Tag Archives: Apple

Review: Apple’s new MacBook Pro

By Brady Betzel

What do you need to know about the latest pro laptop from Apple? Well, the MacBook Pro is fast and light; the new Touch Bar is handy and sharp but not fully realized; the updated keys on the keyboard are surprisingly great; and working with ProRes QuickTime files in resolutions higher than 1920×1080 inside of FCP X, or any NLE for that matter, is blazing fast.

When I was tasked with reviewing the new MacBook Pro, I came into it with an open mind. After all, I did read a few other reviews that weren’t exactly glowing, but I love speed and innovation among professional workstation computers, so I was eager to test it myself.

I am pretty open-minded when it comes to operating systems and hardware. I love Apple products and I love Windows-based PCs. I think both have their place in our industry, and to be quite honest it’s really a bonus for me that I don’t rely heavily on one OS or get too tricked by the Command Key vs. Windows/Alt Key.

Let’s start with the call I had with the Apple folks as they gave me the lowdown on the new MacBook Pro. The Apple reps were nice, energetic, knowledgeable and extremely helpful. While I love Apple products, including this laptop, it’s not the be-all-end-all.

The Touch Bar is nice, but not a revolution. It feels like the first step in an evolution, a version 1 of an innovation that I am excited to see more of in later iterations. When I talked with the Apple folks they briefed me on what Tim Cook showed off in the reveal: emoji buttons, wide gamut display, new speakers and USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 connectivity.

NLEs
They had an FCPX expert on the call, which was nice considering I planned on reviewing the MacBook Pro with a focus on the use of nonlinear editing apps, such as Adobe Premiere Pro, Avid Media Composer and Blackmagic’s Resolve. Don’t get me wrong, FCPX is growing on me — it’s snappy jumping around the timeline with ProRes 5K footage; assigning roles are something I wish every other app would pick up on; and the timeline is more of a breeze to use with the latest update.

The other side to this is that in my 13 years of working in television post I have never worked on a show that primarily used FCP or FCPX to edit or finish on. This doesn’t mean I don’t like the NLE, it simply means I haven’t relied on it in a professional working environment. Like I said, I really like the road it’s heading down, and if they work their way into mainstream broadcast or streaming platforms a little more I am sure I will see it more frequently.

Furthermore, with the ever-growing reduction in reliance on groups of editors and finishing artists apps like FCPX are poised to shine with their innovation. After all that blabbering, in this review I will touch on FCPX, but I really wanted to see how the MacBook Pro performed with the pro NLEs I encounter the most.

Specs
Let’s jump into the specs. I was sent a top-of-the-line 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, which costs $3,499 if configured online. It comes with a quad/-core Intel Core i7 2.9GHz (up to 3.8 GHz using Turbo Boost) processor, 16GB of 2133MHz memory, 1TB PCI-e SSD hard drive and Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB of memory. It’s loaded. I think the only thing that can actually be upgraded beyond this configuration would be to include a 2TB hard drive, which would add another $800 to the price tag.

Physically, the MacBook Pro is awesome — very sturdy, very thin and very light. It feels great when holding it and carrying it around. Apple even sent along a Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 adapter, which costs an extra $29 and a USB-C to Lightning Cable that costs an extra $29.

So yes, it feels great. Apple has made a great new MacBook Pro. Is it worth upgrading if you have a new-ish MacBook Pro at home already? Probably not, unless the Touch Bar really gets you going. The speed is not too far off from the previous version. However, if you have a lot of Thunderbolt 3/USB-C-connected peripherals, or plan on moving to them, then it is a good upgrade.

Testing
I ran some processor/graphics card intensive tests while I had the new MacBook Pro and came to the conclusion that FCPX is not that much faster than Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 when working with non-ProRes-based media. Yes, FCPX tears through ProRes QuickTimes if you already have your media in that format. What about if you shoot on a camera like the Red and don’t want to transcode to a more edit-friendly codec? Well, that is another story. To test out my NLEs, I grabbed a sample Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps clip from the Red sample footage page, strung out a 10-minute-long sequence in all the NLEs and exported both a color-graded version and a non-color-graded version as ProRes HQ QuickTimes files matching the source file’s specs.

