Quick Look: Jaunt One’s 360 camera

By Claudio Santos

To those who have been following the virtual reality market from the beginning, one very interesting phenomenon is how the hardware development seems to have outpaced both the content creation and the software development. The industry has been in a constant state of excitement over the release of new and improved hardware that pushes the capabilities of the medium, and content creators are still scrambling to experiment and learn how to use the new technologies.

One of the products of this tech boom is the Jaunt One camera. It is a 360 camera that was developed with the explicit focus of addressing the many production complexities that plague real life field shooting. What do I mean by that? Well, the camera quickly disassembles and allows you to replace a broken camera module. After all, when you’re across the world and the elephant that is standing in your shot decides to play with the camera, it is quite useful to be able to quickly swap parts instead of having to replace the whole camera or sending it in for repair from the middle of the jungle.

Another of the main selling points of the Jaunt One camera is the streamlined cloud finishing service they provide. It takes the content creator all the way from shooting on set through stitching, editing, onlining and preparing the different deliverables for all the different publishing platforms available. The pipeline is also flexible enough to allow you to bring your footage in and out of the service at any point so you can pick and choose what services you want to use. You could, for example, do your own stitching in Nuke, AVP or any other software and use the Jaunt cloud service to edit and online these stitched videos.

The Jaunt One camera takes a few important details into consideration, such as the synchronization of all of the shutters in the lenses. This prevents stitching abnormalities in fast moving objects that are captured in different moments in time by adjacent lenses.

The camera doesn’t have an internal ambisonics microphone but the cloud service supports ambisonic recordings made in a dual system or Dolby Atmos. It was interesting to notice that one of the toolset apps they released was the Jaunt Slate, a tool that allows for easy slating on all the cameras (without having to run around the camera like a child, clapping repeatedly) and is meant to automatize the synchronization of the separate audio recordings in post.

The Jaunt One camera shows that the market is maturing past its initial DIY stage and the demand for reliable, robust solutions for higher budget productions is now significant enough to attract developers such as Jaunt. Let’s hope tools such as these encourage more and more filmmakers to produce new content in VR.


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