Tag Archives: Ambisonic audio

Nugen adds 3D Immersive Extension to Halo Upmix

Nugen Audio has updated its Halo Upmix with a new 3D Immersive Extension, adding further options beyond the existing Dolby Atmos bed track capability. The 3D Immersive Extension now provides ambisonic-compatible output as an alternative to channel-based output for VR, game and other immersive applications. This makes it possible to upmix, re-purpose or convert channel-based audio for an ambisonic workflow.

With this 3D Immersive Extension, Halo fully supports Avid’s newly announced Pro Tools V.2.8, now with native 7.1.2 stems for Dolby Atmos mixing. The combination of Pro Tools 12.8 and Halo 3D Immersive Extension can provide a more fluid workflow for audio post pros handling multi-channel and object-based audio formats.

Halo Upmix is available immediately at a list price of $499 for both OS X and Windows, with support for Avid AAX, AudioSuite, VST2, VST3 and AU formats. The new 3D Immersive Extension replaces the Halo 9.1 Extension and can now be purchased for $199. Owners of the existing Halo 9.1 Extension can upgrade to the Halo 3D Immersive Extension for no additional cost. Support for native 7.1.2 stems in Avid Pro Tools 12.8 is available on launch.

Recording live musicians in 360

By Luke Allen

I’ve had the opportunity to record live musicians in a couple of different in-the-field scenarios for 360 video content. In some situations — such as the ubiquitous 360 rock concert video — simply having access to the board feed is all one needs to create a pretty decent spatial mix (although the finer points of that type of mix would probably fill up a whole different article).

But what if you’re shooting in an acoustically interesting space where intimacy and immersion are the goal? What if you’re in the field in the middle of a rainstorm without access to AC power? It’s clear that in most cases, some combination of ambisonic capture and close micing is the right approach.

What I’ve found is that in all but a few elaborate set-ups, a mobile ambisonic recording rig (in my case, built around the Zaxcom Nomad and Soundfield SPS-200) — in addition to three to four omni-directional lavs for close micing — is more than sufficient to achieve excellent results. Last year, I had the pleasure of recording a four-piece country ensemble in a few different locations around Ireland.

Micing a Pub
For this particular job, I had the SPS and four lavs. For most of the day I had planted one Sanken COS-11 on the guitar, one on the mandolin, one on the lead singer and a DPA 4061 inside the upright bass (which sounded great!). Then, for the final song, the band wanted to add a fiddle to the mix — yet I was out of mics to cover everything. We had moved into the partially enclosed porch area of a pub with the musicians perched in a corner about six feet from the camera. I decided to roll the dice and trust the SPS to pick up the fiddle, which I figured would be loud enough in the small space that a lav wouldn’t be used much in the mix anyways. In post, the gamble paid off.

I was glad to have kept the quieter instruments mic’d up (especially the singer and the bass) while the fiddle lead parts sounded fantastic on the ambisonic recordings alone. This is one huge reason why it’s worth it to use higher-end Ambisonic mics, as you can trust them to provide fidelity for more than just ambient recordings.

An Orchestra
In another recent job, I was mixing for a 360 video of an orchestra. During production we moved the camera/sound rig around to different locations in a large rehearsal stage in London. Luckily, on this job we were able to also run small condensers into a board for each orchestra section, providing flexibility in the mix. Still, in post, the director wanted the spatial effect to be very perceptible and dynamic as we jump around the room during the lively performance. The SPS came in handy once again; not only does it offer good first-order spatial fidelity but a wide enough dynamic range and frequency response to be relied on heavily in the mix in situations where the close-mic recordings sounded flat. It was amazing opening up those recordings and listening to the SPS alone through a decent HRTF — it definitely exceeded my expectations.

It’s always good to be as prepared as possible when going into the field, but you don’t always have the budget or space for tons of equipment. In my experience, one high-quality and reliable ambisonic mic, along with some auxiliary lavs and maybe a long shotgun, are a good starting point for any field recording project for 360 video involving musicians.


Sound designer and composer Luke Allen is a veteran spatial audio designer and engineer, and a principal at SilVR in New York City. He can be reached at luke@silversound.us.

The importance of audio in VR

By Anne Jimkes

While some might not be aware, sound is 50 percent of the experience in VR, as well as in film, television and games. Because we can’t physically see the audio, it might not get as much attention as the visual side of the medium. But the balance and collaboration between visual and aural is what creates the most effective, immersive and successful experience.