In order to work with Red media in some of the NLEs, you must download a few patches: for FCPX you must install the Red Apple workflow installer and for Media Composer you must install the Red AMA plug-in. Premiere doesn’t need anything extra.

Test 1: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute sequence (no color grade or FX) exported as ProRes HQ matching the source file’s specs. Premiere > Media Encoder = 1 hour, 55 minutes. FCPX = 1 hour, 57 minutes. Media Composer = two hours, 42 minutes (Good news, Media Composer’s interface and fonts display correctly on the new display).

You’ll notice that Resolve is missing from this list and that is because I installed Resolve 12.5.4 Studio but then realized my USB dongle won’t fit into the USB-C port — and I am not buying an adapter for a laptop I do not get to keep. So, unfortunately, I didn’t test a true 6K ProRes HQ export from Resolve but in the last test you will see some Resolve results.

Overall, there was not much difference in speeds. In fact, I felt that Premiere Pro CC 2017 played the Red file a little smoother and at a higher frames-per-second count. FCPX struggled a little. Granted a 6K Red file is one of the harder files for a CPU to process with no debayer settings enabled, but Apple touts this as a MacPro semi-replacement for the time being and I am holding them to their word.

Test 2: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute color-graded sequence exported as ProRes HQ matching the source files specs. Premiere > Media Encoder = one hour, 55 minutes. FCPX = one hour, 58 minutes. Media Composer = two hours, 34 minutes.

It’s important to note that the GPU definitely helped out in both Adobe Premiere and FCPX. Little to no extra time was added on the ProRes HQ export. I was really excited to see this as sometimes without a good GPU — resizing, GPU-accelerated effects like color correction and other effects will slow your system to a snail’s pace if it doesn’t fully crash. Media Composer surprisingly speed up its export when I added the color grade as a new color layer in the timeline. By adding the color correction layer to another layer Avid might have forced the Radeon to kick in and help push the file out. Not really sure what that is about to be honest.

Test 3: Red 6K 6144×3160 23.98fps R3D — 10-minute color-graded sequence resized to 1920×1080 on export as ProRes HQ. Premiere > Media Encoder = one hour, 16 minutes. FCPX = one hour, 14 minutes. Media Composer = one hour, 48 minutes. Resolve = one hour, 16 minutes

So after these tests, it seems that exporting and transcoding are all about the same. It doesn’t really come as too big of a surprise that all the NLEs, except for Media Composer, processed the Red file in the same amount of time. Regardless of the NLE, you would need to knock the debayering down to a half or more to start playing these clips at realtime in a timeline. If you have the time to transcode to ProRes you will get much better playback and rendering speed results. Obviously, transcoding all of your files to a codec, like ProRes or Avid DNX, takes way more time up front but could be worth it if you crunched for time on the back end.

In addition to Red 6K files, I also tested ProRes HQ 4K files inside of Premiere and FCPX, and both played them extremely smoothly without hiccups, which is pretty amazing. Just a few years ago I was having trouble playing down 10:1 compressed files in Media Composer and now I can playback superb-quality 4K files without a problem, a tremendous tip of the hat to technology and, specifically, Apple for putting so much power in a thin and light package.

While I was in the mood to test speeds, I hooked up a Thunderbolt 2 SSD RAID (OWC Thunderbay 4 mini) configured in RAID-0 to see what kind of read/write bandwidth I would get running through the Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter. I used both AJA System Test as well as the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test. The AJA test reported a write speed of 929MB/sec. and read speed of 1120MB/sec. The Blackmagic test reported a write speed of 683.1MB/sec. and 704.7MB/sec. from different tests and a read speed of 1023.3MB/sec. I set the test file for both at 4GB. These speeds are faster than what I have previously found when testing this same Thunderbolt 2 SSD RAID on other systems.

For comparison, the AJA test reported a write speed of 1921MB/sec. and read speed of 2134MB/sec. when running on the system drive. The Blackmagic test doesn’t allow for testing on the system drive.

What Else You Need to Know
So what about the other upgrades and improvements? When exporting these R3D files I noticed the fan kicked on when resizing or adding color grading to the files. Seems like the GPU kicked on and heated up which is to be expected. The fan is not the loudest, but it is noticeable.

