View this newsletter in a browser.

 



Mother! director Darren Aronofsky
By Iain Blair

Writer/director/producer Darren Aronofsky made a big splash when his debut feature Pi won the Director’s Award at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. He then quickly followed that up with 2000’s acclaimed drama Requiem for a Dream.

But his hot streak and momentum came to a screeching halt in 2002 when Brad Pitt dropped out of his expensive and ambitious sci-fi epic The Fountain just weeks before shooting was due to start. Aronofsky scrambled to completely rewrite and retool The Fountain, this time starring Hugh Jackman and Rachel Weisz.

Since then, Aronofsky regained his momentum and continued to make such visually audacious films as 2008’s The Wrestler, 2010’s Black Swan (for which he got a directing Oscar nomination, and star Natalie Portman took home the gold)
and 2014’s Noah.

His latest film, Mother!, is another hard-to-categorize film — part horror story, part comedy, part fable, part psychological thriller — that stars Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem as a married couple whose relationship is severely tested when uninvited guests suddenly arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence and ultimately turning it into a literal war zone.

I recently talked to Aronofsky about making the film, and why he ditched the score.

This isn’t just a horror film. What sort of film did you set out to make?
After Black Swan I wanted to return to the horror genre, and I felt the home invasion genre hadn’t been used well in a while — and we can all relate to having house guests that overstay their welcome. So I felt that was a great starting point, and I also wanted to deal with larger issues — the planet we all live on, as guests in a sense. But I’m not really a genre filmmaker. For me, Pi was a thriller at its core, but I added lots of stuff and it became something else. I think I always do that. When I pitched Black Swan they felt it wasn’t enough of a ballet movie or horror film. It didn’t fit into any one genre. I just do what I think is cool and interesting, and then I start adding stuff.

Read More >






Making the jump to 360 Video (Part 1)
By Mike McCarthy

While a full VR experience requires true 3D content in order to render a custom perspective based on the position of the viewer’s head, there is a “video” version of VR, which is called 360 Video.

Read More >


‘Demo Love’ and how to avoid its trap
By Jonathan Hecht

What is “demo love?” It's when you put a piece of music on your rough cut, and you keep using the same track. Repeat exposure has you believing that your video can’t exist without this song.

Read More >


Tobin Kirk joins animation house Laundry as EP

Behind the Title: Designer
and CD Jayse Hansen

Creative nominees named
for 2017 HPA Awards

For more information contact  info@postPerspective.com

Read past newsletters at  www.postperspective.com/newsletter

© 2017 postPerspective. All Rights Reserved.

22566 SW Washington St. Sherwood, OR 97140

Unsubscribe