuring things out as they go. On a traditional production set, you have audio mixers and boom operators capturing audio on set. On a VR/AR set, there is no hiding. No boom operators or audio mixers can be visible capturing high-quality audio of the performance.

Some productions have relied on the onboard camera microphones. Unfortunately, in most cases, this turns out to be completely unusable. When the client gets all the way to the audio post, there is a realization that hidden wireless mics on all the actors would have yielded a better result. In VR especially, we recommend starting the sound consultation in pre-production, so that we can offer advice and guide decisions for the best quality product.

What question should clients ask before embarking on VR?
They should ask what they want the viewer to get out of the experience. In VR, no two people are going to walk away with the same viewing experience. We recommend staying focused on the major points that they would like the viewer to walk away with. They should then expand that to answer: What do I have to do in VR to drive that point home, not only mentally, but drawing their gaze for visual support? Based on the genre of the project, considerations should be made to “physically” pull the audience in the direction to tell the story best. It could be through visual stepping stones, narration or audio pre-cues, etc.

What tools are you using on VR projects?
Because this is a nascent field, new tools are becoming available by the day, and we assess and use the best option for achieving the highest quality. To properly address this question, we ask: Where is your project going to be viewed? If the content is going to be distributed via a general Web streaming site, then it will need to be delivered in that audio file format.

There are numerous companies writing plug-ins that are quite good to deliver these formats. If you will be delivering to a Dolby VR (object-based preparatory format) supported site, such as Jaunt, then you will need to generate the proper audio file for that platform. Facebook (higher order ambisonics) requires even a different format. We are currently working in all these formats, as well as working closely with leaders in VR sound to create and test new workflows and guide developments in this new frontier.

What’s the one thing you think everyone should know about working and viewing VR?
As we go through life, we each have our own experiences or what we choose to experience. Our frame of reference directs our focus on things that are most interesting to us. Putting on VR goggles, the individual becomes the director. The wonderful thing about VR is now you can take that individual anywhere they want to go… both in this world and out of it. Directors and producers should think about how much can be packed into a story to draw people into the endless ways they perceive their world.

Ronen Tanchum brought on to run The Artery’s new AR/VR division

New York City’s The Artery has named Ronen Tanchum head of its newly launched virtual reality/augmented reality division. He will serve as creative director/technical director.

Tanchum has a rich VFX background, having produced complex effects set-ups and overseen digital tools development for feature films including Deadpool, Transformers, The Amazing Spiderman, Happy Feet 2, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Wolverine. He is also the creator of the original VR film When We Land: Young Yosef. His work on The Future of Music — a 360-degree virtual experience from director Greg Barth and Phenomena Labs, which immerses the viewer in a surrealist musical space — won the DA&D Silver Award in the “Best Branded Content” category in 2016.

“VR today stands at just the tip of the iceberg,” says Tanchum. “Before VR came along, we were just observers and controlled our worlds through a mouse and a keyboard. Through the VR medium, humans become active participants in the virtual world — we get to step into our own imaginations with a direct link to our brains for the first time, experiencing the first impressions of a virtual world. As creators, VR offers us a very powerful tool by which to present a unique new experience.”

Tanchum says the first thing he asks a potential new VR client is, ‘Why VR? What is the role of VR in your story? “Coming from our long experiences in the CG world by working on highly demanding creative visual projects, we at The Artery have evolved our collective knowledge and developed a strong pipeline into this new VR platform,” he explains, adding that The Artery’s new division is currently gearing up for a big VR project for a major brand. “We are using it to its fullest to tell stories. We inform our clients that VR shouldn’t be created just because it’s ‘cool.’ The new VR platform should be used to play an integral part of the storyline itself — a well crafted VR experience should embellish and complement the story.”

 

AES Conference focuses on immersive audio for VR/AR

By  Mel Lambert

The AES Convention, which was held at the Los Angeles Convention Center in early October, attracted a broad cross section of production and post professionals looking to discuss the latest technologies and creative offerings. The convention had approximately 13,000 registered attendees and more than 250 brands showing wares in the exhibits halls and demo rooms.

Convention Committee co-chairs Valerie Tyler and Michael MacDonald, along with their team, created the comprehensive schedule of workshops, panels and special events for this year’s show. “The Los Angeles Convention Center’s West Hall was a great new location for the AES show,” said MacDonald. “We also co-located the AVAR conference, and that brought 3D audio for gaming and virtual reality into the mainstream of the AES.”

“VR seems to be the next big thing,” added AES executive director Bob Moses, “[with] the top developers at our event, mapping out the future.”

