Tag Archives: ACE

John Gilroy, ACE, on editing Roman J. Israel, Esq.

By Amy Leland

John Gilroy, ACE, comes from an impressive storytelling family. His father, Frank D. Gilroy, was a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, as well as a screenwriter and director for film and television. His older brother Tony is a screenwriter and director, known for films such as Michael Clayton and the Jason Bourne films. His fraternal twin Dan is also a screenwriter and director, whose work includes the film Nightcrawler. John’s editing credits include his brothers’ films Michael Clayton and Nightcrawler, as well as many others, including Warrior, Pacific Rim and Rogue One.

John Gilroy (Mike Windle/Getty Images)

While the Gilroy brothers have often worked together, they have all also made significant films independently. With a family filled with such storytelling talents, it is no surprise that John ended up where he is now, but it turns out his path wasn’t as predestined as one might think. I sat down with him to talk about that legacy, his path toward it, and his most recent editing project, Roman J. Israel, Esq. The film stars Denzel Washington, and yes, it was written and directed by twin brother Dan.

Did you want to be in this industry because it’s the family business?
It may be the opposite of that. My brothers and I grew up around the film industry because our dad’s in the business. He’s a writer/director. We didn’t live in Hollywood. We lived in upstate New York, but we were in orbit of all that throughout our childhood. I decided to go the other way. I actually thought, “You know what? I’ll be a lawyer.”

I majored in government at college, but by graduation I really didn’t want to go through another three years of law school. I didn’t know what I wanted to do, so I worked as a bartender for a couple of years in New York, which was a lot of fun. Then I just started gravitating toward the film business. I really wanted to be a director, like everybody else. I looked around at how I could get my foot in the door. My father knew an editor, Rick Shane, who let me hang out in his cutting room between my bar shifts. I didn’t go to film school, so I picked up what I could there. Then I got into a cutting room on a job as an apprentice, and really just worked very hard and very steadily for a bunch of years. Finally I became an editor. My brothers became screenwriters. They wrote together early on, and then separately. But editing was my trajectory.

Do you remember having early heroes who were filmmakers, or did that come later?
When I was young I was “wowed” by the same films that a lot of people were: Lawrence of Arabia and The Godfather for instance. Many of the films I really loved were made by directors who had been film editors. I was a big fan of David Lean, Hal Ashby and Robert Wise. It’s sort of one of the logical reasons I gravitated to editing I guess — I thought this is a good way to get in, because some of my directing heroes started as film editors.

I think the movie that really made me think about editing early on was Slaughterhouse Five, which was edited by Dede Allen. It’s a great movie — a lot of nonlinear cross cutting. It must have been a lot of fun for her in the cutting room making that movie. But that was the first film I ever saw that I thought, “Ahhh, isn’t it interesting how it’s put together.” I really hadn’t thought about how a movie was put together before that; it just seemed like an invisible process.

I teach editing classes, and one of the things I tell my students is that you have to accept that if you do your job well, people shouldn’t see it. So it’s nice that occasionally it’s okay to see the editing and be impressed by that. That’s a very tough thing to do. I felt that way about Whiplash. When I saw it, I thought, “I’m seeing the editing, and that’s a good thing because it’s really fascinating how this was put together.” That is unusual.

Every once in a while, there is a movie like that. I cut a movie years ago called Narc, where the editing was kind of up in your face like that. Every movie tells you what to do, but you’re right, usually it’s an absolutely invisible and seamless experience. You shouldn’t be thinking about it at all, if it goes right.

You’ve worked a lot with family. In fact, your brother Dan — with whom you did Nightcrawler and Roman J. Israel, Esq. — is your twin. Does that make that working collaboration easier? Does it make it harder? How does it affect that process?
It makes it easier for sure. We’ve all worked with many other people, independent of each other but working with Danny or Tony is easier because there’s a shorthand. You develop a shorthand with a director if you work with them on more than one picture no matter who it is. I guess it’s even stronger if it’s your brother, and then maybe even more if he’s your twin.

We’re very different sorts of people, however…. we’re fraternal twins. You wouldn’t even know we were brothers to look at us, but we definitely have a similar sensibility. So in terms of pace and what’s right and what’s wrong, that kind of thing, we’re pretty much in lock step. Our process moves very quickly. The decision-making is fluid because we’re not debating very much. We’re both looking at our movie in the same way.

For the whole thing to be a success, it’s very important for an editor to be able to climb into a director’s brain and to sync up with them on some level. If there’s some sort of weird tug-of-war going on, it’s never going to happen… You’re not going to find the magic.

