Tag Archives: ABC

Qwire’s tool for managing scoring, music licensing upped to v.2.0

Qwire, a maker of cloud-based tools for managing scoring and licensing music to picture, has launched QwireMusic 2.0, which expands the collaboration, licensing and cue sheet capabilities of QwireMusic. The tool also features a new and intuitive user interface as well as support for the Windows OS. User feedback played a role in many of the new updates, including marker import of scenes from Avid for post, Excel export functions for all forms and reports and expanded file sharing options.

QwireMusic is a suite of integrated modules that consolidates and streamlines a wide range of tasks and interactions for pros involved with music and picture across all stages of post, as well as music clearance and administration. QwireMusic was created to help facilitate collaboration among picture editors and post producers, music supervisors and clearance, composers, music editors and production studios.

Here are some highlights of the new version:
Presentations — Presentations allow music cues and songs to be shared between music providers (supervisors and composers) and their clients (picture editors, studio music departments, directors and producers. With Presentations, selected music is synced to video, where viewers can independently adjust the balance between music and dialogue, adding comments on each track. The time-saving efficiency of this tool centralizes the music sharing and review process, eliminating the need for the confusing array of QuickTimes, Web links, emails and unsecured FTP sites that sometimes accompany post production.

Real-time licensing status — QwireMusic 2.0 allows music supervisors to easily audition music, generate request letters, and share potential songs with anyone who needs to review them. When the music supervisor receives a quote approval, the picture editor and music editor are notified, and the studio music budget is updated instantly and seamlessly. In addition, problem songs can be instantly flagged. As with the original version of QwireMusic, request letters can be generated and emailed in one step with project-specific letterhead and signatures.

Electronic Cue Sheets — QwireMusic’s “visual cue sheet,” allows users to review all of the information in a cue sheet displayed alongside the final picture lock.  The cue sheet is automatically populated from data already entered in qwireMusic by the composer, music supervisor and music editor. Any errors or missing information are flagged. When the review is complete, a single button submits the cue sheet electronically to ASCAP and BMI.

QwireMusic has been used by music supervisors, composers, picture editors and music editors on over 40 productions in 2016, including Animals (HBO); Casual (Hulu); Fargo (FX); Guilt (Freeform); Harley and the Davidsons (Discovery); How to Get Away With Murder (ABC); Pitch (Fox); Shameless (Showtime); Teen Wolf (MTV); This Is Us (NBC); and Z: The Beginning of Everything (Amazon).

“Having everyone in the know on every cue ever put in a show saves a huge amount of time,” says Patrick Ward, a post producer for the shows Parenthood, The West Wing and Pure Genius. “With QwireMusic I spend about a tenth of the time that I used to disseminating cue information to different places and entities.”

Setting the visual tone for ABC’s ‘Madoff’

Bernie Madoff, one of the most hated men on earth thanks to his massive Ponzi scheme, was recently the focus of a four-part ABC miniseries called, simply, Madoff.

Technicolor PostWorks New York colorist Anthony Raffaele worked directly with Madoff cinematographer Frankie DeMarco in finalizing a look of the series, which captures the big money atmosphere of Wall Street in the 1990s and 2000s.

 Directed by Raymond De Felitta, Madoff is told from the perspective of its title character (Richard Dreyfuss) and portrays his schemes to defraud investors and meticulous efforts to keep the truth about his activities hidden from the public and his family.

DeMarco shot the show with an Arri Alexa camera and used vintage Cooke Speed Panchro lenses to give the imagery a filmic look indicative of its time period. He also shot Super 16 and Super 8 film for Madoff’s childhood sequence.

“It’s a character-driven story told from one person’s point of view,” DeMarco recalls. “So, I didn’t want it looking too sharp or crisp. I used the vintage Cooke Speed Panchro lenses to give the movie a more round, human feel.”

Much of the action shifts between the 19th floor of the Lipstick Building in Midtown Manhattan, which housed the offices of Madoff’s investment firm, and a small boiler room operation on the 17th floor — this was hidden from all but a few insiders and is where the dirty work of the fraud scheme was carried out.