The battery life on the new MacBook Pro is great when just playing music, surfing the web or writing product reviews. I found that the battery lasted about two days without having to plug in the power adapter. However, when exporting QuickTimes from either Premiere or FCPX the battery life dropped — a lot. I was getting a battery life of one hour and six minutes, which is not good when your export will take two hours. Obviously, you need to plug in when doing heavy work; you don’t really have an option.

This leads me to the new USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports — and, yes, you still have a headphone jack (thank goodness they didn’t talk with the iPhone developers). First off, I thought the MagSafe power adapter should have won a Nobel Peace Prize. I love it. It must be responsible for saving millions of dollars in equipment when people trip over a power cord — gracefully disconnecting without breaking or pulling your laptop off the table. However, I am disappointed Apple didn’t create a new type of MagSafe cable with the USB-C port. I will miss it a lot. The good news is you can now plug in your power adapter to either side of the MacBook Pro.

Adapters and dongles will have to be purchased if you pick up a new MacBook Pro. Each time I used an external peripheral or memory card like an SD card, Tangent Ripple Color Correction panel or external hard drive, I was disappointed that I couldn’t plug them in. Nonetheless, a good Thunderbolt 3 dock is a necessity in my opinion. You could survive with dongles but my OCD starts flaring up when I have to dig around my backpack for adapters. I’m just not a fan. I love how Apple dedicated themselves to a fast I/O like USB-C/Thunderbolt 3, but I really wish they gave it another year. Just one old-school USB port would have been nice. I might have even gotten over no SD card reader.

The Touch Bar
I like it. I would even say that I love it — in the apps that are compatible. Right now there aren’t many. Adobe released an update to Adobe Photoshop that added compatibility with the Touch Bar, and it is really handy especially when you don’t have your Wacom tablet available (or a USB dongle to attach it). I love how it gives access to so many levels of functionality to your tools within your immediate reach.

It has super-fast feedback. When I adjusted the contrast on the Touch Bar I found that the MacBook Pro was responding immediately. This becomes even more evident in FCPX and the latest Resolve 12.5.4 update. It’s clear Apple did their homework and made their apps like Mail and Messages work with the Touch Bar (hence emojis on the Touch Bar). FCPX has a sweet ability to scrub the timeline, zoom in to the timeline, adjust text and more from just the Touch Bar — it’s very handy, and after a while I began missing it when using other computers.
In Blackmagic’s latest DaVinci Resolve release, 12.5.4, they have added Touch Bar compatibility. If you can’t plug in your color correction panels, the Touch Bar does a nice job of easing the pain. You can do anything from contrast work to saturation, even adjust the midtones and printer lights, all from the Touch Bar. If you use external input devices a lot, like Wacom tablets or color correction panels, the Touch Bar will be right up your alley.

One thing I found missing was a simple application launcher on the Touch Bar. If you do pick up the new MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, you might want to download Touch Switcher, a free app I found via 9to5mac.com that allows you to have an app launcher on your Touch Bar. You can hide the dock, allowing you more screen real estate and the efficient use of the Touch Bar to launch apps. I am kind of surprised Apple didn’t make something like this standard.

The Display
From a purely superficial and non-scientific point of view, the newly updated P3-compatible wide-gamut display looks great… really great, actually. The colors are rich and vibrant. I did a little digging under the hood and noticed that it is an 8-bit display (data that you can find by locating the pixel depth in the System Information > Graphics/Display), which might limit the color gradations when working in a color space like P3 as opposed to a 10-bit display displaying in a P3 color space. Simply, you have a wider array of colors in P3 but a small amount of color shades to fill it up.

The MacBook Pro display is labeled as 32-bit color meaning the RGB and Alpha channels each have 8 bits, giving a total of 32 bits. Eight-bit color gives 256 shades per color channel while 10-bit gives 1,024 shades per channel, allowing for much smoother transitions between colors and luminance values (imagine a sky at dusk going smoothly from an orange to light blue to dark blue — the more colors per channel allows for a smoother gradient between lights and darks). A 10-bit display would have 30-bit color with each channel having 10 bits.

I tried to hook up a 10-bit display, but the supplied Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 dongle Apple sent me did not work with the mini display port. I did a little digging and it seems people are generally not happy that Apple doesn’t allow this to work, especially since Thunderbolt 2 and mini DisplayPort are the same connection. Some people have been able to get around this by hooking up their display through daisy chaining something like a Thunderbolt 2 RAID.