How did this particular project come about? Were you involved from the beginning?
Romans J. Israel, Esq. sprang from the fertile imagination of my brother Dan, who is turning out some really interesting spec scripts these days. He wrote it for Denzel Washington, and then Denzel said yes. It’s a brilliant script, and it quickly attracted a lot of people. We were fortunate to have the same production team we had on Nightcrawler. Robert Elswit shooting and Kevin Kavanaugh doing production design, James Howard doing the music, and then me editing of course, so there’s a lot of experience there. Dan has been wise enough to surround himself with a lot of talent. And he’s also a great boss. He is everybody’s compass in finding the movie, but he’s very open to ideas, and the process is pleasant, highly creative and fun. He makes it that way.

Robert Elswit worked with you and Dan on this one and Nightcrawler. He’s such an amazing cinematographer. When you’re talking about the guy who takes Paul Thomas Anderson’s visions and brings them to life, this is clearly somebody with an incredibly strong sense of the visual. What was the collaborative process like for the three of you?
I have an opinion about everything (laughs), but I try to step back in the pre-production process. I step back and let Robert and Kevin and Dan do their thing, and I try not to be part of that because I’m going to have a big say later on. So I’m sort of circling that pre-production process, just looking in, happy to answer any questions, look at anything. It’s fine. I’ll do that.

Once we start shooting, though, my cutting room becomes command central, and I’m building the movie. That’s me taking what’s been shot and looking ahead to see what they’re doing. But I’m trying to put the movie together as quickly as possible. And things are occurring to me, things that I might need. If I say, “Could I get something, I need something quickly,” it’s attended to in the course of the shooting. I just kind of build the movie from the very beginning as quickly as possible, and finding the truth in every scene. That’s what I’m thinking about.

So you are cutting scenes as the production is going on. Are you on set?
I’ll be on set the very first day to say, “Hey, how are you doing?” Then they probably won’t see me very much. Occasionally I’ll come out if their shooting something I’ve asked for, but you don’t see me much on set.

Let’s talk about the technical aspect a little bit. What did they shoot on?
Robert Elswit is a big advocate of film and we actually were able to shoot film for all of the day stuff. Film is not as forgiving at night, so we shot on an Arri Alexa for our night scenes.

What about your edit process? What’s your set up for your edits?
I’m as technical as I need to be. I’m actually one of the last guys that started cutting on a Moviola, like a million years ago. So that’s where I learned how to cut. I had a very good team. Richard Molina was my first assistant and Corey Seeholzer was my Second. It was a small, experienced crew. In terms of the workflow in the room, I tend to delegate that to my First. Basically, the way I work is my First runs the room.

If my first assistant is running the room, I can be focused on my Avid and I thinking creatively about the movie all of the time. There are many technical aspects to our workflow that I only sort of look at peripherally. I obviously have a deep knowledge of how our cutting room operates, but I couldn’t do Richard’s job. It’s too technical for me. I’m doing the same thing that I’ve always done. I’m getting my dailies, and climbing into the movie — thinking about the story — what is the story and where is the truth?

Sound seems so important to this story. His constant use of headphones, his devotion to his iPod, his reaction to the construction next door to him, and especially the way he was experiencing sound to show his emotional state. The couple of times where, in moments of anxiety, sound would drop out. How much of that was worked out in the edit, and how much was left for the sound mix?
In terms of knowing where certain sound design elements are going to happen, again, the movie is telling us what to do. Margit Pfeiffer, our sound supervisor, assembled a really great team. Andy Koyama and Martyn Zub mixed the film. Martyn and Ann Scibelli were our sound designers and Del Spiva was our music editor. Many of us had worked on Nightcrawler and again, there was a shorthand between us… a collaboration which made it easy for the sound of our film to evolve very quickly.

I work hard to make my first pass of a film feel like a third or fourth pass, and the sound has a lot to do with that. That’s how you can make a crazy deadline like what we were shooting for, which was a little (laughs) ambitious. Danny started shooting in April and wasn’t really done until early June. Then he was like, “Hey, what about the Toronto Film Festival?” And I was like, “Okay (laughs some more).”

So one and a half months?
Yeah. We ran for it, and we made it. After the Toronto Film Festival, we saw some ways to make the movie even better and more streamlined, and we acted on that. That’s the version that’s in the theaters now.

