The A-List: Hidden Figures director Ted Melfi


by Iain Blair

When writer/producer/director Ted Melfi (St. Vincent) first came across the true story behind his new film, Hidden Figures, he was amazed that it had never been told before. The drama recounts the history of an elite team of black female mathematicians at NASA who helped win the all-out space race against the Soviet Union and, at the same time, brought issues of race, equal rights, sexism and opportunity to the surface of 1960s society.

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The A-List: Jim Jarmusch talks about his latest film Paterson


by Iain Blair

Over the past few decades, writer/director Jim Jarmusch has followed the beat of his own drum and built up a body of idiosyncratic films that include Permanent Vacation, Stranger Than Paradise, Down by Law, Mystery Train, Night on Earth, Dead Man, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, Coffee and Cigarettes, Broken Flowers, The Limits of Control and Gimme Danger.  His new film, Paterson, fits firmly in that tradition. Paterson is a bus driver in the city of Paterson, New Jersey. He is also a poet. Each day he adheres to a simple routine that informs his poetry — observing the world around him.

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The A-List: Manchester by the Sea director Kenneth Lonergan


by Iain Blair

It’s been 16 years since filmmaker and playwright Kenneth Lonergan made his prize-winning debut at Sundance with You Can Count on Me, which he wrote and directed. The film won
the Sundance Grand Jury Prize and was an Academy Award and Golden Globe nominee for Best Screenplay.  Lonergan’s most recent film is also garnering award attention. Directed by one of the most distinctive writing talents on the American indie scene today, Manchester by the Sea fulfills that earlier promise and extends Lonergan’s artistic vision.

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The A-List: Lion director Garth Davis


by Iain Blair

The plot of Lion, the new awards-buzzy Weinstein film, sounds like an over-the-top, completely made-up Hollywood tearjerker — a five-year-old Indian boy named Saroo (Sunny Pawar) wanders onto a train, falls asleep and wakes up thousands of miles away from his home and family. Frightened, he ends up in chaotic Kolkata. Somehow he survives living on the streets, escaping all sorts of terrors and close calls, before ending up in an orphanage.

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Sponsored: Why RED Studios Hollywood Calls on the G-RACK 12


 

RED Studios Hollywood boasts a long history of riding the cutting edge in commercial video. Today, under the growing umbrella of camera pioneer RED Digital Cinema, RED Studios Hollywood keeps advancing video production in every way possible. Whether that means finding new ways to apply RED camera technology or improving the workflow between those cameras and final video consumption, every step involves the integration of storage. RED’s post production team at RED Studios Hollywood manages to stay deceptively small. The group is composed of about half a dozen editors working almost exclusively within Adobe Premiere Pro, Avid Media Composer and Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, with the bulk of its content arriving in 4K+ R3D RAW file formats.… Continue Reading

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The A-List: Collateral Beauty director David Frankel


by Iain Blair

Oscar-winner David Frankel is probably best known for his successful films The Devil Wears Prada and Marley & Me, but the writer/director has an eclectic slate of films under his belt, including The Big Year, Hope Springs and One Chance. His new film, Collateral Beauty, is a drama about a successful New York advertising executive who suffers a great tragedy and retreats from life. While his concerned friends try desperately to reconnect with him, he seeks answers from the universe by writing letters to Love, Time and Death. But it’s not until his notes bring unexpected personal responses that he begins to understand how these constants interlock in a life fully lived, and how even the deepest loss can reveal moments of meaning and beauty.

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postPerspective Update: VR Special Edition


 

Virtual reality is seemingly everywhere, especially this holiday season. Just one look at your favorite electronics store’s website and you will find VR headsets from the inexpensive, to the affordable, to the “if I win the lottery” ones.

While there are many companies popping up to service all aspects of VR/AR/360 production, for the most part traditional post and production companies are starting to add these services to their menu, learning best practices as they go.

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The A-List: A conversation with Arrival director Denis Villenueve


by Iain Blair

Dark and super-intense dramas are the specialty of acclaimed French-Canadian filmmaker Denis Villenueve. It was his explosive 2015 hit Sicario — about an idealistic FBI agent (Emily Blunt) whose hunt for justice thrusts her into the lawless US/Mexican border where drugs, terror, illegal immigration and corruption challenge her moral compass — that put him on Hollywood’s radar. The film received three Academy Award nominations, including Best Achievement in Cinematography (Roger Deakins) and Best Achievement in Sound Editing (Alan Robert Murray) and paved the way for his latest film, the sci-fi drama Arrival.

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The A-List: Jackie and Neruda director Pablo Larraín


by Iain Blair

Chilean director Pablo Larraín has been hailed as one of the most ambitious, iconoclastic, daring political filmmakers of his generation. His films include No, a drama about the 1988 plebiscite that brought an end to the Pinochet era; Tony Manero, about a man obsessed with John Travolta’s character from Saturday Night Fever; and The Club, a drama about disgraced priests. He’s also one of the hardest-working directors in the business, with two major releases out before Christmas. First up is Fox’s Jackie, followed by Neruda.

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Taking DJI’s Phantom 4 drone for a ride


by Brady Betzel

I’ve been trying to get my hands on a professional drone to review for a few years now. My wife even got me a drone from a local store that was a ton of fun to play with but hard to master.  For years, I’ve been working on television shows that use drone footage and capture incredible imagery, but it always seemed out of reach for me as an editor. Finally, after much persistence (or pestering, depending on who you ask), DJI agreed to send me the Phantom 4 to test out, and boy is it awesome!

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The A-List: James L. Brooks on his latest film The Edge of Seventeen


by Iain Blair

James L. Brooks, the writer/director/producer, probably has a reinforced mantelpiece in his home. If not, he could likely use one. He is a three-time Academy Award winner and 20-time Emmy Award-winner whose films include Broadcast News, Terms of Endearment, As Good As It Gets and Jerry Maguire. Brooks, who began his career as a writer, produced television hits such as Taxi, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Rhoda, Lou Grant and The Simpsons. He produced his newest film, The Edge of Seventeen, for writer and first-time director Kelly Fremon Craig.

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The A-List: Bleed for This director Ben Younger


by Iain Blair

Writer/director Ben Younger had been MIA for quite a while. Back in 2000 he made a splash with his feature debut, Boiler Room. This tense crime drama was set in the high stakes world of brokerage firms and investment banking. Five years later he directed his second film, the Meryl Streep/Uma Thurman romantic dramedy Prime, which grossed $67 million worldwide. Then Younger disappeared from sight. Over a decade later, he’s back with his third film, Bleed for This, a super-intense boxing drama and the true comeback story of Vinny Pazienza.

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The sound of fighting in Jack Reacher: Never Go Back


by Jennifer Walden

Tom Cruise is one tough dude, and not just on the big screen. Cruise, who seems to be aging very gracefully, famously likes to do his own stunts, to the dismay of film studio execs. Cruise’s most recent tough guy turn is in the sequel to 2014’s Jack Reacher. Jack Reacher: Never Go Back. Supervising sound editor Mark P. Stoeckinger, based at Formosa, has worked on many Cruise films, including both Jack Reachers, Mission: Impossible II and III, The Last Samurai and he helped out on Edge of Tomorrow.

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The A-List: Chatting with Moonlight director Barry Jenkins


by Iain Blair

Moonlight may only be Barry Jenkins’ second film — his first was the 2008 low-budget debut Medicine for Melancholy — but he’s already established himself as a filmmaker to watch. Written and directed by Jenkins, Moonlight chronicles the life of a young black man from childhood to adulthood as he struggles to find his place in the world while growing up in a rough neighborhood of Miami.

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The A-List — Director Ed Zwick talks Jack Reacher: Never Go Back


by Iain Blair

Director, screenwriter and producer Ed Zwick got his start in television as co-creator of the Emmy Award-winning series Thirtysomething. His feature film career kicked off when he directed About Last Night. Zwick went on to direct the Academy Award-winning films Glory and Legends of the Fall.  He also produced the Oscar-nominated I Am Sam, as well asTraffic and won an Oscar as a producer of 1999’s Best Picture, Shakespeare in Love. His latest film, Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, reunites him with his The Last Samurai star Tom Cruise.

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The A-List: Director Terrence Malick’s team behind Voyage of Time


by Iain Blair

A new Terrence Malick film is always a cinematic event, and his latest, Voyage of Time, doesn’t disappoint. Thought provoking and visually transcendent, it’s nothing less than a celebration of life and the grand history of the cosmos. A journey that spans the eons from the Big Bang to the dinosaur age to our present human world and beyond.  A labor of love, several decades in the making, it also represents Malick’s first foray into documentary storytelling and will be released in two formats: Voyage of Time: Life’s Journey, the 90-minute version narrated by Cate Blanchett, and Voyage of Time: The IMAX Experience, a 45-minute version narrated by Brad Pitt.

