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Making our dialogue-free indie feature ‘Driftwood’

By Paul Taylor and Alex Megaro

Driftwood is a dialogue-free feature film that focuses on a woman and her captor in an isolated cabin. We chose to shoot entirely MOS… because we are insane. Or perhaps we were insane to shoot a dialogue-free feature in the first place, but our choice to remove sound recording from the set was both freeing and nerve wracking due to the potential post production nightmare that lay ahead.

Our decision was based on how, without speech to carry along the narrative, every sound would need to be enhanced to fill in the isolated world of our characters. We wanted draconian control over the soundscape, from every footstep to every door creak, but we also knew the sheer volume of work involved would put off all but the bravest post studios.

The film was shot in a week with a cast of three and a crew of three in a small cabin in Upstate New York. Our camera of choice was a Canon 5D Mark II with an array of Canon L-series lenses. We chose the 5D because we already owned it — so more bang for our buck — and also because it gave us a high-quality image, even with such a small body. Its ease of use allowed us to set up extremely quickly, which was important considering our extremely truncated shooting schedule. Having no sound team on set allowed us to move around freely without the concerns of planes passing overhead or cars rumbling in the distance delaying a shot.

The Audio Post
The editing was a wonderfully liberating experience in which we cut purely to image, never once needing to worry about speech continuity or a host of other factors that often come into play with dialogue-driven films. Driftwood was edited on Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, a program that can sometimes be a bit difficult for audio editing, but for this film it was a non-issue. The Magnetic Timeline was actually quite perfect for the way we constructed this film and made the entire process smooth and simple.

Once picture locked, we brought the project to New York City’s Silver Sound Studios, who jumped at the chance to design the atmosphere for an entire feature from the ground up. We sat with the engineers at Silver Sound and went through Driftwood shot-by-shot, creating a master list of all the sounds we thought necessary to include. Some were obvious, such as footsteps, breathing, clocks ticking and others less so, such as the humming of an old refrigerator or creaking of a wooden chair.

Once the initial list was set, we discussed whether or not to use stock audio or rerecord everything at the original location. Again, because we wanted complete control to create something wholly unique, we concluded it was important to return to the cabin and capture its particular character. Over the course of a few days, the Silver Sound gang rerecorded nearly every sound in the film, leaving only some basic Foley work to complete in their studio.

Once their library was complete, one of the last steps before mixing was to ADR all of the breathing. We had the actors come into the studio over a one-week period during which they breathed, moaned and sighed inside Silver Sound’s recording booth. These subtle sounds are taken for granted in most films, but for Driftwood they were of utter importance. The way the actors would sigh or breath could change the meaning behind that sound and change the subtext of the scene. If the characters cannot talk, then their expressions must be conveyed in other ways, and in this case we chose a more physiological track.

By the time we completed the film we had spent over a year recording and mixing the audio. The finished product is a world unto itself, a testament to the laborious yet incredibly exciting work performed by Silver Sound.

Driftwood was written, directed and photographed by Paul Taylor. It was produced and edited by Alex Megaro.

One thought on “Making our dialogue-free indie feature ‘Driftwood’

  1. thomas

    “Once picture locked, we brought the project to New York City’s Silver Sound Studios”

    what a missed opportunity for sound to actually influence the picture edit
    draconian control indeed

    Reply

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