What do you look for in an assistant editor?
It’s a complex skill set. They have to be very knowledgeable technically to offset my ignorance on some level. There’s a lot of temp VFX work that we do in the room, wherever we can — filling in green screens and that sort of thing. The assistants have to be quite knowledgeable with VFX tools in the Avid and/or After Effects.

I also mentioned that I do a lot of sound work, but when I’m really working hard on my cut of the film, I delegate a lot of the sound work to them so they must have a deep background in sound and sound design. Those are two important skills they need to have —that and being able to keep the room running smoothly.

What do you know now that you wish you knew when you first started?
Whatever I know now that I’d like to pass on to my young self took thousands of hours to come by, and I’m not sure I could articulate it, but I do think it is harder to become an editor today. It’s a good news/bad news thing… the good news is that you can make media and edit on your phone if you want to — the tools are available. You could start being an editor instantly or at least start practicing. It wasn’t like that when I was young. There was film, and it was expensive, and you had to learn a lot and wait much longer before you got an opportunity.

But these days, an assistant’s job is even further removed from what an editor does. They need to absorb a lot more technical knowledge to work in a cutting room. When I was an assistant, I was often working in a cutting room with the editor shoulder to shoulder, handing him his next shot. You learn a lot by being close in on the process. With computers, editing is a much more solitary endeavor.

Editorial is a ladder. It’s a transition from apprentice to an assistant, and then assistant to editor. From assistant to editor, you’re actually doing two entirely different jobs. It’s always been that way but the chasm seems greater to me now, because assistants need to know more to do their jobs.

Director Dan Gilroy and Denzel Washington on set.

Is there anything else about Roman J. Israel, Esq. that you would like people to know?
In some ways, I think this is one of the most important films that I’ve ever worked on. I think it’s an emotional and brainy piece of filmmaking, in terms of Danny’s story and what Denzel brought to the character. I’m very proud of it. It also portrays our criminal justice system accurately, which might be eye opening for some people.

It was also really interesting and refreshing to actually to see a movie where the main conflict was somebody simply trying to hold onto their morals. It’s almost rare now that that’s something to strive for.

I know… It’s kind of a throwback. It has a ‘70s feel to it, and Roman is also sort of a time capsule throwback himself. The movie works, I think, because Denzel is fascinating to watch, and at the end of his journey, he is ultimately a hero. It was a lot of fun working with Denzel too. He’s a great filmmaker himself, and was extremely helpful to Dan and I in the cutting room. We had a lot of fun together.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Checking In: HPA Lifetime Achievement Award honoree Herb Dow

The HPA Lifetime Achievement Award, which will be handed out at the HPA Awards ceremony in Los Angeles tonight, is intended “to give recognition to individuals who have, with great service, dedicated their careers to the betterment of the industry.” That sentence perfectly describes this year’s honoree, Herb Dow, ACE.

Not only a hands-on editor with an impressive resume — including cutting episodes of such classic series as Fantasy Island and WKRP in Cincinnati — Herb has spent much of his career helping to build community within the post production world, whether at his roasts during NAB, his now bi-weekly Friday lunches in LA or with his Website postproductionpro.com, a sort of LinkedIn for the post world.

We recently reached out to Herb to ask him about how he got started in the industry, trends he’s seen over the years, and so much more.

You began your career as a film editor. Can you talk about what you loved most about the job and how you got started?
My entry into the business was marrying a film editor’s daughter 51 years ago. My wife’s father, Robert Swanson, was cutting Mannix at Desilu and he recommended me for an apprentice position in commercial integration on the lot. I spent eight years there moving up to Group 1 — back then the joke was you could go to medical school and be cutting brains faster. I loved editing. Putting together stories on film is a great career, and I still miss that aspect of my life.

Can you tell us some of the projects you worked on, and what you were cutting on when you started?
My first editing job was at MGM on a show called Lucan about a guy who turned into a wolf and solved crimes. It lasted seven episodes. I worked on 12 different series (none of which were picked up beyond the original order), but out of eight pilots, seven were picked up for series. I also cut MOWs and a few features.

You are considered a pioneer in nonlinear editing. How did you get involved in the development of the Ediflex system?
I had spent four years working at Culver Studios with a first floor cutting room. It had big picture windows, a beach mural on the wall that made it look like I was cutting on the beach, and speakers hanging from the ceiling playing loud rock music. Then I went over to Universal to cut on a show called Street Hawk. No windows, small room and not a great show.