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Sponsored: Dialogue Mixing for Reality TV


by Jennifer Walden

“Dialogue is my forte,” says Christopher Koch, CAS, re-recording mixer/supervising sound editor at PostWorks NY, who has cleaned, edited, and mixed some of the most challenging dialogue imaginable: the dialogue on reality TV series. What makes it so challenging is that the run-and-gun filming style is combined with a mad dash, day and a half post sound schedule. With no possibility of ADR, it’s do or die with the dialogue captured on location — whether that location is a busy street, a noisy kitchen or a quiet interior. “I strive to match all dialogue to the quality of the studio interviews. I use that as my baseline or benchmark for how the rest of the show is going to sound,” says Koch, who is currently mixing reality series like Chopped on Food Network, Black Ink Crew: Chicago on VH1, and Say Yes to the Dress on TLC.… Continue Reading

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Deepwater Horizon’s immersive mix via Twenty Four Seven Sound


by Jennifer Walden

The Peter Berg-directed filmDeepwater Horizon, in theaters now, opens on a black screen with recorded testimony from real-life Deepwater Horizon crew member Mike Williams recounting his experience of the disastrous oil spill that began April 20, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. This documentary-style realism moves into a wide, underwater immersive soundscape. The transition sets the music and sound design tone for the entire film,” explains Eric Hoehn, re-recording mixer at Twenty Four Seven Sound. “We intentionally developed the immersive mixes to drop the viewer into this world physically, mentally and sonically.”

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The A-List: The Girl on the Train director Tate Taylor


by Iain Blair

Tate Taylor had just one small comedy — 2008’s Pretty Ugly People — on his directing resume when that part of his career got turbo-charged thanks to his 2011 Oscar-winner The Help, which he also co-wrote and co-produced. Next he tackled Get On Up, the biopic of James Brown, the Godfather of Soul.  Now, for his fourth feature, Taylor has plunged even deeper into the murky depths of twisted human behavior in the highly anticipated mystery-thriller The Girl on the Train, based on the bestseller by Paula Hawkins, the Universal release explores obsession, revenge, sex, lying, desire, pain and addiction.

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Our IBC Video Coverage: Edition Two


 

postPerspective TV traveled to IBC 2016 to shoot interviews from the show floor. So for those of you who couldn’t make the trip to Amsterdam or weren’t able to see everything at the show, we are here to help you catch up.

This is the second of two video newsletters we sent out, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our archive!… Continue Reading

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Creating new worlds for Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle


by Randi Altman

What if Germany and Japan had won World War II? What would the world look like? That is the premise of Philip K. Dick’s 1963 novel and Amazon’s series, The Man in the High Castle, which is currently gearing up for its second season premiere later in the year. The Man in the High Castle features familiar landmarks with unfamiliar touches. For example, New York City’s Times Square has its typical billboards, but sprinkled in are giant swastika banners, images of Hitler and a bizarro American flag, whose blue stripes have been replaced with yet another swastika.

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Our IBC Video Coverage: Edition One


 

postPerspective TV traveled to IBC 2016 to shoot interviews from the show floor. So for those of you who couldn’t make the trip to Amsterdam or weren’t able to see everything at the show, we are here to help you catch up. This is the first of two video newsletters you will receive from us, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our archive!… Continue Reading

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IBC: Surrounded by sound


by Simon Ray

came to the 2016 IBC Show in Amsterdam at the start of a period of consolidation at Goldcrest in London. We had just gone through three years of expansion, upgrading, building and installing. Our flagship Dolby Atmos sound mixing theatre finished its first feature,Jason Bourne, and the DI department recently upgraded to offer 4K and HDR. I didn’t have a particular area to research at the show, but there were two things that struck me almost immediately on arrival: the lack of drones and the abundance of VR headsets.

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The A-List: ‘Hell or High Water’ director David Mackenzie


by Iain Blair

Over the course of nine films, acclaimed Scottish director David Mackenzie has managed to pull off quite a trick, by appearing to embrace genre filmmaking while simultaneously subverting the whole concept. His last film, Starred Up, was both a brutal prison drama and a story about anger therapy. Young Adam was both an erotic thriller and a tragic love story. Perfect Sense was a sci-fi romance. His latest genre mash-up, Hell or High Water, might look like a standard-issue, nail-biting bank-heist thriller, but it’s also a lyrical western, a road movie, and a timely commentary on current political and economic issues in America.

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Emmy-nominated composer Chris Bacon on ‘Bates Motel’


by Jennifer Walden

The creators of A&E’s Bates Motel series have proven that it is possible to successfully rework a classic film for the small screen. The series is a contemporary prequel to Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. Understandably, when the words “contemporary” and “prequel” are combined, it may induce a cringe or two, as LA-based composer Chris Bacon admits. “But then I heard who was involved — writers/producers Carlton Cuse and Kerry Ehrin. I’m a huge fan of their work on Lost and Friday Night Lights, so the idea sounded much more appealing. I went from feeling like ‘this is a terrible idea’ to ‘how do I get involved in this!’”

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‘Suicide Squad’: Imageworks VFX supervisor Mark Breakspear


by Randi Altman

In Warner Bros.’ Suicide Squad, a band of captured super-villains are released from prison by the government and tasked with working together to fight a common enemy, the evil Joker.  This film, which held top box office honors for weeks, has a bit of everything: comic book antiheroes, super powers, epic battles and redemption. It also features a ton of visual effects work that was supervised by Sony Imageworks’ Mark Breakspear, who worked closely with production supervisor Jerome Chen and director David Ayer (see our interview with Ayer).

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Creating VR audio workflows for ‘Mars 2030’ and beyond By Jennifer Walden


by Jennifer Walden

Let’s say you want to shoot a short VR film. You’ve got a solid script, a cast of known actors, you’ve got a 360-degree camera and a pretty good idea of how to use it, but what about the sound? The camera has a built-in mic, but will that be enough coverage? Should the cast be mic’d as they would be for a traditional production? How will the production sound be handled in post?

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The A-List: ‘Suicide Squad’ director David Ayer


by Iain Blair

With his distinctive, anarchic, immersive style, director/ producer/screenwriter David Ayer has always excelled at probing the murky depths of human behavior and blurring the lines between the bad guys and the good guys in such hardcore films as Training Day, Fury, Sabotage, Harsh Timesand End of Watch. Now Ayer, whose credits include Street Kings, and the screenplays for U-571, The Fast and the Furious, Dark Blue and S.W.A.T., has made Suicide Squad, a blockbuster without the usual bluster, and a superhero movie without the usual heroes.

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SIGGRAPH Video Coverage: Edition Two


 

At SIGGRAPH 2016, postPerspective TV shot interviews at our booth and around the show floor, all in an effort to deliver SIGGRAPH to those who couldn’t make the trip to Anaheim and to help catch-up those who were at the show but couldn’t see everything. This is the second of two video newsletters you will receive from us, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our full archive!… Continue Reading

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SIGGRAPH 2016 Video Update – Day One


 

At SIGGRAPH 2016, postPerspective TV shot interviews at our booth and around the show floor, all in an effort to deliver SIGGRAPH to those who couldn’t make the trip to Anaheim and to help catch-up those who were at the show but couldn’t see everything. This is the first of two video newsletters you will receive from us in the coming days, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our full archive!… Continue Reading

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The A-List: ‘The Little Prince’ director Mark Osborne


by Iain Blair

Two-time Academy Award-nominated director Mark Osborne has been telling stories with animation and live-action for more than 25 years. His breakout film was the 2008 animated DreamWorks offeringKung Fu Panda — co-directed by John Stevenson. Osborne’s live-action directing credits include the independent feature film Dropping Out, the animated TV series Spongebob Squarepants, featuring Patchy the Pirate, and all of the live-action sequences forThe Spongebob Squarepants Movie.

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The sound of sensory overload for Cinemax’s ‘Outcast’


by Jennifer Walden

As a cockroach crawls along the wall, each move is watched intensely by a boy whose white knuckles grip the headboard of his bed. His shallow breaths stop just before he head-butts the cockroach and sucks its bloody remains off the wall.  That is the fantastic opening scene of Robert Kirkman’s latest series, Outcast, airing now on Cinemax. Kirkman, writer/executive producer onThe Walking Dead, sets his new horror series in the small town of Rome, West Virginia, where a plague of demonic-like possessions is infecting the residents. Outcast supervising sound editor Benjamin Cook, of 424 Post in Culver City, says the opening of the pilot episode featured some of his favorite moments in terms of sound design.

