Neil Anderson upped to colorist at Lucky Post, talks inspiration

Neil Anderson has been promoted to colorist at Dallas’ Lucky Post after joining the company in 2013 right out of film school. Anderson’s projects include national brands such as Canada Dry, Costa, TGI Friday’s, The Salvation Army and YETI. His latest feature work was featured at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in Augustine Frizzell’s comedy, Never Goin’ Back. He works on Blackmagic Resolve 14.

Anderson’s interest in cameras and color science inspired his career as a colorist, but he says his inspiration changes all the time, depending on where his mind is at. “Sometimes I’ll see a commercial on TV and think, ‘Wow. There was great care put into that piece, I wonder how they did that?’ Then I’ll go back and rewatch it over and over again trying to pick it apart and see what I can glean. Or if I’m developing a specific workflow/look and I’m struggling to get exactly what I’m after, I’ll find interesting frames from films that pop into my head for guidance.”

In terms of colorists who inspire him, Anderson points to Peter Doyle (who most recently colored Darkest Hour). “He’s incredibly technical, and he exploits his thorough knowledge of color science to guide films through a color pipeline in an almost algorithmic fashion. I’m at awe by his expertise and, in a way, use him as a model of how I want to approach projects.

“I also admire Steven Scott for maybe the opposite reason. While technical like Peter, to me he approaches projects with a painter’s eye first. I’ve heard him say the best inspiration is to simply pay attention to the world around us. His work and approach remind me to branch out artistically just as much as I try technically.”

When he thinks about cinematographers, Roger Deakins comes to mind. “He’s a DP that really captures almost the entire look of the film in-camera, and the color grading is supposedly very simple and minor in the end. This is because he and his colorist work hand in hand before the shoot, developing a look they’ll see and use on set,” explains Anderson. “This workflow is a critical tool for modern colorists, and Roger is a reminder of the importance of having a good relationship with your DP.”

Tim Nagle, a Lucky Post finishing artist, describes Anderson as a “quiet and ardent observer of life’s design, from light and shadow on a city street to bold color blocks in a Wong Kar-wai film. His attention to detail and process are implacable.”

“Color is like magic to most people; the process feels like happenstance and you don’t realize how it’s supporting the narrative until it’s not,” concludes Anderson. “I love the challenge of each project and mining through color theory to achieve the best results for our clients.”


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