I went to the head of post and said that I would finish the episode, but I was leaving and my assistant could take over. He asked why and I said no windows, etc. He said they were starting a new series at the Oakwood apartments on Pass and that it had a new-fangled electronic editing system and there were windows.

I went over and met Adrian Ettlinger. He created the CMX 600, the very first nonlinear system. The system was called Vidicut and had six VHS decks all with the same material and a Commodore 64 controlled with a light pen. I jumped at the chance to work on it and cut 24 episodes of Still the Beavers while helping Adrian modify the system to work for editors like myself. We formed a company with Milt Forman, Andy Maltz, Adrian and me called Cinedco. Then we renamed the system to Ediflex.

How has the world of nonlinear editing changed over the years?
Not much has changed since Avid came on the scene 30 years, aside from the computers getting faster. The big change is what I am involved in now, BeBop Technology  — editing in the cloud, which gets rid of all the machines.

What are the most significant changes you’ve seen in production and post over your time in the industry?
HD and 4K were substantial. The growth of the business has been astronomical, with many more content providers and outlets. There are a lot more jobs in post.

Looking forward, where do you see the post industry heading?
Well, I might be prejudiced, but I think using the cloud environment for post will change the industry dramatically. Freeing artists to work from anywhere they want with faster processors and no machinery to worry about is going to change our world of post.

Herb at one of his industry gatherings.

What does being given the HPA Lifetime Achievement Award mean to you?
I am so proud to be awarded this honor in my 50th year in post. I was mentored by a lot of wonderful men and women in this industry, and it really is a thank you to all of them for helping me with my career.

You have always been involved in fostering relationships with pros in the industry, from your Las Vegas roasts to your Friday lunches. Why is this so important to you?
It has always been about the people. I love the fraternity/sorority I belong to. My roasts and lunches are a way to be among more of these people all the time. I love them.

You’ve accomplished so much over the years. What is your proudest moment?
No question, it was the Ediflex changing the art form as we knew it. That was an incredible moment for me. And, actually, getting to do it all again with BeBop at the other end of my career is a gift from the gods.

Editfest LA line-up set

American Cinema Editors’ EditFest, the day-long event celebrating the art and craft of editing, takes place in Los Angeles on August 6. Launched in 2008, EditFest offers audiences the opportunity to hear award-winning film and television editors share their insights and experiences.

Past EditFest participants have included renowned editors Anne V. Coates, ACE; Tim Porter, ACE; Fred Raskin, ACE; Barney Pilling, ACE; Paul Hirsch, ACE; Tom Cross, ACE; and others.

As in previous years, EditFest will feature film and television panels, a catered lunch and a cocktail reception. The event returns again this year to the Frank Wells Theater at the Disney Studios lot in Burbank.

The schedule for Saturday, August 6th is as follows:

Cutting it in Hollywood – Personal learning experiences and overcoming obstacles
John Axelrad, ACE – Crazy Heart, Rudderless, Something Borrowed
Zene Baker, ACE – 50/50, Neighbors, This is the End
Barbara Gerard – Brothers & Sisters, Everwood, Supergirl
David Rogers, ACE – Entourage, The Office, The Mindy Project
Moderated by Mitchell Danton, ACE (Editor and Author of Cutting it in Hollywood)

Cult Film Favorites
Mark Helfrich, ACE – Showgirls
Tina Hirsch, ACE – Deathrace 2000, Gremlins
Norm Hollyn – Heathers
Mark Golblatt, ACE – Terminator, Starship Troopers
Jane Kurson, ACE – Beetlejuice
Moderated by Michael Krulik – Avid Technology Principal Applications Specialist

Inside the Cutting Room with Bobbie O’Steen: A Conversation With Michael Tronick, ACE
Michael Tronick, ACE – Straight Outta Compton (co-editor), Hairspray, Scent of a Woman (co-editor)
Moderated by Bobbie O’Steen (Author of The Invisible Cut & Cut to the Chase)

The Lean Forward Moment
Jeff Ford, ACE – Avengers, Captain America
Kim Roberts, ACE – The Hunting Ground, Waiting for Superman
Kevin Tent, ACE – The Descendants, Nebraska
Moderated by Norm Hollyn (Editor, Author and Head of USC School of Cinematic Arts)

 

Sight, Sound & Story editor-heavy summit is set for next weekend

Manhattan Edit Workshop’s (MEWShop) one-day summit, Sight, Sound & Story, returns to New York on June 11 at the NYIT Auditorium. Panels include the art and processes of editing documentary film and episodic television, and behind the greenscreen with VFX artists. This year’s closing panel will highlight the career of Oscar-winning feature film editor Anne V. Coates, ACE, with author and film historian Bobbie O’Steen. Coates has worked on such films as The Elephant Man, Out of Sight, Unfaithful, Becket, In the Line of Fire and the Oscar-winning Lawrence of Arabia.