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Editor Josh Beal on Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’


by Randi Altman

Looks are deceiving, and that familiar saying is at the heart of Netflix’s dramatic seriesBloodline. The show focuses on the Rayburns, a respected family that runs a popular and long-standing beachfront hotel in the Florida Keys.  On the surface, they are pillars of the community and a perfect family, but when you dig below the surface they are a mess — long-standing family secrets, a black sheep with a criminal record, drug use, alcoholism. It’s all there. Josh Beal joined the editing team of Bloodline around Episode 7 of Season 1 as the show’s only LA-based editor.

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Call of the wild — Tarzan’s iconic yell


by Jennifer Walden

For many sound enthusiasts, Tarzan’s iconic yell is the true legend of that story. Was it actually actor Johnny Weissmuller performing the yell? Or was it a product of post sound magic involving an opera singer, a dog, a violin and a hyena played backwards as MGM Studios claims? Whatever the origin, it doesn’t impact how recognizable that yell is, and this fact wasn’t lost on the filmmakers behind the new Warner Bros. movie The Legend of Tarzan. Supervising sound editor/sound designer Glenn Freemantle and sound designer/re-recording mixer Niv Adiri at Sound24 reveal that they went through numerous iterations of the new Tarzan yell.

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Our Storage Edition: Storage Workflows for 4K and Beyond


by Beth Marchant

Once upon a time, an editorial shop was a sneaker-net away from the other islands in the pipeline archipelago. That changed when the last phases of the digital revolution set many traditional editorial facilities into swift expansion mode to include more post services under one roof. The consolidating business environment in the post industry of the past several years then brought more of those expanded,  overlapping divisions together. That’s a lot for any network to handle, let alone one containing some of the highest quality and most data-dense sound and pictures being created today.

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The A-List: Director David Yates on the VFX-heavy Tarzan


by Iain Blair

Filmmaking is a notoriously slow, labor-intensive business, and most directors would be thrilled if they could get a major movie made and released every couple of years. And then there’s David Yates, who has two mega-productions — each featuring tons of moving parts and cutting-edge VFX — out in the next five months alone. First up is the Warner Bros. action-adventure film The Legend of Tarzan, starring Alexander Skarsgård as the Lord of the Apes, along with Margot Robbie as Jane.

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Netflix’s ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ gets crisper look via UHD


 

Having compiled seven Emmy Award nominations in its debut season, Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt returned in mid-April with 13 new episodes in a form that is, quite literally, bigger and better. The sitcom, from co-creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, features the ever-cheerful and ever-hopeful Kimmy Schmidt, whose spirit refuses to be broken, even after being held captive during her formative years. This season the series has boosted its delivery format from standard HD to the crisper, clearer, more detailed look of Ultra High Definition (UHD).

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Kabir Akhtar on editing The CW series ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’


by Randi Altman

When Kabir Akhtar, ACE, who cut season one of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, got the itch to start editing, he didn’t even know that what he was doing was actually editing… he was just having some fun. In high school, Akhtar would use his computer, multiple tape decks and stereos to record and mix different songs, creating mash-ups, remixes and even musical voicemail messages. An editor was born!

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The A-List — ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ director Roland Emmerich


by Iain Blair

After two decades of rumors and speculation, German director /writer/producer
Roland Emmerich is finally back with Independence Day: Resurgence. This is the long-awaited sequel to his seminal 1996 alien invasion epic Independence Day, one of the most financially successful movies in the history of Hollywood — it ended up making over $817 million worldwide and turning Will Smith into a superstar. Following that smash, Emmerich went on to make other apocalyptic mega-productions, including Godzilla (the 1998 version), The Day After Tomorrow, 10,000 BC and 2012, all of which were huge box office hits despite little love from the critics.

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VR Audio: Crytek goes to new heights for VR game ‘The Climb’


by Jennifer Walden

Dealing with locomotion, such as walking and especially running, is a challenge for VR content developers — but what hasn’t been a challenge in creating VR content? Climbing, on the other hand, has proved to be a simple, yet interesting, locomotion that independent game developer Crytek found to be sustainable for the duration of a full-length game. Crytek, known for the Crysisgame series, recently released their first VR game title, The Climb, a rock climbing adventure exclusively for the Oculus Rift.

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Company 3’s Heydar Adel: The role of today’s online editor


 

Workflows for episodic TV have changed a lot over the last several years, sometimes daily. A role that has gone largely underappreciated in the process is online editor. Senior online editor Heydar Adel is no stranger to the process, having served in that role for over 17 years. While he has only been with Deluxe’s Company 3 in Santa Monica since last year, he is no stranger to Deluxe itself — he held a similar role at the company’s Encore facility for seven years prior to this recent move.

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Keeping score for ‘Better Call Saul’


by Jennifer Walden

When AMC’s Breaking Bad ended, many went through withdrawal from the multi-
Emmy Award-winning show. Thanks to its prequel, Better Call Saul, the world that Vince Gilligan created in the New Mexico desert lives on. But while the landscapes might seem familiar, don’t expect the show to look or sound the same as Breaking Bad. “For me, it all starts with the black and white keys,” says Los Angeles-based composer Dave Porter, whose score for AMC’s Better Call Saul is anything but black and white emotionally.

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The A-List: ‘Maggie’s Plan’ director Rebecca Miller


by Iain Blair

Rebecca Miller is a rara avis in the industry: a female director and screenwriter in what is still essentially a boy’s club. She has written and directed five films, including Sundance Film Festival winners Personal Velocity,Angela, The Ballad of Jack and Rose and The Private Lives of Pippa Lee. She also happens to be daughter of legendary playwright Arthur Miller, and wife of Oscar-winner Daniel Day-Lewis (whose knighthood also entitles her to be referred to as Lady Day-Lewis). Her latest, a romantic comedy titled Maggie’s Plan, starring Greta Gerwig and Ethan Hawke.

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Editing an ‘Empire’ for Fox


by Ellen Wixted

As a child, editor Zack Arnold and his brother shot short films with a VHS camcorder. Before long, he was using two VCRs to re-mix existing movies. After studying film at the University of Michigan, he moved to LA, where he landed a job editing trailers. That led to work on indie features, and then episodic TV. Editing Burn Notice was a breakthrough moment, and the experience opened other doors. Arnold worked with showrunner Ilene Chaiken on a medical drama that was cancelled, but the partnership was solid, so when she was named an executive producer on Fox’s Empire, Arnold was brought on board as well.

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The A-List: Director Tom Tykwer on A Hologram for the King


by Iain Blair

Tom Tykwer, the multi-faceted German director/writer/composer/producer, first burst onto the international scene with his 1998 thriller Run Lola Run. Since then he’s directed such diverse films as Heaven,Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, The Princess and the Warrior, Cloud Atlas (with the Wachowskis) and The International. His latest is A Hologram for the King from Roadside Attractions. Based on Dave Eggers’ novel, A Hologram for the King is set in recession-ravaged 2010. It stars Tom Hanks.

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NAB 2016 Videos Interviews: Edition 3


 

At NAB 2016, postPerspective TV shot interviews at our booth and around the show floor, all in an effort to deliver the NAB Show to those who couldn’t make the trip to Las Vegas and help catch-up those who were at the show but couldn’t see it all.

We hope you enjoy our extensive coverage of new technology, upcoming products and industry trends. It will be time well spent.

This is the third of three video newsletters you will receive from us, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our full archive!

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NAB 2016 Videos Interviews: Edition 2


 

At NAB 2016, postPerspective TV shot interviews at our booth and around the show floor, all in an effort to deliver the NAB Show to those who couldn’t make the trip to Las Vegas and help catch-up those who were at the show but couldn’t see it all. We hope you enjoy our extensive coverage of new technology, upcoming products and industry trends. It will be time well spent. This is the second of three video newsletters you will receive from us in the coming days, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our full archive.

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NAB 2016 Videos Interviews: Edition 1


 

At NAB 2016, postPerspective TV shot interviews at our booth and around the show floor, all in an effort to deliver the NAB Show to those who couldn’t make the trip to Las Vegas and help catch-up those who were at the show but couldn’t see it all. We hope you enjoy our extensive coverage of new technology, upcoming products and industry trends. It will be time well spent. This is the first of three video newsletters you will receive from us in the coming days, but if you’d like to see more videos now, please click here to see our full archive!