 The different atmospheres of these two settings are subtly reinforced through cinematography, lighting and color correction. “Everything that occurs on the 19th floor has a polished, crisp, business feel that’s accented by cooler tones,” says Raffaele, who uses a FilmLight Baselight. “Downstairs, where the fraud occurs, the look is contrasted by a softer, diffused look accented with uncomfortable colors like yellow and green.”

During final grading sessions, DeMarco and Raffaele collaborated remotely. DeMarco was in London working on another project, so Raffaele sent him materials each day that he could review on an iPad. “We had good control over the lighting on the set, so the color was very close when Anthony got it,” DeMarco says. “He did a lovely job of punching up things and fine tuning. He has a great eye and got what I wanted from the get-go.”

As the story progresses and Madoff’s scheme unravels, the look becomes progressively darker. Especially bleak are scenes set in Madoff’s jail cell, where the greenish overtones aAnthony Raffaele re pronounced. A different color treatment was applied to the dreamlike sequences representing Madoff’s thoughts, as he imagines what lies ahead when the truth about his activities comes out.

“Bernie’s visions have a high contrast look, which set them off as something that’s going on inside his head and give them an uncomfortable feel,” Raffaele explains.

Overall, DeMarco says Madoff does a great job of pulling viewers into its antagonist’s inner world. That, he notes, was the product of many factors, beginning with director De Felitta’s strong vision and Dreyfuss’ inspired performance. “There was a very collegial rapport on the set where everyone contributed ideas,” he explains. “It was a real treat to work with Richard Dreyfuss.”

DeMarco adds that the collaborative spirit carried through to post production. “I talked with Anthony before the shoot so we were already on the same page when we reached post — he took that ball and ran with it. It’s a sprawling movie — covering more than 15 years —but it had limited locations, so once we set a look, we were able to carry it through all four episodes.”

 

The Molecule: VFX for ‘The Affair’ and so much more

By Randi Altman

Luke DiTommaso, co-founder of New York City’s The Molecule, recalls “humble”
beginnings when he thinks about the visual effects, motion graphics and VR studio’s launch as a small compositing shop. When The Molecule opened in 2005, New York’s production landscape was quite a bit different than the tax-incentive-driven hotbed that exists today.

Rescue Me was our big break,” explains DiTommaso. “That show was the very beginning of this wave of production that started happening in New York. Then we got Damages and Royal Pains, but were still just starting to get our feet wet with real productions.”

The Molecule partners (L-R) Andrew Bly, Chris Healer and Luke DiTommaso.

Then, thanks to a healthy boost from New York’s production and post tax incentives, things exploded, and The Molecule was at the right place at the right time. They had an established infrastructure, talent and experience providing VFX for television series.

Since then DiTommaso and his partners Chris Healer and Andrew Bly have seen the company grow considerably, doing everything from shooting and editing to creating VFX and animation, all under one roof. With 35 full-time employees spread between their New York and LA offices — oh, yeah, they opened an office in LA! — they also average 30 freelance artists a day, but can seat 65 if needed.

While some of these artists work on commercials, many are called on to create visual effects for an impressive list of shows, including Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, House of Cards and Bloodline, Showtime’s The Affair, HBO’s Ballers (pictured below), FX’s The Americans, CBS’ Elementary and Limitless, VH1’s The Breaks, Hulu’s The Path (for NBC and starring Aaron Paul) and the final season of USA’s Royal Pains. Also completed are the miniseries Madoff and Behind the Magic, a special on Snow White, for ABC.

Ballers-before      Ballers-after

The Molecule’s reach goes beyond the small screen. In addition to having completed a few shots for Zoolander 2 and a big one involving a digital crowd for Barbershop 3, at the time of this interview the studio was gearing up for Jodie Foster’s Money Monster; they will be supplying titles, the trailer and a ton of visual effects.

There is so much for us to cover, but just not enough time, so for this article we are going to dig into The Molecule’s bread and butter: visual effects for TV series. In particular, the work they provided for Showtime’s The Affair, which had its season finale just a few weeks ago.

The Affair
Viewers of The Affair, a story of love, divorce and despair, might be surprised to know that each episode averages between 50 to 70 visual effects shots. The Molecule has provided shots that range from simple clean-ups to greenscreen driving and window shots — “We’ll shoot the plates and then composite a view of midtown Manhattan or Montauk Highway outside the car window scene,” says DiTommaso — to set extensions, location changes and digital fire and rain.