The event’s schedule is as follows:

10:00am – 11:30am — Visual Effects: Behind the Green Screen and the Integral Role of the VFX Team
Moderator: Ross Shain, chief marketing officer at Boris FX & Imagineer Systems
Speakers: Sean Devereaux (Hardcore Henry, The Magnificent Seven), Ed Mendez (The Leftovers, Sin City, X-Men 2) and Michael Huber (Creed, American Ultra) or Alex Lemke (The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, Into the Woods)

11:45am – 1:15pm — Anatomy of a Scene: Deconstructing Documentary Films
Moderator: Livia Bloom, editor of “Errol Morris: Interviews,” writer for Cinema Scope, Filmmaker Magazine, and Film Comment)
Speakers: Erin Casper (American Promise, The Last Season), Mona Davis (The Farm, Angola, USA, Love and Diane), Gabriel Rhodes (The Tillman Story, Newtown)

2:00pm – 3:45pm – TV is the New Black: Television’s Cinematic Revolution
Moderator: Michael Berenbaum, ACE (The Americans, Sex and the City)
Speakers: Kelley Dixon, ACE (Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul, The Walking Dead), Kate Sanford, ACE (Vinyl, Boardwalk Empire, The Wire), Leo Trombetta, ACE (Narcos, Mad Men, Temple Grandin)

4:00pm – 6:00pm — “Inside the Cutting Room with Bobbie O’Steen”: A Conversation with Oscar-Winning Editor Anne Coates
Moderator: Bobbie O’Steen (Cut to the Chase, The Invisible Cut)
Speaker: Anne V. Coates, ACE (Lawrence of Arabia, The Elephant Man, Out of Sight, Erin Brockovich)

To enjoy $20 off your ticket price for Sight, Sound & Story, courtesy of postPerspective, click here.

Check this space soon for our report from the conference!

Panels set for August’s EditFest LA

EditFest Los Angeles is taking place on August 1 in Disney Studios Main Theatre in Burbank. EditFest LA 2015 includes a full day of panels — filled with experienced editors talking about a variety of projects —  as well as a one-on-one conversation with Arthur Schmidt and an opportunity to network.

To kick off the event, Steven Rivkin, ACE, and ACE VP will address the crowd. Then the panels begin. Here is the schedule:

Whiplash

From the Cutting Room to the Red Carpet
Elisa Bonora, ACE – Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
Tom Cross, ACE – Oscar-winning editor of Whiplash
Catherine Haight, ACE – Transparent
Wyatt Smith, ACE – Into the Woods
Moderated by Alan Heim, ACE, president of ACE and Motion Picture Editors Guild.

The Hero’s Journey: From Comic Book to Screen
Jonathan Chibnall – Daredevil
Lisa Lassek – Avengers
Dan Lebental, ACE – Ant-Man / Iron Man
Colby Parker, Jr, ACE – Ant-Man
Fred Raskin, ACE – Guardians of the Galaxy
Moderated by Michael Krulik, Avid Technology, principal applications specialist.

A Look Back to the Future with Arthur Schmidt
A conversation with Arthur Schmidt (Back to the Future, Castaway, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Forrest Gump) moderated by Bobbie O’Steen, author.

Vashi Nedomanski

Vashi Nedomanski

The Lean Forward Moment
Doug Blush, ACE – Twenty Feet from Stardom
Dody Dorn, ACE – Memento
Vashi Nedomansky – That Which I Love Destroys Me
John Venzon, ACE – South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut
Moderated by Norman Hollyn, editor, author, head of  the editing track at the USC School of Cinematic Arts.

ACE launched EditFest in 2008 in Los Angeles, adding EditFest NY in 2009 and EditFest London in 2013. Plans are underway to add additional cities in 2016.

Tickets for EditFest are available online for $400. Some organizational discounts are offered. A complete list is referenced at http://americancinemaeditors.org/editfest-2015/editfest-la-2015.

65th Annual ACE Award noms include tie for Best Feature Drama category

The nominees for the 65th Annual ACE Eddie Awards recognizing editing in 10 categories of film, television and documentaries has been announced. Winners will be presented with statuettes during ACE’s annual awards ceremony on January 30 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.  Next week, the American Cinema Editors will announce the Golden Eddie Filmmaker of the Year honoree and two Career Achievement honorees.

