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Meet The Supervising Sound Editor: Greg Hedgepath

Greg Hedgepath

NAME: Greg Hedgepath

COMPANY: Formosa Group (www.formosagroup.com)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Formosa Group is a new post sound editorial company. The order of the day is to form a creative, collaborative, high-energy, environment where free exchange of techniques and tools used in creating sound for film post production can exist.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Supervising Sound Editor.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Ultimately, my job is to convey the director’s emotional vision for the film, through sound, to the audience. For each film I work on I supervise the editing of all sound elements (except music) and will supervise the mixing of all elements (including music) during temps, pre-dubs, and final mixes.

I am intimately involved in the creation of a tonal arc for the film. Sometimes this is done directly. When, for example, a door opens and closes I will determine how heavy the door is, what size latch it has and how articulated it is, the hinge creak (if there is one), the force used to close it, etc. All of these factors will speak to the quality, and location of the building, and the motivation of the actor.

Other times I use subterfuge. I will often use tonalities, ambiences, and sounds from other realms to create an emotion. For example I recently processed a slowed down wind-up toy to use as a design bed on which were hung other designed voices, chants, fire, cicadas, African instruments, and other elements for a voodoo scene. For the most part it’s not possible to tell what the origin of the sounds were but the emotion is clear. Fear.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
My job often involves psychology on several levels. On one hand I need to constantly test the emotional temperature of my crew to keep morale high and to deal with whatever issues they may be facing whether it’s at work or outside. I believe that most people will give 110 percent when properly motivated and supported. In the end it shows in their work.

On the other hand I look at the whole canvas of sound that we are presenting during editorial and mixing to determine if we are conveying the proper emotion at all times. We are constantly toying with the viewers’ feelings to make them laugh, cry, or sit on the edge of their seats. Is music driving the scene properly? If not, can we help with dialog and effects? What should we feature and hold back in the mix. There are many ways to convey the emotion of the scene. Are we doing it properly?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I like being on the dub stage the most. It’s the place where the actual sculpting of the finished project takes place.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Paperwork.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Dusk.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would probably be a master carpenter or a custom boat designer/builder.

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CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently Best Man Holiday, and the soon to be released Jessabelle and Addicted.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
1) iPhone
2) Pro Tools
3) Vitamix blender.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Primarily Twitter and Facebook.

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