 … Continue Reading

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John Schneider’s Louisiana studio: 58 acres, edit suites and more


by Randi Altman

Long before he ever stepped into Hazzard County or behind the wheel of the General Lee, John Schneider was a kid from Mount Kisco, New York, who was making movies with a Super 8 camera and cutting them the old-fashioned way — with razors and tape. And while he loved acting, starting in theater at the age of eight, the art of filmmaking was his real passion. I recently spoke to Schneider as he sat in an edit suite at his John Schneider Studios (JSS) in Louisiana, which is equidistant between the Baton Rouge and New Orleans airports. JSS offers 58 acres to shoot on, with such varied locations as a river, a lake, a swamp, a baseball field, an Olympic-size swimming pool and five acres of Southeast Asia-like bamboo forest.

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NAB: My pick for this year’s gamechanger is Lytro light field camera


by Isaac Spedding

There has been a lot of buzz around what the gamechanger was at this year’s NAB show. What was released that will really change the way we all work? I was present for the conference session where an eloquent Jon Karafin, head of Light Field Video, explained that Lytro has created a camera system that essentially captures every aspect of your shot and allows you to recreate it in any way, at any position you want, using light field technology.

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The A-List: ‘Miles Ahead’ director and lead actor Don Cheadle


by Iain Blair

he multi-faceted Don Cheadle has starred in some 80 movies, both big (Avengers: Age of Ultron, theOcean’s and Iron Manfranchises) and small (Hotel Rwanda), and produced various TV shows and films. Now he can add director to his resume, thanks to his passion project and labor of love, Miles Ahead, a wild —  and wildly entertaining — free-form biopic of jazz legend Miles Davis. Cheadle not only co-wrote, produced and directed the film, he also stars as the raspy-voiced pioneering musician whose improvisational approach and ambitious forays into rock-jazz fusion helped define modern jazz.

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Actor and Film Vet Sharlto Copley Circles Back to Roots With Dell and Adobe


by Beth Marchant

Popular South African actor Sharlto Copley, best known as Wikus van de Merwe in the critically acclaimed hit District 9, has had an unusual career arc. As a late-blooming actor he’s played otherworldly everymen (Neill Blomkamp’s District 9 and Chappie), a villain (Elysium), a howling mad special ops mercenary (The A-Team) and a superhero-turned-LAPD detective in the first original series from Sony PlayStation (Powers). He was hardly waiting tables before that.

An early adopter in every sense of the word, Copley’s been experimenting with new technology since he first acted in and cobbled together his own short comic skits and action sequences using two Betamax VCRs as a kid.… Continue Reading

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Playing in a sonic sandbox for ‘Batman v Superman’


by Jennifer Walden

If you’re looking to see a deep, intellectual movie, you might want to skip Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. But if it’s action you are after, buy your ticket and enjoy the ride. Directed by Zack Snyder — who has helmed 300, Dawn of the DeadWatchmen, Sucker Punch and Man of Steel — this film tries to answer the age-old question asked on playgrounds and in bars worldwide: “Who would win in a fight? Batman or Superman?”

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The A-List: ‘Midnight Special’ director Jeff Nichols


by Iain Blair

The acclaimed indie auteur Jeff Nichols made his debut in 2007 with Shotgun Stories, a revenge tale full of menace and foreboding. He followed that up with 2011’s Take Shelter, another dark tale that danced around themes of love, madness and the apocalypse. Then came 2012’s Mud, a coming-of-age story starring Matthew McConaughey as a fugitive. Now, after those three ultra-low-budget films, the writer/director has upped the ante with an ambitious new film, the smart sci-fi thriller Midnight Special.

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Rockin’ music supervision for HBO’s ‘Vinyl’


by Jennifer Walden

Otis Redding, The Velvet Underground, The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, The Temptations, Janis Joplin, The Doors… the list of music featured on the HBO seriesVinyl would make any music supervisor drool, and that’s just a small sample of the artists whose music has been featured so far. As you can imagine, big-name artists come with a big price tag. “When you have this many songs from the golden era of rock ‘n’ roll, you’re going to spend some real money. It’s such a music-driven enterprise that you have to go into it with your eyes open,” says veteran music supervisor Randall Poster.

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Director Stephen Frears on Lance Armstrong film, ‘The Program’


by Iain Blair

At first glance, the long film career of acclaimed British director Stephen Frears might look a little schizophrenic. He’s made big Hollywood studio pictures and high-profile films with big stars, such asThe Queen (his second Oscar nom), Mary Reilly,Hero, The Grifters (his first Oscar nom) and Dangerous Liaisons. But he’s probably better known for such smaller, grittier, non-star vehicles as My Beautiful Laundrette, The Snapper and The Van, films that provide a rich palette for Frears to explore stories with a strong social and political conscience.

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‘Late Night with Seth Meyers’ associate director/lead editor Dan Dome


by Randi Altman

You could say that editing runs through Dan Dome’s veins. Dome, associate director of post at Late Night with Seth Meyers, started in the business in 1994 when he took a job as a tape operator at National Video Industries (NVI) in New York. Dome grew up around post — his dad, Art, was a linear videotape editor at NVI, working on Shop Rite spots and programming for a variety of other clients. Dome loved to go in and watch his dad work. “I saw that there were a lot of machines and I knew he put videos together, but I was completely clueless to what the real process was.”

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Setting the visual tone for ABC’s ‘Madoff’


 

Bernie Madoff, one of the most hated men on earth thanks to his massive Ponzi scheme, was recently the focus of a four-part ABC miniseries called, simply, Madoff. Technicolor PostWorks New York colorist Anthony Raffaele worked directly with Madoff DP Frankie DeMarco in finalizing a look of the series, which captures the big money atmosphere of Wall Street in the 1990s and 2000s.

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Deadpool’s Adobe Premiere Pro editing workflow


by Nicholas Restuccio

Director Tim Miller’s Deadpool is action-packed, vulgar (in a good way) and a ton of fun. It’s also one of the few Hollywood blockbusters to be edited entirely on Adobe’s Premiere Pro. On the Saturday following the film’s release, Adobe hosted a panel on the Fox Studios lot that includedDeadpool’s post supervisor Joan Bierman, first assistant editor Matt Carson and Adobe consultants Vashi Nedomansky and Mike Kanfer.

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DP Shane Hurlbut, ASC, goes ‘Into the Badlands’


by Beth Marchant

AMC’s popular new dystopian series Into the Badlands, created by Miles Millar and Al Gough — imagineThe Hunger Games or Game of Thrones as a martial arts saga set in a deep, feudal south and dripping with supernatural influences — brings Hong Kong-style cinema to the small screen. Featuring a diverse international cast, led by Chinese-American Hong Kong star Daniel Wu, it is packed with gorgeous, acrobatic kung fu combat and plenty of gore, without a gun in sight. DP Shane Hurlbut, ASC, (Need for Speed, We Are Marshall, Semi-Pro) shot the show’s six-episode first season with multiple cameras in the swampy, sometimes stormy, summer heat in and around New Orleans.… Continue Reading

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Colorist John Dowdell talks about the look of Carol


by Randi Altman

Todd Haynes’ Carol, about two women who fall in love in New York City in the 1950s, received six Oscar noms this year, including one for Best Cinematography. Despite its setting, this beautifully captured film was actually shot in Cincinnati because of its architectural resemblance to 1950’s Manhattan. But the post was done in New York. One of the movie’s producers, Goldcrest Films, has a post house there, so Carol’s edit team called that location home for about seven months. It was there that editor Affonso Goncalves and his assistant Perri Pivovar enjoyed a close relationship with Goldcrest’s in-house, veteran colorist John Dowdell, who was also working on the film.

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The A-List: Oscar-nominated director of ‘Room’ Lenny Abrahamson


by Iain Blair

Oscar races are usually full of surprises, and that is the case with this year’s list of nominees. One of the biggest was the success of Room, which picked up four nominations in such high-profile categories as Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Director for Lenny Abrahamson, the little-known Irish director who helmed the little-seen cult indies Frank, Garage,What Richard Did and Adam & Paul before making Room, another small indie film about a difficult subject.

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Encore colorist Laura Jans Fazio goes dark with ‘Mr. Robot’


by Randi Altman

After watching Mr. Robot when it premiered on USA Network last year, I changed all of my computer passwords and added a degree of difficulty that I’m proud of. That’s right, I completely and gleefully bought into the paranoia, and I wasn’t alone. The show, about a genius New York-based computer hacker (Rami Maleck) who believes corporations control, well, everything, has been getting its color grade by Laura Jans Fazio, lead colorist at Deluxe’s Encore, since its second episode.