While I couldn’t directly test an external display when I had the MacBook Pro, I’ve read that people have been able to push 10-bit color out of the USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports to an external monitor. So as long as you are at a desk with a monitor you can most likely have 10-bit color output from this system.

I reached out to Apple on the types of adapters they recommend for an external display and they suggest a USB-C to DisplayPort adapter made by Aukey. It retails for $9.99. They also recommend the USB-C to DisplayPort cable from StarTech, which retails for $39.99. Make sure you read the reviews on Amazon because the experience people have with this varies wildly. I was not able to test either of these so I cannot give my personal opinion.

Summing Up
In the end, the new MacBook Pro is awesome. If you own a recent release of the MacBook Pro and don’t have $3,500 to spare, I don’t know if this is the update you will be looking for. If you are trying to find your way around going to a Windows-based PC because of the lack of Mac Pro updates, this may ease the pain slightly. Without more than 16GB of memory and an Intel Xeon or two, however, it might actually slow you down.

The battery life is great when doing light work, one of the longest batteries I’ve used on a laptop. But when doing the heavy work, you need to be near an outlet. When plugged into that outlet be careful no one yanks out your USB-C power adapter as it might throw your MacBook Pro to the ground or break off inside.

I really do love Apple products. They typically just work. I didn’t even touch on the new Touch ID Sensor that can immediately switch you to a different profile or log you in after waking up the MacBook Pro from sleep. I love that you can turn the new MacBook Pro on and it simply works, and works fast.

The latest iteration of FCPX is awesome as well, and just because I don’t see it being used a lot professionally doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be. It’s a well-built NLE that should be given a fairer shake than it has been given. If you are itching for an update to an old MacBook Pro, don’t mind having a dock or carrying around a bunch of dongles, then the 2016 MacBook Pro with the Touch Bar is for you.

The new MacBook Pro chews through ProRes-based media from 1920×1080 to 4K, 6K and higher will play but might slow down. If you are a Red footage user this new MacBook Pro works great, but you still might have to knock the debayering down a couple notches.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

FCPX Creative Summit keynotes announced

Later this month, in Cupertino, California, Apple Final Cut Pro X editors and potential users will be attending the second annual FCPX Creative Summit. The three-day event will take place October 27-30.

The keynote line-up consists of two panels: the first features directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa, along with editor Jan Kovac. The trio worked together on two of the first feature films edited in Final Cut Pro X — Focus and Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.

The second panel includes two-time Emmy-winner Chuck Braverman, Supersphere VR executive producer Lucas Wilson and creative director Duncan Shepherd.

Organized by Future Media Concepts (FMC), in collaboration with Apple, this year’s event will take place next door to the Apple Campus. In addition to the keynote presentations, there will be 30-plus sessions focused on editorial, motion graphics, workflow and case studies.

postPespective readers can save $125 off of registration with code: POST16.

Commercial and film director Jessica Sanders joins Sanctuary

Sanctuary in Culver City has added director Jessica Sanders to its roster. Sanders, who has a background in documentaries and character-driven storytelling, got her big break in advertising with a Sony “make.believe” short film, for which she won a Cannes Young Director Award. The film also got the attention of Steve Jobs, who personally handpicked her to direct the launch ad for the Apple iPad.

During her career, the filmmaker has earned an Oscar nomination for Sing, a short doc on aspiring young vocalists. She also got a Sundance Special Jury Prize for After Innocence, her documentary about wrongfully convicted men cleared by DNA that serves as the basis for her upcoming feature film, Picking Cotton.

Sanders, whose resume also includes campaigns for Amazon, Samsung, Procter & Gamble, Honda and Toyota, is currently working on a three-film campaign for Land Rover out of agency Spark44’s London office. She will be also be directing a short film for Refinery29’s SmashBox Anthology Series, produced by Sanctuary and Sanders.

Main Photo: Elisabeth Caren

Automatic Duck ships app that brings FCP X clips into Motion

During NAB 2016, we spoke to Automatic Duck co-founder Wes Plate about the upcoming release of Xsend Motion, which converts XML from Final Cut Pro X to a Motion 5 project, building a bridge between the two applications. The software, which costs $99, is now shipping, but if you buy it before June 8, it’s on sale for $79.

