Tag Archives: AES

Stranger Things

Upcoming AES LA meeting features Netflix’s Stranger Things sound team

On January 31, the AES LA Section monthly meeting will showcase the sound editorial and re-recording of the Netflix series Stranger Things. Attendees will hear first-hand how the sound team creates the 5.1-channel soundtrack, including the eerie music that is key to the show’s look and feel. A second season from the Duffer Brothers is scheduled to start later this year, with its haunting ’80s-style, synth-based musical score.

For those of you not familiar with the show, it’s set in Indiana in 1983 and focuses on a 12-year-old boy gone missing and the resulting search for him by the police chief and his friends.

The editorial team for Stranger Things is headed up by supervising sound editor Brad North, who works closely with sound designer Craig Henighan, sound effects editor Jordan Wilby and music editor David Klotz. The re-recording crew, working at the Technicolor Seward stage, is Joe Barnett, who handles dialogue and music, and Adam Jenkins, who handles sound effects.

“We drew our inspiration — subconsciously, at least — from such sci-fi films as Alien, The Thing and Predator,” Henighan recalls. Part sci-fi, part horror and part family drama, Stranger Things is often considered an homage to 80’s movies like Close Encounters of the Third Kind and ET.

The joint AES/SMPTE January meeting, which will be held at the Sportsmen’s Lodge in Studio City on Tuesday, January 31, is open to both AES and SMPTE members and non-members.

Panelists will include Adam Jenkins, Jordan Wilby, Joe Barnett, David Klotz, Brad North and Craig Henighan.

AES Conference focuses on immersive audio for VR/AR

By  Mel Lambert

The AES Convention, which was held at the Los Angeles Convention Center in early October, attracted a broad cross section of production and post professionals looking to discuss the latest technologies and creative offerings. The convention had approximately 13,000 registered attendees and more than 250 brands showing wares in the exhibits halls and demo rooms.

Convention Committee co-chairs Valerie Tyler and Michael MacDonald, along with their team, created the comprehensive schedule of workshops, panels and special events for this year’s show. “The Los Angeles Convention Center’s West Hall was a great new location for the AES show,” said MacDonald. “We also co-located the AVAR conference, and that brought 3D audio for gaming and virtual reality into the mainstream of the AES.”

“VR seems to be the next big thing,” added AES executive director Bob Moses, “[with] the top developers at our event, mapping out the future.”

The two-day, co-located Audio for Virtual and Augmented Reality Conference was expected to attract about 290 attendees, but with aggressive marketing and outreach to the VR and AR communities, pre-registration closed at just over 400.

Aimed squarely at the fast-growing field of virtual/augmented reality audio, this conference focused on the creative process, applications workflow and product development. “Film director George Lucas once stated that sound represents 50 percent of the motion picture experience,” said conference co-chair Andres Mayo. “This conference demonstrates that convincing VR and AR productions require audio that follows the motions of the subject and produces a realistic immersive experience.”

Spatial sound that follows head orientation for headsets powered either by dedicated DSP, game engines or smartphones opens up exciting opportunities for VR and AR producers. Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, PlayStation VR and other systems are attracting added consumer interest for the coming holiday season. Many immersive-audio innovators, including DST and Dolby, are offering variants of their cinema systems targeted at this booming consumer marketplace via binaural headphone playback.

Sennheiser’s remarkable new Ambeo VR microphone (pictured left) can be used to capture 3D sound and then post produced to prepare different spatial perspectives — a perfect adjunct for AR/VR offerings. At the high end, Nokia unveiled its Ozo VR camera, equipped with eight camera sensors and eight microphones, as an alternative to a DIY assembly of GoPro cameras, for example.

Two fascinating keynotes bookended the AVAR Conference. The opening keynote, presented by Philip Lelyveld, VR/AR initiative program manager at the USC Entertainment Technology Center, Los Angeles, and called “The Journey into Virtual and Augmented Reality,” defined how virtual, augmented and mixed reality will impact entertainment, learning and social interaction. “Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality have the potential of delivering interactive experiences that take us to places of emotional resonance, give us agency to form our own experiential memories, and become part of the everyday lives we will live in the future,” he explained.

“Just as TV programming progressed from live broadcasts of staged performances to today’s very complex language of multithread long-form content,” Lelyveld stressed, “so such media will progress from the current early days of projecting existing media language with a few tweaks to a headset experience into a new VR/AR/MR-specific language that both the creatives and the audience understand.”

Is his closing keynote, “Future Nostalgia, Here and Now: Let’s Look Back on Today from 20 Years Hence,” George Sanger, director of sonic arts at Magic Leap, attempted to predict where VR/AR/MR will be in two decades. “Two decades of progress can change how we live and think in ways that boggle the mind,” he acknowledged. “Twenty years ago, the PC had rudimentary sound cards, now the entire ‘multitrack recording studio’ lives on our computers. By 2036, we will be wearing lightweight portable devices all day. Our media experience will seamlessly merge the digital and physical worlds; how we listen to music will change dramatically. We live in the Revolution of Possibilities.”

According to conference co-chair Linda Gedemer, “It has been speculated by Wall Street [pundits] that VR/AR will be as game changing as the advent of the PC, so we’re in for an incredible journey!”