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Wylie Stateman talks sound editing on The Hateful Eight


by Jennifer Walden

Quentin Tarantino’s go-to supervising sound editor Wylie Stateman, of Twenty Four Seven Sound, reveals the secret sauce of the director’s cinematic style: “He is truly an aural enthusiast and very much a sculptor of his cinema through the use of sound and music.” That applies to dialogue as well, as Tarantino likes to cast actors with interesting voices. “Sound is a major contributor to Quentin’s films and often the secret sauce that makes the meal just gel and come together as a coherent recognizable work,” says the veteran audio pro, who has seven Oscar noms under his belt, including two for Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012) and Inglourious Basterds (2008).

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The Molecule: VFX for The Affair and so much more


by Randi Altman

Luke DiTommaso, co-founder of New York City’s The Molecule, recalls “humble” beginnings when he thinks about the visual effects, motion graphics and VR studio’s launch as a small compositing shop. When The Molecule opened in 2005, New York’s production landscape was quite a bit different than the tax-incentive-driven hotbed that exists today. “Rescue Me was our big break,” explains DiTommaso. “That show was the very beginning of this wave of production that started happening in New York. Then we got Damages and Royal Pains, but were still just starting to get our feet wet with real productions.”

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The A-List: A chat with the directors of Oscar-nominated Anomalisa


by Iain Blair

Maybe it was just a matter of time before director/writer/producer and Oscar-winner Charlie Kaufman — from whose quirky sensibility sprang such films as Being John Malkovich, Human Nature, Adaptation, Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, Synecdoche, New York and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind — turned his attention to an animated project. Based on Kaufman’s 2005 “sound play” called Theater of the New Ear, Paramount’s Anomalisa follows the mundane life of Michael Stone, a depressed service rep whose life and attitude is changed dramatically after meeting an unusual stranger. The making of the film, however, was anything but mundane.

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The A-List: An interview with ‘The Big Short’ director Adam McKay


by Iain Blair

Writer/director Adam McKay has become one of the most successful comedy directors in Hollywood thanks to such hits as the Anchorman films, Step Brothers, Talladega Nights, The Other Guys and Marvel’s Ant-Man, which he wrote. Considering his resume, he just might seem like the last person in town equipped to make The Big Short, a seriously dense drama about the devastating 2008 financial crisis that is still resonating through every level of American society.

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The A-List: An interview with Quentin Tarantino about ‘The Hateful Eight’


by Iain Blair

For Quentin Tarantino fans it’s been three long years since the colorful writer/director/producer and sometime actor blasted and cursed his way across the screen with Django Unchained. Now he’s back with The Weinstein Company’sThe Hateful Eight, an even more deliriously over-the-top, ultra-violent western — set in the same era — that makes Django look almost sweet and gentle by comparison.

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The A-List: An interview with ‘Chi-Raq’ director Spike Lee


by Iain Blair

Spike Lee takes on guns and gangs in his upcoming new film Chi-Raq, an impassioned rap reworking of Aristophanes Lysistrata, set against a backdrop of Chicago gang violence. Shot by Matty Libatique, who recently shot the equally gritty Straight Outta Compton, it featuresSamuel L. Jackson, Wesley Snipes, Angela Bassett, Nick Cannon, John Cusack and Jennifer Hudson.

 

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The A-List: Director Danny Boyle on posting ‘Steve Jobs’


by Iain Blair

Danny Boyle, who won the 2008 Oscar for Best Director for Slumdog Millionaire, has always been attracted to controversial stories and to pushing the cinematic envelope as far as he could, as such eclectic films as Trainspotting, Shallow Grave, The Beach, A Life Less Ordinary, 28 Days Later, Trance, Sunshine and 127 Hours make very clear. His latest film, Steve Jobs, continues in that tradition with its complex portrait of the visionary co-founder of Apple. I met up with Boyle recently about making the film, his love of post production, and the Oscars.

 

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The A-List: The Danish Girl director Tom Hooper


by Iain Blair

British director Tom Hooper and The King’s Speech swept the Oscars in 2011, with the film winning him Best Director, along with Best Picture and a Best Actor Oscar for Colin Firth. Now the Oxford-educated Hooper, who got his start shooting commercials and such hit TV shows as Prime Suspect, East-Enders, Elizabeth I and John Adams, and whose film credits include Les Misérables and Red Dust, is getting more Oscar buzz for his latest movie The Danish Girl. Read more…

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Sponsored: Viewing HDR On Set Isn’t a ‘Trick Shot’


 

Curtis Clark, ASC, talks about how Canon’s upcoming 24-inch HDR display could be the “Holy Grail.” 

In the game of pool, the key to making a trick shot work is in knowing exactly how to set it up. Trick Shot, a short film about a surprisingly normal family of pool-playing con artists, owes both its narrative and technical flow to one such expertly executed setup. Directed by Evan Kaufmann and shot in 4K by DP Gale Tattersall with Canon’s C300 MK II camera in 10-bit Canon Log 2 Gamma, the short was produced by LēTo Entertainment and Revolution Pictures.… Continue Reading

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Skywalker’s Randy Thom helps keep it authentic for ‘Peanuts’


by Jennifer Walden

The classic Peanuts characters hit the big screen earlier this month thanks to the Blue Sky Studios production, The Peanuts Movie (20th Century Fox.) While the latest technology has given depth and texture to these 2D characters, director Steve Martino and the Schulz family made sure the film didn’t stray far from Charles Schulz’s original creations. Skywalker Sound supervising sound editor/sound designer/re-recording mixer Randy Thom and the Skywalker sound team studied the style of sound effects used in the original Peanuts TV specials and aimed to evoke those sounds as closely as they could for The Peanuts Movie, while also adding a modern vibe.

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The A-List: ‘Carol’ director Todd Haynes


by Iain Blair

Driter/director Todd Haynes — who was Oscar-nominated for hisFar From Heaven ’50s drama — was probably the perfect choice to tackle the lesbian romance at the heart of his new film, Carol. Adapted from Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel, “The Price of Salt,” Carol tells the story of two women from very different backgrounds — Therese, a store clerk (Rooney Mara) and Carol (Cate Blanchett), an alluring woman trapped in a loveless, convenient marriage — who meet and then find themselves in an unexpected love affair in 1950s New York. Read More…

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The A-List: Director George Miller talks ‘Fury Road,’ Oscar season


by Iain Blair

George Miller, whose credits include directing all of the Mad Max films, The Witches of Eastwick, Twilight Zone: The Movie, Lorenzo’s Oil and producing Dead Calm, the thriller that jump-started Nicole Kidman’s career, was in LA recently to talk about Warner Bros. Mad Max: Fury Road. The $375 million-grossing smash is the fourth in the blockbuster series, which left off with Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, released exactly 30 years ago…. Read More

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FotoKem’s Alastor Arnold helps set look for ‘Ash vs Evil Dead’


by Randi Altman

Halloween is known for its ghosts, goblins and gruesome zombies, but this year we got an extra serving of the non-alive, dished up by Sam Raimi and Starz Network. Fans of Raimi’s The Evil Dead (1981) and its sequels (Evil Dead 2, Army of Darkness) were treated to the pilot episode of Ash vs Evil Dead. Back for this comedy/action/horror series on Starz is Bruce Campbell as Ash, the man who lost his hand in battle and then cleverly replaced it with a chainsaw. His quick wit and sarcasm have amazingly not diminished over the years. Raimi, who directed the first episode, worked very closely with long-time editor and collaborator Bob Murawski and FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold to create the look of the pilot. Read more… 

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Sponsored: Narrative Film + Virtual Reality?


 

DP Eve M. Cohen offers advice on how to shoot, back up and store your next VR project. 

