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Keeping score for Better Call Saul
By Jennifer Walden

When AMC’s Breaking Bad ended, many went through withdrawal from the multi-
Emmy Award-winning show. Thanks to its prequel, Better Call Saul, the world that Vince Gilligan created in the New Mexico desert lives on. But while the landscapes might seem familiar, don’t expect
the show to look or sound
the same as Breaking Bad.

“For me, it all starts with the black and white keys,” says Los Angeles-based composer Dave Porter, whose score for AMC’s Better Call Saul is anything but black and white emotionally. At the piano he works out melodies and harmonies that communicate the complicated blend of emotions that move the show. “The characters are complex. The challenge is in trying to find the right balance between the different emotions that are at play in any given scene.”

While Better Call Saul and Breaking Bad feature some of the same characters, Better Call Saul show runners/creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould were adamant that this should be a very different show, says Porter, who won an ASCAP Award for Best Television Composer of 2013 for his work on Breaking Bad. “That meant everything from how they write it, to how they shoot it, to how it sounds. We went back to the drawing board to create a whole new musical vocabulary for Better Call Saul, particularly for Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk) who, eventually, becomes Saul.” Porter defines the show’s score with words like intimate, human and relatable. “Breaking Bad [feels] very worldly,” he says. “The scope is much larger, whereas in Better Call Saul, Jimmy’s fight is a smaller fight. Although it is no less important, it is the challenge of one man.”

Getting Real
In terms of instrumentation, Porter gravitated toward real instruments, relying less on the computer and synths he used on Breaking Bad. “I use instruments that I can actually sit down and play, like organs, electric piano, lots of bass and guitar, vibraphone and different mallet percussion, such as vibes and different little xylophones,” he explains.

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Top 5: Efficiency tips for your health and editing environment
By  Brady Betzel

Sometimes in the edit bay, I find myself feeling sluggish because I haven’t moved from my chair in four or eight or more hours. Usually, I can fix this by working out for a half hour before I leave for work, and I try to get in some kettlebell swings and battle rope maneuvers along with bodyweight stuff like push-ups and pull-ups.

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Talking VR content with Phillip Moses of studio Rascali

Phillip Moses, head of VR content developer Rascali, has been working in visual effects for over 25 years. His resume boasts some big-name films, including Alice in Wonderland, Speed Racer and Spider-Man 3, just to name a few. Seven years ago he launched a small boutique visual effects studio, called The Resistance VFX, with VFX supervisor Jeff Goldman.

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The challenges of editing
a foreign-language doc
By Kristine Pregot

AMD offering FireRender plug-in for 3ds Max

ArsenalCreative beefs up with head of 2D Chris Noellert

VFX-friendly director Samuel Bennetts joins Assembly

Paul McCartney’s VR doc series produced by Jaunt


Indie location tips from John Schneider and Alicia Allain

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