Mel Lambert, who also gets photo credit on pictures from the show, is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA

AES: Avid intros Pro Tools 12.6 and new MRTX audio interface

Avid was at AES in LA with several new tools and updates for audio post pros. New releases include Pro Tools 12.6 software and Pro Tools MTRX, an audio interface for Pro Tools, HDX and HD Native.

Avid Pro Tools 12.6 delivers new editing capabilities, including Clip Effects and layered editing features, making it possible to edit and prepare mixes faster. Production can also be accelerated using automatic playlist creation and selection using shortcut keys. Enhanced “in-the-box” dubber workflows have also been included.

Pro Tools MTRX, developed by Digital Audio Denmark, gives Pro Tools users the superior sonic quality of DAD’s A to D and D to A converters, along with flexible monitoring, I/O and routing capabilities, all in one unit. MTRX will let users gain extended monitor control and flexible routing with Pro Tools S6, S3 and other EUCON surfaces, use the converter as a high-performance 64-channel Pro Tools HD interface, and get automatic sample rate conversion on AES inputs. MTRX (our main photo) will be available later this year.

Tony Cariddi

During AES LA, we caught up with Tony Cariddi, director of product and solutions marketing for Avid, to see what he had to say about where Avid is going next. “What we have seen in the industry is that there is no shortage of innovation and there are new solutions for problems that are always emerging,” says Cariddi. “But what happens when you have all of these different solutions is it puts a lot of pressure on the user to make sure everything works together seamlessly. So what you’ll see from Avid Everywhere going forward is a continuation of trying to connect our own products closer together on the MediaCentral Platform, so it’s really fluid for our users, but also for people to be able to integrate other solutions into that platform just as easily.

“We also have to be responsive to how people want to access our tools,” he continued. “What kind of packages are they looking for? Do they want to subscribe? Do they want to buy? Enterprise licensing? Floating license? So you’ll probably see bundles and new ways to access licensing and new flexible ways to maybe rent the software when you need it. We’re trying to be very responsive to the multifaceted needs of the industry, and part of that is workflow, part of that is financial and part of that is the integration of everything.”

AR/VR audio conference taking place with AES show in fall


The AES is tackling the augmented reality and virtual reality creative process, applications workflow and product development for the first time with a dedicated conference that will take place on 9/30-10/1 during the 141st AES Convention at the LA Convention Center’s West Hall.

The two-day program of technical papers, workshops, tutorials and manufacturer’s expo will highlight the creative and technical challenges of providing immersive spatial audio to accompany virtual reality and augmented reality media.

The conference will attract content developers, researchers, manufacturers, consultants and students, in addition to audio engineers seeking to expand their knowledge about sound production for virtual and augmented reality. The companion expo will feature displays from leading-edge manufacturers and service providers looking to secure industry metrics for this emerging field.

“Film director George Lucas once stated that sound represents 50 percent of the motion picture experience,” shares conference co-chair Andres Mayo. “This conference will demonstrate that VR and AR productions, using a variety of playback devices, require audio that follows the motions of the subject, and produces a realistic immersive experience. Our program will spotlight the work of leading proponents in this exciting field of endeavor, and how realistic spatial audio can be produced from existing game console and DSP engines.”

Proposed topics include object-based audio mixing for VR/AR, immersive audio in VR/AR broadcast, live VR audio production, developing audio standards for VR/AR, cross platform audio considerations in VR and streaming immersive audio content.

Costs range from $195 for a one-day pass for AES members ($295 for a two-day pass) and $125 for accredited students, to $280/$435 for non-members; Early-bird discounts also are available.

Conference registrants can also attend the 141st AES Convention’s companion exhibition, select educational sessions and special events free of charge with an exhibits-plus badge.

Oscar-nominated sound editors, mixers share insights with AES LA section

By Mel Lambert

A recent meeting of the Audio Engineering Society’s Los Angeles section offered an opportunity to hear from a number of Oscar nominees and winners as they shared their experiences while preparing dramatic film soundtracks, including how the various sound elements were secured, edited and mixed to picture, plus the types of hardware used in editorial suites and dubbing stages.

Whiplash, written and directed by Damien Chazelle, was re-recorded on Technicolor at Paramount’s Stage 4 by dialog/music mixer Craig Mann and sound effects mixer Ben Wilkins (see our interview with Wilkins), using tracks secured on location by production mixer Thomas Continue reading

‘Future of Audio Tech’ confab tackles acoustics, loudness, more

By Mel Lambert

Organized by the Audio Engineering Society, “The Future of Audio Entertainment Technology: Cinema, Television and the Internet” conference addressed the myriad challenges facing post professionals working in the motion picture and home delivery industries. Co-chaired by Dr. Sean Olive and Brian McCarty, and held at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Hollywood in early March, the three-day gathering comprised several keynote addresses, workshops and papers sessions.

In addition to sponsorship from Dolby, Harman, Auro3D, Avid, Sennheiser, DTS, NBC Universal Studio Post, MPSE and SMPTE, the event attracted a reported 155 attendees.

Referencing a report last year in The Hollywood Reporter that more than 350 different Continue reading