Indie cinematographer Eve M. Cohen thinks viewers are ready for the next chapter in virtual reality experiences: immersive movies with plots, actors and dialog. “I’ve always been interested in what the next thing is and how using different cameras can open up different ways of seeing the world,” says the UCLA-trained DP. “I found out you actually don’t need millions of dollars to do narrative VR—you just need a really good idea and off-the-shelf gear you can put together yourself. And investing in the right storage is just as essential as choosing a camera.” Read more…

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Cutting ‘Transparent’: A conversation with editor Catherine Haight


by Ellen Wixted

Amazon Studios’ original series Transparent has 11 Emmy nominations — including for Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for A Comedy Series — and five wins. In addition to that recognition, Transparent validates the company’s original programming strategy as it goes head-to-head with the likes of HBO and Netflix. With Season 2 of Transparent set to “air” December 4, the show’s enthusiastic fan base may be scheduling a weekend of pre-holiday binge watching. I spoke with veteran editor Catherine Haight, a long-time collaborator ofTransparent’s creator Soloway, about her path as an editor and the experience of working on the show. Read more…

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The A-List: Director Cary Fukunaga on posting Beasts of No Nation


by Iain Blair

Writer/director/camera operator/cinematographer Cary Fukunaga has literally been one of the hottest — and coldest — directors in the business, thanks to making shorts, docs and movies everywhere from the Arctic Circle to Haiti to East Africa. Now he’s hot again, in every sense of the word, having written/directed/produced and shot the harrowing new war drama Beasts of No Nation, set in the sweltering lands of West Africa, and shot in Ghana. It tells the story a young villager, whose happy family life and childhood are shattered when army troops from the capital city arrive to squelch a rebellion against the country’s corrupt regime.

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The A-List: Creating a VFX tightrope for ‘The Walk’


by Iain Blair

Oscar-winner Bob Zemeckis has always been at the cutting edge of technology and highly skilled at integrating that technology in the telling of stories in such films as Forrest Gump and The Polar Express. Now, in The Walk, he tells the story of the French aerialist who in walked a high-wire between the towers of the almost-completed World Trade Center. “When I first heard this story, I thought, ‘My God, this is a movie that A: should be made under any circumstance, and B: should be absolutely presented in 3D,’ explains Zemeckis. “When you watch a wire walker, you always have to watch by looking up at him. You never get the perspective of what it’s like to be on the wire.” Read more…

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The A-List: ‘Hotel Transylvania 2’ director Genndy Tartakovsky


by Jennifer Walden

Hotel Transylvania 2 follows Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) and his posse as they team up to teach grandson Dennis, who is half-human/half-vampire, a few lessons on how to be a monster, all in an effort to (once again) keep daughter Mavis safely at home. The sequel is not only a return for the “Drac Pack,” it was also a reunion for theHotel Transylvania creative teams at Sony, with visual teams at Sony Pictures Imageworks and the post sound team at Sony Pictures Post being guided by director Genndy Tartakovsky. Read More…

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The A-List: An interview with The Martian director Ridley Scott


by Iain Blair

Ridley Scott, the three-time Oscar-nominated director — whose credits include such varied fare as Hannibal, Robin Hood, Black Hawk Down, Exodus: Gods and Kings, A Good Year and G.I. Jane — has turned his attention to the red badlands of Mars in his new sci-fi thriller The Martian. Starring Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Kate Mara and Jeff Daniels, it tells the story of a botanist astronaut (Damon) left behind on the dead, hostile planet after an aborted mission and the efforts of NASA and a team of international scientists to rescue him. Read more…

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Talking with ‘House of Cards’ Emmy-winning composer Jeff Beal


by Jennifer Walden

As the saying goes, “the third time’s the charm,” and that was certainly true for Emmy-winning composer Jeff Beal. With two previous nominations for his score of Netflix’s House of Cards under his belt, this time Beal took home the statue for “Outstanding Music Composition for a Series.” The winning episode was “Chapter 32” (Season 3, Episode 6), in which President Frank Underwood and First Lady Claire visit Russian President Petrov to hash out a deal to release imprisoned American activist Michael Corrigan. Read more…

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IBC 2015: Investigating HDR


by Simon Ray

It was an interesting couple of days in Amsterdam. I was hoping to get some more clarity on where things were going with the High Dynamic Range concept in both professional and consumer panels, as well as delivery mechanisms to get it to the consumers. I am leaving IBC knowing more, but no nearer a coherent idea as to exactly where this is heading. Read more...

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Review: Telestream Episode Pro 6.5


by Brady Betzel

There are many different programs that are stand alone transcoding solutions — Adobe’s Media Encoder, Apple’s Compressor, Divergent Media’s EditReady, Sorenson’s Squeeze, MPEG Streamclip. It’s also offered via the NLEs themselves, and color correction apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 12. However, in this review I am just focusing on Telestream’s Episode Pro 6.5. Read more…

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The A-List: Peter Bogdanovich on directing ‘She’s Funny That Way’


by Iain Blair

Director Peter Bogdanovich’s latest is She’s Funny That Way, a screwball comedy about the interconnected personal lives of the cast and crew of a Broadway production, starring an ensemble cast that includes Jennifer Aniston, Owen Wilson, Will Forte, Kathryn Hahn, Rhys Ifans and Imogen Poots. Iain Blair met with the director — whose films includeThe Last Picture Show, What’s Up, Doc? Paper MoonMask, Texasville and Noises Off… — recently in Hollywood to talk about making the film, the challenges of posting it, and his take on cinema today. Read more…

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Sam Daley on color grading HBO’s Show Me a Hero


by Ellen Wixted

David Simon’s six-part series Show Me a Hero premiered on HBO in the US in mid-August. Show Me a Hero explores race and community in late-‘80s Yonkers, New York. The show was directed by Paul Haggis with Andrij Parekh as cinematographer, and produced by Simon, Haggis, Zorzi, Gail Mutrux and Simon’s long-time collaborator, Nina Noble. Technicolor PostWorks‘ Sam Daley served as the colorist. Read more…

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The sound of Netflix’s Wet Hot American Summer prequel


by Jennifer Walden

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp supervising sound editor J.M. Davey may not have worked on the Wet Hot American Summer film, but he’s worked with director/writer David Wain on the Emmy award-winning comedy series Childrens Hospital, where he learned first hand about Wain’s comedic use of film references. Read More… 

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Review: Rampant Design Tools’ latest updates


by Brady Betzel

If it seems like I’m reviewing Rampant Design Tools’ latest releases every few months, it’s because I am. Sean and Stefanie Mullen, the creators of Rampant Design Tools, are creating brand new sets of overlays, transitions, paint strokes, flares and tons of other tools monthly. Rampant Design Tools are not stock footage elements; they are color overlays, animated motion graphic elements, transitions, glitches and more.  Read more… 

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‘The Stanford Prison Experiment’: director/editor Kyle Patrick Alvarez


by Randi Altman

College students in a 1971 social experiment at Stanford University tried something new, with horrifying results. For writer/director/editor Kyle Patrick Alvarez, changing roles has been a much more positive experience. His third and most recent film as director is The Stanford Prison Experiment, released nationwide in mid-July but screened at Sundance. Read more…

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Director Chris Columbus on his new VFX-heavy film ‘Pixels’


by Iain Blair

Chris Columbus, who got his start writing several original scripts produced by Steven Spielberg — including the back-to-back hits Gremlins and The Goonies— has directed and produced Pixels, Fox’s new action comedy starring Adam Sandler, a lot of classic video games and 1,200 VFX shots. The film features aliens attacking Earth using Pac-Man, Space Invaders, Frogger, Centipede and Donkey Kong as their military model. The film was shot digitally by DP Amir Mokri on the Arri Alexa.

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‘Sharknado 3’: The Asylum’s Mark Quod talks color and post


by Randi Altman

As I sat down to write about the post process on SyFy’s Sharknado 3, the news was full of shark sightings and attacks, including one on a surfer during a competition in South Africa. While there is nothing funny about the latest happenings, the public’s fascination with these beasts of the ocean continues. Coming on the heels of Discovery’s Shark Week is the latest iteration of the Sharknado series from The Asylum, Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!

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‘Inside Out’: Skywalker helps hug the audience with sound


by Jennifer Walden

Inside Out has two main environments: inside the mind where everything is hyper-real, and out in the world, where everything seems dull by comparison. “We wanted to have the sound mimic that and to follow the actions they took with the picture,” says re-recording mixer Michael Semanick, who handled the sound effects, backgrounds and music for Inside Out. The film’s sound was created at Skywalker Sound in Marin County, California;  it was designed and mixed natively in Dolby Atmos.

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Quick Chat: Ted 2 previs/postvis supervisor Webster Colcord


by Randi Altman

Ted, the foul-mouthed but warm-hearted teddy bear, is back on the big screen, this time fighting for the right to be recognized as a person — he really wants to get married — in Ted 2 from director Seth MacFarlane. Once again, this digital character is seen out and about in Boston, in all sorts of environments, so previs, mocap and postvis played a huge role. Read more…

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Jurassic World: Dinos find their inner animal thanks to Skywalker Sound


by Jennifer Walden

All the sounds you love from the Jurassic Park franchise — Gary Rydstrom’s boss T-rex and those iconic raptors — have been brought back and are updated for Jurassic World. Supervising sound editor/sound designer Al Nelson from Skywalker Sound says, “One of the things that we were very intent on was honoring the original sounds and being consistent with the story. We’ve gone back to the same island so in theory, many of the creatures there have been carried on.”