One big shot for this past season was burning down a cabin during a hurricane. “They had a burn stage so they could captFire-stageure an amount of practical fire on a stage, but we enhanced that, adding more fire to increase the feeling of peril. The scene then cuts to a wide shot showing the location, which is meant to be on the beach in Montauk during a raging hurricane. We went out to the beach and shot the house day for night — we had flicker lighting on the location so the dunes and surrounding grass got a sort of flickering light effect. Later on, we shot the stage from a similar angle and inserted the burning stage footage into the exterior wide location footage, and then added a hurricane on top of all of that. That was a fun challenge.”

During that same hurricane, the lead character Noah gets his car stuck in the mud but they weren’t able to get the tires to spin practically, so The Molecule got the call. “The tires are spinning in liquid so it’s supposed to kick up a bunch of mud and water and stuff while rain is coming down on top of it, so we had our CG department create that in the computer.”

Another scene that features a good amount of VFX was one that involved a scene that took place on the patio outside of the fictitious Lobster Roll restaurant. “It was shot in Montauk in October and it wasn’t supposed to be cold in the scene, but it was about 30 degrees at 2:00am and Alison is in a dress. They just couldn’t shoot it there because it was just too cold. We shot plates, basically, of the location, without actors. Later we recreated that patio area and lined up the lighting and the angle and basically took the stage footage and inserted it into the location footage. We were able to provide a solution so they could tell the story without having the actors’ breath and their noses all red and shivering.”

Lobster_Roll-before      Lobster_Roll-after

Being on Set
While on-set VFX supervision is incredibly important, DiTommaso would argue “by the time you’re on set you’re managing decisions that have already been set into motion earlier in the process. The most important decisions are made on the tech scouts and in the production/VFX meetings.”

He offers up an example: “I was on a tech scout yesterday. They have a scene where a woman is supposed to walk onto a frozen lake and the ice starts to crack. They were going to build an elaborate catwalk into the water. I was like, ‘Whoa, aren’t we basically replacing the whole ground with ice? Then why does she need to be over water? Why don’t we find a lake that has a flat grassy area leading up to it?’ Now they’re building a much simpler catwalk — imagine an eight-foot-wide little platform. She’ll walk out on that with some blue screens and then we’ll extend the ice and dress the rest of the location with snow.

According to DiTommaso being there at the start saved a huge amount of time, money and effort. “By the time you’re on set they would have already built it into the water and all that stuff.”

But, he says, being on set for the shoot is also very important because you never know what might happen. “A problem will arise and the whole crew kind of turns and looks at you like, ‘You can fix this, right?’ Then we have to say, ‘Yeah. We’re going to shoot this plate. We’re going to get a clean plate, get the actors out, then put them back in.’ Whatever it is; you have to improvise sometimes. Hopefully that’s a rare instance and that varies from crew to crew. Some crews are very meticulous and others are more freewheeling.”

Tools
The Molecule is shooting more and more of their own plates these days, so they recently invested in a Ricoh S camera for shooting 360-degree HDR. “It has some limitations, but it’s perfect for CG HDRs,” explains DiTommaso. “It gives you a full 360-degree dome, instantly, and it’s tiny like a cell phone or a remote. We also have a Blackmagic 4K Cinema camera that we’ll shoot plates with. There are pros and cons to it, but I like the latitude and the simplicity of it. We use it for a quick run and gun to grab an element. If we need a blood spurt, we’ll set that up in the conference room and we’ll shoot a plate.”

The Molecule added John Hamm’s head to this scene for Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.

They call on a Canon 74 for stills. “We have a little VFX kit with little LED tracking points and charts that we bring with us on set. Then back at the shop we’re using Nuke to composite. Our CG department has been doing more and more stuff. We just submitted an airplane — a lot of vehicles, trains, planes and automobiles are created in Maya.”

They use Side Effects Houdini for simulations, like fire and rain; for rendering they called on Arnold, and crowds are created in Massive.

What’s Next?
Not ones to be sitting on the sidelines, The Molecule recently provided post on a few VR projects, but their interest doesn’t end there. Chris Healer is currently developing a single lens VR camera rig that DiTommaso describes as essentially “VR in a box.”