The two-day, co-located Audio for Virtual and Augmented Reality Conference was expected to attract about 290 attendees, but with aggressive marketing and outreach to the VR and AR communities, pre-registration closed at just over 400.

Aimed squarely at the fast-growing field of virtual/augmented reality audio, this conference focused on the creative process, applications workflow and product development. “Film director George Lucas once stated that sound represents 50 percent of the motion picture experience,” said conference co-chair Andres Mayo. “This conference demonstrates that convincing VR and AR productions require audio that follows the motions of the subject and produces a realistic immersive experience.”

Spatial sound that follows head orientation for headsets powered either by dedicated DSP, game engines or smartphones opens up exciting opportunities for VR and AR producers. Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, PlayStation VR and other systems are attracting added consumer interest for the coming holiday season. Many immersive-audio innovators, including DST and Dolby, are offering variants of their cinema systems targeted at this booming consumer marketplace via binaural headphone playback.

Sennheiser’s remarkable new Ambeo VR microphone (pictured left) can be used to capture 3D sound and then post produced to prepare different spatial perspectives — a perfect adjunct for AR/VR offerings. At the high end, Nokia unveiled its Ozo VR camera, equipped with eight camera sensors and eight microphones, as an alternative to a DIY assembly of GoPro cameras, for example.

Two fascinating keynotes bookended the AVAR Conference. The opening keynote, presented by Philip Lelyveld, VR/AR initiative program manager at the USC Entertainment Technology Center, Los Angeles, and called “The Journey into Virtual and Augmented Reality,” defined how virtual, augmented and mixed reality will impact entertainment, learning and social interaction. “Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality have the potential of delivering interactive experiences that take us to places of emotional resonance, give us agency to form our own experiential memories, and become part of the everyday lives we will live in the future,” he explained.

“Just as TV programming progressed from live broadcasts of staged performances to today’s very complex language of multithread long-form content,” Lelyveld stressed, “so such media will progress from the current early days of projecting existing media language with a few tweaks to a headset experience into a new VR/AR/MR-specific language that both the creatives and the audience understand.”

Is his closing keynote, “Future Nostalgia, Here and Now: Let’s Look Back on Today from 20 Years Hence,” George Sanger, director of sonic arts at Magic Leap, attempted to predict where VR/AR/MR will be in two decades. “Two decades of progress can change how we live and think in ways that boggle the mind,” he acknowledged. “Twenty years ago, the PC had rudimentary sound cards, now the entire ‘multitrack recording studio’ lives on our computers. By 2036, we will be wearing lightweight portable devices all day. Our media experience will seamlessly merge the digital and physical worlds; how we listen to music will change dramatically. We live in the Revolution of Possibilities.”

According to conference co-chair Linda Gedemer, “It has been speculated by Wall Street [pundits] that VR/AR will be as game changing as the advent of the PC, so we’re in for an incredible journey!”

Mel Lambert, who also gets photo credit on pictures from the show, is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA

AR/VR audio conference taking place with AES show in fall


The AES is tackling the augmented reality and virtual reality creative process, applications workflow and product development for the first time with a dedicated conference that will take place on 9/30-10/1 during the 141st AES Convention at the LA Convention Center’s West Hall.

The two-day program of technical papers, workshops, tutorials and manufacturer’s expo will highlight the creative and technical challenges of providing immersive spatial audio to accompany virtual reality and augmented reality media.

The conference will attract content developers, researchers, manufacturers, consultants and students, in addition to audio engineers seeking to expand their knowledge about sound production for virtual and augmented reality. The companion expo will feature displays from leading-edge manufacturers and service providers looking to secure industry metrics for this emerging field.

“Film director George Lucas once stated that sound represents 50 percent of the motion picture experience,” shares conference co-chair Andres Mayo. “This conference will demonstrate that VR and AR productions, using a variety of playback devices, require audio that follows the motions of the subject, and produces a realistic immersive experience. Our program will spotlight the work of leading proponents in this exciting field of endeavor, and how realistic spatial audio can be produced from existing game console and DSP engines.”

Proposed topics include object-based audio mixing for VR/AR, immersive audio in VR/AR broadcast, live VR audio production, developing audio standards for VR/AR, cross platform audio considerations in VR and streaming immersive audio content.

Costs range from $195 for a one-day pass for AES members ($295 for a two-day pass) and $125 for accredited students, to $280/$435 for non-members; Early-bird discounts also are available.

Conference registrants can also attend the 141st AES Convention’s companion exhibition, select educational sessions and special events free of charge with an exhibits-plus badge.