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Wolf Hall DP Gavin Finney: modern tech for a period drama


by Ellen Wixted

Based on Hilary Mantel’s novels, Wolf Hall was adapted by the BBC in conjunction with PBS as a six-part series for TV. Capturing the volatile mix of sex, politics and religion that defined Henry VIII’s Britain, Wolf Hall was directed by Peter Kosminsky and shot entirely on location by cinematographer Gavin Finney, BSC. The show stars Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell, Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn and Damien Lewis as Henry VIII.

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Review: Adobe Video CC 2015 Updates


by Brady Betzel

The big update to the Adobe Video collection is here. It features some heavy hitters in terms of offerings. If you really want to see what the fuss is all about, go and update your Adobe apps, read this write up and get to playing…NOW! One addition to the line-up that I think is very important to the future of the Creative Cloud ecosphere: Libraries. The new Creative Cloud libraries are basically a way to share common assets between Adobe apps, including their new iOS app Hue CC. Read More…

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‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ colorist Eric Whipp gets graphic


by Randi Altman

Warner Bros.’ Mad Max: Fury Road is quite a ride, with intense action from start to finish, a ton of visual effects and some pretty unforgiving and sand-filled locations and weather. While this is a continuation of the Mad Max films of the past, you might notice a very different graphic look, and that was by design. Aussie director George Miller, who helmed the first three Mad Max features — in 1979, 1981 and 1985 — wanted this new film to have the feel of no other post-apocalyptic film that had come before it, including his own. Read more…

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Going back in time sonically for Outlander series


by Jennifer Walden

While on the surface, it might seem surprising that writer Ron Moore, with his extensive Star Trek credits, created the popular Starz Originals period drama Outlander, but as you dig a bit deeper it all starts to make sense. Outlander is more than just a period piece; it’s about time travel. When it came time to get the team together for Outlander’s audio post, Moore called on a familiar face: supervising sound editor/dialogue editor Vince Balunas, from audio post facility AnEFX, who previously worked with both Moore and Outlander’s picture editor, Michael O’Halloran, on Battlestar Galactica. Read more…

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Lesley Chilcott revisits education with #TEACHnow PSA


by Randi Altman

Documentary filmmaker and commercial director Lesley Chilcott tackled the topic of education when she produced Waiting for Superman, a documentary that investigated public education in America. She has returned to that topic once more, this time for the small screen and in the form of a 60-second public service announcement called #TEACHnow forParticipant Media. Read more…

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Helping color Kurt Cobain’s world for ‘Montage of Heck’


by Staff

Director Brett Morgen spent eight years putting together the documentary Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, which tells the fascinating and tragic story of the Nirvana front man in a very intimate way via never-before-heard recordings and animations based on his mostly unseen drawings. There are also very personal home movies and interviews Morgen did with the artist’s mother, band mates, friends and wife, Courtney Love. Read more…

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Free versions of software help develop stronger entry-level talent


by The Unknown Artist

One of the biggest buzzes at the NAB Show this year was the announcement of free versions of software from Avid and The Foundry: Avid First and Nuke Non-Commercial. This is a pretty big deal… for those companies and for the industry as a whole because I have seen how free versions, not just short-term trial versions of software, have a significant, positive impact. Read more…

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Mark Mothersbaugh on scoring ‘The Last Man on Earth’


by Jennifer Walden

So, the toilet pool is a growing national trend — at least according to the uber-talented composer, artist and musician Mark Mothersbaugh. His recent composing work on the Fox TV series The Last Man on Earth, executive produced and partially directed by Phil Lord and Chris Miller of The Lego Movie fame. For those of you who haven’t seen the series yet and are confused as to what a toilet pool is, well it’s simple: it’s a pool that you use as a toilet. If this doesn’t make you want to watch the show, now available on Hulu, I don’t know what will. Read more

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Jonathan Moser’s Myths of Editing


by Jonathan Moser

We can’t fix bad shooting, bad directing, bad acting, bad lighting, bad planning, bad screen direction, bad conception, bad continuity, bad sound. Not totally. What we can sometimes do is distract the viewer and draw attention away from these mistakes and flubs that shouldn’t have happened in the first place. On even rarer occasions (see article on Annie Hall) we can completely overhaul a badly conceived project, but it’s painful. If you’re doing a project, don’t rely on the editor to save your ass. Do it as right as possible while filming. Read more…

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NAB 2015 coverage


by Adrian Winters

Nice Shoes Adrian Winters shares his thoughts and perspective on trends and tech at NAB 2015. Along with Adrian we have blogs from Tim Spitzer, Will Rogers, Mel Lambert and Jon Moser on our site. There are videos from the show floor as well. Check out our ongoing NAB 2015 coverage.

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‘Modern Marvels’ takes on the Panama Canal expansion project


by Jennifer Walden

Have you noticed just how casually people throw around the word “epic” these days? For example, “That burrito I just ate was epic!” Or, “That concert I went to last night was epic.” For the record, those things are not epic. What truly is epic? The new Panama Canal expansion project that has been documented via a Modern Marvels special on the History Channel. Read more

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Nvidia GPU Technology Conference: Part I


by Fred Ruckel

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending the Nvidia GPU Technology Conference 2015 in San Jose, California. This was not a conference for the faint of heart; it was an in-depth look at where the development of GPU technology is heading and what strides it had made over the last year. In short, it was the biggest geek fest I have ever known, and I mean that as a compliment. The cast of The Big Bang Theory would have fit right in. Read more…

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Final Cut Pro X resurrected: Focus’ advanced workflow


by Daniel Restuccio

To many, Apple’s Final Cut Pro editing application died in June 2011 when they announced Final Cut X. It lacked many of the features of Final Cut 7 and fell out of favor with many editors looking for an alternative to Avid Media Composer. Nearly four years later Final Cut Pro 10.1.4 is fully resurrected and, for the makers of the Will Smith caper Focus, a godsend that provided a flexible, efficient and cost-effective workflow to post their feature movie shot on the Arri Alexa. Read More…

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Sony pushes 4K for mainstream


by Randi Altman

Sony’s main focus for NAB 2015 is on making 4K mainstream. At their recent pre-NAB press event in New York City, Sony introduced numerous technologies and methodologies to help people ease the transition into mainstream 4K. From cameras to editing and storage to archiving, Sony has something to offer at all levels. Read more…

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Cleaning, creating and mixing sounds for The Americans


by Jennifer Walden

The concept of FX’s The Americans, now in its third season, is incredibly compelling — two Cold War-era Soviet spies, who look and sound as American as the proverbial apple pie. They have two kids, a house in the D.C. suburbs and a very dangerous double life dedicated to gathering intel for the Motherland. Read More

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‘Banshee’ associate producer Gwyn Shovelski talks VFX


by Randi Altman

For those of you lucky enough to have discovered Banshee on Cinemax, you know just how fun a ride it can be… and just how violent. The amount of blood spilled would make Quentin Tarantino proud. The show recently finished its third season run of action-packed goodness, and while the episodes featured many in-your-face visual effects — I urge you to search for “Chayton’s Death Scene” on YouTube — courtesy of Zoic Studios, there were also many effects that were just, well, face effects.  Read more…

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The color of Malick’s Knight of Cups


by Randi Altman

Terrence Malick’s Knight of Cups, which premiered at the Berlin Film Festival in early February, has literally been years in the making. Shot in 2012, on 35mm, 65mm and a variety of digital formats, Knight of Cups has had a two-year post-production cycle. Read More

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GenArts Sapphire 8 Review


by Brady Betzel

Some in the broadcast world view plug-in and preset programs as unnecessary because of how costly they can be. And to be honest, aside from some very specialized effects, with some creative ingenuity they can basically be created inside of Media Composer or After Effects. Read More

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Oscar-nominee Ben Wilkins discusses Whiplash’s audio mix, edit


by Randi Altman

When I first spoke with Ben Wilkins, he was freshly back from the Oscar-nominee luncheon in Hollywood and about to head to his native England to attend the BAFTAs. Wilkins was nominated by both academies for his post sound work on Sony Picture Classics’ Whiplash, the Damien Chazelle-directed film about an aspiring jazz drummer and his brutal instructor. Read More