More specifically, sound in VR can be used to ease people into the experience, what we also call “on boarding.” It can be used subtly and subconsciously to guide viewers by motivating them to look in a specific direction of the virtual world, which completely surrounds them.

In every production process, it is important to discuss how sound can be used to benefit the storytelling and the overall experience of the final project. In VR, especially the many low-budget independent projects, it is crucial to keep the importance and use of audio in mind from the start to save time and money in the end. Oftentimes, there are no real opportunities or means to record ADR after a live-action VR shoot, so it is important to give the production mixer ample opportunity to capture the best production sound possible.

Anne Jimkes at work.

This involves capturing wild lines, making sure there is time to plant and check the mics, and recording room tone. Things that are already required, albeit not always granted, on regular shoots, but even more important on a set where a boom operator cannot be used due to the 360 degree view of the camera. The post process is also very similar to that for TV or film up to the point of actual spatialization. We come across similar issues of having to clean up dialogue and fill in the world through sound. What producers must be aware of, however, is that after all the necessary elements of the soundtrack have been prepared, we have to manually and meticulously place and move around all the “audio objects” and various audio sources throughout the space. Whenever people decide to re-orient the video — meaning when they change what is considered the initial point of facing forward or “north” — we have to rewrite all this information that established the location and movement of the sound, which takes time.

Capturing Audio for VR
To capture audio for virtual reality we have learned a lot about planting and hiding mics as efficiently as possible. Unlike regular productions, it is not possible to use a boom mic, which tends to be the primary and most naturally sounding microphone. Aside from the more common lavalier mics, we also use ambisonic mics, which capture a full sphere of audio and matches the 360 picture — if the mic is placed correctly on axis with the camera. Most of the time we work with Sennheiser and use their Ambeo microphone to capture 360 audio on set, after which we add the rest of the spatialized audio during post production. Playing back the spatialized audio has become easier lately, because more and more platforms and VR apps accept some form of 360 audio playback. There is still a difference between the file formats to which we can encode our audio outputs, meaning that some are more precise and others are a little more blurry regarding spatialization. With VR, there is not yet a standard for deliverables and specs, unlike the film/television workflow.

What matters most in the end is that people are aware of how the creative use of sound can enhance their experience, and how important it is to spend time on capturing good dialogue on set.


Anne Jimkes is a composer, sound designer, scholar and visual artist from the Netherlands. Her work includes VR sound design at EccoVR and work with the IMAX VR Centre. With a Master’s Degree from Chapman University, Jimkes previously served as a sound intern for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Assimilate’s Scratch VR Suite 8.6 now available

Back in February, Assimilate announced the beta version of its Scratch VR Suite 8.6. Well, now the company is back with a final version of the product, including user requests for features and functions.

Scratch VR Suite 8.6 is a realtime post solution and workflow for VR/360 content. With added GPU stitching of 360-video and ambisonic audio support, as well as live streaming, the Scratch VR Suite 8.6 allows VR content creators — DPs, DITs, post artists — a streamlined, end-to-end workflow for VR/360 content.

The Scratch VR Suite 8.6 workflow automatically includes all the basic post tools: dailies, color grading, compositing, playback, cloud-based reviews, finishing and mastering.

New features and updates include:
– 360 stitching functionality: Load the source media of multiple shots from your 360 cameras. into Scratch VR and easily wrap them into a stitch node to combine the sources into a equirectangular image.
• Support for various stitch template format, such as AutoPano, Hugin, PTGui and PTStitch scripts.
• Either render out the equirectangular format first or just continue to edit, grade and composite on top of the stitched nodes and render the final result.
• Ambisonic audio: Load, set and playback ambisonic audio files to complete the 360 immersive experience.
• Video with 360 sound can be published directly to YouTube 360.
• Additional overlay handles to the existing. 2D-equirectangular feature for more easily positioning. 2D elements in a 360 scene.
• Support for Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, HTC Vive and Google Cardboard.
• Several new features and functions make working in HDR just as easy as SDR.
• Increased Format Support – Added support for all the latest formats for even greater efficiency in the DIT and post production processes.
• More Simplified DIT reporting function – Added features and functions enables even greater efficiencies in a single, streamlined workflow.
• User Interface: Numerous updates have been made to enhance and simplify the UI for content creators, such as for the log-in screen, matrix layout, swipe sensitivity, Player stack, tool bar and tool tips.