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Colorist Stephen Nakamura
on grading Stephen King’s It

By Randi Altman

A scary clown can be thanked for helping boost what had been a lackluster summer box office. In its first weekend, Stephen King’s It opened with an impressive $125 million.

This horror film takes place in a seemingly normal small town, but of course things aren’t what they seem. And while most horror films set most of the action in shadowy darkness, the filmmakers decided to let a lot of this story unfold in the bright glow of daylight in order to make the most of the darkness that eventually takes over. That presented some interesting opportunities for Deluxe’s Company 3 veteran colorist Stephen Nakamura.

How early did you get involved on It?
We came onboard early to do the first trailer. The response on YouTube and other places was enormous. I can’t speak for the filmmakers, but that was when I first realized how much excitement there was out there for this movie.

Had you worked with director Andy Muschietti before? What kind of direction were you given and how did he explain the look he wanted?
One of the concepts about the look that evolved during production, and we continued it in the DI, was this idea that a lot of the film takes place in fairly high-key situations, not the kind of dark, shadowy world some horror films exist in. It’s a period piece. It’s set in a small town that sort of looks like this pleasant place to be, but all this wild stuff is happening! You see these scary movies and everything’s creepy and it’s overcast outside and it’s clearly a horror movie from the outset. Naturally, that can work, but it can be even scarier when you play against that. The violence and everything feels more shocking.

How would you describe the look of the film?
You have the parts that are like I just described and then it does get very dark and shadowy as the action goes into dark spaces and into the sewer. And all that is particularly effective because we’ve kind of gotten to know all the kids who are in what’s called the losers’ club, and we’re rooting for them and scared about what might happen to them.

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Sony Imageworks' VFX work
on Spider-Man: Homecoming

By Daniel Restuccio

With the film getting ready to release digitally on September 26 and on 4K Ultra HD/Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D, Blu-ray and DVD on October 17, it's a great time to focus on the film’s VFX.

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Behind the Title: Park Road
Post’s Anthony Pratt

This workflow architect thinks about how the studio can partner with a production to wrap process and people around a project, all with a view of achieving the best result at the end of that process.

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Adobe intros updates to Creative Cloud, including Team Projects

Adobe will be offering new capabilities in their Creative Cloud video tools and services. Highlights include virtual reality/360, animation, motion graphics, editing, collaboration and Adobe Stock.

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ATTO’s quad-port version of 32Gb Fibre line of HBAs

Broadway Video’s Sue
Pelino and team win Emmy

LumaForge supports shared projects in Adobe Premiere

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