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Making ‘Being Evel’: James Durée walks us through post


by Randi Altman

Those of us of a certain age will likely remember being glued to the TV as a child watching Evel Knievel jump his motorcycle over cars and canyons. It felt like the world held its collective breath, hoping that something horrible didn’t happen… or maybe wondering what it would be like if something did. read more

More in this issue…

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XML, AAF, EDL, WTF?


by The Unknown Artist

I’ve been asked a few times recently to explain the what, how and why of XML, AAF and EDLs. They’re an essential part of any turnover, and each post house will request a different set of one or more of these (often along with your project or bin). I, the Unknown Artist, am here to try and demystify this aspect of turnovers, and hopefully make turnover specs seem less weirdly demanding. Read More

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postPerspective Extra – Getting CrossFit with G-Technology


by Randi Altman

In the years since the Reebok CrossFit Games launched in 2007, the series of grueling events that test the physical prowess of some of the fittest people on earth has become a phenomenon. Unlike all other marathon sporting events — from Ironman triathlons to NFL football games — CrossFit tests the full range of a person’s physical fitness. Forbes called it “one of the fastest growing sports in America.” Thousands of elite participants compete for a chance to be called one of the 100 fittest men and women in the world at the CrossFit Games in July. Read MoreContinue Reading

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Formatting, archiving in the digital age


by Lenny Mastrandrea

Recently, I read an interesting commentary by Keith Phipps at The Dissolve, regarding the ongoing dispute between film and digital aficionados. While being interviewed about his new feature Mr. Turner, director Mike Leigh claimed that the aversion of directors, like Quentin Tarantino, to digital as a format for feature films has no justification at this point. Read More

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Checking in with DP Timur Civan


by Randi Altman

New York City born and raised, Timur Civan’s path to becoming a director of photography started with his background in fine art, something he studied in school and something that still influences his work… but that path wasn’t exactly planned. Read More

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FotoKem’s nextLab pushes envelope with Gone Girl’s 6K workflow


by Daniel Restuccio

Back in the fall of 2013, FotoKem was prepping and packing up one of its nextLab data field systems and shipping it to a hotel in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. This particular hotel was the off-set digital asset processing hub for David Fincher’s Gone Girl, which is being released on Blu-ray/DVD on January 13 and has also garnered a considerable amount of Oscar buzz this season. Read More

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e2 creates new sounds for Godzilla while paying homage to original


by Randi Altman

Imagine the challenge of having to re-create the sound of the iconic Godzilla from the movies of the ‘50s? Along with the work involved, there is also the responsibility of staying true to the original and allowing all of those who already have an idea in their mind of what Godzilla sounds like to stay in the moment. Read More

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A Small Section of the World: How this doc got its look and feel


by Randi Altman

Lesley Chilcott makes documentaries. Some as a producer, such as An Inconvenient Truth, Waiting for Superman and It Might Get Loud, and some as a producer and director, such as her latest, A Small Section of the World. The project is about a group of women in a remote part of Costa Rica who started a coffee mill… and a very successful one at that. Read More

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Unbroken: real sound for a real story


by Jennifer Walden

Unbroken is about the human spirit and just how hard it is to break. The film is based on the life of Louis Zamperini, which was chronicled by Laura Hillenbrand in her non-fiction novel Unbroken. Zamperini, a delinquent youth transformed by his athletic prowess on the high school track team, went on to compete in the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. But that was just the beginning of an amazing life. Read More

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Oscar-winner William Goldenberg on editing The Imitation Game


by Randi Altman

William Goldenberg’s path to editing The Imitation Game was an interesting one. He had never worked with director Morten Tyldum before, but a chance meeting at a party after the BAFTA Awards led to the pairing. Read More

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Performance Post: embracing new tech, working efficiently


by Randi Altman

How do you get to celebrate 30 years as an independently owned post house in this industry? In addition to the obvious, such as quality work and servicing clients, you need to evolve your business with the needs of the industry. Read More

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The sound of Fury Part II: Tiger 1 tanks


by Jennifer Walden

It’s rare for a director to stop a shoot for the benefit of the sound team, but then again it’s not every day that you have a rare WWII Tiger 1 tank on the set… the only operable Tiger 1 tank still in existence. Read More

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Fury Part I: The Sounds of War


by Jennifer Walden

Having three job titles on a film may seem like a huge undertaking, but it’s actually quite a natural flow — taking the reins at the starting gate and steering a film’s sound from the pre-production phase through the final mix of the sound effects. Read More

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Checking in with A Better Place director/post vet Dennis Ho


by Randi Altman

Change is good. That’s what people say, right? Well Dennis Ho, president of Hollywood-based post house Digital Jungle recently proved that point by helming his first film, the indie offering A Better Place. Read More

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Filmmaker HaZ Dulull gets in Sync with new short film


by Randi Altman

Writer/director/VFX supervisor Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull, whose sci-fi short Project Kronos is currently being adapted into a feature film, recently completed another short, Sync. Dulull says this proof-of-concept piece is part of a package used when developing feature film and TV properties. Read More

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Gone Girl: Light Iron and David Fincher’s path to 6K


by Daniel Restuccio

Light Iron Post CEO Michael Cioni is an outspoken and passionate advocate of pushing the edge of post technology for the mission of getting the best images possible on screen. David Fincher’sGone Girl represents the third movie, following The Social Network and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, that Cioni and his team have collaborated on with the director. Read More

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Kirk Baxter on editing David Fincher’s Gone Girl


by Daniel Restuccio

When David Fincher took on the film Gone Girl, he immediately started to round up the “usual suspects,” his most trusted collaborators, including Kirk Baxter, who has two Editing Oscars on his mantle from previous work with Fincher (The Social Network and TheGirl With the Dragon Tattoo). Read More

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Arri managing director Franz Kraus discusses the Alexa 65


by Randi Altman

During IBC 2014 in Amsterdam, I was offered the opportunity to sit down with Franz Kraus, managing director of Arri. There was some breaking news he was willing to share — a new camera that had been whispered about here and there on the show floor. Read More

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IBC 2014: quite a ride


by Randi Altman

After spending a week in Amsterdam for the IBC show, I am left with these random thoughts: There is no possible way to pack for whatever weather that city decides to throw at you. It’s hot, then it’s cold, then it’s hot — sometimes at the same moment in time. It’s like the menopause of weather. Read More

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HP intros new versions of its mobile and tower workstations


by Mike McCarthy

Last week I got the opportunity to attend HP’s big workstation launch event in Fort Collins, Colorado. HP is releasing new versions of its ZBook mobile workstations and desktop Z workstation towers. Read More

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Editing magic: History’s Houdini


by Randi Altman

When asked about magicians or illusionists who push the boundary, most young people would immediately think of David Blaine or Criss Angel. But before either of them drank fire or locked themselves in a water-filled box in front of a crowd, there was Harry Houdini. Read More

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Five ways to turn ‘good’ into ‘great’ when working with clients


by Chad Hutson

Over the years, I’ve been asked several times about what makes a project “great.” Oftentimes the clients are especially nice and organized folks, though others may be a bit harder to handle despite their excellent creative thinking. Read More

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Using humor to tell serious story for Greenpeace


by Randi Altman

When you think of the environmental organization Greenpeace, images of people protecting whales, forests and oceans come to mind. It’s serious business… but recently the non-profit decided to extend its reach with humor. Read More

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Soundcrafter pieces together the varied sounds of Boyhood


by Jennifer Walden

A decade in dog years is said to be roughly equivalent to 70 human ones. I think that calculation holds true for technology too. Okay, maybe not to that extreme, but it does seem that way. Read More

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Editor Chris Peterson takes on The Sixties for CNN


by Randi Altman

What do you think of when someone mentions the 1960s? Hippies protesting the Vietnam War? Woodstock? Putting a man on the moon? There is so much to reflect on when thinking of this pivotal time in history, and CNN agrees. Read More

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Frame.io: video collaboration, media access, task management in the cloud


by Randi Altman

We all know that the world and how people communicate and share information has changed — it’s instant and it’s global — and that change has trickled down to the production and post industries. Read More

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Creating Under the Dome’s sound experience


by Jennifer Walden

Imagine living your life under an invisible dome that offers no escape, seeing the same people in the same town day after day… oh, and the “prison” you call home has supernatural powers that might or might not be evil. Read More

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Creating a deeper talent pool: Training for Mistika, Mamba FX


by David Cox

An interesting challenge for any manufacturer that aspires to bring a new product to market — or a different way of thinking to an existing market — is how to cultivate an extensive user-base by training enough individuals to allow their technology to take hold. Read More

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