“We have been working on Xsend Motion for a long time, and while it was great to announce at NAB that it was coming, we’re thrilled to finally have it available,” says Plate. “The day after it shipped a customer wrote to me that Xsend Motion ‘really saved our bacon.’ Xsend Motion is already finding its audience.”

Xsend Motion, which reads XML exports, or is able to process projects directly from the Final Cut Pro X Share menu, is also able to translate clip transforms, speed changes, and many third party filters. It can be purchased through FxFactory.

Check out our interview with Wes about Xsend Motion during NAB.

Apple upgrades Final Cut Pro X, Motion and Compressor

Apple has just announced Motion version 5.2, Final Cut Pro X version 10.2 and Compressor version 4.2. 

Both Motion and Final Cut Pro X now include 3D title capabilities. Users can create animated, customizable 3D text via cinematic templates with built-in backgrounds and animations. There is a large collection of text styles, and it’s possible to customize titles with hundreds of combinations of materials, lighting and edges for advanced 3D looks. Both Motion 5.2 and Final Cut Pro X 10.2 have additional controls to adjust environment, shadows and more, and both instantly convert 2D titles to 3D.

Among Motion 5.2’s many other new 3D title capabilities are flexible surface shading with options for texture maps, diffuse and specular reflection and bump mapping; real-world attributes such as paints, finishes and distress; and more than 90 built-in materials including metals, woods and plastics. Users can combine layers of materials to create unique looks, customize any material and save it as a new preset, and save any 3D title and access it instantly in Final Cut Pro X. (Similarly, Final Cut Pro X version 10.2 users can open any 3D title in Motion to add multiple lights, cameras and tracking.)

Motion version 5.2 supports Panasonic AVC-Ultra, Sony XAVC S and JVC H.264 Long GOP camera formats, and has 12 new generators, including Manga Lines, Sunburst and Spiral Graphics. Apple has made many other enhancements to improve performance and increase control, and to address issues with the prior version. For example, choosing a smooth option on an already smooth point no longer changes the curve, and double-clicking to add a new keyframe in the curve editor no longer changes interpolation of subsequent keyframes.

Motion-Materials_Display27-PF-PRINTBesides its new 3D title capabilities, Final Cut Pro X version 10.2 is capable of many new advanced effects, such as the ability to display up to four video scopes simultaneously; to apply super ellipse shape mask to any clip; and to apply draw mask to any clip, with options for linear, Bézier or B-spline smoothing. There are new shape and color mask controls for every effect, and Version 10.2 instantly displays the alpha channel for any effect mask. Apple has merged the color board into a new “color correction” effect, and it is possible to rearrange the processing order of the color correction effect. Users can save custom effects as presets for quick access.

Final Cut Pro X version 10.2 supports Panasonic AVC-Ultra, Sony XAVC S, and JVC H.264 Long GOP camera formats, with the ability to import Sony XAVC and XDCAM formats without a separate plug-in. Version 10.2 also has GPU-accelerated RED RAW processing with support for dual GPUs and for RED RAW anamorphic formats.

Additional features include “smart collections” at the event and library level, an import window that consolidates all options into a single sidebar, and GPU rendering when using “send to Compressor” (with support for dual GPUs). Final Cut Pro version 10.2 also improves upon the prior version with faster drawing of audio waveforms, which betters performance especially when editing over a network. Among a long list of other improvements: transform controls work correctly with photos in a secondary storyline, freeze frames copy media across multiple libraries, slow-motion video clips from iPhone appear in the browser with a badge, and MXF-wrapped AVC-Intra and uncompressed files export faster.

Finally, Compressor version 4.2 introduces new features that let users create an iTunes Store package for iTunes Store submission; add movie, trailer, closed captions and subtitles to an iTunes Store package; preview closed captions and subtitles right in the viewer; zoom in within the viewer to watch content with true pixel accuracy; and display and assign channels to QuickTime audio tracks prior to processing. Like the new version of Final Cut Pro X, Compressor version 4.2 offers GPU rendering when using “send to Compressor,” with support for dual GPUs. It also offers hardware-accelerated, multipass H.264 encoding on compatible systems, automatic bit-rate calculation to MPEG-4 and H.264 QuickTime movies, optional matrix stereo downmix when processing surround sound for QuickTime output, and CABAC entropy mode for multipass encoding. To address prior issues, Apple improved stability when using Apple AES3 audio format with ProRes 422 HQ. Also jobs submitted via Droplet now appear in the “active” and “completed” tabs.