For only the second time in the organization’s history, a tie resulted in an additional nominee in the Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) category creating six nominees instead of five, indicating a tie in the number of votes for the fifth placing films.

The ACE Eddie Award nominees are listed below.

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC): TIE!
American Sniper
Joel Cox, ACE & Gary Roach, ACE

Boyhood
Sandra Adair, ACE

Kirk Baxter

Kirk Baxter

Gone Girl
Kirk Baxter, ACE

The Imitation Game
William Goldenberg, ACE

William Goldenberg

William Goldenberg

Nightcrawler
John Gilroy, ACE

Whiplash
Tom Cross

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY OR MUSICAL):
Birdman
Douglas Crise & Stephen Mirrione, ACE

Guardians of the Galaxy
Fred Raskin, Hughes Winborne, ACE & Craig Wood, ACE

Into the Woods
Wyatt Smith

Inherent Vice
Leslie Jones, ACE

Grand Budapest Hotel
Barney Pilling

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Big Hero 6
Tim Mertens

The Boxtrolls
Edie Ichioka, ACE

Lego Movie
David Burrows & Chris McKay

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):

Citizenfour
Mathilde Bonnefoy

Finding Vivian Maier
Aaron Wickenden

Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
Elisa Bonora

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION):
Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey: Standing Up in the Milky Way
John Duffy, ACE, Michael O’Halloran, Eric Lea

Pauly Shore Stands Alone
Troy Takaki, ACE & Joey Vigour

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History: Episode 3 / The Fire of Life
Erik Ewers

BEST EDITED HALF-HOUR SERIES FOR TELEVISION:
Silicon Valley: “Optimal Tip to Tip Efficiency”
Brian Merken & Tim Roche

Veep: “Special Relationship”
Anthony Boys

Transparent: Pilot
Catherine Haight

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
24: “10pm to 11am”
Scott Powell, ACE

Mad Men: “Waterloo”
Christopher Gay

Madam Secretary: “Pilot”
Elena Maganini, ACE & Michael Ornstein, ACE

Sherlock: “His Last Vow”
Yan Miles

The Good Wife: “A Few Words”
Scott Vickrey, ACE

BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
True Detective: “Who Goes There”
Affonso Goncalves

True Detective: “The Secret Fate of All Life”
Alex Hall

House of Cards: “Chapter 14”
Byron Smith

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Fargo “Buridan’s Ass”
Regis Kimble

Olive Kitteridge: “A Different Road”
Jeffrey M. Werner, ACE

The Normal Heart
Adam Penn

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown: “Iran”
Hunter Gross

Deadliest Catch: “Lost At Sea”
Josh Earl, ACE & Johnny Bishop

Vice: “Greenland is Melting & Bonded Labor”
Joe Langford & Nick Carew

Final Ballots will be mailed on January 5 and voting ends on January 21.  The Blue Ribbon panels where judging for all television categories and the documentary film category take place January 18.  Projects in the aforementioned categories are viewed and judged by panels comprised of professional editors (all ACE members).  All 700-plus ACE members vote during the final balloting of the ACE Eddies, including active members, life members, affiliate members and honorary members.

PostChat’s Jesse Averna named affiliate member of the ACE

American Cinema Editors held its annual holiday party on December 7 in Los Angeles. As part of the night’s festivities, the organization presents new inductees into the ACE. Sesame Street editor Jesse Averna, who helps run the weekly Twitter conversation #PostChat, was among them.

Averna (@dr0id), a four-time Emmy winner for his work on Sesame Street, was presented with a plaque from Oscar-winning editor Alan Heim (All That Jazz, Network, American History X, The Notebook). Averna was invited into the ACE as an Affiliate Member. While Averna notes that Active membership is his ultimate goal, he fully acknowledges the great honor of this induction, stating, “Tonight I received one of the biggest honors of my career — induction into ACE as an Affiliate member.”

In addition to editing and associate directing Sesame Street, you can catch Averna teaching Avid and FCP X at the School of Visual Arts Continuing Ed. He is also editing a feature documentary on rare kaiju monster flicks called Kaiju Gaiden, editing a short film with LiveStar Entertainment for Marvel called Tales to Astonish, directing a children’s live-action puppet show called Monica’s Mixing Bowl and moving his own film into production.