Tag Archives: 360

Samsung’s 360 Round for 3D video

Samsung showed an enhanced Samsung 360 Round camera solution at NAB, with updates to its live streaming and post production software. The new solution gives professional video creators the tools they need — from capture to post — to tell immersive 360-degree and 3D stories for film and broadcast.

“At Samsung, we’ve been innovating in the VR technology space for many years, including introducing the 360 Round camera with its ruggedized design, superior low light and live streaming capabilities late last year,” says Eric McCarty of Samsung Electronics America.

The Samsung 360 Round offers realtime 3D video to PCs using the 360 Round’s bundled software so video creators can now view live video on their mobile devices using the 360 Round live preview app. In addition, the 360 Round live preview app allows creators to remotely control the camera settings, via Wi-Fi router, from afar. The updated 360 Round PC software now provides dual monitor support, which allows the editor to make adjustments and show the results on a separate monitor dedicated to the director.

Limiting luminance levels to 16-135, noise reduction and sharpness adjustments, as well as a hardware IR filter make it possible to get a clear shot in almost no light. The 360 Round also offers advanced stabilization software and the ability to color-correct on the fly, with an intuitive, easy-to-use histogram. In addition, users can set up profiles for each shot and save the camera settings, cutting down on the time required to prep each shot.

The 360 Round comes with Samsung’s advanced Stitching software, which weaves together video from each of the 360 Round’s 17 lenses. Creators can stitch, preview and broadcast in one step on a PC without the need for additional software. The 360 Round also enables fine-tuning of seamlines during a live production, such as moving them away from objects in realtime and calibrating individual stitchlines to fix misalignments. In addition, a new local warping feature allows for individual seamline calibrations in post, without requiring a global adjustment to all seamlines, giving creators quick and easy, fine-grain control of the final visuals.

The 360 Round delivers realtime 4K x 4K (3D) streaming with minimal latency. SDI capture card support enables live streaming through multiple cameras and broadcasting equipment with no additional encoding/decoding required. The newest update further streamlines the switching workflow for live productions with audio over SDI, giving producers less complex events (one producer managing audio and video switching) and a single switching source as the production transitions from camera to camera.

Additional new features:

  • Ability to record, stream and save RAW files simultaneously, making the process of creating dailies and managing live productions easier. Creators can now save the RAW files to make further improvements to live production recordings and create a higher quality post version to distribute as VOD.
  • Live streaming support for HLS over HTTP, which adds another transport streaming protocol in addition to the RTMP and RTSP protocols. HLS over HTTP eliminates the need to modify some restrictive enterprise firewall policies and is a more resilient protocol in unreliable networks.
  • Ability to upload direct (via 360 Round software) to Samsung VR creator account, as well as Facebook and YouTube, once the files are exported.

NextComputing, Z Cam, Assimilate team on turnkey VR studio

NextComputing, Z Cam and Assimilate have teamed up to create a complete turnkey VR studio. Foundation VR Studio is designed to provide all aspects of the immersive production process and help the creatives be more creative.

According to Assimilate CEO Jeff Edson, “Partnering with Z Cam last year was an obvious opportunity to bring together the best of integrated 360 cameras with a seamless workflow for both live and post productions. The key is to continue to move the market from a technology focus to a creative focus. Integrated cameras took the discussions up a level of integration away from the pieces. There have been endless discussions regarding capable platforms for 360; the advantage we have is we work with just about every computer maker as well as the component companies, like CPU and GPU manufacturers. These are companies that are willing to create solutions. Again, this is all about trying to help the market focus on the creative as opposed to debates about the technology, and letting creative people create great experiences and content. Getting the technology out of their way and providing solutions that just work helps with this.”

These companies are offering a few options with their Power VR Studio.

The Foundation VR Studio, which costs $8,999 and is available now includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 6-core Intel core i7-8700K 3.7GHz processor
o Memory: 16GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

Then there is the Power VR Studio, for $10,999, which is also available now. It includes:
• NextComputing Edge T100 workstation
o CPU: 10-core Intel core i9-7900K 3.3GHz processor
o Memory: 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
• Z Cam S1 6K professional VR camera
• Z Cam WonderStitch software for offline stitching and profile creation
• Assimilate Scratch VR Z post software and live streaming for Z Cam

These companies will be at NAB demoing the systems.

 

 

Hobo’s Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey on embracing full-service VR

By Randi Altman

New York-based audio post house Hobo, which offers sound design, original music composition and audio mixing, recently embraced virtual reality by launching a 360 VR division. Wanting to offer clients a full-service solution, they partnered with New York production/post production studios East Coast Digital and Hidden Content, allowing them to provide concepting through production, post, music and final audio mix in an immersive 360 format.

The studio is already working on some VR projects, using their “object-oriented audio mix” skills to enhance the 360 viewing experience.

We touched base with Hobo’s founder/president, Howard Bowler, and post production producer Jon Mackey to get more info on their foray into VR.

Why was now the right time to embrace 360 VR?
Bowler: We saw the opportunity stemming from the advancement of the technology not only in the headsets but also in the tools necessary to mix and sound design in a 360-degree environment. The great thing about VR is that we have many innovative companies trying to establish what the workflow norm will be in the years to come. We want to be on the cusp of those discoveries to test and deploy these tools as the ecosystem of VR expands.

As an audio shop you could have just offered audio-for-VR services only, but instead aligned with two other companies to provide a full-service experience. Why was that important?
Bowler: This partnership provides our clients with added security when venturing out into VR production. Since the medium is relatively new in the advertising and film world, partnering with experienced production companies gives us the opportunity to better understand the nuances of filming in VR.

How does that relationship work? Will you be collaborating remotely? Same location?
Bowler: Thankfully, we are all based in West Midtown, so the collaboration will be seamless.

Can you talk a bit about object-based audio mixing and its challenges?
Mackey: The challenge of object-based mixing is not only mixing based in a 360-degree environment or converting traditional audio into something that moves with the viewer but determining which objects will lead the viewer, with its sound cue, into another part of the environment.

Bowler: It’s the creative challenge that inspires us in our sound design. With traditional 2D film, the editor controls what you see with their cuts. With VR, the partnership between sight and sound becomes much more important.

Howard Bowler pictured embracing VR.

How different is your workflow — traditional broadcast or spot work versus VR/360?
Mackey: The VR/360 workflow isn’t much different than traditional spot work. It’s the testing and review that is a game changer. Things generally can’t be reviewed live unless you have a custom rig that runs its own headset. It’s a lot of trial and error in checking the mixes, sound design, and spacial mixes. You also have to take into account the extra time and instruction for your clients to review a project.

What has surprised you the most about working in this new realm?
Bowler: The great thing about the VR/360 space is the amount of opportunity there is. What surprised us the most is the passion of all the companies that are venturing into this area. It’s different than talking about conventional film or advertising; there’s a new spark and its fueling the rise of the industry and allowing larger companies to connect with smaller ones to create an atmosphere where passion is the only thing that counts.

What tools are you using for this type of work?
Mackey: The audio tools we use are the ones that best fit into our Avid ProTools workflow. This includes plug-ins from G-Audio and others that we are experimenting with.

Can you talk about some recent projects?
Bowler: We’ve completed projects for Samsung with East Coast Digital, and there are more on the way.

Main Image: Howard Bowler and Jon Mackey