Final Cut Pro X resurrected: Focus’ advanced workflow

By Daniel Restuccio

To many, Apple’s Final Cut Pro editing application died in June 2011 when they announced Final Cut X.  Derided as an odd version of iMovie, it lacked many of the features of Final Cut 7 and fell out of favor with many editors looking for an alternative to Avid Media Composer.

Nearly four years later Final Cut Pro 10.1.4 is fully resurrected and, for the makers of the Will Smith caper Focus, a godsend that provided a flexible, efficient and cost-effective workflow to post their feature movie shot on the Arri Alexa.

Less than two years since releasing the new MacPro “cylinder,” Apple claims that they have upgraded Final Cut Pro X to the level where it can be taken seriously again as a post production Continue reading

Why resolution independence is an illusion

By The Unknown Artist

All professional editorial systems now advertise “resolution independence,” and in some cases “frame-rate independence.” Avid was the last major player to the party around Christmas of 2014, cautiously launching resolution independence through its AMA.

Resolution independence really doesn’t mean much. It’s simply a little bit of code that automatically resizes all your source material to fit the frame size you’re working in. Frame-rate independence is a much bigger issue, however, because of what it means and what each
system does to the material to make it happen.

Continue reading

Wacom’s Intuos Creative Stylus 2 for precise creativity on iPad

Ever wish you had the ability to sketch, draw or paint with the precision your Wacom stylus gives you, but on your iPad? Well wish no more. Wacom has released Intuos Creative Stylus 2, which comes with a fine solid tip for increased visibility and intricate detail all for the iPad. An on-the-go solution for creative professionals, it now also offers USB charging options, a flared front to support a variety of holding styles and side-switch for ease of use. This combination of quality design and superior features provides the perfect tool for artists and designers to work anytime and anywhere.

The Intuos Creative Stylus 2 ($79.95), which will be available in October, offers 2,048 pressure-sensitivity levels, and the user experience is enhanced thanks to Bluetooth 4.0 that seamlessly connects the stylus to iPads and Wacom’s Cloud services. Available soon, the two new cloud-based services offer clipboard functionality (DropZone) that allow for the exchange of files between different devices and a storage service for individual pen, tablet and display settings (ControlRoom).

The Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is made using brushed aluminum and a soft touch silicone grip. Available in black and grey, this design tool also offers an ergonomic shape. A protective carry case holds the stylus, USB charging cable and replacement nibs and make the stylus the ultimate pocket sized companion for today’s on-the-go designer.

Designed for the iPad 3, iPad 4, mini and Air, the Intuos Creative Stylus 2 is compatible with the top five creative apps, including Wacom’s Bamboo Paper, SketchBook Pro for iPad (by Autodesk), ArtRage (by Ambient Design), ProCreate (by Savage Interactive) and more. While using the stylus with compatible apps, it becomes highly responsive to light strokes while rejecting unintentional touches made whilst resting palms on the iPad’s screen. When connecting the stylus to Bamboo Paper, users will have free access to the ‘Creative Pack’ including all brushes and writing tools as well as all artists type notebooks with various canvases and papers particularly for drawing and painting.

Quick Chat: Larry Jordan on NAB 2014

By Randi Altman

As we approach NAB 2014, postPerspective thought it would be fun to throw a few questions at Larry Jordan (www.larryjordan.biz), who will once again be at the show with his podcast Digital Production Buzz,  (@DPBuZZ).

What do you think will be the hot topic at NAB this year?
Clearly, 4K is all the rage. We’ll see 4K everywhere — cameras, monitors, software… What’s interesting to me, though, is that computers are essentially 4K-capable already. The real Continue reading

Quick Chat: Nvidia’s Greg Estes

By Randi Altman

Greg Estes, Nvidia’s VP of marketing, recently took a few minutes out of his schedule to discuss the industry, trends and how the company goes about creating new products that target the needs of users.

The short answer is listening to what studios and broadcasters need. The long answer is… well give it a read and see for yourself.

Continue reading